concluding sentence for informative essay

How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

concluding sentence for informative essay

By the time you get to the final paragraph of your paper, you have already done so much work on your essay, so all you want to do is to wrap it up as quickly as possible. You’ve already made a stunning introduction, proven your argument, and structured the whole piece as supposed – who cares about making a good conclusion paragraph?

The only thing you need to remember is that the conclusion of an essay is not just the last paragraph of an academic paper where you restate your thesis and key arguments. A concluding paragraph is also your opportunity to have a final impact on your audience. 

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How to write a conclusion paragraph that leaves a lasting impression – In this guide, the team at EssayPro is going to walk you through the process of writing a perfect conclusion step by step. Additionally, we will share valuable tips and tricks to help students of all ages impress their readers at the last moment.

Instead of Intro: What Is a Conclusion?

Before we can move on, let’s take a moment here to define the conclusion itself. According to the standard conclusion definition, it is pretty much the last part of something, its result, or end. However, this term is rather broad and superficial.

When it comes to writing academic papers, a concluding statement refers to an opinion, judgment, suggestion, or position arrived at by logical reasoning (through the arguments provided in the body of the text). Therefore, if you are wondering “what is a good closing sentence like?” – keep on reading.

What Does a Good Conclusion Mean?

Writing a good conclusion for a paper isn’t easy. However, we are going to walk you through this process step by step. Although there are generally no strict rules on how to formulate one, there are some basic principles that everyone should keep in mind. In this section, we will share some core ideas for writing a good conclusion, and, later in the article, we will also provide you with more practical advice and examples.

How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay _ 4 MAJOR OBJECTIVES THAT CONCLUSION MUST ACCOMPLISH

Here are the core goals a good conclusion should complete:

  • “Wrap up” the entire paper;
  • Demonstrate to readers that the author accomplished what he/she set out to do;
  • Show how you the author has proved their thesis statement;
  • Give a sense of completeness and closure on the topic;
  • Leave something extra for your reader to think about;
  • Leave a powerful final impact on a reader.

Another key thing to remember is that you should not introduce any new ideas or arguments to your paper's conclusion. It should only sum up what you have already written, revisit your thesis statement, and end with a powerful final impression.

When considering how to write a conclusion that works, here are the key points to keep in mind:

  • A concluding sentence should only revisit the thesis statement, not restate it;
  • It should summarize the main ideas from the body of the paper;
  • It should demonstrate the significance and relevance of your work;
  • An essay’s conclusion should include a call for action and leave space for further study or development of the topic (if necessary).

How Long Should a Conclusion Be? 

Although there are no strict universal rules regarding the length of an essay’s final clause, both teachers and experienced writers recommend keeping it clear, concise, and straight to the point. There is an unspoken rule that the introduction and conclusion of an academic paper should both be about 10% of the overall paper’s volume. For example, if you were assigned a 1500 word essay, both the introductory and final clauses should be approximately 150 words long (300 together).

Why You Need to Know How to End an Essay:

A conclusion is what drives a paper to its logical end. It also drives the main points of your piece one last time. It is your last opportunity to impact and impress your audience. And, most importantly, it is your chance to demonstrate to readers why your work matters. Simply put, the final paragraph of your essay should answer the last important question a reader will have – “So what?”

If you do a concluding paragraph right, it can give your readers a sense of logical completeness. On the other hand, if you do not make it powerful enough, it can leave them hanging, and diminish the effect of the entire piece.

Strategies to Crafting a Proper Conclusion

Although there are no strict rules for what style to use to write your conclusion, there are several strategies that have been proven to be effective. In the list below, you can find some of the most effective strategies with some good conclusion paragraph examples to help you grasp the idea.

One effective way to emphasize the significance of your essay and give the audience some thought to ponder about is by taking a look into the future. The “When and If” technique is quite powerful when it comes to supporting your points in the essay’s conclusion.

Prediction essay conclusion example: “Taking care of a pet is quite hard, which is the reason why most parents refuse their children’s requests to get a pet. However, the refusal should be the last choice of parents. If we want to inculcate a deep sense of responsibility and organization in our kids, and, at the same time, sprout compassion in them, we must let our children take care of pets.”

Another effective strategy is to link your conclusion to your introductory paragraph. This will create a full-circle narration for your readers, create a better understanding of your topic, and emphasize your key point.

Echo conclusion paragraph example: Introduction: “I believe that all children should grow up with a pet. I still remember the exact day my parents brought my first puppy to our house. This was one of the happiest moments in my life and, at the same time, one of the most life-changing ones. Growing up with a pet taught me a lot, and most importantly, it taught me to be responsible.” Conclusion:. “I remember when I picked up my first puppy and how happy I was at that time. Growing up with a pet, I learned what it means to take care of someone, make sure that he always has water and food, teach him, and constantly keep an eye on my little companion. Having a child grow up with a pet teaches them responsibility and helps them acquire a variety of other life skills like leadership, love, compassion, and empathy. This is why I believe that every kid should grow up with a pet!”

Finally, one more trick that will help you create a flawless conclusion is to amplify your main idea or to present it in another perspective of a larger context. This technique will help your readers to look at the problem discussed from a different angle.

Step-up argumentative essay conclusion example: “Despite the obvious advantages of owning a pet in childhood, I feel that we cannot generalize whether all children should have a pet. Whereas some kids may benefit from such experiences, namely, by becoming more compassionate, organized, and responsible, it really depends on the situation, motivation, and enthusiasm of a particular child for owning a pet.”

What is a clincher in an essay? – The final part of an essay’s conclusion is often referred to as a clincher sentence. According to the clincher definition, it is a final sentence that reinforces the main idea or leaves the audience with an intriguing thought to ponder upon. In a nutshell, the clincher is very similar to the hook you would use in an introductory paragraph. Its core mission is to seize the audience’s attention until the end of the paper. At the same time, this statement is what creates a sense of completeness and helps the author leave a lasting impression on the reader.

Now, since you now know what a clincher is, you are probably wondering how to use one in your own paper. First of all, keep in mind that a good clincher should be intriguing, memorable, smooth, and straightforward.

Generally, there are several different tricks you can use for your clincher statement; it can be:

  • A short, but memorable and attention-grabbing conclusion;
  • A relevant and memorable quote (only if it brings actual value);
  • A call to action;
  • A rhetorical question;
  • An illustrative story or provocative example;
  • A warning against a possibility or suggestion about the consequences of a discussed problem;
  • A joke (however, be careful with this as it may not always be deemed appropriate).

Regardless of the technique you choose, make sure that your clincher is memorable and aligns with your introduction and thesis.

Clincher examples: - While New York may not be the only place with the breathtaking views, it is definitely among my personal to 3… and that’s what definitely makes it worth visiting. - “Thence we came forth to rebehold the stars”, Divine Comedy - Don’t you think all these advantages sound like almost life-saving benefits of owning a pet? “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”, The Great Gatsby

strategies

Conclusion Writing Don'ts 

Now, when you know what tricks and techniques you should use to create a perfect conclusion, let’s look at some of the things you should not do with our online paper writing service :

  • Starting with some cliché concluding sentence starters. Many students find common phrases like “In conclusion,” “Therefore,” “In summary,” or similar statements to be pretty good conclusion starters. However, though such conclusion sentence starters may work in certain cases – for example, in speeches – they are overused, so it is recommended not to use them in writing to introduce your conclusion.
  • Putting the first mention of your thesis statement in the conclusion – it has to be presented in your introduction first.
  • Providing new arguments, subtopics, or ideas in the conclusion paragraph.
  • Including a slightly changed or unchanged thesis statement.
  • Providing arguments and evidence that belong in the body of the work.
  • Writing too long, hard to read, or confusing sentences.

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Conclusion Paragraph Outline

The total number of sentences in your final paragraph may vary depending on the number of points you discussed in your essay, as well as on the overall word count of your paper. However, the overall conclusion paragraph outline will remain the same and consists of the following elements:

conclusion ouline

  • A conclusion starter:

The first part of your paragraph should drive readers back to your thesis statement. Thus, if you were wondering how to start a conclusion, the best way to do it is by rephrasing your thesis statement.

  • Summary of the body paragraphs:

Right after revisiting your thesis, you should include several sentences that wrap up the key highlights and points from your body paragraphs. This part of your conclusion can consist of 2-3 sentences—depending on the number of arguments you’ve made. If necessary, you can also explain to the readers how your main points fit together.

  • A concluding sentence:

Finally, you should end your paragraph with a last, powerful sentence that leaves a lasting impression, gives a sense of logical completeness, and connects readers back to the introduction of the paper.

These three key elements make up a perfect essay conclusion. Now, to give you an even better idea of how to create a perfect conclusion, let us give you a sample conclusion paragraph outline with examples from an argumentative essay on the topic of “Every Child Should Own a Pet:

  • Sentence 1: Starter
  • ~ Thesis: "Though taking care of a pet may be a bit challenging for small children. Parents should not restrict their kids from having a pet as it helps them grow into more responsible and compassionate people."
  • ~ Restated thesis for a conclusion: "I can say that taking care of a pet is good for every child."
  • Sentences 2-4: Summary
  • ~ "Studies have shown that pet owners generally have fewer health problems."
  • ~ "Owning a pet teaches a child to be more responsible."
  • ~ "Spending time with a pet reduces stress, feelings of loneliness, and anxiety."
  • Sentence 5: A concluding sentence
  • ~ "Pets can really change a child life for the better, so don't hesitate to endorse your kid's desire to own a pet."

This is a clear example of how you can shape your conclusion paragraph.

How to Conclude Various Types of Essays

Depending on the type of academic essay you are working on, your concluding paragraph's style, tone, and length may vary. In this part of our guide, we will tell you how to end different types of essays and other works.

How to End an Argumentative Essay

Persuasive or argumentative essays always have the single goal of convincing readers of something (an idea, stance, or viewpoint) by appealing to arguments, facts, logic, and even emotions. The conclusion for such an essay has to be persuasive as well. A good trick you can use is to illustrate a real-life scenario that proves your stance or encourages readers to take action. More about persuasive essay outline you can read in our article.

Here are a few more tips for making a perfect conclusion for an argumentative essay:

  • Carefully read the whole essay before you begin;
  • Re-emphasize your ideas;
  • Discuss possible implications;
  • Don’t be afraid to appeal to the reader’s emotions.

How to End a Compare and Contrast Essay

The purpose of a compare and contrast essay is to emphasize the differences or similarities between two or more objects, people, phenomena, etc. Therefore, a logical conclusion should highlight how the reviewed objects are different or similar. Basically, in such a paper, your conclusion should recall all of the key common and distinctive features discussed in the body of your essay and also give readers some food for thought after they finish reading it.

How to Conclude a Descriptive Essay

The key idea of a descriptive essay is to showcase your creativity and writing skills by painting a vivid picture with the help of words. This is one of the most creative types of essays as it requires you to show a story, not tell it. This kind of essay implies using a lot of vivid details. Respectively, the conclusion of such a paper should also use descriptive imagery and, at the same time, sum up the main ideas. A good strategy for ending a descriptive essay would be to begin with a short explanation of why you wrote the essay. Then, you should reflect on how your topic affects you. In the middle of the conclusion, you should cover the most critical moments of the story to smoothly lead the reader into a logical closing statement. The “clincher”, in this case, should be a thought-provoking final sentence that leaves a good and lasting impression on the audience. Do not lead the reader into the essay and then leave them with dwindling memories of it.

How to Conclude an Essay About Yourself

If you find yourself writing an essay about yourself, you need to tell a personal story. As a rule, such essays talk about the author’s experiences, which is why a conclusion should create a feeling of narrative closure. A good strategy is to end your story with a logical finale and the lessons you have learned, while, at the same time, linking it to the introductory paragraph and recalling key moments from the story.

How to End an Informative Essay

Unlike other types of papers, informative or expository essays load readers with a lot of information and facts. In this case, “Synthesize, don’t summarize” is the best technique you can use to end your paper. Simply put, instead of recalling all of the major facts, you should approach your conclusion from the “So what?” position by highlighting the significance of the information provided.

How to Conclude a Narrative Essay

In a nutshell, a narrative essay is based on simple storytelling. The purpose of this paper is to share a particular story in detail. Therefore, the conclusion for such a paper should wrap up the story and avoid finishing on an abrupt cliffhanger. It is vital to include the key takeaways and the lessons learned from the story.

How to Write a Conclusion for a Lab Report

Unlike an essay, a lab report is based on an experiment. This type of paper describes the flow of a particular experiment conducted by a student and its conclusion should reflect on the outcomes of this experiment.

In thinking of how to write a conclusion for a lab, here are the key things you should do to get it right:

  • Restate the goals of your experiment
  • Describe the methods you used
  • Include the results of the experiment and analyze the final data
  • End your conclusion with a clear statement on whether or not the experiment was successful (Did you reach the expected results?)

How to Write a Conclusion for a Research Paper

Writing a paper is probably the hardest task of all, even for experienced dissertation writer . Unlike an essay or even a lab report, a research paper is a much longer piece of work that requires a deeper investigation of the problem. Therefore, a conclusion for such a paper should be even more sophisticated and powerful. If you're feeling difficulty writing an essay, you can buy essay on our service.

How to Write a Conclusion for a Research Paper

However, given that a research paper is the second most popular kind of academic paper (after an essay), it is important to know how to conclude a research paper. Even if you have not yet been assigned to do this task, be sure that you will face it soon. So, here are the steps you should follow to create a great conclusion for a research paper:

  • Restate the Topic

Start your final paragraph with a quick reminder of what the topic of the piece is about. Keep it one sentence long.

  • Revisit the Thesis

Next, you should remind your readers what your thesis statement was. However, do not just copy and paste it from the introductory clause: paraphrase your thesis so that you deliver the same idea but with different words. Keep your paraphrased thesis narrow, specific, and topic-oriented.

  • Summarise Your Key Ideas

Just like the case of a regular essay’s conclusion, a research paper’s final paragraph should also include a short summary of all of the key points stated in the body sections. We recommend reading the entire body part a few times to define all of your main arguments and ideas.

  • Showcase the Significance of Your Work

In the research paper conclusion, it is vital to highlight the significance of your research problem and state how your solution could be helpful.

  • Make Suggestions for Future Studies

Finally, at the end of your conclusion, you should define how your findings will contribute to the development of its particular field of science. Outline the perspectives of further research and, if necessary, explain what is yet to be discovered on the topic.

Then, end your conclusion with a powerful concluding sentence – it can be a rhetorical question, call to action, or another hook that will help you have a strong impact on the audience.

  • Answer the Right Questions

To create a top-notch research paper conclusion, be sure to answer the following questions:

  • What is the goal of a research paper?
  • What are the possible solutions to the research question(s)?
  • How can your results be implemented in real life? (Is your research paper helpful to the community?)
  • Why is this study important and relevant?

Additionally, here are a few more handy tips to follow:

  • Provide clear examples from real life to help readers better understand the further implementation of the stated solutions;
  • Keep your conclusion fresh, original, and creative.

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So, What Is a Good Closing Sentence? See The Difference

One of the best ways to learn how to write a good conclusion is to look at several professional essay conclusion examples. In this section of our guide, we are going to look at two different final paragraphs shaped on the basis of the same template, but even so, they are very different – where one is weak and the other is strong. Below, we are going to compare them to help you understand the difference between a good and a bad conclusion.

Here is the template we used: College degrees are in decline. The price of receiving an education does not correlate with the quality of the education received. As a result, graduated students face underemployment, and the worth of college degrees appears to be in serious doubt. However, the potential social and economic benefits of educated students balance out the equation.

Strong Conclusion ‍

People either see college as an opportunity or an inconvenience; therefore, a degree can only hold as much value as its owner’s skillset. The underemployment of graduate students puts the worth of college degrees in serious doubt. Yet, with the multitude of benefits that educated students bring to society and the economy, the equation remains in balance. Perhaps the ordinary person should consider college as a wise financial investment, but only if they stay determined to study and do the hard work.

Why is this example good? There are several key points that prove its effectiveness:

  • There is a bold opening statement that encompasses the two contrasting types of students we can see today.
  • There are two sentences that recall the thesis statement and cover the key arguments from the body of the essay.
  • Finally, the last sentence sums up the key message of the essay and leaves readers with something to think about.

Weak Conclusion

In conclusion, with the poor preparation of students in college and the subsequent underemployment after graduation from college, the worth associated with the college degree appears to be in serious doubt. However, these issues alone may not reasonably conclude beyond a doubt that investing in a college degree is a rewarding venture. When the full benefits that come with education are carefully put into consideration and evaluated, college education for children in any country still has good advantages, and society should continue to advocate for a college education. The ordinary person should consider this a wise financial decision that holds rewards in the end. Apart from the monetary gains associated with a college education, society will greatly benefit from students when they finish college. Their minds are going to be expanded, and their reasoning and decision making will be enhanced.

What makes this example bad? Here are a few points to consider:

  • Unlike the first example, this paragraph is long and not specific enough. The author provides plenty of generalized phrases that are not backed up by actual arguments.
  • This piece is hard to read and understand and sentences have a confusing structure. Also, there are lots of repetitions and too many uses of the word “college”.
  • There is no summary of the key benefits.
  • The last two sentences that highlight the value of education contradict with the initial statement.
  • Finally, the last sentence doesn’t offer a strong conclusion and gives no thought to ponder upon.
  • In the body of your essay, you have hopefully already provided your reader(s) with plenty of information. Therefore, it is not wise to present new arguments or ideas in your conclusion.
  • To end your final paragraph right, find a clear and straightforward message that will have the most powerful impact on your audience.
  • Don’t use more than one quote in the final clause of your paper – the information from external sources (including quotes) belongs in the body of a paper.
  • Be authoritative when writing a conclusion. You should sound confident and convincing to leave a good impression. Sentences like “I’m not an expert, but…” will most likely make you seem less knowledgeable and/or credible.

Good Conclusion Examples

Now that we've learned what a conclusion is and how to write one let's take a look at some essay conclusion examples to strengthen our knowledge.

The ending ironically reveals that all was for nothing. (A short explanation of the thematic effect of the book’s end) Tom says that Miss Watson freed Jim in her final will.Jim told Huck that the dead man on the Island was pap. The entire adventure seemingly evaporated into nothingness. (How this effect was manifested into the minds of thereaders).
All in all, international schools hold the key to building a full future that students can achieve. (Thesis statement simplified) They help students develop their own character by learning from their mistakes, without having to face a dreadful penalty for failure. (Thesis statement elaborated)Although some say that kids emerged “spoiled” with this mentality, the results prove the contrary. (Possible counter-arguments are noted)
In conclusion, public workers should be allowed to strike since it will give them a chance to air their grievances. (Thesis statement) Public workers should be allowed to strike when their rights, safety, and regulations are compromised. The workers will get motivated when they strike, and their demands are met.
In summary, studies reveal some similarities in the nutrient contents between the organic and non-organic food substances. (Starts with similarities) However, others have revealed many considerable differences in the amounts of antioxidants as well as other minerals present in organic and non-organic foods. Generally, organic foods have higher levels of antioxidants than non-organic foods and therefore are more important in the prevention of chronic illnesses.
As time went by, my obsession grew into something bigger than art; (‘As time went by’ signals maturation) it grew into a dream of developing myself for the world. (Showing student’s interest of developing himself for the community) It is a dream of not only seeing the world from a different perspective but also changing the perspective of people who see my work. (Showing student’s determination to create moving pieces of art)
In conclusion, it is evident that technology is an integral part of our lives and without it, we become “lost” since we have increasingly become dependent on its use. (Thesis with main point)

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How To Write A Conclusion For An Essay?

How to write a good conclusion, how to write a conclusion for a college essay.

Daniel Parker

Daniel Parker

is a seasoned educational writer focusing on scholarship guidance, research papers, and various forms of academic essays including reflective and narrative essays. His expertise also extends to detailed case studies. A scholar with a background in English Literature and Education, Daniel’s work on EssayPro blog aims to support students in achieving academic excellence and securing scholarships. His hobbies include reading classic literature and participating in academic forums.

concluding sentence for informative essay

is an expert in nursing and healthcare, with a strong background in history, law, and literature. Holding advanced degrees in nursing and public health, his analytical approach and comprehensive knowledge help students navigate complex topics. On EssayPro blog, Adam provides insightful articles on everything from historical analysis to the intricacies of healthcare policies. In his downtime, he enjoys historical documentaries and volunteering at local clinics.

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concluding sentence for informative essay

Writing an Informative Essay

Informative essays engage readers with new, interesting, and often surprising facts and details about a subject. Informative essays are educational; readers expect to learn something new from them. In fact, much of the reading and writing done in college and the workplace is informative. From textbooks to reports to tutorials like this one, informative writing imparts important and useful information about a topic.

This tutorial refers to the sample informative outline and final essay written by fictional student Paige Turner.

Reasons to Write Informatively

Your purpose for writing and the audience for whom you are writing will impact the depth and breadth of information you provide, but all informative writing aims to present a subject without opinions or bias. Some common reasons to write informatively are to

  • report findings that an audience would find interesting,
  • present facts that an audience would find useful, and
  • communicate information about a person, place, event, issue, or change that would improve an audience’s understanding.

Characteristics of Informative Essays

Informative essays present factual information and do not attempt to sway readers’ opinions about it. Other types of academic and workplace writing do try to influence readers’ opinions:

  • Expository essays aim to expose a truth about an issue in order to influence how readers view the issue.
  • Persuasive essays aim to influence readers’ opinions, so they will adopt a particular position or take a certain course of action.

Expository and persuasive essays make “arguments.” The only argument an informative essay makes is that something exists, did exist, is happening, or has happened, and the point of the essay is not to convince readers of this but to tell them about it.

  • Informative essays seek to enlighten and educate readers, so they can make their own educated opinions and decisions about what to think and how to act.

Strategies for Writing Informatively

Informative essays provide useful information such as facts, examples, and evidence from research in order to help readers understand a topic or see it more clearly. While informative writing does not aim to appeal emotionally to readers in order to change their opinions or behaviors, informative writing should still be engaging to read. Factual information is not necessarily dry or boring. Sometimes facts can be more alarming than fiction!

Writers use various strategies to engage and educate readers. Some strategies include

  • introducing the topic with an alarming fact or arresting image;
  • asserting what is true or so about the subject in a clear thesis statement;
  • organizing the paragraphs logically by grouping related information;
  • unifying each paragraph with a topic sentence and controlling idea;
  • developing cohesive paragraphs with transition sentences;
  • using precise language and terminology appropriate for the topic, purpose, and audience; and
  • concluding with a final idea or example that captures the essay’s purpose and leaves a lasting impression.

Five Steps for Getting Started

1. Brainstorm and choose a topic.

  • Sample topic : The opioid epidemic in the United States.
  • The opiod epidemic or even opiod addiction would would be considered too broad for a single essay, so the next steps aim to narrow this topic down.

2. Next, write a question about the topic that you would like to answer through research.

  • Sample question : What major events caused the opioid crisis in the United States?
  • This question aims to narrow the topic down to causes of the epidemic in the US.

3. Now go to the Purdue Global Library to find the answers to your research question.

As you begin reading and collecting sources, write down the themes that emerge as common answers. Later, in step four, use the most common answers (or the ones you are most interested in writing and discussing) to construct a thesis statement.

  • Sample answers: aggressive marketing, loopholes in prescription drug provider programs, and economic downturn.

4. Next, provide purpose to your paper by creating a thesis statement.

The thesis attempts to frame your research question. The sample thesis below incorporates three of the more common answers for the research question from step two: What caused the opioid crisis in the United States?

  • Thesis Statement : Aggressive marketing, loopholes in prescription drug provider programs, and economic downturn contributed to the current opioid crisis in the United States.
  • Writing Tip : For additional help with thesis statements, please visit our Writing a Thesis Statement article. For help with writing in 3rd person, see our article on Formal Vs. Informal Writing .

5. Now follow each numbered step in the “Suggested Outline Format and Sample” below.

Sample answers have been provided for “I. Introduction” and “II. First Cause.” A complete sample outline can be seen here. A complete sample informative essay can be seen here.

Suggested Outline Format and Sample

I. INTRODUCTION

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the main topic: Sample topic sentence : There is a current prescription pain medication addiction and abuse epidemic possibly caused by an excessive over prescription of these medications.

B. Now provide a couple sentences with evidence to support the main topic: Sample sentence one with evidence to support the main topic : According to Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), in testimony before the 115th Congress, “In 2016, over 11 million Americans misused prescription opioids … and 2.1 million had an opioid use disorder due to prescription opioids” (Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017, p. 2).

C. Sample sentence two with evidence to support the main topic : Volkow indicated “more than 300,000 Americans have died of an opioid overdose” since 2013 (Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017, p.2).

D. Sample sentence three with evidence to support the main topic : According to Perez-Pena (2017), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported more than 25,000 people in the United States died in 2015 from overdosing on opioids Fentanyl, Oxycodone, and Hydrocodone.

E. Toward the end of the introduction, include your thesis statement written in the 3rd-person point-of-view: Sample thesis statement : Potential solutions to the growing opioid epidemic may be illuminated by examining how opioid addiction is triggered through aggressive pharmaceutical marketing, how opioid addiction manifests among prescribed patients, and how economic downturns play a role in the increase of opioid addiction.

F. Write down the library sources you can use in this introductory paragraph to help support the main topic.

  • Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017
  • Perez-Pena, 2017
  • Writing Tip : For more help writing an introduction, please refer to this article on introductions and conclusions .

II. FIRST CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the first cause of the opioid epidemic: Sample topic sentence that introduces the first cause : One issue that helped contribute to the opioid epidemic is aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical manufacturers.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the first cause: Sample sentence one with evidence that supports the first cause : Perez-Pena (2017) concluded that while the healthcare industry was attempting to effectively and efficiently treat patients with chronic pain, pharmaceutical companies were providing funding to prominent doctors, medical societies, and patient advocacy groups in order to win support for a particular drug’s adoption and usage.

C. Sample sentence two with evidence to support the first cause : In fact, pharmaceutical companies continue to spend millions on promotional activities and materials that deny or trivialize any risks of opioid use while at the same time overstating each drug’s benefit (Perez-Pina, 2017).

D. Next, add more information or provide concluding or transitional sentences that foreshadows the upcoming second cause: Sample concluding and transitional sentence that foreshadow the second cause : Although aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical companies played a large role in opioid addiction, patients are to blame too, as many take advantage of holes in the healthcare provider system in order to remedy their addiction.

E. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the first cause:

  • Writing Tip : For more assistance working with sources, please visit the Using Sources page here.

III. SECOND CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the second cause.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the second cause.

C. Next, add more information or provide concluding or transitional sentences that foreshadows the upcoming third cause.

D. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the second cause:

  • Writing Tip : Listen to Writing Powerful Sentences for information and features of effective writing.

IV. THIRD CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the third cause.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the third cause.

C. Next, add more information or provide a concluding sentence or two.

D. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the third cause:

V. CONCLUSION: Summary of key points and evidence discussed.

  • Writing Tip : For more help writing a conclusion, refer to this podcast on endings .
  • Writing Tip : Have a question? Leave a comment below or Purdue Global students, click here to access the Purdue Global Writing Center tutoring platform and available staff.
  • Writing Tip : Ready to have someone look at your paper? Purdue Global students, click here to submit your assignment for feedback through our video paper review service.

See a Sample Informative Essay Outline here .

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dang bro i got an A

Having faith with all this mentioned, that i will pass my english class at a college. Thank you for posting.

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how-to-write-a-conclusion-of-an-informative-essay

How to Write a Conclusion of an Informative Essay

  • Restate a thesis.
  • Wrap up subtopics.
  • Leave readers with food for thought.

So now you finish the assigned paper and wonder how to write a conclusion of an informative essay. Congrats! You’re at the right place:

This guide will reveal all the details about the process: the elements of an informative essay conclusion, how to connect them to an essay body, and why end on a positive note to leave a reader with food for thought.

how-to-write-a-conclusion-of-an-informative-essay

What is an Informative Essay Conclusion?

We nailed it a long ago in our super popular article about essay conclusions :

A concluding paragraph of your essay is as critical as its introduction. It summarizes the content, provides closure for readers to remember the main idea of your work, and leaves the audience with food for thought.

Long story short, your essay conclusion needs to answer a “What now?” question, giving the audience something to think about after they’ve read your paper.

A good essay conclusion restates a thesis and main ideas, providing a sense of closure. It concludes the thoughts you covered in the essay body, not presenting new ideas.

Tip: Try to finish your informative essay on a positive note, even if the topic itself wasn’t so. It will influence the final impression of your work. Make your conclusion short and sweet, no longer than 5-7 sentences in length.

Conclusion of an Informative Essay

informative-essay-conclusions

Informative essay conclusions need to relate to the information in your previous paragraphs. As a writer, you have three steps to do that:

  • Restate thesis statement
  • Restate main ideas
  • Finish with a call to action

Let’s reveal more details on each one!

P.S. For better clarity, we’ll use a well-known example with pandas. (Remember we addressed it in other blog posts about informative essays ?

Restate Thesis Statement

A thesis statement should remind readers about the main idea and subtopics of the essay they’ve just read.

We bet you remember the formula for writing a thesis statement in informative essays: main topic + subtopic 1 + subtopic 2 + subtopic 3 , connected in one sentence using correct grammar. When writing about introductions, we used this thesis statement example:

  • Giant pandas have special characteristics, live in certain areas of China, and eat food besides just bamboo!

A key aspect to remember when writing a conclusion: Never use the same sentence twice in an essay. What you need to do is take the same ideas but restate your thesis statement in an interesting way yet with the same information.

  • Giant pandas are fascinating animals, and there are many interesting facts to remember about their characteristics, their home, and their diet.

Here we have the same subtopics (characteristics, home, and food), and yet they are not the same but rewritten a bit.

Once again, a big thank goes to Mr. S from YouTube for his panda examples!

Restate Main Ideas

Now it’s time to restate your main ideas by using essay body paragraphs.

Your first paragraph was about giant panda’s special characteristics:

Reread it to remind yourself what you’ve already covered because (again!) you don’t want to use the same fact twice in your paper. Then, go back to your informative essay outline and check which fact is missed but still worth using for an essay. Let’s say, you might forget to include the info about giant pandas’ size:

  • The bear is only six feet long, not as giant as some people may think.

So, you take this fact and write it down in your essay conclusion.

Then, go to your essay body’s second and third paragraphs to do the same: Reread them and make sure the second and third restatements of your main idea answer the subtopics coved in those paragraphs.

For example, you could mention the following information about giant pandas’ homes and diet:

  • Only 2,000 of these black and white bears are left living in the mountains of central China. (To remind readers that many pandas are left, so we need to be careful with what we have left on earth.)
  • Though pandas do eat a great deal of bamboo, they also eat eggs and some small animals. (To remind readers that pandas don’t only eat bamboo, which is the most common thing people know about these wonderful creatures.)

Now you’re done with the restatement of the main ideas, and it’s time to move to the last part of your informative essay conclusion.

Finish with a Call to Action

While there are many ways to finish a paper, a compelling call to action works best for informative essays.

If you left a paper just as it is, with a restated thesis and main ideas, it would sound a bit awkward. A concluding sentence of your essay should provide a sense of closure and answer the “And what now?” question the audience might have after reading your work.

A few variants of calls to action for your informative essay about pandas could be as follows:

  • Now, go read more about pandas! (Well, this one is super boring and simplistic.)
  • Now, it’s time to schedule a visit to a nearby zoo that has one of these amazing animals. (This one is better, providing readers with some thought.)
  • Now that you have read some general information about giant pandas, go to your library to find out more information or learn about a different one of your favorite animals! (Let’s stay with this one.)

That said, here’s what your informative essay conclusion would look like if you wrote about giant pandas:

conclude-informative-essays-example

As you’ve probably noticed, we’ve added a few linking words to the conclusion (“furthermore” and “finally”) to give it a natural flow and make the whole paragraph sound better.

Like other essay types, informative papers need a conclusion that would summarize the main points and leave a reader with a positive impression and food for thought. So, when you wonder how to write a conclusion for an informative essay, follow these three steps:

  • Restate your thesis statement (the same thoughts with other words)
  • Restate main ideas (subtopics you covered in body paragraphs)
  • Finish with a call to action (What should the audience do after reading your work? Please think of encouraging them to get involved in something for further knowledge or research.)

Any questions left? You can always contact our writers , or feel free to leave a comment in the section below!

Related posts

  • What Is the Difference between Primary and Secondary Sources
  • Common Types of Plagiarism with Examples
  • Exemplification Essay – Ideas and Tips

Our Writing Guides

In a short paper—even a research paper—you don’t need to provide an exhaustive summary as part of your conclusion. But you do need to make some kind of transition between your final body paragraph and your concluding paragraph. This may come in the form of a few sentences of summary. Or it may come in the form of a sentence that brings your readers back to your thesis or main idea and reminds your readers where you began and how far you have traveled.

So, for example, in a paper about the relationship between ADHD and rejection sensitivity, Vanessa Roser begins by introducing readers to the fact that researchers have studied the relationship between the two conditions and then provides her explanation of that relationship. Here’s her thesis: “While socialization may indeed be an important factor in RS, I argue that individuals with ADHD may also possess a neurological predisposition to RS that is exacerbated by the differing executive and emotional regulation characteristic of ADHD.”

In her final paragraph, Roser reminds us of where she started by echoing her thesis: “This literature demonstrates that, as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Highlight the “so what”  

At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what’s at stake—why they should care about the argument you’re making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or broader context.

In the conclusion to her paper about ADHD and RS, Roser echoes the stakes she established in her introduction—that research into connections between ADHD and RS has led to contradictory results, raising questions about the “behavioral mediation hypothesis.”

She writes, “as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Leave your readers with the “now what”  

After the “what” and the “so what,” you should leave your reader with some final thoughts. If you have written a strong introduction, your readers will know why you have been arguing what you have been arguing—and why they should care. And if you’ve made a good case for your thesis, then your readers should be in a position to see things in a new way, understand new questions, or be ready for something that they weren’t ready for before they read your paper.

In her conclusion, Roser offers two “now what” statements. First, she explains that it is important to recognize that the flawed behavioral mediation hypothesis “seems to place a degree of fault on the individual. It implies that individuals with ADHD must have elicited such frequent or intense rejection by virtue of their inadequate social skills, erasing the possibility that they may simply possess a natural sensitivity to emotion.” She then highlights the broader implications for treatment of people with ADHD, noting that recognizing the actual connection between rejection sensitivity and ADHD “has profound implications for understanding how individuals with ADHD might best be treated in educational settings, by counselors, family, peers, or even society as a whole.”

To find your own “now what” for your essay’s conclusion, try asking yourself these questions:

  • What can my readers now understand, see in a new light, or grapple with that they would not have understood in the same way before reading my paper? Are we a step closer to understanding a larger phenomenon or to understanding why what was at stake is so important?  
  • What questions can I now raise that would not have made sense at the beginning of my paper? Questions for further research? Other ways that this topic could be approached?  
  • Are there other applications for my research? Could my questions be asked about different data in a different context? Could I use my methods to answer a different question?  
  • What action should be taken in light of this argument? What action do I predict will be taken or could lead to a solution?  
  • What larger context might my argument be a part of?  

What to avoid in your conclusion  

  • a complete restatement of all that you have said in your paper.  
  • a substantial counterargument that you do not have space to refute; you should introduce counterarguments before your conclusion.  
  • an apology for what you have not said. If you need to explain the scope of your paper, you should do this sooner—but don’t apologize for what you have not discussed in your paper.  
  • fake transitions like “in conclusion” that are followed by sentences that aren’t actually conclusions. (“In conclusion, I have now demonstrated that my thesis is correct.”)
  • picture_as_pdf Conclusions

How to Write an Informative Essay?

09 May, 2020

15 minutes read

Author:  Tomas White

The bad news is that if you're anything like the majority of students, you're overwhelmed with all kinds of essays your teachers ask you to create. It feels as if they multiply day on day. However, the good news is that here, at HandMade Writing blog, you can find all the answers on how to craft a decent informative essay in no time. So, without further ado, let's dive into the essence of the issue together!

Informative Essay

What is an Informative Essay?

An informative essay is a piece of writing that seeks to inform or explain a subject or topic to educate the reader. When writing an informative essay consider the audience and correspond to their level. Do not over-explain to experts where knowledge can be assumed or under-explain to novices that lack basic understating.

There are in four main categories:

  • To define a term
  • To compare and contrast a subject
  • To analyze data
  • To provide a how-to guide on a subject

An informative paper should be written in an objective tone and avoid the use of the first person.

You may order an informative essay written from scratch at our professional essay writing service – our essay writers are available 24/7.

What is the Purpose of an Informative Essay?

The purpose of an informative essay is to educate the reader by giving them in-depth information and a clear explanation of a subject.  Informative writing should bombard the reader with information and facts that surround an issue. If your reader comes away feeling educated and full of facts about a subject than you have succeeded.

Examples of informative writing are pamphlets, leaflets, brochures, and textbooks. Primarily texts that are used to inform in a neutral manner.

What is the Difference Between an Informative Essay and Expository Essay?

An expository essay and an informative essay are incredibly similar and often confused. A lot of writers class them as the same type of essay. The difference between them is often hazy and contradictory depending on the author’s definition.

In both essays, your purpose is to explain and educate. An expository essay is here to define a single side of an argument or the issue. It’s the first step to writing an argumentative essay through taking the argument on the next level. Informative essays are less complicated. They are just about the information. Such essays generally require less research on a topic, but it all depends on the assignment level and subject. The difference between the two essay types is so subtle that they are almost interchangeable.

How to Plan an Informative Essay Outline

Informative essay outline

Your plan for an informative essay outline should include:

  • Choosing a topic
  • Conducting research
  • Building a thesis statement
  • Planning the structure of introduction
  • Choosing the topic of a body paragraph
  • Forming a satisfying conclusion

By following the list above, you will have a great outline for your informational writing.

Related Post: How to write an Essay outline 

How to Choose an Informative Essay Topic

One of the most difficult tasks when writing is coming up with a topic. Here is some general advice when you are choosing a topic for your essay:

  • Choose a topic that you are interested in. Your interest in writing on the subject will make the essay more engaging.
  • Choose a theme that you know a little about. This way you will be able to find sources and fact easier.
  • Choose a topic that can explain something new or in a different way.
  • Choose a topic that you can support with facts, statistics, and
  • Choose a topic that is relevant to the subject.
  • Remember the four types of categories information essays cover.

Inspiration and Research for Your Ultimate Topic

Your perfect informative essay title can come from numerous sources. Here is where you can potentially seek for relevant topics:

Informative essay topic sources

Not only will they inspire you, but they will also provide with some of the research you need.

Researching an Informative Essay

The best sources should be objective. Some excellent sources for an informative essay include:

Sources for informative essay research

Always remember to check if the source of information will have a bias. For example, a newspaper journalist may have a political leaning, and their article might reflect that. A charities site for motor neuron disease may also come as biased. Analyze the source for the writer’s agenda.

Informational research should answer the five W’s (who, what, where, why and how), and these will form the majority of your essay’s plan. So, if I were writing about the different types of pollution I’d research what kinds of pollution there are, who and how they affect, why they happen, and where they are most likely to occur.

Collating and organizing this information will form your thesis statement and paragraph layout.

Still struggling to find a topic for your informational writing? Then, here are some ideas to that might inspire you.

Examples of Informative Essay Topics for College Students

  • How to avoid stress
  • What ecological problems are we faced with today?
  • What are the effects of obesity?
  • What is cyberbullying?
  • How has the internet changed the world?
  • How to adjust to college life
  • Where to find the best part-time jobs
  • How to get along with your room-mate
  • Guidance on how to write a college application
  • How caffeine affects studying

Examples of Informative Essay Topics for High School

  • How to start your own vegetable garden
  • The reason for and effects of childhood obesity
  • Outline the consequences of texting and driving
  • How to make your favorite food
  • What is climate change? And what are its effects?
  • The different types of pollution
  • The history of the Titanic.
  • An essay on the Great Depression
  • The life and times of Ernst Hemmingway
  • How to have a great vacation
Related Posts: Argumentative essay topics | Research paper topics

Informative Essay Example

When you have finished planning and research, you have to start writing. But, how do you start an informative essay? The simple answer is to just go with it. Do not get overly critical. Just pour out all the information you have. You can shape it up later.

Important points to consider are: never use first person pronouns and keep the topic objective not subjective . Remember, your purpose is to educate the reader in the most thorough way possible by explaining a topic with statistics and facts.

how to write an informative essay

As usual, the essay should include an introduction, main body, and conclusion. All information should be presented in a clear and easy to understand manner. The flow of information should be signposted. We will delve into these areas in more detail now.

Related Post: How to Write a Narrative essay

How to Write an Introduction for an Informative Essay?

An introductory paragraph of an informative essay should comprise of the following things:

A Hook to Ensnare the Reader

An introductory paragraph for informative writing should start with a hook. A hook needs to be in the first sentence and something that will ‘wow’ the reader and impel them to read on. Alarming statistics on the subject/topic make up great hooks for informative essays. For example, if you were writing an essay on cyber-bullying, citing the number of children who have considered suicide due to cyberbullying could be a powerful opening message.

A Thesis Statements for Direction

All introductions should include a thesis statement. The best practice is to place it at the end of the introductory paragraph to summarize your argument.  However, you do not want to form an argument or state a position. It is best to use the thesis statement to clarify what subject you are discussing.

Related Post: What is a thesis statement

It may also be better to place the statement after the hook, as it will clarify the issue that you are discussing.

For example, ‘Research conducted by Bob the Scientist indicates that the majority of issues caused by cyberbullying can be overcome through the informative literature on the subject to educate bullies about the consequences of their actions.’

How to Write the Body of an Informative Essay

Informative essay body paragraphs

When writing the body of an informative paper, it is best to break the paragraph down into four distinct steps.

 The Claim or Statement

The claim or statement is a single, simple sentence that introduces the main topic of the paragraph. It can be narrow or broad depending on the level and depth of the essay. Think of this as the ‘what’ aspect. For example, the claim for a high-school informative paper would be broader than a claim written at the university level. This is the first step to signposting your essay. It provides a logical and easy way to follow a discussion.

The Supporting Evidence

After making a claim you want to back it up with supporting evidence. Supporting evidence could be findings from a survey, the results of an experiment, documented casual effects or a quote. Anything that lends support to the claim or statement in the first sentence would work. This is the ‘why’ aspect of your research. By using supporting evidence like this, you are defining why the statement is essential to the topic.

Explanation

After you state the supporting evidence, you want to explain ‘how’ this finding is important to the subject at hand. That usually unpacks the supporting evidence and makes it easier for the reader to understand. So, an explanation is to explain how this claim and the supporting research affects your thesis statement.

Concluding Sentence

You should always finish a body paragraph with a concluding sentence that ties up the paragraph nicely and prompts the reader on to the next stage. This is a signpost that the topic and the paragraph are wrapped up.

How to Write the Conclusion of an Informative Essay

Writing a conclusion to an informative paper can be hard as there is no argument to conclude – there is only information to summarize. A good conclusion for these types of essays should support the information provided on the subject. It should also explain why these topics are important.

Here are some Tips on writing informative essay conclusions:

Rephrase Your Thesis Statement

It is vital that you rephrase the thesis and not copy it word for word. That will allow you restate the theme or key point of your essay in a new way. You will simultaneously tie your conclusion back to the introduction of your essay. Echoing your introduction will bring the essay full circle.

Read Through Your Body Paragraphs

Read through the body paragraphs of your essay and ask if a brief overview of the main points of the essay would form a good conclusion for the essay. Generally, it is best to restate the main points of the essay in a conclusion using different words.

Finish the Conclusion With a Clincher

A clincher gives your concluding paragraph a powerful finish. It is a sentence that leaves the reader thinking about your essay long after they have put it down.

Some excellent examples of clinchers are:

  • A statement of truth
  • A thought-provoking quote relevant to the subject and thesis statement
  • A lingering question that none of the research has answered or puts the research into a new light
  • Whether it provides an answer to a common question
  • Challenge your reader with a quote from an expert that forces them to think about or change their own behavior
  • Something that shifts the focus onto the future and the long-time implications of your research

Context and Significance of the Information

A conclusion should always try to frame why the topic was important, and in what context it was important. By doing this your research matters.

Remember: A concluding paragraph should never include new information.

Informative Essay Sample

Be sure to check the sample essay, completed by our writers. Use it as an example to write your own informative paper. Link:  Tesla motors

Tips for Writing an Excellent Informative Essay

Here are a few tips for writing an informative paper

  • When writing the main body paragraph, concentrate on explaining information only once. Avoid repeating the same information in the next section.
  • Focus on the subject. Make sure all the information that you include is relevant to the topic you are describing. Do not include information that “goes off.”
  • Write in a logical way that is signposted. Writing like this will make an essay flow and mean it is easier to understand.
  • Always revise the essay at least three times. This way, you will find where to expand ideas in the paragraph, where to trim back ideas until everything has the right balance.
  • Be familiar with the academic reference style you are writing in
  • Write to your audience. Make sure you know who you are writing it for.

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Informative Essay — Purpose, Structure, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is informative writing?

Informative writing educates the reader about a certain topic. An informative essay may explain new information, describe a process, or clarify a concept. The provided information is objective, meaning the writing focuses on presentation of fact and should not contain personal opinion or bias.

Informative writing includes description, process, cause and effect, comparison, and problems and possible solutions:

Describes a person, place, thing, or event using descriptive language that appeals to readers’ senses

Explains the process to do something or how something was created

Discusses the relationship between two things, determining how one ( cause ) leads to the other ( effect ); the effect needs to be based on fact and not an assumption

Identifies the similarities and differences between two things; does not indicate that one is better than the other

Details a problem and presents various possible solutions ; the writer does not suggest one solution is more effective than the others

What is informative writing?

Purpose of informative writing

The purpose of an informative essay depends upon the writer’s motivation, but may be to share new information, describe a process, clarify a concept, explain why or how, or detail a topic’s intricacies.

Informative essays may introduce readers to new information .

Summarizing a scientific/technological study

Outlining the various aspects of a religion

Providing information on a historical period

Describe a process or give step-by-step details of a procedure.

How to write an informational essay

How to construct an argument

How to apply for a job

Clarify a concept and offer details about complex ideas.

Purpose of informative essays

Explain why or how something works the way that it does.

Describe how the stock market impacts the economy

Illustrate why there are high and low tides

Detail how the heart functions

Offer information on the smaller aspects or intricacies of a larger topic.

Identify the importance of the individual bones in the body

Outlining the Dust Bowl in the context of the Great Depression

Explaining how bees impact the environment

How to write an informative essay

Regardless of the type of information, the informative essay structure typically consists of an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Introduction

Background information

Explanation of evidence

Restated thesis

Review of main ideas

Closing statement

Informative essay structure

Informative essay introduction

When composing the introductory paragraph(s) of an informative paper, include a hook, introduce the topic, provide background information, and develop a good thesis statement.

If the hook or introduction creates interest in the first paragraph, it will draw the readers’ attention and make them more receptive to the essay writer's ideas. Some of the most common techniques to accomplish this include the following:

Emphasize the topic’s importance by explaining the current interest in the topic or by indicating that the subject is influential.

Use pertinent statistics to give the paper an air of authority.

A surprising statement can be shocking; sometimes it is disgusting; sometimes it is joyful; sometimes it is surprising because of who said it.

An interesting incident or anecdote can act as a teaser to lure the reader into the remainder of the essay. Be sure that the device is appropriate for the informative essay topic and focus on what is to follow.

Informative essay hooks

Directly introduce the topic of the essay.

Provide the reader with the background information necessary to understand the topic. Don’t repeat this information in the body of the essay; it should help the reader understand what follows.

Identify the overall purpose of the essay with the thesis (purpose statement). Writers can also include their support directly in the thesis, which outlines the structure of the essay for the reader.

Informative essay body paragraphs

Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence, evidence, explanation of evidence, and a transition sentence.

Informative essay body paragraphs

A good topic sentence should identify what information the reader should expect in the paragraph and how it connects to the main purpose identified in the thesis.

Provide evidence that details the main point of the paragraph. This includes paraphrasing, summarizing, and directly quoting facts, statistics, and statements.

Explain how the evidence connects to the main purpose of the essay.

Place transitions at the end of each body paragraph, except the last. There is no need to transition from the last support to the conclusion. A transition should accomplish three goals:

Tell the reader where you were (current support)

Tell the reader where you are going (next support)

Relate the paper’s purpose

Informative essay conclusion

Incorporate a rephrased thesis, summary, and closing statement into the conclusion of an informative essay.

Rephrase the purpose of the essay. Do not just repeat the purpose statement from the thesis.

Summarize the main idea found in each body paragraph by rephrasing each topic sentence.

End with a clincher or closing statement that helps readers answer the question “so what?” What should the reader take away from the information provided in the essay? Why should they care about the topic?

Informative essay example

The following example illustrates a good informative essay format:

Informative essay format

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5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

4-minute read

  • 19th September 2022

If you’re a student writing an essay or research paper, it’s important to make sure your points flow together well. You’ll want to use connecting words (known formally as transition signals) to do this. Transition signals like thus , also , and furthermore link different ideas, and when you get to the end of your work, you need to use these to mark your conclusion. Read on to learn more about transition signals and how to use them to conclude your essays.

Transition Signals

Transition signals link sentences together cohesively, enabling easy reading and comprehension. They are usually placed at the beginning of a sentence and separated from the remaining words with a comma. There are several types of transition signals, including those to:

●  show the order of a sequence of events (e.g., first, then, next)

●  introduce an example (e.g., specifically, for instance)

●  indicate a contrasting idea (e.g., but, however, although)

●  present an additional idea (e.g., also, in addition, plus)

●  indicate time (e.g., beforehand, meanwhile, later)

●  compare (e.g., likewise, similarly)

●  show cause and effect (e.g., thus, as a result)

●  mark the conclusion – which we’ll focus on in this guide.

When you reach the end of an essay, you should start the concluding paragraph with a transition signal that acts as a bridge to the summary of your key points. Check out some concluding transition signals below and learn how you can use them in your writing.

To Conclude…

This is a particularly versatile closing statement that can be used for almost any kind of essay, including both formal and informal academic writing. It signals to the reader that you will briefly restate the main idea. As an alternative, you can begin the summary with “to close” or “in conclusion.” In an argumentative piece, you can use this phrase to indicate a call to action or opinion:

To conclude, Abraham Lincoln was the best president because he abolished slavery.

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As Has Been Demonstrated…

To describe how the evidence presented in your essay supports your argument or main idea, begin the concluding paragraph with “as has been demonstrated.” This phrase is best used for research papers or articles with heavy empirical or statistical evidence.

As has been demonstrated by the study presented above, human activities are negatively altering the climate system.

The Above Points Illustrate…

As another transitional phrase for formal or academic work, “the above points illustrate” indicates that you are reiterating your argument and that the conclusion will include an assessment of the evidence you’ve presented.

The above points illustrate that children prefer chocolate over broccoli.

In a Nutshell…

A simple and informal metaphor to begin a conclusion, “in a nutshell” prepares the reader for a summary of your paper. It can work in narratives and speeches but should be avoided in formal situations.

In a nutshell, the Beatles had an impact on musicians for generations to come.

Overall, It Can Be Said…

To recap an idea at the end of a critical or descriptive essay, you can use this phrase at the beginning of the concluding paragraph. “Overall” means “taking everything into account,” and it sums up your essay in a formal way. You can use “overall” on its own as a transition signal, or you can use it as part of a phrase.

Overall, it can be said that art has had a positive impact on humanity.

Proofreading and Editing

Transition signals are crucial to crafting a well-written and cohesive essay. For your next writing assignment, make sure you include plenty of transition signals, and check out this post for more tips on how to improve your writing. And before you turn in your paper, don’t forget to have someone proofread your work. Our expert editors will make sure your essay includes all the transition signals necessary for your writing to flow seamlessly. Send in a free 500-word sample today!

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Essay Conclusions

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Learn about the elements of a successful essay conclusion.

The conclusion is a very important part of your essay. Although it is sometimes treated as a roundup of all of the bits that didn’t fit into the paper earlier, it deserves better treatment than that! It's the last thing the reader will see, so it tends to stick in the reader's memory. It's also a great place to remind the reader exactly why your topic is important. A conclusion is more than just "the last paragraph"—it's a working part of the paper. This is the place to push your reader to think about the consequences of your topic for the wider world or for the reader's own life!

A good conclusion should do a few things:

Restate your thesis

Synthesize or summarize your major points

Make the context of your argument clear

Restating Your Thesis

You've already spent time and energy crafting a solid thesis statement for your introduction, and if you've done your job right, your whole paper focuses on that thesis statement. That's why it's so important to address the thesis in your conclusion! Many writers choose to begin the conclusion by restating the thesis, but you can put your thesis into the conclusion anywhere—the first sentence of the paragraph, the last sentence, or in between. Here are a few tips for rephrasing your thesis:

Remind the reader that you've proven this thesis over the course of your paper. For example, if you're arguing that your readers should get their pets from animal shelters rather than pet stores, you might say, "If you were considering that puppy in the pet-shop window, remember that your purchase will support 'puppy mills' instead of rescuing a needy dog, and consider selecting your new friend at your local animal shelter." This example gives the reader not only the thesis of the paper, but a reminder of the most powerful point in the argument!

Revise the thesis statement so that it reflects the relationship you've developed with the reader during the paper. For example, if you've written a paper that targets parents of young children, you can find a way to phrase your thesis to capitalize on that—maybe by beginning your thesis statement with, "As a parent of a young child…"

Don’t repeat your thesis word for word—make sure that your new statement is an independent, fresh sentence!

Summary or Synthesis

This section of the conclusion might come before the thesis statement or after it. Your conclusion should remind the reader of what your paper actually says! The best conclusion will include a synthesis, not just a summary—instead of a mere list of your major points, the best conclusion will draw those points together and relate them to one another so that your reader can apply the information given in the essay. Here are a couple of ways to do that:

Give a list of the major arguments for your thesis (usually, these are the topic sentences of the parts of your essay).

Explain how these parts are connected. For example, in the animal-shelter essay, you might point out that adopting a shelter dog helps more animals because your adoption fee supports the shelter, which makes your choice more socially responsible.

One of the most important functions of the conclusion is to provide context for your argument. Your reader may finish your essay without a problem and understand your argument without understanding why that argument is important. Your introduction might point out the reason your topic matters, but your conclusion should also tackle this questions. Here are some strategies for making your reader see why the topic is important:

Tell the reader what you want him or her to do. Is your essay a call to action? If so, remind the reader of what he/she should do. If not, remember that asking the reader to think a certain way is an action in itself. (In the above examples, the essay asks the reader to adopt a shelter dog—a specific action.)

Explain why this topic is timely or important. For example, the animal-shelter essay might end with a statistic about the number of pets in shelters waiting for adoption.

Remind the readers of why the topic matters to them personally. For example, it doesn’t matter much if you believe in the mission of animal shelters, if you're not planning to get a dog; however, once you're looking for a dog, it is much more important. The conclusion of this essay might say, "Since you’re in the market for a dog, you have a major decision to make: where to get one." This will remind the reader that the argument is personally important!

Conclusion paragraphs

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17 Essay Conclusion Examples (Copy and Paste)

essay conclusion examples and definition, explained below

Essay conclusions are not just extra filler. They are important because they tie together your arguments, then give you the chance to forcefully drive your point home.

I created the 5 Cs conclusion method to help you write essay conclusions:

Essay Conclusion Example

I’ve previously produced the video below on how to write a conclusion that goes over the above image.

The video follows the 5 C’s method ( you can read about it in this post ), which doesn’t perfectly match each of the below copy-and-paste conclusion examples, but the principles are similar, and can help you to write your own strong conclusion:

💡 New! Try this AI Prompt to Generate a Sample 5Cs Conclusion This is my essay: [INSERT ESSAY WITHOUT THE CONCLUSION]. I want you to write a conclusion for this essay. In the first sentence of the conclusion, return to a statement I made in the introduction. In the second sentence, reiterate the thesis statement I have used. In the third sentence, clarify how my final position is relevant to the Essay Question, which is [ESSAY QUESTION]. In the fourth sentence, explain who should be interested in my findings. In the fifth sentence, end by noting in one final, engaging sentence why this topic is of such importance.

Remember: The prompt can help you generate samples but you can’t submit AI text for assessment. Make sure you write your conclusion in your own words.

Essay Conclusion Examples

Below is a range of copy-and-paste essay conclusions with gaps for you to fill-in your topic and key arguments. Browse through for one you like (there are 17 for argumentative, expository, compare and contrast, and critical essays). Once you’ve found one you like, copy it and add-in the key points to make it your own.

1. Argumentative Essay Conclusions

The arguments presented in this essay demonstrate the significant importance of _____________. While there are some strong counterarguments, such as ____________, it remains clear that the benefits/merits of _____________ far outweigh the potential downsides. The evidence presented throughout the essay strongly support _____________. In the coming years, _____________ will be increasingly important. Therefore, continual advocacy for the position presented in this essay will be necessary, especially due to its significant implications for _____________.

Version 1 Filled-In

The arguments presented in this essay demonstrate the significant importance of fighting climate change. While there are some strong counterarguments, such as the claim that it is too late to stop catastrophic change, it remains clear that the merits of taking drastic action far outweigh the potential downsides. The evidence presented throughout the essay strongly support the claim that we can at least mitigate the worst effects. In the coming years, intergovernmental worldwide agreements will be increasingly important. Therefore, continual advocacy for the position presented in this essay will be necessary, especially due to its significant implications for humankind.

chris

As this essay has shown, it is clear that the debate surrounding _____________ is multifaceted and highly complex. While there are strong arguments opposing the position that _____________, there remains overwhelming evidence to support the claim that _____________. A careful analysis of the empirical evidence suggests that _____________ not only leads to ____________, but it may also be a necessity for _____________. Moving forward, _____________ should be a priority for all stakeholders involved, as it promises a better future for _____________. The focus should now shift towards how best to integrate _____________ more effectively into society.

Version 2 Filled-In

As this essay has shown, it is clear that the debate surrounding climate change is multifaceted and highly complex. While there are strong arguments opposing the position that we should fight climate change, there remains overwhelming evidence to support the claim that action can mitigate the worst effects. A careful analysis of the empirical evidence suggests that strong action not only leads to better economic outcomes in the long term, but it may also be a necessity for preventing climate-related deaths. Moving forward, carbon emission mitigation should be a priority for all stakeholders involved, as it promises a better future for all. The focus should now shift towards how best to integrate smart climate policies more effectively into society.

Based upon the preponderance of evidence, it is evident that _____________ holds the potential to significantly alter/improve _____________. The counterarguments, while noteworthy, fail to diminish the compelling case for _____________. Following an examination of both sides of the argument, it has become clear that _____________ presents the most effective solution/approach to _____________. Consequently, it is imperative that society acknowledge the value of _____________ for developing a better  _____________. Failing to address this topic could lead to negative outcomes, including _____________.

Version 3 Filled-In

Based upon the preponderance of evidence, it is evident that addressing climate change holds the potential to significantly improve the future of society. The counterarguments, while noteworthy, fail to diminish the compelling case for immediate climate action. Following an examination of both sides of the argument, it has become clear that widespread and urgent social action presents the most effective solution to this pressing problem. Consequently, it is imperative that society acknowledge the value of taking immediate action for developing a better environment for future generations. Failing to address this topic could lead to negative outcomes, including more extreme climate events and greater economic externalities.

See Also: Examples of Counterarguments

On the balance of evidence, there is an overwhelming case for _____________. While the counterarguments offer valid points that are worth examining, they do not outweigh or overcome the argument that _____________. An evaluation of both perspectives on this topic concludes that _____________ is the most sufficient option for  _____________. The implications of embracing _____________ do not only have immediate benefits, but they also pave the way for a more _____________. Therefore, the solution of _____________ should be actively pursued by _____________.

Version 4 Filled-In

On the balance of evidence, there is an overwhelming case for immediate tax-based action to mitigate the effects of climate change. While the counterarguments offer valid points that are worth examining, they do not outweigh or overcome the argument that action is urgently necessary. An evaluation of both perspectives on this topic concludes that taking societal-wide action is the most sufficient option for  achieving the best results. The implications of embracing a society-wide approach like a carbon tax do not only have immediate benefits, but they also pave the way for a more healthy future. Therefore, the solution of a carbon tax or equivalent policy should be actively pursued by governments.

2. Expository Essay Conclusions

Overall, it is evident that _____________ plays a crucial role in _____________. The analysis presented in this essay demonstrates the clear impact of _____________ on _____________. By understanding the key facts about _____________, practitioners/society are better equipped to navigate _____________. Moving forward, further exploration of _____________ will yield additional insights and information about _____________. As such, _____________ should remain a focal point for further discussions and studies on _____________.

Overall, it is evident that social media plays a crucial role in harming teenagers’ mental health. The analysis presented in this essay demonstrates the clear impact of social media on young people. By understanding the key facts about the ways social media cause young people to experience body dysmorphia, teachers and parents are better equipped to help young people navigate online spaces. Moving forward, further exploration of the ways social media cause harm will yield additional insights and information about how it can be more sufficiently regulated. As such, the effects of social media on youth should remain a focal point for further discussions and studies on youth mental health.

To conclude, this essay has explored the multi-faceted aspects of _____________. Through a careful examination of _____________, this essay has illuminated its significant influence on _____________. This understanding allows society to appreciate the idea that _____________. As research continues to emerge, the importance of _____________ will only continue to grow. Therefore, an understanding of _____________ is not merely desirable, but imperative for _____________.

To conclude, this essay has explored the multi-faceted aspects of globalization. Through a careful examination of globalization, this essay has illuminated its significant influence on the economy, cultures, and society. This understanding allows society to appreciate the idea that globalization has both positive and negative effects. As research continues to emerge, the importance of studying globalization will only continue to grow. Therefore, an understanding of globalization’s effects is not merely desirable, but imperative for judging whether it is good or bad.

Reflecting on the discussion, it is clear that _____________ serves a pivotal role in _____________. By delving into the intricacies of _____________, we have gained valuable insights into its impact and significance. This knowledge will undoubtedly serve as a guiding principle in _____________. Moving forward, it is paramount to remain open to further explorations and studies on _____________. In this way, our understanding and appreciation of _____________ can only deepen and expand.

Reflecting on the discussion, it is clear that mass media serves a pivotal role in shaping public opinion. By delving into the intricacies of mass media, we have gained valuable insights into its impact and significance. This knowledge will undoubtedly serve as a guiding principle in shaping the media landscape. Moving forward, it is paramount to remain open to further explorations and studies on how mass media impacts society. In this way, our understanding and appreciation of mass media’s impacts can only deepen and expand.

In conclusion, this essay has shed light on the importance of _____________ in the context of _____________. The evidence and analysis provided underscore the profound effect _____________ has on _____________. The knowledge gained from exploring _____________ will undoubtedly contribute to more informed and effective decisions in _____________. As we continue to progress, the significance of understanding _____________ will remain paramount. Hence, we should strive to deepen our knowledge of _____________ to better navigate and influence _____________.

In conclusion, this essay has shed light on the importance of bedside manner in the context of nursing. The evidence and analysis provided underscore the profound effect compassionate bedside manner has on patient outcome. The knowledge gained from exploring nurses’ bedside manner will undoubtedly contribute to more informed and effective decisions in nursing practice. As we continue to progress, the significance of understanding nurses’ bedside manner will remain paramount. Hence, we should strive to deepen our knowledge of this topic to better navigate and influence patient outcomes.

See More: How to Write an Expository Essay

3. Compare and Contrast Essay Conclusion

While both _____________ and _____________ have similarities such as _____________, they also have some very important differences in areas like _____________. Through this comparative analysis, a broader understanding of _____________ and _____________ has been attained. The choice between the two will largely depend on _____________. For example, as highlighted in the essay, ____________. Despite their differences, both _____________ and _____________ have value in different situations.

While both macrosociology and microsociology have similarities such as their foci on how society is structured, they also have some very important differences in areas like their differing approaches to research methodologies. Through this comparative analysis, a broader understanding of macrosociology and microsociology has been attained. The choice between the two will largely depend on the researcher’s perspective on how society works. For example, as highlighted in the essay, microsociology is much more concerned with individuals’ experiences while macrosociology is more concerned with social structures. Despite their differences, both macrosociology and microsociology have value in different situations.

It is clear that _____________ and _____________, while seeming to be different, have shared characteristics in _____________. On the other hand, their contrasts in _____________ shed light on their unique features. The analysis provides a more nuanced comprehension of these subjects. In choosing between the two, consideration should be given to _____________. Despite their disparities, it’s crucial to acknowledge the importance of both when it comes to _____________.

It is clear that behaviorism and consructivism, while seeming to be different, have shared characteristics in their foci on knowledge acquisition over time. On the other hand, their contrasts in ideas about the role of experience in learning shed light on their unique features. The analysis provides a more nuanced comprehension of these subjects. In choosing between the two, consideration should be given to which approach works best in which situation. Despite their disparities, it’s crucial to acknowledge the importance of both when it comes to student education.

Reflecting on the points discussed, it’s evident that _____________ and _____________ share similarities such as _____________, while also demonstrating unique differences, particularly in _____________. The preference for one over the other would typically depend on factors such as _____________. Yet, regardless of their distinctions, both _____________ and _____________ play integral roles in their respective areas, significantly contributing to _____________.

Reflecting on the points discussed, it’s evident that red and orange share similarities such as the fact they are both ‘hot colors’, while also demonstrating unique differences, particularly in their social meaning (red meaning danger and orange warmth). The preference for one over the other would typically depend on factors such as personal taste. Yet, regardless of their distinctions, both red and orange play integral roles in their respective areas, significantly contributing to color theory.

Ultimately, the comparison and contrast of _____________ and _____________ have revealed intriguing similarities and notable differences. Differences such as _____________ give deeper insights into their unique and shared qualities. When it comes to choosing between them, _____________ will likely be a deciding factor. Despite these differences, it is important to remember that both _____________ and _____________ hold significant value within the context of _____________, and each contributes to _____________ in its own unique way.

Ultimately, the comparison and contrast of driving and flying have revealed intriguing similarities and notable differences. Differences such as their differing speed to destination give deeper insights into their unique and shared qualities. When it comes to choosing between them, urgency to arrive at the destination will likely be a deciding factor. Despite these differences, it is important to remember that both driving and flying hold significant value within the context of air transit, and each contributes to facilitating movement in its own unique way.

See Here for More Compare and Contrast Essay Examples

4. Critical Essay Conclusion

In conclusion, the analysis of _____________ has unveiled critical aspects related to _____________. While there are strengths in _____________, its limitations are equally telling. This critique provides a more informed perspective on _____________, revealing that there is much more beneath the surface. Moving forward, the understanding of _____________ should evolve, considering both its merits and flaws.

In conclusion, the analysis of flow theory has unveiled critical aspects related to motivation and focus. While there are strengths in achieving a flow state, its limitations are equally telling. This critique provides a more informed perspective on how humans achieve motivation, revealing that there is much more beneath the surface. Moving forward, the understanding of flow theory of motivation should evolve, considering both its merits and flaws.

To conclude, this critical examination of _____________ sheds light on its multi-dimensional nature. While _____________ presents notable advantages, it is not without its drawbacks. This in-depth critique offers a comprehensive understanding of _____________. Therefore, future engagements with _____________ should involve a balanced consideration of its strengths and weaknesses.

To conclude, this critical examination of postmodern art sheds light on its multi-dimensional nature. While postmodernism presents notable advantages, it is not without its drawbacks. This in-depth critique offers a comprehensive understanding of how it has contributed to the arts over the past 50 years. Therefore, future engagements with postmodern art should involve a balanced consideration of its strengths and weaknesses.

Upon reflection, the critique of _____________ uncovers profound insights into its underlying intricacies. Despite its positive aspects such as ________, it’s impossible to overlook its shortcomings. This analysis provides a nuanced understanding of _____________, highlighting the necessity for a balanced approach in future interactions. Indeed, both the strengths and weaknesses of _____________ should be taken into account when considering ____________.

Upon reflection, the critique of marxism uncovers profound insights into its underlying intricacies. Despite its positive aspects such as its ability to critique exploitation of labor, it’s impossible to overlook its shortcomings. This analysis provides a nuanced understanding of marxism’s harmful effects when used as an economic theory, highlighting the necessity for a balanced approach in future interactions. Indeed, both the strengths and weaknesses of marxism should be taken into account when considering the use of its ideas in real life.

Ultimately, this critique of _____________ offers a detailed look into its advantages and disadvantages. The strengths of _____________ such as __________ are significant, yet its limitations such as _________ are not insignificant. This balanced analysis not only offers a deeper understanding of _____________ but also underscores the importance of critical evaluation. Hence, it’s crucial that future discussions around _____________ continue to embrace this balanced approach.

Ultimately, this critique of artificial intelligence offers a detailed look into its advantages and disadvantages. The strengths of artificial intelligence, such as its ability to improve productivity are significant, yet its limitations such as the possibility of mass job losses are not insignificant. This balanced analysis not only offers a deeper understanding of artificial intelligence but also underscores the importance of critical evaluation. Hence, it’s crucial that future discussions around the regulation of artificial intelligence continue to embrace this balanced approach.

This article promised 17 essay conclusions, and this one you are reading now is the twenty-first. This last conclusion demonstrates that the very best essay conclusions are written uniquely, from scratch, in order to perfectly cater the conclusion to the topic. A good conclusion will tie together all the key points you made in your essay and forcefully drive home the importance or relevance of your argument, thesis statement, or simply your topic so the reader is left with one strong final point to ponder.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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How to Conclude a Paragraph

Last Updated: December 13, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Diane Stubbs and by wikiHow staff writer, Danielle Blinka, MA, MPA . Diane Stubbs is a Secondary English Teacher with over 22 years of experience teaching all high school grade levels and AP courses. She specializes in secondary education, classroom management, and educational technology. Diane earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Delaware and a Master of Education from Wesley College. There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 113,319 times.

If you want a body paragraph to be effective, you need to conclude it properly — a closing sentence is as imperative as a conclusion is to an essay or a research paper. Closing or concluding sentences act like a concluding paragraph in an essay and review the points you made in the paragraph. To effectively conclude a paragraph, restate your topic sentence and include what you taught the reader. Tailor the sentence to the type of essay you’re writing, whether it’s a persuasive or compare and contrast essay.

Reviewing Your Paragraph

Step 1 Reread what you’ve written.

  • Focus on what you lay out in the topic sentence.
  • Note your evidence and details.

Step 2 Focus on the main idea.

  • If your topic sentence reads, “Cats may be small, but they’re mighty predators,” then your main idea is that cats are big hunters.
  • Your concluding statement should show how your paragraph supported the idea that cats are big predators. For example, a closing statement might read, “Based on these statistics, cats are predators who hunt frequently and decrease the area bird population.”

Step 3 Summarize your ideas.

  • For example, the closing statement above, “Based on these statistics, cats are predators who hunt frequently and decrease the area bird population,” reminds the reader that the paragraph just provided statistics about how often cats hunt and how they impact the local bird population. These details support the main idea, and the writer has mentioned both.

Drafting a Closing Statement

Step 1 Begin the sentence with a signal word, if desired.

  • Consequently
  • As a result

Step 2 Restate the topic sentence.

  • An example topic sentence might read: “Cats are natural predators because they enjoy hunting and will even hunt for sport.”
  • Your concluding statement for this paragraph might read: “As a result of their continued hunts even after they’re domesticated and provided cat food, cats are proven to be natural predators.”

Step 3 Reassert your point in a persuasive essay.

  • As an example, “The data shows that cats hunt even when they have steady meals, which proves that they are natural hunters.”

Step 4 Focus on the similarities and differences in a compare and contrast essay.

  • For example, “As the data shows, feral cats hunt 140% more than domestic cats.”

Step 5 Show how the facts are related in a cause and effect essay.

  • For example, “Consequently, homes that own cats have fewer birds living in their yards.”

Step 6 Sum up your facts in an informative essay.

  • For example, “In the end, cats hunt out of instinct.”

Step 7 Connect your paragraph details to the topic sentence.

  • For example, “To conclude, feral cats are more dangerous to birds than house cats because they have more hunting opportunities and kill more birds each year on average.” This sentence supports the main idea that feral cats hunt more than house cats and shows how the two details provided in the sentence link back to the topic sentence.

Step 8 Set up the next paragraph.

  • For example, your closing statement could read, “In summation, statistics show that cats who wear bell collars are less of a threat to birds because they kill fewer birds even if they have the same number of hunting opportunities.” This signals to the reader that the writer has finished with one main idea and is moving onto another in a new paragraph.

Avoiding Common Errors

Step 1 Avoid using the words “I” or “my” in your closing statement.

  • You also want to avoid the word “you.” For example, don’t say, “As you can see” in your concluding sentence.
  • There are some exceptions, such as if you’re writing an introductory paragraph or an opinion essay.

Step 2 Stay away from minor details.

  • Reread your concluding statement, then compare it to your paragraph. Do you reference one detail but not another? If it does, rewrite the sentence to address the main points, not the subpoints.

Step 3 Write a statement that serves a purpose.

  • A poor closing statement might read: “As you can see, the evidence suggests that cats like to hunt."
  • A better closing statement could read: “Based on the data, cats look for opportunities to hunt for sport, proving they are natural predators."

Expert Q&A

Diane Stubbs

  • In some cases, the concluding statements in introductions and conclusions may have a slightly different format. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Remember that your goal is to show the reader your ideas. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Focus on your main idea. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

concluding sentence for informative essay

  • Try to avoid sounding redundant. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Don’t just restate your topic sentence. Show how the details you’ve provided contribute to the main idea. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 1

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Write a Paragraph

  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/editing-and-proofreading/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/paragraphs/
  • ↑ https://openoregon.pressbooks.pub/wrd/chapter/writing-summaries/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/transitions/
  • ↑ https://lsa.umich.edu/sweetland/undergraduates/writing-guides/how-do-i-write-an-intro--conclusion----body-paragraph.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/academic_writing/essay_writing/argumentative_essays.html
  • ↑ https://owl.excelsior.edu/rhetorical-styles/compare-and-contrast-essay/
  • ↑ https://owl.excelsior.edu/rhetorical-styles/cause-and-effect-essay/
  • ↑ https://www.grammarly.com/blog/how-to-write-an-informative-essay/
  • ↑ https://wts.indiana.edu/writing-guides/paragraphs-and-topic-sentences.html
  • ↑ https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/conclusion

About This Article

Diane Stubbs

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Concluding sentence: easy writing guide.

January 21, 2021

Concluding Sentence

A concluding sentence should tie up an argument in a paragraph, essay, or paper. Unfortunately, many people make a mistake when writing essays and papers by leaving out this sentence. Others don’t even know what a conclusion sentence is and why it is important, leave alone knowing how to write it. So, let’s start by answering, what is a conclusion sentence?

What is a Concluding Sentence?

Every paragraph has a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and a concluding sentence. But, what’s a concluding sentence? Well, this is the sentence that sums up all the information that has been presented in the paragraph. It tells the readers that you’re getting to the closure of the paragraph.

Essentially, this sentence completes a paragraph while restating the main argument or idea. Conclusion sentence starters include words and phrases like “thus”, “therefore”, “resulting”, “in brief”, “hence”, and “to sum up” are often used to start this sentence.

This sentence summarizes the main argument. It also ties the paragraph without rephrasing or your topic sentence. A concluding sentence in a paragraph wraps up the entire argument while guiding the readers regarding the information that you have provided.

How to Write a Concluding Sentence

The concluding sentence definition may vary. However, this sentence should serve its purpose effectively. To achieve this, you should learn how to write a good concluding sentence. Here is a step-by-step guide on how to write a conclusion sentence.

  • Summarize Start by summarizing the paragraph’s content. Remember that this sentence should not introduce anything new to the paragraph. It should recap what you’ve shared with your readers in simple and few words. Essentially, this sentence should wrap up your main points briefly.
  • Make your sentence short The concluding sentence words should be few. However, the length of this sentence should depend on the essay or paragraph size. For instance, two lines could be sufficient for a paragraph that has ten lines. Essentially, summarize everything without losing the meaning.
  • Provide a closure In addition to summarizing a paragraph, this sentence should provide a solid closure to your readers. The importance of a solid close is less when composing a cliff-hanger only. Readers should feel at ease after reading your paper or essay. They should not be confused by the last sentence. Therefore, make sure that your sentence wraps up everything nicely.
  • Read the sentence Learning how to make a concluding sentence alone is not enough. You should also ensure that this sentence serves its purpose. Therefore, check your sentence to ensure that it mentions the chief points. It should provide a sense of summarization to the paragraph by wrapping up and summarizing all the key points. It should also rephrase the thesis statement to enhance understanding. What’s more, it should restate your topic sentence. It should represent all the findings, data, figures, materials, logic, and facts.

When learning how to write concluding sentence, bear in mind that this is a final word on the topic. As such, it should leave readers with a sense of closure or completion. This should be the clincher instead of a summary. The essential points of your write-up should be presented in your essay conclusion. What’s more, this sentence should compel readers to focus on new views regarding the topic. And most importantly, it should end on a positive note.

How to Start a Concluding Sentence

There are many ways of starting this sentence. You can learn about these ways by checking out well written concluding sentence examples. For instance, you can use these concluding sentence starters:

  • In conclusion ,
  • In general ,
  • Therefore ,

To understand how these starters can be used, check these conclusion sentence examples for essays.

Example 1 : In conclusion, marijuana may become recognized as a healing tool one day because it has more than recreational value.

Example 2 : Lastly, the widespread abuse of marijuana and its profitability should compel lawmakers to decriminalize its use in the U.S

Example 3: Therefore, marijuana should be availed to the general public due to its therapeutic benefits.

Example 4 : Clearly, a significant correlation between health risks and marijuana risks that explain why it should be decriminalized exist.

Example 5 : In general, marijuana should be legalized globally because its use is as old as the history of mankind.

The effective use of starters signals the beginning of this paragraph to the readers. It also ensures a smooth transition from the explanation of the main points to the end of the paragraph.

Concluding Sentence Transitions

You’ve probably read a good concluding sentence example and come across what seems like a transition word. Well, some of these sentences start with transition words. Here are examples of such transitions:

  • In other words ,
  • All in all ,

A writer can also include their final thought. This is very common in write-ups that do not provide a chance for writers to interject their opinion. Here is a concluding sentence essay sample that includes the final thought and a concluding statement.

In short, you can gain both stamina and muscle by following these steps though all exercise programs take time to achieve the desired results.

In this example, the writer starts the sentence with a transition, then moves on to the concluding statement before giving their opinion about the program’s results.

Useful Tips and Insights

In addition to using conclusion sentence examples, follow these tips:

  • Add a summary – Include a summary of your essay or paper in the sentence to serve as the crux of your writing. Your final thought or judgment should be supported by the summary of the main point in this sentence.
  • Call for action – This sentence should call readers to take action using an emotional and factual argument to evoke the desired response from the readers.
  • Evoke a certain image – Make sure that your sentence has an impact on the readers by painting a vivid picture. You should convey your ideas and transfer your mental image into the mind of the readers.
  • Make suggestions – Recommend beneficial changes to the surrounding and the audience.
  • Add quotations – Starting or ending your paper or essay with a quotation can create a good impression. It can also leave a lasting effect on the reader. Therefore, consider using a quotation in your conclusion.

By reading a good conclusion sentence example, you will see how the author restates their thesis or topic sentence using the right synonyms. You will also learn to wrap up the paragraph with the right words. What’s more, a good example will show you the best way to use starters and transition words to signal the beginning of this paragraph.

The purpose of the last sentence in a paragraph is to remind the audience about the discussed topic. It also sums up all the information provided in that paragraph. Although you can use a concluding sentence generator, you should learn and practice writing it. This will enable you to give every paragraph that you write a great sense of completion or closure. Writing services may also come in handy here. In short, your readers will feel that you addressed the main point to its conclusion.

concluding sentence for informative essay

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Examples of Informative Essays

Woman Typing an Essay

  • DESCRIPTION Woman Typing an Essay
  • SOURCE paulaphoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus
  • PERMISSION Used under Getty Images license

The purpose of an informative essay is to educate others on a certain topic. Typically, these essays will answer one of the five Ws: who, what, where, when, and why. Of course, they can also answer "how," indicating how to do something.

Informative essays must never express your opinion or try to convince others to take a certain action or stance. That role is expressly reserved for persuasive essays . Of course, if your informative essay is interesting enough, it may move readers to learn more about the subject, but they'll have to come to that on their own, thanks to the wealth of interesting information you present.

Read our examples of informative essays and learn more about choosing a topic and how to write an informative essay to help you get started.

Structure of an Informative Essay

The basic structure of an informative essay is very simple. It needs to have a beginning, middle, and end. These are known more formally as the introduction, body, and conclusion, respectively.

The Introduction

The beginning, otherwise known as the introduction, is your opportunity to present your thesis statement and grab the attention of the reader. Your thesis statement must be one sentence, making it very clear what the reader will be informed about.

The introduction can be anywhere from a paragraph to a page, depending on the requirements and circumstances. Use this opportunity to introduce the main idea, provide any pertinent definitions, and briefly describe what will be covered. Above all else, the introduction must clearly state what readers are about to explore. Be sure to steer clear of any evidence of your opinion on the topic.

Below, you'll find two informative essay introduction examples to help you brainstorm your own ideas.

Sample Introduction #1 : This essay discusses the topic of donating blood.

When you woke up this morning, did you think today would be the day you save a life? In fact, it's quite easy to save a life and it only takes a little bit of your time. You don't even need to be a paramedic or firefighter. All you have to do is set aside approximately one hour to donate blood. This essay will explore how to donate blood, whom it benefits, and how often you can contribute to these life-saving measures.

Sample Introduction #2: This essay explores the history of Ireland from the perspective of its iconic castles.

Ireland is a country steeped in history. In fact, its history dates beyond 3,000 B.C, when the megalithic tombs were constructed in Newgrange. Throughout the country's expansive evolution, the Irish fought time and again to maintain their independence as a sovereign nation. Evidence of the rich history is clearly visible through its many castles, including Leighlinbridge Castle and Carlow Castle, two of Ireland's oldest establishments.

The middle, otherwise known as the body, is your opportunity to expound upon the thesis statement and grab the attention of the audience with solid facts, statistics, statements , and other supporting details.

The body will be several paragraphs long, comprising the bulk of the essay. This is where you'll provide further details about the main idea. Be sure you delve deeply into every area previously outlined in the introduction.

The Conclusion

The end, otherwise known as the conclusion , is your opportunity to summarize the essay in a paragraph or two. It should spur the reader to want to learn more about the topic. Be sure to reiterate the thesis statement clearly. In your introduction, you may have laid out what would be covered in the essay. Offer a sentence or two reiterating what was learned about those topic areas.

After that, offer up a few closing remarks that gloss over the most important elements. End on a high note, encouraging your readers to learn more or contemplate the most important elements of your essay. You may even pose a rhetorical question.

Below, you'll find two sample conclusions to help you brainstorm your own ideas.

Sample Conclusion #1 : This concludes the essay example above on the topic of donating blood. Note how it emphasizes the simplicity of the process.

The process of donating blood is decidedly simple. Many folks carry out the process while reading a chapter from a new book or watching an episode of their favorite TV show. Indeed, the infinitesimal amount of time it takes to donate blood can transfer into a lifetime of happiness for the recipient. Remember to bring juice or something sugary to keep your glucose levels high at the end of the procedure. Then, hold your head up high, knowing there's a life out there that's about to be saved by you.

Sample Conclusion #2 : This conclusion to the Ireland essay example reiterates the "ferocity of its people."

If Ireland isn't an example of a rebel nation, what is? The ferocity of its people is clearly evidenced by the fact that Leighlinbridge Castle was built and rebuilt three times before it was finally sacked by the Cromwellians. Carlow Castle's staggering history earmarks Ireland's triumphant history too, starting as a mighty fortress and surviving numerous rebellions. Indeed, Ireland is a country storied in history and its many castles are the tellers of its tale.

Sample Informative Essay

In the sample below, note a few things as you read. Try to keep an eye out for the thesis statement in the first paragraph. Then, note the transition words in two of the body paragraphs. They are, "Also in line with safety…" and "In terms of fun…" Finally, in-text citations will vary, based on your teacher's style guide, so be sure to double-check those. Download the PDF version below the essay to keep as a handy reminder.

The title of the following essay is "How to Travel Solo Successfully."

James Baldwin said it best. "I met a lot of people in Europe. I even encountered myself" (Baldwin, 2014). Solo travel will not only reveal colorful new heights, it will also introduce you to yourself - your resiliency, your sense of adventure, your independence. Learning how to travel solo is as intrinsic as tying your shoes, and it is something that can be learned today. The first, most obvious, way to travel solo successfully is to research your area. The number one indicator of a tourist is someone stopped in the middle of the sidewalk scanning the GPS on their phone. According to World Travel News Report, four in fifteen tourists will be pickpocketed if they stand still on a busy street (Parker, 2019). Arrive well-informed on the area. Understand the public transportation system to the point where you can blend in as a local. Also in line with safety, you may want to splurge on accommodations. You can stay alone in a hostel, but read the reviews carefully. Make sure it is in a safe area and security is a priority for them. You might even want to consider a private room, some of which include a private bath. In terms of fun, pack for your lack of companionship. Bring a blank journal to record your adventures. Pack a paperback to enjoy while you wait out a rainstorm in a coffee shop. World traveler Samantha Byrnes says, "I never travel with friends. When I'm exploring a new continent, my journal is my only sidekick" (Byrnes, 2018). This allows her to absorb her new surroundings, make new acquaintances, and focus on the act of encountering herself. Byrnes continues, "We lost sight of ourselves in the day-to-day. We focus on work, family, to-do lists, chores. Solo travel allows us to return to ourselves so that, when we resume our day-to-day activities, we can give our all" (Byrnes, 2018). Learning how to travel solo successfully is an achievable feat. You can stay safe if you remain knowledgeable on the area and choose your accommodations wisely. Beyond that, you can experience true transformation through the simple act of carrying a tattered old journal. What do you say? Will you explore solo travel? Choose wisely, for it just might change your life forever.

Example Informative Essay

Example Informative Essay

Subject matter.

Have you been tasked with writing an informative essay? If the topic is open, the first thing you must ask yourself is, "What interests me the most?" This will make the task far less laborious. Take something you're already knowledgeable about and share it with the world, citing other sources and stating current facts and statistics.

This is your chance to add to others' viewpoints on a subject as long as you don't include your own opinions. Allow them to analyze the data, perhaps in a cause and effect layout. Or, you can educate them on how to do something, create something, or solve a problem.

Here are some examples of informative essay topics to get your creative juices flowing:

  • How to open a bank account
  • World poverty
  • Procrastination and its effects
  • Homelessness
  • Air pollution
  • Dream interpretation
  • History of women's right to vote
  • Foreign cultures
  • U.S. stock market
  • Biographies
  • Architecture in Paris
  • History of the Titanic

Example Essay Titles

While your introduction must be carefully crafted in order to reel readers in, your essay title is the first thing they encounter, and it needs to be enticing. Formulate a clear title, indicating what's about to be discussed. Find a way to invite others to want to learn more. Remember to follow these rules for capitalization in titles .

Here are some possible titles for inspiration:

  • How to Donate Blood
  • A Brief History of Ireland
  • Understanding the Link Between Cholesterol and Heart Disease
  • How to Buy a House
  • Understanding Your Credit Score
  • Defining Poverty in the City of Chicago
  • The Health Benefits of a Vegetarian Diet
  • The Importance of Regular Daily Exercise
  • Top Three Causes of Global Warming
  • Reducing Carbon Emissions With Alternative Fuels
  • The Many Cost Savings of Hybrid Vehicles
  • Understanding Geothermal Heating and Cooling
  • Why Cleaning Your Air Ducts Is Important
  • Qualifications for Contractors
  • How to Get a Commercial Driver's License

Essay Writing Steps

Most of the work on an informative essay is done before you actually sit down to type.

  • Select an appropriate topic.
  • Research and gather ideas about the subject. See what you already know about the subject as you uncover other areas you still need to research.
  • Make a list of these important facts. Be sure all the facts are accurate. This is a good time to craft your thesis statement as well as a topic sentence for each fact you'd like to include.
  • Create an outline that will organize your facts in a logical way. After this, you'll be ready to make your first draft.
  • Write your essay based on the outline you've created. Ensure that one section naturally flows into the next.
  • Proofread and edit your work. Editing is an important step for any writing project. Reading your essay out loud will help you notice areas where your writing may be unclear or awkwardly worded.

If possible, have someone else read your essay and offer their ideas for improvement. Of course, don't forget to pay attention to grammar, punctuation, spelling, capitalization, and other errors as well.

Knowledge Is Power

An informative essay is the best way to explain something complicated - in an uncomplicated way. Even though you're (hopefully) writing on a topic of interest to you, be sure to back up each claim with substantial facts and statistics. Let the content speak for itself, inviting readers to learn more.

Informative essays are powerful, persuasive essays are moving, but have you ever been tasked with a narrative essay? Enjoy the wonders of this third form of essay writing in Narrative Essay Examples and let the endless exchange of knowledge begin!

EL Education Curriculum

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  • ELA G3:M2:U3:L7

Writing Informational Texts: Writing a Conclusion about My Freaky Frog

In this lesson, daily learning targets, ongoing assessment.

  • Technology and Multimedia

Supporting English Language Learners

Universal design for learning, closing & assessments, you are here:.

  • ELA Grade 3
  • ELA G3:M2:U3

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.3.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • W.3.2d: Provide a concluding statement or section.
  • W.3.4: With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.
  • W.3.6: With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • W.3.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • I can write a conclusion to effectively close my informative essay about a freaky frog. ( W.3.2d , W.3.4 , W.3.6 , W.3.10 )
  • I can create a contents page for my Freaky Frog book. ( W.3.4 , W.3.10 )
  • Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog: Conclusion ( W.3.2d , W.3.4 , W.3.6 , W.3.10 )
  • Freaky Frog book: Contents Page ( W.3.4 , W.3.10 )
  • Prepare any necessary informal checklists.
  • Locate three informational texts with contents pages.
  • Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the questions and goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet your students' needs.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: Students use word-processing tools to write their informative essays. See the Unit 3 Overview for suggested word-processing tools.
  • Work Time B: Students could word-process their contents page or type straight into an online book using sites such as My Storybook .

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 3.I.A.2, 3.I.C.10, 3.I.C.12, 3.II.A.1, 3.II.A.2.

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs in coming full circle on an essay. Help students celebrate completing the first full draft of their freaky frog informative essay. For ELLs, this may be a moment to be especially proud, as they have completed the task in English, a language they may struggle with.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to "let go" of their draft. The language in their text may not be complete or always correct, so encourage the class to celebrate the overall communication and knowledge of freaky frog adaptations. Also, students have limited work time to finish their conclusions before moving on to writing their contents page. This may be a difficult transition. Encourage students and let them know that writing takes time and that they have learned and improved a lot even if they do not feel finished. Acknowledge that ELLs not only possess a lot of content knowledge, but they are also able to communicate about it in at least two languages. "Fantastic!"

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • In Work Time A, provide shorter sentence frames during the close read and during the Closing and Assessment. Examples: "In summary, the _____frog has _____. Two of them are _____. However, _____. This will prompt language while requiring students to generate more of their own syntax and content. Alternatively, invite students to write the sentence frames for students who need heavier support.
  • Reinforce vocabulary and collocations that students need to use to show knowledge about the topic, e.g., adaptation , transparent from beneath , transparent skin , rain forest canopy . Invite students to play a guessing game in which one student defines or explains a word from the Word Wall or vocabulary log while another student tries to guess the word. Alternatively, underline words in the student's text that could be replaced with a more precise word and invite the student to revise.

For heavier support:

  • To kinesthetically familiarize students with the function of the contents page, copy the contents page of Everything You Need to Know About Frogs and use a paper trimmer to quickly cut out each entry without the page number. Shuffle the resulting strips. Copy random pages of information from Everything You Need to Know About Frogs . Give the contents strips to half of the students and the pages to the other half. Invite the students with the content strips to find the student who has the matching page.
  • To build schema around the concept of a conclusion, read a quick story but omit the ending. When the students notice that the story was not finished, explain that it is just as frustrating when an informative essay does not have an ending. That is why conclusions are so important.
  • Review academic vocabulary and essay structure as needed.
  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Continue to support students as they generalize skills that they learned from the previous session in order to set themselves up for success during independent writing.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): During Work Time A, students will be asked to offer suggestions to improve a partner's writing. Giving feedback is a skill that takes practice. Consider modeling this skill in advance or offering sentence frames for students to use that are connected to the Informative Writing Checklist.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Continue to provide prompts and sentences frames for those students who require them to be successful in peer interactions and collaboration. Also support students in sustaining effort and/or attention by restating the goal of each activity.

Key:  Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

  • effectively (L)
  • Verbs I and Verbs II (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Poison Dart Frog Model (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Language Dive Guide: Conclusion Sentence (for teacher reference)
  • Language Dive Sentence strip chunks: Conclusion Sentence (for display; see supporting materials)
  • Language Dive Note-catcher: Conclusion Sentence (one per student and one to display)
  • Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog (begun in Lesson 4; one per student)
  • Informational Writing Planning graphic organizer (from Lesson 3, one per student)
  • Informative Writing Checklist (from Lesson 3; one per student)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Domain-Specific Word Wall (started in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Performance Task anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Everything You Need to Know about Frogs and Other Slippery Creatures (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; book; one per student)
  • Selection of informational texts (three for display; see Teaching Notes)
  • Contents template (optional; see Teaching Notes)
  • Blank paper (one piece per student)
  • Scrap paper (one piece per student)

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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Enago Academy

Academic Essay Writing Made Simple: 4 types and tips

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The pen is mightier than the sword, they say, and nowhere is this more evident than in academia. From the quick scribbles of eager students to the inquisitive thoughts of renowned scholars, academic essays depict the power of the written word. These well-crafted writings propel ideas forward and expand the existing boundaries of human intellect.

What is an Academic Essay

An academic essay is a nonfictional piece of writing that analyzes and evaluates an argument around a specific topic or research question. It serves as a medium to share the author’s views and is also used by institutions to assess the critical thinking, research skills, and writing abilities of a students and researchers.  

Importance of Academic Essays

4 main types of academic essays.

While academic essays may vary in length, style, and purpose, they generally fall into four main categories. Despite their differences, these essay types share a common goal: to convey information, insights, and perspectives effectively.

1. Expository Essay

2. Descriptive Essay

3. Narrative Essay

4. Argumentative Essay

Expository and persuasive essays mainly deal with facts to explain ideas clearly. Narrative and descriptive essays are informal and have a creative edge. Despite their differences, these essay types share a common goal ― to convey information, insights, and perspectives effectively.

Expository Essays: Illuminating ideas

An expository essay is a type of academic writing that explains, illustrates, or clarifies a particular subject or idea. Its primary purpose is to inform the reader by presenting a comprehensive and objective analysis of a topic.

By breaking down complex topics into digestible pieces and providing relevant examples and explanations, expository essays allow writers to share their knowledge.

What are the Key Features of an Expository Essay

concluding sentence for informative essay

Provides factual information without bias

concluding sentence for informative essay

Presents multiple viewpoints while maintaining objectivity

concluding sentence for informative essay

Uses direct and concise language to ensure clarity for the reader

concluding sentence for informative essay

Composed of a logical structure with an introduction, body paragraphs and a conclusion

When is an expository essay written.

1. For academic assignments to evaluate the understanding of research skills.

2. As instructional content to provide step-by-step guidance for tasks or problem-solving.

3. In journalism for objective reporting in news or investigative pieces.

4. As a form of communication in the professional field to convey factual information in business or healthcare.

How to Write an Expository Essay

Expository essays are typically structured in a logical and organized manner.

1. Topic Selection and Research

  • Choose a topic that can be explored objectively
  • Gather relevant facts and information from credible sources
  • Develop a clear thesis statement

2. Outline and Structure

  • Create an outline with an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion
  • Introduce the topic and state the thesis in the introduction
  • Dedicate each body paragraph to a specific point supporting the thesis
  • Use transitions to maintain a logical flow

3. Objective and Informative Writing

  • Maintain an impartial and informative tone
  • Avoid personal opinions or biases
  • Support points with factual evidence, examples, and explanations

4. Conclusion

  • Summarize the key points
  • Reinforce the significance of the thesis

Descriptive Essays: Painting with words

Descriptive essays transport readers into vivid scenes, allowing them to experience the world through the writer ‘s lens. These essays use rich sensory details, metaphors, and figurative language to create a vivid and immersive experience . Its primary purpose is to engage readers’ senses and imagination.

It allows writers to demonstrate their ability to observe and describe subjects with precision and creativity.

What are the Key Features of Descriptive Essay

concluding sentence for informative essay

Employs figurative language and imagery to paint a vivid picture for the reader

concluding sentence for informative essay

Demonstrates creativity and expressiveness in narration

concluding sentence for informative essay

Includes close attention to detail, engaging the reader’s senses

concluding sentence for informative essay

Engages the reader’s imagination and emotions through immersive storytelling using analogies, metaphors, similes, etc.

When is a descriptive essay written.

1. Personal narratives or memoirs that describe significant events, people, or places.

2. Travel writing to capture the essence of a destination or experience.

3. Character sketches in fiction writing to introduce and describe characters.

4. Poetry or literary analyses to explore the use of descriptive language and imagery.

How to Write a Descriptive Essay

The descriptive essay lacks a defined structural requirement but typically includes: an introduction introducing the subject, a thorough description, and a concluding summary with insightful reflection.

1. Subject Selection and Observation

  • Choose a subject (person, place, object, or experience) to describe
  • Gather sensory details and observations

2. Engaging Introduction

  • Set the scene and provide the context
  • Use of descriptive language and figurative techniques

3. Descriptive Body Paragraphs

  • Focus on specific aspects or details of the subject
  • Engage the reader ’s senses with vivid imagery and descriptions
  • Maintain a consistent tone and viewpoint

4. Impactful Conclusion

  • Provide a final impression or insight
  • Leave a lasting impact on the reader

Narrative Essays: Storytelling in Action

Narrative essays are personal accounts that tell a story, often drawing from the writer’s own experiences or observations. These essays rely on a well-structured plot, character development, and vivid descriptions to engage readers and convey a deeper meaning or lesson.

What are the Key features of Narrative Essays

concluding sentence for informative essay

Written from a first-person perspective and hence subjective

concluding sentence for informative essay

Based on real personal experiences

concluding sentence for informative essay

Uses an informal and expressive tone

concluding sentence for informative essay

Presents events and characters in sequential order

When is a narrative essay written.

It is commonly assigned in high school and college writing courses to assess a student’s ability to convey a meaningful message or lesson through a personal narrative. They are written in situations where a personal experience or story needs to be recounted, such as:

1. Reflective essays on significant life events or personal growth.

2. Autobiographical writing to share one’s life story or experiences.

3. Creative writing exercises to practice narrative techniques and character development.

4. College application essays to showcase personal qualities and experiences.

How to Write a Narrative Essay

Narrative essays typically follow a chronological structure, with an introduction that sets the scene, a body that develops the plot and characters, and a conclusion that provides a sense of resolution or lesson learned.

1. Experience Selection and Reflection

  • Choose a significant personal experience or event
  • Reflect on the impact and deeper meaning

2. Immersive Introduction

  • Introduce characters and establish the tone and point of view

3. Plotline and Character Development

  • Advance   the  plot and character development through body paragraphs
  • Incorporate dialog , conflict, and resolution
  • Maintain a logical and chronological flow

4. Insightful Conclusion

  • Reflect on lessons learned or insights gained
  • Leave the reader with a lasting impression

Argumentative Essays: Persuasion and Critical Thinking

Argumentative essays are the quintessential form of academic writing in which writers present a clear thesis and support it with well-researched evidence and logical reasoning. These essays require a deep understanding of the topic, critical analysis of multiple perspectives, and the ability to construct a compelling argument.

What are the Key Features of an Argumentative Essay?

concluding sentence for informative essay

Logical and well-structured arguments

concluding sentence for informative essay

Credible and relevant evidence from reputable sources

concluding sentence for informative essay

Consideration and refutation of counterarguments

concluding sentence for informative essay

Critical analysis and evaluation of the issue 

When is an argumentative essay written.

Argumentative essays are written to present a clear argument or stance on a particular issue or topic. In academic settings they are used to develop critical thinking, research, and persuasive writing skills. However, argumentative essays can also be written in various other contexts, such as:

1. Opinion pieces or editorials in newspapers, magazines, or online publications.

2. Policy proposals or position papers in government, nonprofit, or advocacy settings.

3. Persuasive speeches or debates in academic, professional, or competitive environments.

4. Marketing or advertising materials to promote a product, service, or idea.

How to write an Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays begin with an introduction that states the thesis and provides context. The body paragraphs develop the argument with evidence, address counterarguments, and use logical reasoning. The conclusion restates the main argument and makes a final persuasive appeal.

  • Choose a debatable and controversial issue
  • Conduct thorough research and gather evidence and counterarguments

2. Thesis and Introduction

  • Craft a clear and concise thesis statement
  • Provide background information and establish importance

3. Structured Body Paragraphs

  • Focus each paragraph on a specific aspect of the argument
  • Support with logical reasoning, factual evidence, and refutation

4. Persuasive Techniques

  • Adopt a formal and objective tone
  • Use persuasive techniques (rhetorical questions, analogies, appeals)

5. Impactful Conclusion

  • Summarize the main points
  • Leave the reader with a strong final impression and call to action

To learn more about argumentative essay, check out this article .

5 Quick Tips for Researchers to Improve Academic Essay Writing Skills

concluding sentence for informative essay

Use clear and concise language to convey ideas effectively without unnecessary words

concluding sentence for informative essay

Use well-researched, credible sources to substantiate your arguments with data, expert opinions, and scholarly references

concluding sentence for informative essay

Ensure a coherent structure with effective transitions, clear topic sentences, and a logical flow to enhance readability 

concluding sentence for informative essay

To elevate your academic essay, consider submitting your draft to a community-based platform like Open Platform  for editorial review 

concluding sentence for informative essay

Review your work multiple times for clarity, coherence, and adherence to academic guidelines to ensure a polished final product

By mastering the art of academic essay writing, researchers and scholars can effectively communicate their ideas, contribute to the advancement of knowledge, and engage in meaningful scholarly discourse.

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Best Ways To Increase Word Count in an Essay

Best Ways To Increase Word Count in an Essay

  • Smodin Editorial Team
  • Published: May 23, 2024

Are you writing a homework essay and struggling to meet the minimum word count requirements? Or maybe you’re finding it challenging to add substance without sacrificing quality.

In this guide, we’ll cover simple strategies to increase word count in an essay while also improving the quality of your writing. These methods include using AI tools like Smodin, refining your paraphrasing, and mastering sentences.

1. Use AI Writing Tools

Using AI writing tools can help make your essay longer. These tools can provide assistants in various ways:

  • AI tools like Smodin can analyze your text. They suggest alternatives, letting you expand on ideas without harming your writing.
  • AI tools can help you find chances to break up or combine sentences. This will increase the required word count while keeping things clear and flowing.
  • These tools can recommend synonyms. They replace generic terms, adding depth to your essay.
  • AI writing assistants, like Smodin Writer , can give tailored suggestions based on your essay’s topic and tone. They ensure your desired word count increases and fits your writing goals.

Adding AI writing tools to your essay-crafting process can be a powerful way to boost your word count easily. They can also improve the quality of your work.

2. Write Short Stories

Adding stories to your essay is a compelling way to add words and engage your readers, especially when it comes to creative writing. Here’s how you can effectively utilize storytelling:

  • Add anecdotes : They give context and detail to your points while adding extra words.
  • Develop vivid characters and scenarios : Use them to illustrate your ideas and add depth to your writing.
  • Use vivid language to paint a picture for your readers : It will immerse readers in the story while increasing your word count.
  • Use emotional appeal : Connect with your reader through stories. The stories should evoke feelings and resonate with their experiences.

Weaving stories into your essay boosts word count. It also makes your content more engaging and memorable. Consider using AI tools like Smodin. They can refine your storytelling and improve your narrative flow.

3. Expand Paragraphs

Expanding paragraphs is a strategic approach. It will increase the word count and improve the depth and coherence of your essay. Here are key tactics to effectively expand your paragraphs:

  • Add detail and explanation to your main points : This will make your writing more substantial and longer.
  • Eliminate filler words : As you expand, watch for words that do not add meaning which will negatively affect your essay length.
  • Strengthen body paragraphs : Develop your body paragraphs by connecting ideas logically and cohesively.
  • Use transitional phrases : These help you move between ideas and paragraphs. They keep your essay flowing and positively increase the word count.

By expanding your paragraphs carefully, you can boost your word count. This will enrich your writing’s quality and structure. AI tools, like Smodin, can help here, too. They will streamline and improve how you expand paragraphs.

4. Add Examples

Adding examples to your essay is a powerful way to support your arguments. It also makes your writing more engaging. Here are some strategies for effectively incorporating examples into your writing:

  • Use relevant examples : They must relate to the topic and support your arguments. Avoid using examples that are unrelated or confusing.
  • Use many examples : They can emphasize different parts of your argument and make your writing more complete.
  • Use examples from different sources : They give a full view of the topic. They show your skill at analyzing and evaluating diverse views.
  • Use examples to contrast and compare : Using examples to contrast and compare ideas can highlight their strengths and weaknesses. It can provide a more nuanced understanding of the topic.
  • Use examples to clarify complex concepts : They can make concepts easier to understand.

Adding examples to your essay provides evidence to back your arguments. It also makes your writing more engaging and persuasive.

5. Clarify Sentences

When aiming to increase your essay’s word count, clear sentences are crucial. They add substance and depth to your writing. Here are key strategies to enhance clarity and expand your content effectively:

  • Provide more detail : Elaborate on key points by adding more detail and examples to enrich your explanations.
  • Use descriptive language : It illustrates concepts and engages readers deeply.
  • Clarify your statements : Make them clear and short. Avoid ambiguity and complexity.
  • Emphasize the key points : Do this to reinforce your arguments and provide a full understanding.
  • Add more depth : Dive deeper into topics by exploring various angles and perspectives to enrich your analysis and clarify statements.
  • Avoid unnecessary information : Trim away details that do not matter or add to the main ideas. This keeps your writing clear.

These strategies will help you clarify your sentences and add depth to your content. They will also increase the word count while keeping your essay relevant and coherent.

6. Use Quotations

Using quotes in your essay can boost word count and add credibility and depth to your arguments. Here are some effective ways to use quotations in your writing:

  • Use quotes from quality sources : They will give solid evidence for your claims.
  • Adding authority : Quotes from experts or well-known figures can add a sense of authority to your writing and boost the validity of your arguments.
  • Emphasizing key points: Similar to using examples, quotations can be used to highlight key ideas or perspectives that align with your argument.
  • Provide different viewpoints : Integrate quotes with diverse viewpoints. They enrich the discussion and show a complete understanding of the topic.
  • Use quotes strategically : They will strengthen your argument and persuade your readers.
  • Cite relevant quotes : Remember to cite quotes correctly as per your school or university’s guidelines.

By skillfully using quotes, you can improve your writing, increase your word count, and enrich your essay with valuable insights and perspectives.

7. Expand the Introduction and Conclusion

The intro and conclusion of your essay are crucial. By expanding these sections, you can boost your word count and strengthen the coherence and impact of your writing.

Expanding the introduction:

  • Provide more detail : Start your essay with a more detailed and engaging hook to capture your reader’s attention.
  • Introduce the topic thoroughly : Spend more time setting the context and giving background on it.
  • Connect ideas : Make clear connections between your introduction and the body of your essay. This ensures a smooth transition.
  • Show off your writing : The introduction sets the tone for the whole essay. Aim to showcase your writing skills from the very first sentence well.
  • Write the introduction last : While this may seem like a backward approach, it’s the best way to ensure you include all the necessary details in your intro.

Expanding the conclusion:

  • Revisit key points : Summarize the main arguments and ideas from your essay. Give a full recap for your readers.
  • Offer more insights : Explore the broader meaning of your topic. Or suggest new research and discussion topics.
  • Tie your conclusion to the introduction : This will create a cohesive essay.
  • Write with intention : Invest time crafting a thoughtful conclusion. Make it impactful to leave a lasting impression on your professor or teacher.

By adding to your introduction and conclusion, you can increase your essay’s word count. You will also improve the structure, coherence, and impact of your writing.

8. Add Transition Phrases

As mentioned, adding transition phrases to your school or college essay is a strategic way to increase your word count. It also improves the flow and coherence of your writing. These phrases act as bridges between ideas. They help your readers navigate your essay smoothly.

Here are some effective ways to utilize transition phrases to boost your word count:

  • Use transition words and phrases to connect your ideas. Do this for both paragraphs and sections. It will make your essay cohesive and well-structured.
  • Use a variety of transitions. Try a range of phrases, such as “in addition,” “furthermore,” “on the other hand,” and “in conclusion.” They will add depth and complexity to your writing.
  • Ensure the phrases you use are right for the context. They should guide your readers through your arguments well.

By adding transition phrases to your essay, you can increase your word count. This will also improve the clarity, flow, and coherence of your writing.

Let Smodin Boost Your Word Count

Learning to increase word count in essays is not just about quantity. It’s also about improving the quality and impact of your writing.

These techniques will change your own writing process and help you write essays and research papers that resonate with your professors and teachers, no matter how many words you need.

Platforms like Smodin use AI to offer a simple solution to essay writing. They help you increase your word count easily. Here’s how Smodin can help you:

  • Smodin uses AI to analyze your text and suggests ways to add words in addition to removing unnecessary words.
  • Smodin can help with paraphrasing. It can also add depth and length to sentences.
  • Use Smodin to improve your writing. It gives suggestions on grammar and style.
  • Tailored recommendations to suit your specific writing needs and goals.

Explore Smodin’s services today to improve your writing.

IMAGES

  1. Best Tips and Help on How to Write a Conclusion for Your Essay

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  2. How To Write a Conclusion for an Essay: Expert Tips and Examples

    concluding sentence for informative essay

  3. How to Write a Conclusion of an Informative Essay

    concluding sentence for informative essay

  4. 3 Ways to Write a Concluding Paragraph for a Persuasive Essay

    concluding sentence for informative essay

  5. How To Write A Conclusion Statement For An Essay

    concluding sentence for informative essay

  6. How to Teach Paragraph Writing

    concluding sentence for informative essay

VIDEO

  1. Great Writing 4

  2. 3.1 Informative Essay Speech Communiction

  3. Supporting Sentence Concluding sentence

  4. Concluding Sentence for Cause and Effect Paragraph

  5. Great Writing 4

  6. How to write a paragraph.Part three.Introducing and concluding sentence.Urdu/Hindi

COMMENTS

  1. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis. To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis.

  2. Ending the Essay: Conclusions

    Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay: Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long--more than ten pages or so. But shorter essays tend not to require a restatement of your main ideas. Avoid phrases like "in conclusion," "to conclude," "in summary," and "to sum up ...

  3. How to Close an Informative Essay

    Closing an informative essay is just as important as opening it because it is the last thing your reader will read about the topic. To write an effective conclusion, summarize the essay's content and restate the thesis in an interesting way. ... Finally, wrap up your conclusion with an authoritative sentence that effectively summarizes the ...

  4. How to Write a Conclusion: Full Writing Guide with Examples

    These three key elements make up a perfect essay conclusion. Now, to give you an even better idea of how to create a perfect conclusion, let us give you a sample conclusion paragraph outline with examples from an argumentative essay on the topic of "Every Child Should Own a Pet: Sentence 1: Starter.

  5. Writing an Informative Essay

    Writing an Informative Essay Informative essays engage readers with new, interesting, and often surprising facts and details about a subject. Informative essays are educational; readers expect to learn something new from them. ... Next, add more information or provide a concluding sentence or two. D. Write down the library sources you can use ...

  6. How to Write a Conclusion of an Informative Essay

    It will influence the final impression of your work. Make your conclusion short and sweet, no longer than 5-7 sentences in length. Conclusion of an Informative Essay. Informative essay conclusions need to relate to the information in your previous paragraphs. As a writer, you have three steps to do that: Restate thesis statement; Restate main ideas

  7. How to Write an Essay Conclusion

    1. Return to Your Thesis. Similar to how an introduction should capture your reader's interest and present your argument, a conclusion should show why your argument matters and leave the reader with further curiosity about the topic. To do this, you should begin by reminding the reader of your thesis statement.

  8. Conclusions

    Highlight the "so what". At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what's at stake—why they should care about the argument you're making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put ...

  9. Writing an Informative Essay

    A well-written informative essay should include an introduction (hook, bridge, thesis), a body (topic sentence, research, explanation), and a conclusion (reframed thesis and call to action). While ...

  10. How to Write an Informative Essay Guide

    Concluding Sentence. You should always finish a body paragraph with a concluding sentence that ties up the paragraph nicely and prompts the reader on to the next stage. This is a signpost that the topic and the paragraph are wrapped up. ... How to Write the Conclusion of an Informative Essay. Writing a conclusion to an informative paper can be ...

  11. Informative Essay

    Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence, evidence, explanation of evidence, and a transition sentence. Informative essay body paragraphs. ... Incorporate a rephrased thesis, summary, and closing statement into the conclusion of an informative essay. Rephrase the purpose of the essay. Do not just repeat the purpose statement from the ...

  12. 5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

    Overall, It Can Be Said…. To recap an idea at the end of a critical or descriptive essay, you can use this phrase at the beginning of the concluding paragraph. "Overall" means "taking everything into account," and it sums up your essay in a formal way. You can use "overall" on its own as a transition signal, or you can use it as ...

  13. How to End an Essay: Writing a Strong Conclusion

    End your essay with a call to action, warning, or image to make your argument meaningful. Keep your conclusion concise and to the point, so you don't lose a reader's attention. Do your best to avoid adding new information to your conclusion and only emphasize points you've already made in your essay. Method 1.

  14. Essay Conclusions

    The conclusion is a very important part of your essay. Although it is sometimes treated as a roundup of all of the bits that didn't fit into the paper earlier, it deserves better treatment than that! It's the last thing the reader will see, so it tends to stick in the reader's memory. It's also a great place to remind the reader exactly why ...

  15. 17 Essay Conclusion Examples (Copy and Paste)

    Essay Conclusion Examples. Below is a range of copy-and-paste essay conclusions with gaps for you to fill-in your topic and key arguments. Browse through for one you like (there are 17 for argumentative, expository, compare and contrast, and critical essays). Once you've found one you like, copy it and add-in the key points to make it your own.

  16. How to Conclude a Paragraph: 14 Steps (with Pictures)

    Closing or concluding sentences act like a concluding paragraph in an essay and review the points you made in the paragraph. To effectively conclude a paragraph, restate your topic sentence and include what you taught the reader. Tailor the sentence to the type of essay you're writing, whether it's a persuasive or compare and contrast essay.

  17. How To Write A Concluding Sentence (With Examples)

    Essentially, this sentence completes a paragraph while restating the main argument or idea. Conclusion sentence starters include words and phrases like "thus", "therefore", "resulting", "in brief", "hence", and "to sum up" are often used to start this sentence. This sentence summarizes the main argument. It also ties the ...

  18. Conclusion Examples: Strong Endings for Any Paper

    See how to write a good conclusion for a project, essay or paper to get the grade. Strong conclusion examples pave the way for the perfect paper ending. See how to write a good conclusion for a project, essay or paper to get the grade. ... It could end up being the five or so sentences that a reader carries with them forever. Now that you've ...

  19. Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs

    If you're looking for good conclusion starters to finish your piece strongly, look no further. ... Essays; Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs By Mary Gormandy White, M.A. , Staff ... Review some examples of good conclusion sentence starters so you'll be able to craft appropriate endings of your own.

  20. Examples of Informative Essays

    Informative essays must be educational and objective. Follow a guide to structuring one, download a sample essay, or pick a topic from our list of examples.

  21. Writing Informational Texts: Writing a Conclusion about ...

    In this lesson, students write a conclusion for their informative essay about a freaky frog (W.3.2d). Then they generate a contents page for their Freaky Frog book based on their writing over the course of the module. ... Language Dive Note-catcher: Conclusion Sentence (one per student and one to display) Informative Essay about a Freaky Frog ...

  22. TOUCHSTONE 2.2 Informative Essay Draft English ...

    Includes all of the required components of an essay, including an introduction with a thesis; an adequate number of body paragraphs (3-6), each with a topic sentence; and a conclusion with a concluding statement; however, some components may be ineffective; the sequence of sentences and paragraphs is somewhat logical, and may lack good flow.

  23. Types of Essays in Academic Writing

    4. College application essays to showcase personal qualities and experiences. How to Write a Narrative Essay. Narrative essays typically follow a chronological structure, with an introduction that sets the scene, a body that develops the plot and characters, and a conclusion that provides a sense of resolution or lesson learned. 1.

  24. Best Ways To Increase Word Count in an Essay

    Adding examples to your essay provides evidence to back your arguments. It also makes your writing more engaging and persuasive. 5. Clarify Sentences. When aiming to increase your essay's word count, clear sentences are crucial. They add substance and depth to your writing. Here are key strategies to enhance clarity and expand your content ...