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Georgetown University 2023-24 Essay Prompt Guide

Regular Decision Deadline: Jan 10

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Georgetown 2023-24 Application Essay Question Explanations

The Requirements: 1 essay of 250 words; 1 half-page essay; 2 page-long essays

Supplemental Essay Type(s):  Activity , Why, Diversity

Prompt 1: Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you would like to highlight. (250 words)

This prompt may come first on the list, but we think you should save it for last! For the other essays on the Georgetown application, we ask you to dig deep and share personal stories that showcase talents and interests. Don’t dry the well by listing all of your (many!) skills and talents too soon. Every essay should reveal something new to admissions. So once you finish polishing your other pieces, ask yourself: what’s missing? Is there some critical puzzle piece that will help connect your other three essays? Or have you been dying to get something off your chest that didn’t fit anywhere else? This essay could be the perfect outlet for you to showcase your more personal skills, interests, and quirks. If the rest of your essays showcase your drive to work in international relations, perhaps your answer to this prompt could showcase a lighter side: your love of experimental cooking (and impressive knife skills!). Or maybe explain how learning a new language helped you learn how to whistle! While you should aim to showcase genuine skills that you have put effort into cultivating, you can also have a little bit of fun. This prompt is the most open-ended one on the application, so show admissions something they won’t find anywhere else on your application.

Prompt 2: Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced) 

Next up is a fun twist on the classic activity essay, which asks you to expand on an extracurricular endeavor that you care about. For starters, we’d give you basically the same advice the prompt does: focus on one of the activities “in which you have been most involved.” Although we usually urge students to write about items that haven’t appeared elsewhere on their application, the activity essay is an exception since it specifically asks you to address an item on your resume. So, pick something with meat! When have you had the opportunity to take on a leadership role? How has four years of debate club shaped the way you communicate? Was it difficult coaching pee wee soccer as a freshman, and what motivated you to stick with it?

Prompt 3: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

Though it seems straightforward, this may be one of the hardest prompts! (What do you mean, tell you about myself in my own words?) Don’t fret. You can treat this essay just like the Common App’s prompt #1 , which asks students to write about a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. (Even better: if you’ve already written an essay in response to the Common App’s first prompt, you can recycle that essay here since Georgetown has its own application platform!)

If you’re approaching this essay from scratch, take some time to brainstorm. What about your background, talents, or identity might be worth highlighting for an admissions officer? Don’t worry about cramming every aspect of the wonder that is you into one essay; they will naturally reveal themselves along the way as you write. Whether you want to write about a facet of your identity that few people know about or a passion you’ve been dabbling in (and telling everyone about) for years, you can’t go wrong with authentic reflection and an engaging hook!

Georgetown University School-Specific Prompts.

(each school-specific prompt should not exceed 1 page, single-spaced), georgetown college of arts and sciences: a liberal arts education from the college of arts & sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.).

Admissions wants to learn about a time when your mind was changed. If you’re an active reader or information seeker, you probably have a few ideas already. But if nothing comes to mind immediately, don’t panic; instead, think about the times in your life when you’ve had an “Aha!” moment that forced you to drastically re-examine one of your beliefs or understandings. Admissions wants to know that you are open to new ideas and can reflect in order to see things from a different perspective. As you tell your story, include sensory details to bring your experience to life, whether you’re sitting in the back of a classroom, head in your hands, trying to wrap your brain around the truth-bomb your teacher just dropped; or curled up in a blanket by the fireplace with your nose in a gripping book. If you’re deciding between “Aha!” moments to write about, pick the one most closely related to your intended field of study. Applicants who can articulate their thoughts and feelings while showcasing malleability and a willingness to thoughtfully consider new ideas will likely stand out as valuable additions to the Georgetown community. 

School of Health: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care at Georgetown University. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science).

If we know anything about applying to medical programs, it is this: everyone wants to help people; everyone wants to make the world a better place; everyone wants to make a meaningful contribution. Few fields lend themselves to service-oriented clichés and platitudes as readily as medicine does, so to safely navigate the minefield of hackneyed generalizations, start with something personal! What’s one eye-opening experience that made you believe healthcare could be your calling? Perhaps it was a single moment, like accidental eye contact with a concerned mother at the ER. Or maybe it was something more long-term, such as navigating your school in a wheelchair after knee surgery and realizing you want to improve patient outcomes through researching physical therapies. Whatever the case, use your personal story as the backdrop for your argument. What did you learn? What problems do you hope to tackle? What change do you hope to help create? As we said, it’s not enough to just want these things; your job is to show admissions why medicine interests you personally. Once you’ve accomplished that, be sure to address the role Georgetown will play in your plan for the future. In other words, why do you want to study healthcare at Georgetown in particular? Do they have a research lab that’s at the forefront of innovation? A wise applicant will do some research so they can infuse their response with specific details that demonstrate meticulousness and drive.

School of Nursing: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying your intended major, Nursing.

Well, this is about as straightforward as prompts get! Our advice is much the same as it is for students applying to the School of Health (see above). Set yourself apart from other applicants by not only discussing the factors that led you to pursuing a career in nursing, but by also connecting those experiences to your larger goals for the future. If there are elements of a Georgetown education that will support your particular interest or connect to your past experiences in some way, you should dig into that in your response, while also revealing new information to admissions about your character, motivations, and aspirations.

Walsh School of Foreign Service: The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

The Walsh School of Foreign Service wants to know what fuels your fire. What is driving you to dedicate your undergraduate studies (and maybe even your life!) to a path of service? Maybe you are incredibly passionate about combating climate change before it’s too late. What do you hope to achieve and how? Perhaps you’re following in the footsteps of a trailblazer you look up to—how do you hope to continue fighting the good fight in their honor? If you’re feeling stuck, ask yourself: what kind of mark would you like to leave on the world? How do you think you can positively contribute to a cause that is important to you? If you had the power to make a lasting impact in any area at all, what would it be? While building the personal connection is key, you’ll also want to leave yourself some space to spell out at least a few steps you might take to address your global issue of choice.

McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

If you think we’ve never seen an essay with the line, “I love money,” you would be wrong. Spoiler: this does not make a great first impression. Studying business is about so much more than dollars and cents, and the prompt offers a few other aspects of business you’ll learn about in this program including “ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives.” In order to get some perspective, we’d recommend doing your homework. Like any classic why essay, the best answers are personal and specific, so go beyond your general interest in business and try to figure out specifically why Georgetown could be the right fit for you. Is it the location? The professors? The travel opportunities? Allow yourself to follow every lead and fall down every rabbit hole as you root through the program website. Your essay should paint a picture of the kind of student you will be at Georgetown, from the classes you’ll take to the activities you’ll pursue. How will this education prepare you for your dream career?

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georgetown university application essay questions

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Georgetown university.

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Want to see your chances of admission at Georgetown University?

We take every aspect of your personal profile into consideration when calculating your admissions chances.

Georgetown University’s 2023-24 Essay Prompts

Extracurricular essay.

Briefly (approximately one-half page, single-spaced) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

Personal Statement Essay

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents.

Select-A-Prompt Essay

All students applying to Georgetown will have to answer 3 essay prompts: two general essays and one school-specific essay.

Please elaborate on any special talents or skills you would like to highlight.

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

Georgetown College of Arts and Sciences: A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.)

School of Health: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care at Georgetown University. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science).

School of Nursing: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying your intended major, Nursing.

Walsh School of Foreign Service: The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

What will first-time readers think of your college essay?

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Georgetown Supplemental Essays: 2022-2023

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Georgetown Essay Guide Quick Facts:

  • Georgetown acceptance rate: 12%— U.S. News ranks Georgetown as a highly competitive school.
  • 1 half-page (~250 word) essay
  • 1 full-page (~500 word) essay
  • 1 school-specific essay (~500 words)
  • Georgetown application note : Georgetown DOES NOT accept the Common Application or Coalition Application. Students must submit an application via Georgetown’s own application portal.  
  • #1 Georgetown Essay Tip : We recommend answering ALL Georgetown University supplemental essays comprehensively and thoughtfully, highlighting in all of your Georgetown essays why Georgetown is the perfect school for you.

Does Georgetown have supplemental essays?

Yes. You will be required to answer three Georgetown University essay prompts as part of the Georgetown application requirements.

While many students may find the Georgetown supplemental essays stressful, the Georgetown essays are actually a great chance to show Georgetown admissions who you are. In particular, pay attention to your “why this college essay” (in this case, the why Georgetown essay). Georgetown admissions loves this question when assessing a Georgetown application. 

Still stressed about getting the Georgetown University supplemental essays right? This guide will break down each of the Georgetown essays, giving you the best chance to impress Georgetown admissions.

Note: Georgetown does not use the Common App . Instead, you will respond to the Georgetown essay prompts through the Georgetown Application portal . Since the Georgetown application does not go through the Common App , keep a close eye on Georgetown’s application deadlines in order to ensure you have plenty of time to work on your Georgetown essays.

What are Georgetown’s supplemental essays?

The Georgetown essay prompts are found only in the Georgetown application. Your responses to the three Georgetown University essay prompts will discuss your extracurriculars , background , and motivations for attending Georgetown.

Above all, the Georgetown University supplemental essays aim to help the Georgetown admissions officers get to know you . Each of the Georgetown essay prompts is broad. This gives you the freedom to write your Georgetown supplemental essays about who you are with relatively few limitations. Take advantage of each of the Georgetown University essay prompts to maximize your Georgetown admissions odds .

Georgetown Supplemental Essays — Prompt 1 ( Required ):

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (1/2 page, single-spaced).

In the first of the Georgetown essays, Georgetown admissions asks about the activity in which you are most involved. Most strong Georgetown applicants will engage meaningfully with several extracurricular activities . So, highlight what extracurriculars make you unique in your Georgetown supplemental essays. 

This Georgetown essay prompt gives you the chance to demonstrate how your extracurricular pursuits make you special. This will help you impress Georgetown admissions.

Answer the “why,” “what,” and “how”

This prompt for the Georgetown essays asks you to discuss three key things: 

  • Why you chose to do your chosen activity
  • What you’ve done to show dedication to this activity
  • How this activity has impacted your community

Strong Georgetown University supplemental essays will address each of these things. Don’t get bogged down in statistics when answering the first of the Georgetown supplemental essays: why you chose to do an activity and the results of your involvement matter more than the sheer number of hours you’ve spent doing something.

The best Georgetown essays will discuss topics that you haven’t already emphasized elsewhere in your application. Use this Georgetown application essay to offer new insight into your extracurricular life, and be careful not to be repetitive. This Georgetown application essay should provide a response that Georgetown admissions hasn’t seen in another part of your application. 

Show another side of yourself

Additionally, note that the activity that you write about in this Georgetown application essay doesn’t need to connect directly to your major. After all, your Georgetown supplemental essays should help admissions officers understand all aspects of who you are, both as a student and as an individual.

In this Georgetown application essay, use your chosen extracurricular to highlight your collaboration and leadership skills. Think about how your extracurricular engagements will inform what you do in the future and weave it into the first of the Georgetown University supplemental essays. While your accomplishments are relevant and important, Georgetown admissions will ultimately admit you based on your potential. 

The Georgetown supplemental essays are a great way to show admissions what you will do with your education. You want admissions officers to come away from your first Georgetown application essay with an understanding not only of what you’ve done in high school but, also, of what you will do on their campus.

Think outside the box

georgetown supplemental essays

In your Georgetown supplemental essays, try to avoid writing about an activity that lots of students could write about such as sports, Model UN, or volunteering at homeless shelters. Georgetown essays about these topics can feel cliché. That being said, if you have a unique story to tell about one of these topics, tell it in the Georgetown supplemental essays. 

As you craft this Georgetown application essay (as well as the other Georgetown University supplemental essays), make sure that your response is as unique and personal as possible. Additionally, all of your Georgetown essays should be vivid, descriptive, and deeply authentic. With that in mind, if you read over your Georgetown essays and feel like someone else could have written them, you might want to rethink your topics and responses to the Georgetown University essay prompts.

Successful Georgetown supplemental essays focus more on the applicant than the organization. In other words, don’t waste time describing the logistics of your activity or program when responding to the first of the Georgetown essay prompts. Instead, just write about what you did and why it mattered . Write about your actions, leadership, and impact. Finally, balance storytelling with reflection. How can you use your Georgetown application essay to reveal your values and goals?

Georgetown Essay Reflection Questions:

  • Is your response to this Georgetown application essay personal and unique?
  • Did you use the first of the Georgetown supplemental essays to write about one of the activities in which you are most involved?
  • Does your Georgetown application essay focus on you more than the organization or club you describe?
  • Do you avoid repeating details found elsewhere in your application?

Georgetown Supplemental Essays — Prompt 2 ( Required ):

As georgetown is a diverse community, the admissions committee would like to know more about you in your own words. please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (1 page, single-spaced).

As stated above, Georgetown does not use the Common Application or the Coalition Application. As a result, many students reuse their Common App essay for the second of the three Georgetown essay prompts. 

For many students, this is a good choice for this Georgetown application essay. In general, applicants tend to spend more time editing and reworking their Common App Personal Statements than any other college essays. So, if you feel like your Common App essay “best describes you,” you might consider repurposing it for this Georgetown application essay prompt.

When (and when not) to use your personal statement

georgetown supplmental essays

That being said, the second of the Georgetown essay prompts does differ from the Common App essay prompts in some notable ways. Often, your Common App essay topic was chosen because it “best describes you.” This Georgetown application essay prompt, however, also highlights how Georgetown is a “ diverse community ,” essentially asking how you would supplement this diversity. 

While not necessarily a standard “why this college essay,” the second of the Georgetown University essay prompts asks what you would bring to campus in terms of “diversity.” Remember, the term “diversity” can mean many things. In other words, it doesn’t just relate to your cultural background or heritage. Essentially, your second Georgetown application essay should revolve around what makes you unique and what your perspective would bring to the Georgetown community.

To strengthen your Georgetown University supplemental essays, consider writing a new personal statement if your Common App essay was primarily about academics. You might also edit your Common App essay to better suit this Georgetown application essay by emphasizing how your diverse attributes will inform your presence on Georgetown’s campus. Successful Georgetown supplemental essays will do just that. 

One more note: Georgetown supplemental essays in response to this prompt can either be “personal or creative.” If you are a creative writer, this Georgetown application essay is your time to shine! If you have a deeply personal and impactful story, tell it in the second of the Georgetown essay prompts—even if you don’t do so in a conventional essay form.

  • Does this Georgetown application essay response highlight the unique perspective you would contribute to Georgetown’s diverse community?
  • Do you reveal what “best describes you”?
  • Does your essay present a part of your background and experience that you did not already write about for one of the other Georgetown University essay prompts?
  • Does your essay “show” your message more than it “tells” it?

Georgetown Supplemental Essays — College Specific Prompts

The Georgetown supplemental essays in this section will vary depending on your intended major or area of study. Responses to these Georgetown essays should focus on your intellectual interests and intended educational goals. Successful student responses to these college specific Georgetown University supplemental essays should be unique and passionate. Lackadaisical and cliche responses to these Georgetown supplemental essays will not stand out to admissions amongst the many Georgetown essays that are submitted. 

What’s the best way to impress admissions when responding to these college-specific Georgetown essay prompts? Successful college-specific Georgetown supplemental essays will write a why Georgetown essay that shows how applicants will enrich Georgetown specifically. These Georgetown University supplemental essays should also show how applicants would benefit from and utilize Georgetown specific programs. 

While all the Georgetown essay prompts seem different, at the core they are each a why this college essay. Let’s check out what it takes to impress admissions officers when responding to each of these college-specific Georgetown supplemental essays. 

Unpacking the College Specific Prompts:

These Georgetown University essay prompts are school-specific. The school-specific Georgetown application essay responses should not exceed 1 page, single-spaced.

The third of the Georgetown supplemental essays will depend on which of the four colleges within the University to which you apply. The last of the Georgetown supplemental essays essentially poses the why this college essay prompt. Successful responses to these school specific Georgetown supplemental essays will include everything you’d want to see in a why Georgetown essay.

However, this why Georgetown essay should get specific. Your final Georgetown application essay should show why you want to study your major and why at Georgetown. 

When reading Georgetown University supplemental essays, the Georgetown admissions committee looks for applicants who accord with the University’s Jesuit values of service, ethics, and global awareness. Also, they want to see that you’ve considered why Georgetown is the place for you. This leads us to the “why Georgetown essay” and the college-specific “why school essay.”

Be specific

Successful Georgetown supplemental essays responding to this Georgetown essay prompt will make full use of the one single-spaced page limit. This Georgetown application essay will typically be around 650 words. The best Georgetown essays will use specific details to articulate a cohesive plan for studying at Georgetown. Research the specific programs, professors, classes, and opportunities that you want to participate in at Georgetown. Given the specific nature of Georgetown’s programs, it’s even more important that you know exactly why Georgetown is the place for you. Then, demonstrate that to Georgetown admissions through the last of the Georgetown University supplemental essays.

In your Georgetown application essay, avoid just writing about location. Many students write their why Georgetown essay about wanting to go to college in Washington D.C., but there are many universities nearby. When writing about D.C. in this Georgetown application essay, articulate how your engagement with the community will be made possible by opportunities at Georgetown . What makes Georgetown the perfect school for you?

Georgetown College Prompt: 

What does it mean to you to be educated how might georgetown college help you achieve this aim (applicants to the sciences and mathematics or the faculty of languages and linguistics should address their chosen course of study.).

georgetown supplemental essays

This Georgetown application essay prompt depends on a definition—namely, what it means to “be educated.” To begin, think about what education means to you—is it academic? Social? Cultural? All of the above? Now, consider how Georgetown’s programs can help you educate yourself as a professional and as a community member. This Georgetown College why school essay (or why this college essay) needs applicants to tie that all together.

In general, successful Georgetown essays (Georgetown supplemental essays that impress Georgetown admissions) for Georgetown College will use the definition of “educated” to address why a student wants to pursue a major. Impactful Georgetown University supplemental essays for Georgetown College will think critically about why you want to pursue your chosen field and how this field will inform what your education looks like. At the end of the day, this Georgetown application essay should make the case that you can only truly be educated by Georgetown to achieve your goals. Use specific details—courses, professors, and programs—to emphasize why Georgetown College is the place for you. 

School of Nursing & Health Studies Prompt:

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. please specifically address your intended major (global health, health care management & policy, human science, or nursing)..

georgetown supplemental essays

When writing the Georgetown supplemental essays, keep in mind that everyone can say they want to make a difference and help people. If you want your “why school essay” for the School of Nursing & Health Studies to stand out, then, be sure to include specific details of how your interest in health and nursing originated and what you hope to do with it.

Successful Georgetown essays for the School of Nursing & Health Studies will be authentic and personal. Try to approach this prompt through a personal connection to healthcare. Then, connect your story to specific programs at Georgetown. Many students will write about their shadowing in the medical field or volunteering in medical facilities in their Georgetown essays. What sets you apart? 

Additionally, avoid focusing on the COVID-19 pandemic in this Georgetown essay—these essays can seem cliché unless you have a specific personal connection to healthcare in the age of COVID-19.

Walsh School of Foreign Service Prompt:

The walsh school of foreign service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. what is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world.

georgetown supplemental essays

Effective Georgetown supplemental essays responding to the “why this college essay” for Walsh will detail how you plan to impact the world and how Georgetown will make that plan a reality. ”Global problems” and “service to the world” both take many forms. Successful Georgetown essays won’t narrow applicants’ interests solely to political science and international relations—instead, they’ll think broadly about the tools Georgetown can give them to make the world a better place. Like other Georgetown essays, your response to this prompt should be specific and personal.

Successful Georgetown University supplemental essays for this prompt should not just be aspirational. Instead, they should also include how your interest in solving global problems translates to your past and current activities.

If you aren’t sure how to begin answering this “why school essay” prompt, think about how you spend your time. Do you tutor underprivileged children, so you care about expanding access to education? Do you help people learn to speak English because you want to break down cultural and linguistic barriers? International problem-solving comes in many forms. The best Georgetown supplemental essays will depict Walsh as the next step in an applicant’s journey toward making a difference in the international sphere.

McDonough School of Business Prompt: 

The mcdonough school of business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. please discuss your motivations for studying business at georgetown..

georgetown supplemental essays

This Georgetown application essay prompt emphasizes the holistic nature of business—namely, how it relates to “ethical, analytical, financial, and global” perspectives. This holistic attitude also accords with Georgetown’s Jesuit values, which set McDonough apart from its competitors.

The best responses to this specific “why school essay” (“Why McDonough ?”) will answer all aspects of this prompt, emphasizing the Jesuit dimensions of McDonough’s programs. A moving “why business” and “why this college essay” will not focus on money or titles. Instead, the best Georgetown essays for the “why school” essay for McDonough will emphasize the impact that you will have at Georgetown and beyond.

The most impactful Georgetown supplemental essays will get personal. What are your current and prior experiences with your intended major? How have you developed the skills to succeed in business? Research the specific programs and opportunities you would join at McDonough.

College-Specific Georgetown Essay Reflection Questions:

  • Does your essay respond adequately to the essay prompt?
  • Do you discuss the specific clubs, classes, professors, and/or opportunities that you would be involved in?
  • Does your essay tell a personal and specific narrative?
  • Do you articulate a clear plan for your time at Georgetown?

How to write Georgetown Supplemental Essays

So, how should you answer the Georgetown University essay prompts?

First of all, keep in mind the word limits of the Georgetown university essay prompts. The first of the Georgetown essays is limited to 250 words. This Georgetown supplemental essay asks you to discuss the importance of an extracurricular activity in which you are most involved. The next two Georgetown essays– the personal statement and the “Why Georgetown” college-specific essay– have one-page single-spaced limits rather than word limits. 

All three Georgetown University essay prompts are required

Before you start writing, it’s important to understand how your essays will be assessed. 

In evaluating Georgetown essays, the admissions team looks at both content and writing skill. Essentially, this means it’s not just about what you say in the Georgetown supplemental essays, but how you say it. Use the Georgetown University essay prompts to tell your story, and approach each of the Georgetown Universityessay prompts holistically. Since there are three Georgetown University essay prompts, you can illustrate different parts of your identity in different essays. Each Georgetown application essay should tell your readers something new about you.

It may feel overwhelming to complete three Georgetown University essay prompts. However, if you give yourself enough time to plan, draft, and revise your Georgetown supplemental essays, you can help minimize your stress. In fact, using the tips from this guide will show you how to use the Georgetown University essay prompts to your advantage!

Focus on your identity

georgetown supplemental essays

In each Georgetown application essay, focus on one experience, event, or element of your identity. Then, introduce it in an intriguing way through a “hook” at the beginning of each of your Georgetown supplemental essays. Next, provide background and relevant details to each of your Georgetown essays. And finally, discuss in your Georgetown supplemental essays how this has impacted your life, motivations, and relationships with others. In each of the Georgetown essays, relate your stories, background, and discussion to a central message in order to best respond to the Georgetown essay prompts.

In this guide, we’ve broken down each of the Georgetown University essay prompts to help you write Georgetown supplemental essays that will stand out in admissions.

How much does Georgetown care about essays?

Georgetown is intentionally not part of the Common Application; they want to admit applicants who put in the extra effort to apply. This makes the “Why Georgetown” college specific supplemental essay even more important. However, of course, all of the Georgetown supplemental essays are important within the Georgetown application requirements.

Read the checklist of Georgetown application requirements to make sure you complete each step, including the three Georgetown supplemental essays. Many students have impressive GPAs and test scores, which means your Georgetown University supplemental essays give you the chance to stand out. 

Implement the tips in this essay guide to set yourself apart through your Georgetown supplemental essays. Use your Georgetown essays to engage your reader through interesting stories, vivid details, and an actionable plan for your time at Georgetown.

Top 3 Tips for Writing Georgetown Essays

In this guide, we’ve discussed how to specifically answer the three Georgetown essay prompts. But, what are some of the most important tips in making sure you impress the admissions team with your Georgetown supplemental essays?

How to write impressive Georgetown supplemental essays:

#1 – start early.

Be sure to leave yourself time to edit and revise each of your Georgetown University supplemental essays! Georgetown has two deadlines to turn in all of your Georgetown application requirements: November 1, 2021, and January 10, 2022. Apply by November to know your decision on December 15, 2021.

#2 – Look at the big picture

When writing your Georgetown supplemental essays, consider your application as a whole. Make sure that each of your Georgetown essays says something new about you. After all, no two Georgetown essay prompts are the same. Be sure to not repeat other parts of your application in the essays.

# 3 – Show your unique self

These Georgetown supplemental essays are an opportunity for you to stand out to admissions. Don’t generalize when writing your Georgetown essays. Get specific about your experiences. Use the opportunity to not only demonstrate who you are, but also to show off your writing style.

Georgetown Supplemental Essays — Final Thoughts

In each of your Georgetown essays, be unique and original, but also genuine and honest. Instead of trying to predict what your readers would like to hear in your Georgetown supplemental essays, just tell your personal story. 

Do your research on the specific college within the University to which you are applying so you can connect yourself with Georgetown. Be clear, concise, and specific in your responses to the Georgetown essay prompts. There is no cookie-cutter Georgetown student, so highlight what makes you stand out in your Georgetown supplemental essays. Good luck!

georgetown supplmental essays

This Georgetown supplemental essays guide was written by Sarah Kaminski .  Looking for more admissions support? Click  here  to schedule a free meeting with one of our Admissions Specialists. During your meeting, our team will discuss your profile and help you find targeted ways to increase your admissions odds at top schools. We’ll also answer any questions and discuss how  CollegeAdvisor.com  can support you in the college application process.

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Georgetown Supplemental Essays 2023-24 – Prompts and Advice

September 11, 2023

Georgetown supplemental essays

The nation’s oldest Jesuit institution of higher learning is also its most selective, as Georgetown University welcomed just 13% of applicants to the Class of 2027 onto its historical and notably beautiful Washington, D.C. campus. Whenever you are applying to a school of Georgetown’s caliber, where the average admitted applicant has a 1470 SAT score and is at (or near) the top of their high school class, you need to find ways to set yourself apart from the pack. Toward that aim, prospective Hoyas need to take advantage of the Georgetown supplemental essays.

(Want to learn more about How to Get Into Georgetown? Visit our blog entitled:  How to Get Into Georgetown: Admissions Data and Strategies  for all of the most recent admissions data as well as tips for gaining acceptance.)

The goal is to write compelling, standout compositions. Your essays should showcase your exceptional writing ability and reveal more about who you are as an individual. Below are Georgetown’s essay prompts for the 2023-24 admissions cycle along with tips about how to address each one.

Georgetown Supplemental Essays – Prompt 1

Indicate any special talents or skills you possess. (250 words)

If you are a world-class athlete, you are likely already in the recruitment process. If you placed high in AIME or won a National Merit Scholarship, that is already stated in the awards section. Therefore, using the prized 250 words of real estate to merely rehash the fact that you won an award for something you are good at would not be an inspiring move. Instead, use this essay as an opportunity to offer a new level of depth and understanding about your talent(s). In addition to discussing the talent you possess, touch on the journey of how you developed your abilities.

A few years back, Malcolm Gladwell popularized the idea that becoming an expert at anything takes 10,000 hours of practice. Consider talking about the grind and sacrifice it took you to become great at a given skill. Describe how you see that skill becoming even more finely-tuned/developed over time. If this skill fits into your future academic/career plans, all the better—share that too!

Georgetown Supplemental Essays – Prompt 2

Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (approximately 1/2 page, single-spaced) 

Perhaps you are the captain of a team, the editor-in-chief of your school paper, or the president of a club. On the other hand, you may simply be a valuable contributing member. Regardless of whether you are a leading man/woman or a still-essential bit player, make sure that you use your writing ability to show the admissions officer what type of involved team member you are rather than merely telling them.

You can also discuss how you have engaged with your high school local/community. Share what you have learned from interacting with people of a different ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual identity, etc. Draw on past evidence of your commitment to being a positive force in the context of your activity/activities. Also be sure to speculate how that is likely to manifest on Georgetown’s campus. Research and cite Hoya student-run organizations, local nonprofit groups, or anything else you are drawn to. The admissions committee wants to understand precisely how you will contribute to their campus community of 7,000+ undergrads. Drawing the link between your past efforts and future aims is critical here. For example, if you’ve done work with Habitat for Humanity throughout your teens, it will be most impactful if you express your commitment to joining Georgetown’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity in the future.

Georgetown University Supplemental Essays – Prompt 3

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

Whether you decide to write about yourself in a way that is light, creative, humorous, personal, sincere, or vulnerable (any are perfectly fine), aim to reveal a picture of yourself that cannot be gleaned from elsewhere in your application materials.

Take note of the wide-open nature of this prompt. While there are no limits to the way in which you approach this essay, here are some angles to consider:

  • A perspective you hold
  • An experience you had
  • A community you belong to
  • Your cultural or family background
  • Something you’ve had to overcome

The admissions officer looking at your essay is hoping to connect with you through your written words. So be open, humble, thoughtful, inquisitive, emotionally honest, mature, and insightful. No matter what type of story you tell, the goal is to have the reader come away saying, “I can definitely see this applicant as a contributing member of our talented and engaged student community.”

Georgetown Supplemental Essays — The School-Specific Essay

Depending on the College or School that you are applying to at Georgetown, you’ll need to write a separate school-specific essay. At their core, all of them are “Why Us” essays, so as you address each prompt (see below), be sure to include Georgetown-specific offerings and opportunities that support your reasoning, interests, and future plans.

Elements of a great Georgetown “Why Us?” essay

  • Cite school-specific  academic programs , professors,  research opportunities ,  internship/externship programs , and  study abroad programs .
  • Reference student-run organizations at Georgetown that align with your passions.
  • Describe how you take advantage of Georgetown’s immense resources both inside and outside of the classroom.
  • Make sure to touch on both a) why Georgetown is the perfect fit for you and) why you are the perfect fit for Georgetown. Covering both topics is essential.

Common mistakes on a Georgetown “Why Us?” essay .

  • Fawning over the picturesque Gothic-style Georgetown campus (it is quite beautiful, but they already know that).
  • Georgetown is top-ranked, prestigious, and has a great reputation. Again, they know!
  • Too many generic expressions of feeling (e.g., It has been my dream since I was a toddler to be a Hoya…).
  • Recycled statements from your other “Why Us?” essays that come across as stale, impersonal, or worst of all–irrelevant/inaccurate.

Georgetown College: A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.).

Since you’ll be encountering all kinds of new topics and ways of thinking at Georgetown, the admissions committee is interested in discovering how you’ve interacted with new and surprising information in the past. Keep in mind that the ways in which your thinking changed are much more important than the class, book, or event you select, so choose something that allows you to demonstrate your open-mindedness, curiosity, and willingness to challenge yourself—this might be a book you read in English class, a lecture you attended, a summer course you engaged in, etc. Note that Georgetown encourages certain types of applicants to choose examples related to their prospective field of study.

Further, be sure to describe why you are interested in a liberal arts education from Georgetown specifically.

Georgetown Supplemental Essays (Continued)

School of nursing & health studies: describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. please specifically address your intended major (global health, health care management & policy, human science, or nursing)..

“A nurse is not what you do, it is who you are.”

This quote from an anonymous source captures the idea that becoming a nurse is a calling; not a profession you just stumble into. Healthcare in general is no different. Healthcare professionals are willing to work long shifts in the service of others, be on the frontlines of a pandemic, and deal with life’s toughest challenges (e.g., suffering and death) on a regular basis. Many applicants share stories of caring for sick relatives, experiencing a tough medical episode themselves, or observing the challenges faced by a particular community as inspiration for studying nursing or healthcare. In addition to your school-specific research, this essay is a chance to show the admissions committee that you are a passionate and mature healthcare or nursing candidate and that this field is genuinely “who you are.”

Walsh School of Foreign Service: The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

International service is not something every 17/18-year-old in the country is dreaming about doing as a vocation. There is likely a very interesting story surrounding what motivated you to apply to the Walsh School of Foreign Service and this essay invites you to share this very narrative. You don’t need to look any deeper than today’s headlines to identify powerful and immensely challenging global problems. Whether you are aiming for a B.S. in Business and Global Affairs, a B.S. in Foreign Service, or a B.S. in Global, International, and Comparative History, you likely have a highly specific set of academic and career goals taking shape in your mind.

If you can communicate these goals and the motivations behind them while sharing a vision for how you will contribute to the betterment of humankind in one or multiple regions of the world, then you are likely to end up with an excellent Walsh essay. Moreover, you’ll want to be sure to discuss why Walsh in particular will be a great fit for you.

McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

Before you start writing, you’ll want to do some McDonough-specific research and think about why a business education from McDonough in particular will be a great fit for your interests and goals. Further, to stand out, applicants need to connect the resources they’ve chosen to experiences they’ve had, demonstrating that they have availed themselves of every opportunity to dive into the business world during their high school years. Of course, not everyone has parents who hand them money to invest in the stock market or land them an internship at Goldman Sachs in 9th grade.

Relevant experiences can include high school investing clubs, participation in activities like FBLA, summer programs/courses in business/finance/economics, running your own local small business or e-business (Etsy, landscaping, etc.), or just a regular old retail job. The important thing to highlight is what you learned from your experiences, how you’ll bring that newly acquired knowledge to the classroom at Georgetown, and how your experiences have informed & influenced what you hope to continue learning in college.

How important are the Georgetown supplemental essays?

There are a whopping 8 factors that Georgetown considers to be “very important” to the evaluation process. These are: rigor of secondary school record, character/personal qualities, class rank, GPA, standardized test scores, recommendations, extracurricular activities, and most relevant to this blog—the application essays. The essays undoubtedly play a significant role in the admissions process at Georgetown. They can help the committee decide who to admit when choosing between similarly-credentialed (GPA, test scores, etc.) applicants.

Want personalized assistance with your Georgetown supplemental essays?

Interested in working with one of our experienced and knowledgeable essay coaches as you craft your Georgetown supplemental essays? We encourage you to get a quote  today.

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A licensed counselor and published researcher, Andrew's experience in the field of college admissions and transition spans two decades. He has previously served as a high school counselor, consultant and author for Kaplan Test Prep, and advisor to U.S. Congress, reporting on issues related to college admissions and financial aid.

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College Essays

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With an acceptance rate of less than 12 percent , Georgetown is ranked as an extremely competitive school . If you want to be a part of the student body, you need to impress, and one of the best opportunities you have to do that is in your Georgetown essays.

Don't let the Georgetown essay prompts intimidate you. Though they may look complicated at first—and they do ask complex questions—some foresight and planning will help you write essays that are sure to impress.

This guide will walk you through the Georgetown essays, giving you a look into the expectations and thought process behind each of the essay prompts .

Feature Image: Patrickneil /Wikimedia Commons

What Should You Know About the Georgetown Essay Prompts?

Georgetown doesn't use the Common or Coalition Application . Instead, you'll be filling out an application tailored specifically to their desires, though it may cover most of the same information.

Because of that, you'll want to pay extra close attention to what you discuss in your essays. Your essays should be tied specifically to Georgetown rather than the more general approach of the Coalition or Common Application .

The Georgetown essays include one short essay of about a half-page, single-spaced, one longer one-page essay required of all students, and a second one-page essay specifically tied to one of Georgetown's four schools: Georgetown College, the School of Nursing and Health Studies, Walsh School of Foreign Service, and the McDonough School of Business.

Students in the arts—specifically music, dance, theater, and studio art—may submit additional portfolios as part of their application, but it isn't required.

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What Are the Required Georgetown Essay Prompts?

Because Georgetown's application is only for Georgetown, you'll immediately notice that they're a lot more specific than the Common or Coalition prompts. You should keep that specificity in mind as you answer the questions, thinking not just about why you want to go to a good school, but why you want to attend Georgetown specifically .

How to Answer the Georgetown Short Essay Prompt

Discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved. (One half-page, single spaced.)

This question is pretty straightforward. Though you've no doubt discussed your extracurriculars throughout your application, this question asks you to think deeper about one of them . Ask yourself why you do those activities, and what they personally mean to you.

"Why," not "what," should be the question you're answering . Flesh out your mentions of extracurriculars in your application with discussions of why you do them and what you've learned. The activity you discuss should be significant to you—not something you do purely for fun or something you do because your parents make you.

As with the first question, don't inflate things to look more impressive. If you spent most of your summer watching TV, that might be relevant if you're an aspiring screenwriter, and you can mention it—but again, answer the question of why . Why did you choose the shows you did? What did you learn from them?

That said, watching TV isn't the best choice. You'd be better off discussing how you spent your summer working on an original short film or participating in a workshop for aspiring screenwriters—but no matter what your preferred activity, there is a way to discuss why it's significant to you and what you learned from it.

This prompt gives you space to discuss your interests, particularly the things that can't be represented by numbers as grades and test scores can. It gives Georgetown a clearer picture of you, which helps in their decision.

This is also a space to expand on participation. Maybe you never became captain of the swim team and you've been worried that the lack of leadership might count against you. In this essay, you can explain that though that was your goal, you didn't quite make it—but that you learned a lot anyway.

This essay really is about what's significant to you, so there are no wrong answers—it's your execution that matters . Avoid being too general, or focusing too much on picking the most impressive thing from your roster if that thing didn't actually matter to you. Be genuine with what's significant to you and your essay will be stronger for it.

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How to Answer the Georgetown Essay Prompt for All Applicants

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (One page, single-spaced.)

Notice how the emphasis on this question is on you. This is called a "Why You?" style essay — though the application is for Georgetown, the admissions office wants to know why you'll be a good fit for the college and what you in particular will bring to the student body .

What this means is that Georgetown doesn't want to hear about how they have the best program or the greatest campus. They want to know about you and what makes you unique .

When answering this question, think about what makes you a good fit for Georgetown's student body. Consider their mission statement , their origin as a Catholic and Jesuit college , and what that means today.

That doesn't mean that you need to identify yourself as Catholic if you aren't (please don't do that), but that you should consider the role that faith plays in Georgetown's approach to education . How does their mission statement connect to your own life and educational goals?

Demonstrating that you understand the school's mission and how you can contribute to it as a student is one of the most important parts of this question.

But "Why You?" is only part of the question . The specific mention of diversity is important, too. Its inclusion in the question means that it's important to Georgetown, and they want you to demonstrate that it's important to you, too.

Don't get too fixated on typical meanings of "diverse." We often use the word to refer to the variety of genders, sexualities, races, socio-economic statuses, and so on that exist in the world, but diversity of thought is worthwhile, too. Of course, you should write about your gender, sexuality, race, and so on if it's relevant to what you'll bring to campus—and it often is—but don't feel like it's all you have to offer.

Think about what your experience has taught you, and how those lessons will contribute to Georgetown's diverse student body. That can mean discussing overcoming socio-economic hardship, or it can mean relating how you and your seven brothers used to squabble until you realized working together got chores done faster. Everybody has a unique story to tell, and this is Georgetown offering you space to tell yours .

Georgetown invites you to get creative here, but if you want to take a more embellished approach than a traditional essay, be sure that that creativity comes through in your writing and language rather than in the events . Don't inflate things to look more interesting or diverse than you are—this is your chance to flesh out the grades and test scores with your personality, so be sure it's your personality that the admissions office sees.

How to Answer the Georgetown College Essay Prompt

Georgetown College is the largest undergraduate school at Georgetown University, and contains many of the school's arts and sciences programs.

What does it mean to you to be educated? How might Georgetown College help you achieve this aim? (Applicants to the Sciences and Mathematics or the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics should address their chosen course of study.) (One page, single-spaced.)

This question is asking about your personal relationship with education and learning. But more than that, it's asking you why you want to attend Georgetown, making it a "Why Us?" essay .

When answering this prompt, think about your goals and how Georgetown fits into them . They don't need to hear about how they're a good school and you've always wanted to attend a competitive college—they already know that, and most other students also want to attend a good school. Why Georgetown specifically, as opposed to all the other possible schools you could apply to?

This is a good place to demonstrate familiarity with their mission and curriculum. Are there particular classes or faculty driving your decision to attend? Mention them!

Think holistically here. How will attending Georgetown enrich your education and help you reach your career goals? Keep their mission statement in mind as you write—consider the ideas of diversity, service to humanity, and community and how those fit into your goals.

Again, avoid generalities. Your essay should have enough concrete connection to Georgetown that you couldn't easily swap another school's name in and still have it make sense. Of course, there will always be some overlap with other schools, but be sure that the true spirit of Georgetown comes through in your essay.

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How to Answer the Georgetown School of Nursing & Health Studies Essay Prompt

Georgetown's School of Nursing and Health Studies is exactly what it sounds like. This is where you'll be applying if you're interested in any of the health care fields, which is reflected in the prompt.

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, Human Science, or Nursing). (One page, single-spaced.)

This question isn't quite a clear-cut "Why Us?" or "Why You?" question, unlike the previous ones. Instead, it's asking "Why Health Care?"

Again, always keep in mind Georgetown's mission as a college: diversity, discussion, and the well-being of humanity. All of these things can factor into your essay in a meaningful way.

Think beyond health care being a reliable and well-paying field. Why do you want to care for people? Why the health field, specifically? Tying Georgetown's mission into this question is a great way to demonstrate your interest in the field, but also in the specific ways that this school teaches.

In this question, Georgetown wants you to demonstrate your interest in the field. If you're invested in health care, you're more likely to succeed in the program. The admissions office also wants to know what passion and interest you'll bring to the school, making you a student they want to invest in.

If you don't already know why you've chosen to pursue health care over other fields, now's the time to start thinking about it. Health care can often be thankless, difficult, and even frightening if you're working in emergency situations. What drives you to do it anyway?

Maybe you've struggled with illness yourself, and you want to commit to researching cures. Or maybe you're fascinated by the ways that disease impacts society, and you want to learn more about prevention and how to enact it on an individual basis. No matter what your career goal is, it's important that you can explain why you've chosen this field over all others.

However, be sure you can tie your interest to Georgetown specifically. Your essay will be even stronger if it explains not just what appeals to you about health care, but why Georgetown is the right college to help you achieve your goals.

How to Answer the Walsh School of Foreign Service Essay Prompt

If you're interested in international relations, Wash School of Foreign Service is likely where you'll be applying.

The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world? (One page, single-spaced.)

This is a perfect example of a  "Why Us?" question. Of all the schools out there, and all the programs, what led you to apply to Georgetown's school of foreign service? 

The trick to this question is being specific. Sure, the Walsh School of Foreign Service has interesting classes, great professors, and a strong track record for job placements, but so do a lot of other schools out there. What does it offer that other schools can't? In your response, be sure to mention specific courses/internship opportunities/professors who will give you opportunities unique to Georgetown.

We give more advice on how to answer this question under the next prompt, which is also a Why Us question!

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How to Answer the McDonough School of Business Essay Prompt

The McDonough School of Business is exactly what it sounds like. If you're attending Georgetown with an interest in business, you'll need to answer the following prompt:

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown. (One page, single-spaced.)

Like the Walsh School of Foreign Service, the McDonough School of Business prompt is a classic "Why Us?" question , asking you to identify not just that Georgetown is a good school, but why it's the right school for you and your interests.

To answer this question, consider the university's ethos and curriculum. Look at their course offerings and consider those as well as whatever reasons you have for applying. Think specifically, not generally— beyond it being a well-respected university, what does Georgetown have to offer you that other well-respected universities do not?

Georgetown wants to hear that you're committed to their program specifically, so answer in specifics. Identify features of their program in particular, and be sure to answer the question of why those features draw you to Georgetown.

If you have a personal anecdote about Georgetown, such as a moment on a tour, a personal connection to the campus, or admiration for a particular alumni, this essay is a good place to discuss it. If not, it's always a good idea to use concrete specifics, such as classes and extracurriculars that appeal to you. Fold those into a discussion of Georgetown's mission and your own career goals to paint a complete picture of why this is the right school for you.

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What Does a Successful Georgetown Essay Look Like?

Planning an essay can be difficult as you try to weigh what the school might want against everything you could possibly cover. Thankfully, there's at least one successful Georgetown essay out there you can read in its entirety :

"Listen, girl. He's over 60 and speaks no English. There is no way we would hire him." His tone was rude, but I sadly understood why my dad wasn't hired. I faced my hopeful dad and watched his smile drop as I told him that Dave just remembered that they hired someone yesterday and that they really couldn't afford to hire anyone else. My dad was disappointed, but nonetheless he graciously shook Dave's hand and thanked him for his time. Job searching is difficult for everyone, but in a world full of Daves, it's almost impossible. Daves are people who look at my family and immediately think less of us. They think illegal, poor and uneducated. Daves never allow my dad to pass the first round of job applications. Daves watch like hawks as my brother and I enter stores. Daves inconsiderately correct my mother's grammar. Because there are Daves in the world, I have become a protector for my family. I excuse their behavior as just being a "typical American." I convince my mother that they are only staring at her lovely new purse. I convince my dad they are only shouting about store sales to us. Aside from being a protector, I am also an advocate. As an advocate, I make sure my family is never taken advantage of. I am always looking out for scams and discrepancies. I am the one asking the questions when we buy or sell a car. I make sure all details are discussed and no specifics are left unanswered.

It's not hard to see why the writer was accepted to Georgetown. This essay clearly demonstrates her experience and understanding of the world. The last paragraph is a great example of how to turn that experience into something actionable—she wants to go into public service, politics, or diplomacy because of how she's helped her parents and the bigotry she's witnessed as she's done so.

We know from reading exactly what the writer will bring to Georgetown: an understanding of the world and the way it's treated her and her family. She demonstrates her understanding of diversity clearly, which answers the first prompt—it shows what makes her unique as well as what she'll contribute.

The essay shows her personal story and how that's influenced her lifelong plans. Because the admissions office understands where she comes from and the essay finishes with where she hopes to go—as well as covering some of the obstacles she's overcome—they have a complete picture of her as a student.

One area the essay could be improved is strengthening the connection to Georgetown specifically. This essay is quite strong—she did get into Georgetown with it—but spending a little more time reflecting on how her life experience connects to Georgetown's mission would give it a little extra oomph . As it is, this could be an application essay for pretty much any school. Drawing a clear connection from your experiences to the college you're applying to demonstrates a stronger degree of interest, making your essay stand out.

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Key Points of Advice for Georgetown Essays

No matter which prompts you're answering, it's a good idea to follow general advice for your Georgetown essays, too. Though the application for Georgetown is unique to the school, it still follows most of the common rules of college applications, so be sure to read up on some common tips for college applications .

#1: Read Prompts Carefully

Don't just answer the surface-level question. You have quite a bit of space to answer each of these, so read each one carefully, understand the deeper questions it might be asking, such as "Why You?" and be sure to answer those as well. Brainstorming will be a huge help here, as you can get all of your ideas out and select the ones that support your point the best.

#2: Connect Your Story to Your School

When you're writing "Why Us?" essays, think about your story—the things that have made you who you are, your ambition, your goals—and add in how Georgetown is the next step on your journey. Think beyond that it has a good reputation or that lots of impressive people have graduated from there. Draw a clear line between you and Georgetown by tying your experience in with its curriculum and mission statement. This will demonstrate that you're not just reusing the same essay for a bunch of schools, and that Georgetown is your real goal.

#3: Edit and Revise

Editing and revision are your best friends when it comes to a polished Georgetown essay. Don't just fire off a draft and call it good. Spend some time planning, writing, editing, and revising , being sure to start early so you can let your drafts rest between readings.

Spending more time will take some of the stress out of writing and let you put in more effort to get it into shape. The longer you have, the more thought you can put into it, so start early!

What's Next?

Give yourself plenty of time to get your Georgetown essay done by staying on top of all the deadlines for your application .

What else do you need to get into your dream school aside from stellar essays? This guide has all the requirements to get into Georgetown .

Even if you're not going to Georgetown, you should understand the college application process from start to finish. This helpful guide will walk you through applying to college starting from your freshman year of high school!

georgetown university application essay questions

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Melissa Brinks graduated from the University of Washington in 2014 with a Bachelor's in English with a creative writing emphasis. She has spent several years tutoring K-12 students in many subjects, including in SAT prep, to help them prepare for their college education.

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August 6, 2021

Georgetown University 2021-2022 Essay Prompts

georgetown university application essay questions

Georgetown University, home of a college application that looks like it was invented in the early aughts, has released the 2021-2022 essay prompts for applicants to the Class of 2026. This year, applicants are asked to answer four essay prompts. But do keep in mind that since Georgetown is not a Common Application subscriber (its longtime admissions czar, Charles Deacon , a recurring character and favorite of our college admissions blog, has been a longtime holdout), these essays are not in addition to the Personal Statement and optional Covid-19 essay. Rather, many students are able to use a shortened version of their Personal Statement for one of the Georgetown prompts. So what exactly are the prompts, you ask? Wonder no more!

The first prompt reads, “Indicate any special talents or skills you possess.” Applicants are asked to answer the question in 250 words. The second prompt reads, “Briefly discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.” Applicants are asked to answer the question in about half a page, single spaced. The third prompt reads, “As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you.” Applicants are asked to answer the question in about a page, single spaced. This, of course, is the perfect opportunity to use the Common Application Personal Statement. Georgetown’s fourth and final prompt reads, “What does it mean to be educated? How might Georgetown College help you achieve this aim?” Applicants are asked to answer this prompt in about a page, single spaced. It’s essentially a Why College essay with a little extra kick to it.

Have a question on the 2021-2022 Georgetown University essays for applicants to the Class of 2026? Let us know your question by posting it below. We look forward to hearing from you!

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June 29, 2022

Georgetown University School of Medicine: Secondary Application Essay Tips [2022 – 2023] & Podcast Interview

georgetown university application essay questions

Are you interested in Georgetown University’s School of Medicine? In this blog post, we give our advice on tackling the school’s secondary essays and interview Dr. Ellen Dugan, MD, Senior Associate Dean for Admissions.

georgetown university application essay questions

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Georgetown University School of Medicine 2022 – 2023 secondary application essay questions

Given the Jesuit influence at Georgetown and its adoption of the Cura Personalis philosophy, I recommend covering your clinical, research and community service experience for Georgetown’s secondary application essay. The school places special emphasis on training physicians to treat medically underserved communities. Highlight your personal connections, volunteer work and leadership roles in medically underserved communities.

Georgetown Medical School short essay question #1

The Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM) strives to ensure that its students become respectful physicians, with cultural humility, who embrace all dimensions of caring for the whole person. With our Jesuit values of Cura Personalis, People for Others, and Community in Diversity, we are steadfast in our commitment to racial justice and to addressing the health inequities exacerbated by the recent pandemic. Please describe how your values, life experiences, and your identity will contribute to these GUSOM priorities. (1,000 characters)

This prompt for Georgetown replaces one that broadly asked to hear that you are compassionate and holistic. How do you embrace the Jesuit values as specified in the prompt (research them) and at the same time advocate for equity and justice for all? (You do not need to profess being Jesuit if that is not your truth, but all applicants would wisely explain their identification with these values and how they came to be instilled in your character.) How does doing so correspond with being humble?  How does being humble and righteous for equity define a physician’s character? How did the pandemic reveal stark inequity and racial bias? Explain this. What can others expect from you regarding how you uphold these values as ideals and actions?

Georgetown Medical School short essay question #2

Is there any further information that you would like the Committee on Admissions to be aware of when reviewing your file that you were not able to notate in another section of this or the AMCAS Application? ( 1,000 characters )

This would be the best place to cover any academic difficulties that you have overcome , whether you’ve retaken courses, created an increasing trend in your GPA or retaken the MCAT for a higher score. Focusing on those areas of the application that you have successfully improved can provide compelling evidence of your academic potential and how you will perform in medical school. If this approach is not relevant to your application, you can use this section to update the committee on new publications, activities or awards that may not be on the AMCAS application. Discuss what you have been doing since you started the application process.

Georgetown Medical School long essay question

Why have you chosen to apply to the Georgetown University School of Medicine and how do you think your education at Georgetown will prepare you to become a physician for the future?  (3,000 characters)

Since this is such a long essay, it will be helpful to draw upon your previous experiences to demonstrate why your values align with those of Georgetown . Use 1-3 concrete, specific examples to explain how and why you will integrate easily into their study body. The second part of this essay prompt requires that you focus on the future. After researching their curriculum and special programs , you can explain how each of these will enhance your medical education. Make a list and use this as an outline to guide your response. Focus on the most important points last; they may be forgotten if you include them at the beginning of such a long essay. For that reason, it will be important to provide a concise summary of what you’ve covered in the conclusion.

Watch: Cura Personalis Explained

Dr. Ellen Dugan, Georgetown Medical School’s Senior Associate Dean for Admissions, talks about the school’s driving value of Cura Personalis:

View the full interview here .

Applying to Georgetown? Here are some stats:

Georgetown Medical School median MCAT score: 512

Georgetown Medical School median undergrad GPA: 3.69

Georgetown Medical School acceptance rate: 2.4%

U.S. News  ranks Georgetown #56 for research and #90 for primary care.

Check out the Med School Selectivity Index for more stats.

Has this blog post helped you feel more confident about approaching your Georgetown application? We hope so. It’s our mission to help smart, talented applicants like you gain acceptance to your target schools. With so much at stake, why not hire a consultant whose expertise and personalized guidance can help you make your dream come true? We have several flexible consulting options— click here to get started today !

Georgetown Medical School application timeline 2022-23

MD Deadlines

MD/PhD Deadlines

Source: Georgetown University School of Medicine website

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Mary Mahoney Admissions Expert

Dr. Mary Mahoney, PhD, is the medical humanities director at Elmira College and has more than 20 years of experience as an advisor and essay reviewer for med school applicants. She is a tenured English professor with an MFA in creative writing from Sarah Lawrence College and a PhD in literature and writing from the University of Houston. For the past 20 years, Mary has served as a grad school advisor and essay reviewer for med school applicants.  Want Mary to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

All You Want to Know About Georgetown Medical School’s Admissions [ Admissions Straight Talk Podcast Episode 459]

Ellen Dugan Feb 2022

Interested in a spot in Georgetown University SOM? [Show Summary]

Dr. Ellen Dugan, Georgetown Medical School’s Senior Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid, describes how cura personalis , or care of the whole person, drives the Georgetown experience and curriculum. 

Interview with Dr. Ellen Dugan, Georgetown Medical School’s senior associate dean for admissions [Show Notes]

Welcome to the 459th episode of Admissions Straight Talk . Thanks for joining me. Are you ready to apply to your dream medical schools? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted’s Med School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/medquiz , complete the quiz, and you’ll not only get an assessment but also tips on how to improve your qualifications and your chances of acceptance. Plus, it’s all free. 

Our guest today is Dr. Ellen Dugan , Senior Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid at Georgetown University School of Medicine. She is a Hoya through and through. She earned her MD at Georgetown University School of Medicine and then completed her residency training in Emergency Medicine, also at Georgetown. Following four years of service in the National Health Service in rural West Virginia, Dr. Dugan returned to Georgetown and has been on the faculty there since 1990. She served on the Admissions Committee for 10 years prior to becoming the Associate Dean. In addition to her admissions duties, she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and formerly served as the Vice-Chair and Interim Academic Chair in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Georgetown. 

Can you give us an overview of Georgetown University School of Medicine’s curriculum program for those listeners who aren’t that familiar with it? [2:10]

I’m happy to. That’s our new curriculum, which they basically started revising in 2015-16. Our graduating class of 2021 was the first class to go all the way through, so it’s fairly new. It’s divided up into three phases. The first 18 months of the first and second year, or the foundational phase, are made up of six blocks of core content. They’re organ-system-based modules that integrate basic science disciplines with doctoring training if you will. The doctoring courses are called “cura personalis,” referring to and uniting the development of professional skills that are unique to doctoring, like physical diagnosis, communications, ethics. This runs through all the blocks. There are also intercessions that are one week long that are emphasizing topics critical to physicians in healthcare. An example would be the opioid epidemic. Then they have medical student brand rounds all through the first three years.

The core clinical phase is the third year, which is blocked out into 4-8-week core clerkships. Those would be medicine, surgery, OB-GYN, pediatrics, family medicine, psychiatry, neurology, and three two-week selectives, or electives. Then there’s the advanced clinical phase, which is the fourth year, and that’s made up of 37 weeks. Three of those four-week blocks are required. One is four weeks in emergency medicine, and then the other two are four-week blocks in doing acting internships where they function as interns so that they get the confidence and the skills to hit the ground running for residency. Then the best part of it, they have 24 weeks of electives, so they can basically design their entire fourth-year course other than those first three blocks that they have to do. It really gives them great freedom.

Is the elective block always at the end of the fourth year, or does that vary depending upon the student? [3:59]

It varies. They can do the emergency medicine later on. What they want to do in those first few blocks is when they’re getting ready for residency, they hone those blocks into the specialty they want to go into so that they have letters and clinical experience in that particular field.

What would you like listeners to know about Georgetown that many applicants don’t realize? Or what myths would you like to dispel? [4:22]

The biggest one is that you don’t have to be Catholic to be at Georgetown. We are one of four Jesuit medical schools in the United States and that gives us that distinction. Another thing people don’t realize is that we accept both international and DACA students. We’re not looking for who would fit our school, but we’re looking for applicants that have different backgrounds , different lived experiences that add to the class in their own unique ways. The most important thing for us because we are a Jesuit institution, is that they embody our Jesuit mission of cura personalis , or care for the whole person. We’re not just caring for patients physically, but we are also caring for their emotional, spiritual, social wellbeing. The other big dedication to service is our students work with the underserved and the marginalized populations. It’s a really big part of their education. An interesting fact is that of this first-year class, 70% did not come to us straight out of college. They come from all different experiences. Where the gap year used to be frowned upon, it now seems to be the norm more than the exception. I think there’s a preconceived notion that this school is extremely competitive. Although it’s really difficult, the student body isn’t, it’s more a collaborative environment and culture. The preclinical curriculum is pass/fail and we don’t submit rank lists to residency programs so they’re not ever really being pitted against each other. The hope with the pass/fail is that the students are learning to learn, not to learn to take step one, and with that stressor removed that they will actually retain the information and assimilate it into their knowledge base.

You’ve mentioned cura personalis and the Jesuit mission several times. In a really practical way, how does it show up in the teaching? Is it possible to give an example? [6:09]

There are a few things that we do, but it’s based on the curriculum. Students are required as part of their graduation requirement to do 20 hours of service to the underserved. Most of our students end up doing more than that. We have a Hoya Clinic, which is a student-run clinic that the fourth-years run with attendings who supervise. First, second, third, and fourth-years can all volunteer. It’s a clinic that is for homeless families that are in transitional housing in the Southeast Area of D.C. We also now collaborate with the law students in caring and advocating for patients’ health issues, not just their health issues, but the law students help us with their legal issues, their social issues, all in the spirit of cura personalis and social justice and alleviating healthcare disparities.

Then we have the Jesuit mission and reflection dinners, which are small groups where you do Jesuit readings and reflections, and then the students talk about ways to enhance the Jesuit curriculum and mission in the curriculum. We also have the Racial Justice Committee for Change, which is a dedicated group of student staff and faculty that pursues sustainable change in diversity, equity, and inclusion at the School of Medicine and throughout the Georgetown community, the University Medical Center.

What are you trying to glean from the secondary application that you don’t get from the primary? [7:53]

Well, it’s more specific to us. The primary essay is the “Why Georgetown?” essay. That’s where we’re trying to figure out what interests you about Georgetown, what resonates with you about Georgetown, what is it that you are seeking from Georgetown, and what would you bring to us .

The first short question is asking the applicant how their values, life experiences, and identity contribute to our priorities, which are racial justice, adjusting healthcare inequities, and in this particular question, exacerbated by the recent pandemic, so it’s specific more to the pandemic health inequities.

Then the second short question is a space for somebody to add additional information. People will put in why their MCAT was bad, they were ill that day, or let’s say they got into graduate school after they applied, and they want to tell us what they’re doing now, so there’s a space for that as well. Or issues even that came up during the pandemic that have affected their grades, or their health, whatever it is. 

What are some of the more common mistakes that you see applicants make in approaching Georgetown’s secondary? [9:03]

I wouldn’t say “mistakes,” but I think it’s more of a lack of an understanding of who we are and what we stand for. Have they actually read our mission statement? Do they actually know anything about us? 

Could you walk the listener through the process that the application goes through once they submit the secondary? [9:34]

It’s a fairly long process, but once it’s complete, it goes to the committee for evaluation for interview. That’s based on a holistic approach, looking at the whole package, meaning not just grades and MCATs, but lived experiences, clinical experience, research, and very importantly is their service, dedication, and their letters of reference, leadership. We also weigh the depth of their application, how they assimilated themselves into the community of their school. What have they done to give back to their community?

We also take into consideration difficulties people have had with COVID, meaning family issues, loved ones being ill, wifi, people that went home and didn’t have a designated quiet space, and so that’s all part of it, too. A lot of the schools went pass/fail across the board and you didn’t have an option to do grades to get grades for your science courses, so we also take that into consideration as well because that was a big thing that students faced, and are still facing, actually.

How should an applicant approach reapplication to medical school, and specifically to Georgetown, if they haven’t gotten an interview invitation, or they’ve already heard that they’re rejected? [11:53]

What we tell applicants or reapplicants, especially, is to go back to our website and take a real good look at it critically in terms of their application in reference to what we’re looking for. They should look at their experiences and see where they might have gaps as to what we’re looking for because not all schools are looking for what we are and we’re not looking for what all other schools are looking for. What we’re also really interested in is what they’re doing with their time in this gap year. We understand many won’t have a job immediately when they apply, but they should give us an update of what they’re doing because the gaps are not helpful to us. There’s a lot of time between now and the fall, or the summer when they start to apply that they can actually find those opportunities to embellish their application.

Are you open to updates in the course of the application cycle? [12:47]

Yes. We actually have a portal in our system that’s called Post-Submission Update. It’s actually listed under the banner of the secondary. There’s a portal there for a post-submission update, so they can update anything, send it all in there as well.

When travel restrictions ease, do you plan to go back to in-person interviews, or keep a mix of in-person and virtual, as we’re doing now? [13:12]

Well, as my colleagues said, “That horse is out of the barn now.” If anything good came out of this pandemic, it’s that this virtual interview provided an opportunity for people that might not have applied to us or have been able to come and interview because it’s so expensive getting hotel rooms and traveling and food and all of those things that I think this is one of the reasons why everybody’s applications were off the charts this past year, or the last cycle.

I think the hybrid version is the way we’re going to need to go. It gave an opportunity, especially for disadvantaged, underrepresented students to be able to interview with us and not feel like they were at a disadvantage because they couldn’t come to the school, so I think in-person is always better, but if that’s the opportunity for them to interview with us and that’s their only option, then I think that’s a great idea. I think we’re probably going to go with a hybrid going forward.

We were actually thinking of doing something in the spring but I don’t think we’re going to be able to do it because visitors are still not really back on campus. We thought we would have small groups come, sort of like a second look day. They’re already accepted applicants, so there’s no advantage to coming or not coming and we’d have a tour of the school and of the student panel, they could talk to students, and do a few more things that is like a second look day, but not virtual. We’re hoping that maybe we might be able to do this later in the spring.

How do you look at candidates who faced mental health issues in the past? [15:20]

As you know, no one is required to disclose any health or mental health issues. If they choose to share that with us, it depends on how they present it and what it is they’re trying to tell us by giving us this information. We have to look at this on a case-by-case basis because it’s very personal and it’s something we take very seriously, but again, it’s on a case-by-case basis.

What about somebody who has an academic infraction, or perhaps a misdemeanor on their record? [16:04]

The misdemeanor is interesting because some states will say a speeding ticket is a misdemeanor so it sounds really terrible if you have a misdemeanor listed on there. It’s in the explanation of what that academic infraction is, what the misdemeanor is, what the felony is. Again, it’s more on a case-by-case basis, how it’s presented , are they remorseful, what did they learn from this, those sorts of things.

How was application volume this cycle compared to the big one in 2021 as well as the 2019-2020 cycle? [17:02]

In 2021, we had 17,881 applications. We were up 24% and applications were up nationally 18%. In this current cycle, we have 15,993 applicants, so we’re down 11%, nationally they’re down 12%. Comparing that to the pre-pandemic to 2019 to 2020, we had 14,464 applications. We’re actually, this current cycle, if you leave at the 2021 cycle, we’re up about 10.5%. Usually, that up or down is about 2-3%, so it’s very interesting to see.

Do you have any idea what’s coming in the next cycle? [18:07]

No, we don’t. I think a lot of it is going to depend on the students and the whole grading thing and the courses that they’re able to take. Their experiences have been discontinued because of it all. It’s still up and down that way, like right now, with Omicron going down. It looks like they may have the opportunity to have those experiences again in person, so it’s going to be different.

We also were warned by the AAMC that we might see people with criminal records because they were in demonstrations or protesting, and they gave us a heads up that we may see this. It’s more of them advocating than anything, but I thought that was an interesting point that they brought up.

What advice would you give to med school applicants wanting to apply to Georgetown this upcoming cycle for 2023 matriculation, or even looking further ahead to 2024 matriculation? [19:08]

You look at these students that went through their first year of medical school, and it was all virtual last year. They brought the first-year students in for anatomy in January. If they wanted to be in there, they had the option of doing it. I’m not sure how you do anatomy and dissections virtually, but they gave them the option, and most of them all came in for it, but that was the first opportunity they had to be together. I think looking forward, hopefully, we will be rid of this plague that we are all going through and that they will be able to all be together from day one. 

A lot of people were looking at this happening and saying, “Hmm, I think I might put off applying to medical school for another year, just to make sure that I won’t be sitting in my bathroom all day long and listening to Zoom sessions,” so I think we have to see what’s on the horizon in terms of the pandemic and make choices that way. But I think for the ones that are hellbent on applying this summer, when we open up again in June, you look at these next few months that you have, and look at our criteria, or look at the school’s criteria that you’re going to be looking at and see if there are ways that you could tweak your application, get those experiences in-person, especially clinically. 

It’s really important that you actually have some sense of an idea of what you’re getting yourself into. I think shadowing is a huge part . A scribing job in the summer is also wonderful, it’s well thought of as solid clinical experience. It’s great if you could fit something in now that gets those experiences in, not just to check a box, but because this is what you’re interested in. You’re into medicine and this is what you want to learn and inform yourself of. Do you want to be an advocate, a scientist, and a healer, or do you want to just be a scientist? I think there are lots of things that they need to think about before they make that big jump because it’s a long road, it’s a wonderful road, but it’s really difficult.

Take the med school admissions quiz!

Is research a nice-to-have when applying to Georgetown, or is it pretty much a must-have? [21:29]

As I said, when we do the holistic review, if somebody has a great application or they have no research or they just have a little bit of research, we take that into consideration. It’s really nice if they have some kind of research. It doesn’t have to be clinically-based or translational. A lot of the science majors do, they work in their biology department, let’s say, and they do even bench work. They know what assays are, how to come up with a project, they work with a PI, so they have experience with it. We like to see that. It’s not a deal-breaker, but we really do like to see that.

How do you feel about virtual shadowing? [22:28]

I think with virtual shadowing, a lot of students are basically in a Zoom session with a physician, and the physician will tell them about their background and what they’ve done, or they’ll walk them through a case. It’s not the same as seeing a physician interact with a patient and seeing those nuances of what kind of questions to ask to find out from the patient what they really want. That’s such a skill that you learn when you see a physician with patients. Virtual shadowing is the next best thing, and for some people, it’s the only thing they have, but you really need to see that dynamic up close and personal.

It’s like in the emergency room, this is the worst day of their life. They’re coming in there, they’re vulnerable, they’re scared, they are out of control, and you have such a little window to make that connection with them to make them know they’re going to be taken care of and well taken care of, so those are the things that you want to see and have an idea of, not that everyone has to shadow in the emergency department, but just that patient-physician interaction is so key.

Are there any questions you would’ve liked me to ask you that I haven’t? [24:02]

I think one that I think I would’ve liked you to ask is what are our support services are like for our students.

I like to say, “Once you are one of ours, you are ours for life, and we’re going to do everything we can to help you thrive to become an excellent physician and to be supported.” This is really difficult, but as I said before, wonderful. It’s so much information coming at you at once and you have to learn how to apply it. It’s a different way of studying. It’s a different way of applying your knowledge. Everybody’s smart when they come in, but then people are just astounded when they start to struggle, or they have a little hiccup and they don’t understand.

It’s really important that they have these support services, not just academically. We have an Office of Student Learning, and they do great things with our students in terms of tutoring sessions together or tutoring sessions alone. They do all kinds of things with their academics. As they say, “If you’re struggling, we will find you. If you don’t find us, we will find you. It’s our job.”

We also have the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, which basically works for the institution to have a culture and an environment of equity and diversity and inclusion and to be there for those students that need that help, too. We have bias training, we have premed pipeline programs, commitment to racial justice, and RJCC.

We also have the CAPS Program, which is the Counseling and Psychiatric Services. We have two psychologists that are designated just to the medical school. Then there are CAPS in other counseling areas that are open for our students.

Then we have advisors. As I say, “They’re advised to death.” We have preclinical advisors. That could be a staff member or physician for the first and second-year students and that person’s there to help them figure out things as they come up and how to navigate things that come up. Then they also are there to help them start figuring out what it is they might want to do for a career. Then, in their second and third year, they have a clinical advisor who is a physician, and that person is there to help them navigate things and help them continue to figure out what they want to do. When the time comes they can help figure out what block streams they want to do in the third year or what sorts of things would be best to do in the summers, those kinds of things. Then the clinical advisor are also there to help the fourth years navigate this dense morass of a match system for residency. It’s really complicated.

Not only do you have a clinical advisor, you’ll also have a specialty advisor. I have one going into neurosurgery, so she has me and she has a neurosurgeon, or one going into ped, so me and a pediatrician. Even if you’re going into emergency medicine, you would have me and another emergency medicine physician, so they get a lot of support during this time, and they help you figure out what letters recommendation you need, what kind of way rotations you might want to do to for a specific spot for residency. They help you figure out your CV, how to write your CV, how to do your personal statement . There’s a lot of support. I think besides the fact that our students are most excellent, I think this is a huge help in terms of them matching the residency. We do really well.

They also have a research advisor to figure out what project they want to do. They have a requirement for graduation to do a research project and it’s called an “independent scholarly project,” so they have to do that somewhere over their four years. There’s a research advisor for that.

Then they have the big sibs, the second-year students who are assigned to a first-year student to be there as a point person to help them. There’s peer-to-peer tutoring, where the upperclassmen tutor the first and second years if they need it. We have an Ombudsman for private issues that come up. Then we have these academic families where groups of 10 from each school are put in these societies, which are made of first, second, third, and fourth-year students, alumni, faculty, staff, and so they do things together in terms of social things that are fun. They do service projects together. They do reflection, they do dinners together. You’re not just part of your class, you’re part of the school as a community, as a group. In my days, you knew your classmates and maybe a couple ahead of you and behind you, and that was it, so this is a really great way that we incorporate everybody into the school so students are part of the whole place.

Where can listeners learn more about Georgetown University School of Medicine? [30:03]

Well, we are all over the place. We are on social media. It’s a great place to actually hear from students too. Some of them do a day in the life of a Georgetown student and they have little videos. Certainly, go to our website, which is som.georgetown.edu , and look for the admissions piece. You could also read about our Racial Justice Committee for Change. It’s front and center on there. We also have information sessions that we have several times a month that you can just join a Zoom link and learn more about us. You’re able to ask questions because we have students on these panels, and we also have our outreach person. There are a lot of opportunities to get more information, and actually get it live,

Related Resources:

  • 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School and Secondary Essays , a free guide
  • School-Specific Secondary Application Essay Tips
  • Secondary Strategy: Why Do You Want To Go Here?

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The Office of Undergraduate Admissions encourages you to learn more about the admissions process by exploring the information provided on our website. Currently, you are able to apply as an undergraduate student in three different ways: as  a first year applicant ,  a transfer applicant , or  a visiting student .  International students  follow the same admissions procedures and use the same application as all other applicants to the university.

We encourage you to thoroughly read the important information about the application process, policies and procedures. If you are unable to find the information that you are looking for on our website, you may contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (202) 687.3600 and request to speak with an admissions officer.

Georgetown University welcomes applications for admission to its undergraduate schools from students of character, intelligence, motivations and achievement, without distinction on the basis of race, gender, immigration status or religious preference. The University, through its Committee on Admissions, selects for its first-year class and transfer students that most likely to profit from the educational offerings of Georgetown. New students are admitted in the fall semester and for full-time study only. ​

We believe that the college admissions process is a very personal experience which deeply affects the lives of our applicants. In order to fulfill our commitment to this holistic admissions process, Georgetown uses its own application, which allows our applicants to best express their personalities, talents, skills and accomplishments. The Georgetown Application benefits our applicants in many ways.

  • Our personalized application allows us to keep our applicant pool to a manageable size which guarantees that all applications will be read by a regional Admissions Officer who will apply his/her regional knowledge to the decision making process.
  • We are able to offer each applicant an alumni interview, which further personalizes the process by allowing the applicant to tell his/her story in his/her own words.
  • The Georgetown Application allows high school counselors and teachers to submit personalized letters of recommendation for our applicants.

georgetown university application essay questions

Undergraduates at Georgetown receive a liberal arts education steeped in the Jesuit traditions of social justice and cura personalis , or “care of the whole person.” The university is committed to helping students grow intellectually, spiritually and emotionally as well as encouraging them to become thoughtful and caring members of society who contribute to the greater good. In the classroom, discussions span the universe of human interest. No matter what their academic pursuits may be, all undergraduates explore broad intellectual horizons in one of five undergraduate schools:

College of Arts & Sciences

McDonough School of Business

School of Health School of Nursing

Walsh School of Foreign Service

Students are admitted to and receive their degrees from one of the five schools but can take classes offered in any undergraduate school. In fact, students are encouraged to think broadly and take an interdisciplinary approach to their education. Many students major in one school and minor in another, getting valuable experience of studying with students of every major and background.

Students are encouraged to enhance their classroom learning experience by taking advantage of Georgetown’s location in Washington, D.C., holding internships on Capitol Hill, the National Institutes of Health, ABC News, The World Bank, The Smithsonian, Embassies, or with the myriad of non-profit and corporate groups involved with policy-making. Before graduation, 95% of Georgetown students have at at least one internship.

georgetown university application essay questions

Student Life

With more than 6,300 undergraduates from all 50 states and more than 130 countries, Georgetown is a vibrant place to live and learn. Visit the Campus Life section of the University’s website to find out more about the dynamic Georgetown community. It includes a wide spectrum of student organizations , sports teams and clubs, student publications and student activism in political and social causes. Community is further fostered through residence life, with more than 80 percent of students living on the University campus.

If you are interested in contacting a current Georgetown student, please visit the Georgetown Admissions Ambassador Program (GAAP) website to find one from your home state or country.

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Georgetown Secondary Application Essay Tips & Prompts

  • Cracking Med School Admissions

The Georgetown University School of Medicine secondary application reflects the school’s mission in recruiting a diverse and compassionate medical school class. The primary Georgetown secondary application essay is tough – it’s like a 1-page “ Why Georgetown ,” “ Why Medicine ,” and Autobiography all in one essay! Georgetown changed its character limit last year, so our applicants who pre-wrote this secondary had to re-work it. This year, we are advising students to pre-write this secondary because the essays + character limits have not changed for the past couple of years. The Georgetown secondary essays are also unique and difficult to finish with excellence. 

Our Cracking Med School Admissions team has a track record of helping our mentees receive acceptances to Georgetown Medical School year after year. Get started and read our Georgetown Medical School secondary application tips below. To learn more about student life, read our extensive blog post on  How to Get Into Georgetown Medical School.

Cracking Med School Admissions - 1 School Secondary Essay Edits

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  • We study your application strengths to see what unique attributes we’ll bring to the medical school

Georgetown Secondary Application Questions: 2023 – 2024

  • Are you/will you be enrolled as a student at Georgetown University during the 2022-2023 academic year? (Y/N)
  • The Georgetown University Academy for Research, Clinical, and Health Equity Scholarship (ARCHES)
  • Pedro Arrupe S.J. Scholarship for Peace (ARRUPE)
  • Gateway Exploration Program (GEP)
  • Georgetown Scholars Program (GSP)
  • Georgetown University School of Medicine Summer Immersion Program (GUSOM SCS)
  • Cultivating Opportunity & Realizing Excellence (CORE) Leadership Program
  • Graduated from Georgetown Experimental Medical Studies Program (GEMS)
  • Graduated from Special Master’s Program (SMP)
  • The Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM) strives to ensure that its students become respectful physicians, with cultural humility, who embrace all dimensions of caring for the whole person. With our Jesuit values of Cura Personalis, People for Others, and Community in Diversity, we are steadfast in our commitment to racial justice and to addressing the health inequities exacerbated by the recent pandemic. Please describe how your values, life experiences, and your identity will contribute to these GUSOM priorities. (1,000 characters max)
  • Is there any further information that you would like the Committee on Admissions to be aware of when reviewing your file that you were not able to notate in another section of this or the AMCAS Application? (1,000 characters max)
  • Why have you chosen to apply to the Georgetown University School of Medicine and how do you think your education at Georgetown will prepare you to become a physician for the future? (3,000 characters max)

Tips to Answer Georgetown Secondaries

Georgetown Secondary Pre-Writing Guidance: Georgetown changed its character limit last year, so our applicants who pre-wrote this secondary had to re-work it. This year, we are advising students to NOT pre-write this secondary. However, because this essay is tough to perfect, make sure to start on this essay as soon as you receive the official secondary. 

Georgetown Secondary Application Tip #1: Understand the Jesuit value of “cura personalis.” You can read more about Georgetown’s philosophy / mission statement here: What is Cura Personalis – Georgetown College

Once you understand Cura Personalis, show how you have fostered your commitment to serve others in all 3 of the long essays. We advise our students to pick stories and activities that exemplify cura personalis. The Georgetown Medical School Admissions committee seeks to recruit a medical school class of compassionate physicians who are visionaries in wanting to improve healthcare. 

Georgetown Secondary Application Tip #2: For the question, “ Why have you chosen to apply to the Georgetown University School of Medicine and how do you think your education at Georgetown will prepare you to become a physician for the future? ” this is like a “Why Georgetown,” “Why do you want to be a doctor” and “Tell me about yourself” loaded in one question. Make sure to incorporate all 3 of these ideas in your response. 

Read the following resources to help you respond to this essay:

  • How To Write An Autobiography For Medical School
  • Why this Medical School? Secondary Essay Example

One successful technique we’ve advised our mentees through our secondary essay edits – include why you want to be going to medical school in Washington D.C. Many of our students who receive interview invites show compassion through their stories AND state that they want to engage in community health, advocacy, and public policy in Washington D.C. Don’t be afraid to write about opportunities in Washington D.C. (the opportunities you want to pursue as a medical student don’t necessarily have to be linked to Georgetown University). While it’s not wrong to write about your interest in research and biomedical scientists, we advise students to link their research to “big picture” ideas to improve healthcare.

Georgetown Secondary Application Tip #3: For the question, “ Is there any further information that you would like the Committee on Admissions to be aware of when reviewing your file that you were not able to notate in another section of this or the AMCAS Application? ” treat this like a diversity essay. You can write about your experiences in Washington D.C., any hardship you have faced, leadership experiences, global health projects, and anything else that would help you stand out.

Read our helpful blog post on Diversity Essays:  Medical School Diversity Essay Examples and Tips

Georgetown Secondary Application Tip #4: This is a tough secondary application, and medical school applicants frequently ask for our help to edit and brainstorm their Georgetown University School of Medicine secondary application essay responses. We can help you through our secondary essay packages . Have questions about how you can stand out? Contact us below.

Georgetown Secondary Application Tip   #5:  Georgetown medical students take advantage of opportunities at other Georgetown University graduate schools. For example, we’ve had mentees who take business school classes at the McDonough School of Business and public policy classes at McCourt School of Public Policy. If you discuss your interests in other Georgetown graduate schools in your Georgetown secondary application, make sure to discuss how your clinical experiences during clinical rotations, medical education, and learnings at other graduate schools will all complement each other.

[ Read more secondary essay tips: George Washington (GW) , New York University (NYU) , University of Virginia (UVA) , Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)  ]

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Georgetown Secondary Application Questions: 2022 – 2023

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Georgetown Secondary Application Questions: 2021 – 2022

  • Why have you chosen to apply to the Georgetown University School of Medicine and how do you think your education at Georgetown will prepare you to become a physician for the future? (1 page, formatted at your discretion)

Georgetown University School of Medicine Secondary Application Questions: 2020 - 2021

  • The Georgetown University School of Medicine strives to ensure that its students become respectful physicians who embrace all dimensions of caring for the whole person. Please describe how your personal characteristics or life experiences will contribute to the Georgetown University School of Medicine community and bring educational benefits to our student body. (1,000 characters max)

Georgetown Medical School Secondary Application Questions: 2019 – 2020

Georgetown medical school secondary application questions: 2018 – 2019, georgetown medical school secondary application questions: 2017 – 2018, georgetown medical school secondary application questions: 2016 – 2017, georgetown medical school secondary application questions: 2015 – 2016.

  • Why have you chosen to apply to the Georgetown University School of Medicine and how do you think your education at Georgetown will prepare you to become a physician for the future? (1-2 page, formatted at your discretion)

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Application Components

The Admissions Committee takes a holistic approach to the evaluation process, meaning we consider all aspects of your application to determine if you can handle the rigor of the Georgetown MBA Program and to discover if our program is the best “fit” for you. Each element of the application is reviewed by the Admissions Committee to learn about you as a student, a professional, and on a personal level.

Students in the Full-time and Flex MBA Programs at Georgetown McDonough come from a wide variety of educational fields of study and professional industries. Our  Full-time  and  Flex MBA Program class profiles offer an overview of our most recent class of MBA students.

Returning users:  Log in  to continue or complete your application

MBA Application Process

The Georgetown MBA application process requires thorough review of each applicant’s submitted components. The process follows a standard order of operations.

  • Submit completed application: Gather all required application components and submit before your selected application round deadline.
  • Admissions review: Each element of your application is carefully and holistically reviewed by the Admissions Committee to learn about you as a student, a professional, and on a community member.
  • Interview : Interviews are invitation only and are another way for you to showcase your fit for the Georgetown MBA program.
  • Receive your decision: Unless additional materials are required by the Admissions Committee, you should receive a decision regarding your admittance by the indicated decision notification deadline. Those who have been accepted into the program will receive information regarding deposit deadlines and pre-arrival to-dos.

Application Deadlines

All complete applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. ET on the deadline day .

*To formally accept an offer of admission, two, non-refundable $2,000 deposits ($4,000 total) are required to reserve your seat in the class. **The MBA Admissions Committee has extended the Round 2 deadline for the Flex MBA Online program to January 11, 2024. Please read the recent announcement, Georgetown Flex MBA Online Provides Greater Access for International Students . All complete FXO applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. ET by January 11, 2024.

Preparing your MBA application can be a lengthy process. That is why we’ve carefully chosen our admissions components so you only have to submit one written essay, one video essay, one letter of recommendation, and unofficial documents to apply. The Admissions Committee reviews completed applications that include the components listed below. Please allow several weeks after the application deadline for your application materials to be processed and for our team to update your application status online. Decisions are released through your online application by the published notification date.

Application Form

  • Test score *
  • Transcripts

Recommendation

Application fee.

  • Interview (invitation only)
  • International applicants

Re-applicants

*Flex MBA and Flex MBA Online applicants may qualify for a test waiver. Review our Flex MBA test waiver policy .

  • Applicants who would like to be considered for both the Full-time and Flex MBA Programs must submit separate applications with a different email address for each program.
  • The Flex MBA Online (FXO) program is strictly for students who reside in the United States, including international students who have permanent residency in the United States or already reside in the United States on a visa (this program does not sponsor F-1 visas). If you are admitted and enroll to FXO, you are expected to attend classes online from any time zone within the United States according to Eastern Time (ET).
  • Your online application must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. ET on the deadline date. Applications that are received after the deadline will be considered for the next admissions round.
  • Documents submitted to the Georgetown University McDonough School of Business become the property of Georgetown University and will not be returned to the applicant.
  • Should you be admitted, you will receive a conditional offer and will be required to mail all original/official copies of each application document (test scores, transcripts, degree certificates) to the Admissions Office. Discrepancies between self-reported/unofficial documents and official records may result in an admissions offer being rescinded.
  • If any application materials are found to be forged, falsified, or altered in any way, the university will notify all relevant officials, including the individual or institution issuing the document and, as appropriate, immigration officers. If an offer of admission has been made, it may be rescinded.
  • If you are a visually-impaired applicant and need an accessible application, please contact us at  [email protected]  and we’d be happy to assist.

All applications must be submitted through our  online application   by creating your application account . If you are a visually-impaired applicant and need an accessible application, please contact us at  [email protected] . We would be happy to assist.

Test Score Requirements

Graduate management admissions test (gmat) / graduate record exam (gre)/executive assessment.

Scores accepted to the  Full-time MBA Program  include:

  • GMAT, GRE, Executive Assessment (valid scores, taken within the last five years)
  • Expired GMAT/GRE scores
  • Applicants who meet the necessary criteria may apply with a test waiver. PLEASE NOTE: For additional dates and details for the Test Waiver Application during each application round , please view the policy page

Scores accepted to the  Flex MBA Program and Flex MBA Online Program   include:

  • LSAT, MCAT, and PCAT
  • Applicants who  meet the necessary criteria may apply with a test waiver

Scores accepted to the  MAAP MBA Program  include:

To complete your application, you must upload an  unofficial , scanned copy of your test score directly into the online application.  Official scores only need to be submitted if you are admitted to the program. 

GMAT Program Codes

  • Full-time MBA Program: JT7-G0-20
  • Flex MBA Program: JT-G0-64

If you would like to test your GMAT skills prior to taking the test, take this  GMAT mini quiz .

GRE Program Code

  • Full-time and Flex MBA Programs: 7821

Executive Assessment

  • The Executive Assessment is specifically designed to evaluate the business school readiness of seasoned professionals. The assessment focuses on skills that are critical both at work and in a professional MBA program: higher-order reasoning, critical thinking, analysis, and problem-solving. Because it was designed specifically for experienced professionals, it requires modest preparation, takes only 90 minutes to complete, and includes flexible rescheduling options. The test is administered by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), creators of the GMAT® exam. Learn more about the Executive Assessment by visiting  gmac.com/ea .

International applicants are required to submit  additional application components .

You are required to hold a four-year bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university or an equivalent degree from a foreign country. To complete your application, you must upload  unofficial  transcripts for all academic coursework you have taken directly into the online application. Please make sure each transcript document includes:

  • Course names
  • All grades received (including transfer credits and study abroad programs)
  • Cumulative GPA
  • Degree conferral information
  • For more information on how to submit your grading scale, please view our  Grade Scale Guide . 
  • For more information on submitting your degree certificate, please view our  Diploma Guide . 

Official transcripts should only be submitted if you are admitted to the program. 

Fall 2024 Essays

We want to hear your story. When responding to our required essays, be authentic and take time to reflect on your goals and past experiences. Craft a response that explains how these experiences led you to pursue an MBA. 

Personal Essay

Our goal at Georgetown McDonough is to craft a diverse class with people who have had varying personal and professional life experiences. As such, we want to give our applicants the opportunity to select one essay (from a list of three) that allows them the ability to best highlight their experiences, characteristics, and values that showcase the value proposition that they can bring to the McDonough community. Please select one of the following three essays to complete in 500 words (approximately two pages, double spaced) and include the essay prompt and your first/last name at the top of your submission.

  • Essay Option One – Georgetown Community Our mission is rooted in Jesuit principles of equality and respect for everyone and an ethos of caring for the whole person. Inclusivity and diversity are core to supporting a community of people with an intersectional understanding of themselves and the world around them. Share how your educational, familial, cultural, economic, social, and/or other individual life experiences will contribute to the diversity of perspectives and ideas at Georgetown University.
  • ​ Essay Option Two – Leave Your Legacy Commitment to service and community is an important value that Hoyas share across Georgetown McDonough’s 40+ MBA student-run clubs and organizations, nine centers and initiatives, and various other co-curricular activities. What do you want your legacy to be as a McDonough student and alumni? Be as specific as possible.
  • Essay Option Three – Magis Magis is a Jesuit value that instills the sense of achieving “more” or “greater” excellence. Share how you achieved magis during a professional experience as evidenced on your resume. Describe why this experience exemplified excellence and what about your involvement (i.e. strengths or skills) contributed to the excellence.  

Video Essay

Building a cohort of diverse and unique individuals is important to the admissions team. We want you to bring your whole self to Georgetown McDonough. Throughout the application, we’ve learned about what you would add as a professional and leader. Just as important is learning about your interests outside of work. In one minute, please share 5-10 random facts about yourself that are not on your resume and how these facts contribute to who you are as a professional and leader.

Video Guidelines

  • You may use your phone, computer, or other means to record the video, but please ensure all audio and visual components are clear. We recommend a well-lit room and minimal noise distraction. 
  • The admissions committee would like for you to appear in person during part of your video.
  • We recommend unscripted, conversational videos – help us get to know the real you!
  • Upload your video to an accessible website (such as YouTube, Vimeo, Youku, or Tudou), and submit the direct video URL into your online application. 
  • Please note that all videos must remain active and accessible to the admissions committee online for a minimum of five years for record retention purposes.
  • For your privacy: Do not include your name in the title of your video. You may submit “unlisted” videos via YouTube or password protected videos through Vimeo. If using a password, please include immediately after your link in the text box below. [Ex: www.youtube.com/123, password: Hoyas]  

Optional Essay

Please provide any information you would like to add to your application that you have not otherwise included (300-350 words, approximately one page, double spaced).

Re-Applicant Essay

Required for re-applicants. How have you strengthened your candidacy since your last application? We are particularly interested in hearing about how you have grown professionally and personally (300-350 words, approximately one page, double spaced).

How have you progressed in your career and made an impact in your organization? Use this component of the application process to clearly outline your professional experience and accomplishments. Upload a current resume that corresponds to the information submitted in the “Employment” section of your online application. Your resume should clearly identify part-time and internship experience, as well as months and years in each position. 

Only one recommendation is required for the Georgetown MBA application. We are interested in gaining insight from someone who can objectively evaluate your professional performance as well as managerial and leadership potential. We discourage letters from university faculty, family members, and additional letters of recommendation. A current supervisor is strongly preferred for Full-time MBA applicants and required of Flex MBA and Flex MBA Online applicants. 

To complete the recommendation requirement, your recommender is required to submit a recommendation form. Your recommender will receive this form and detailed instructions once you complete the “Recommendations” section of your application. We recommend allowing your recommender at least one week to complete the form. Your recommender is welcome to attach a letter or Common Letter of Recommendation (LOR) at the bottom of this form. 

You are required to submit a $175 non-refundable application fee, payable online via credit card. We are unable to accept personal checks and money orders.

You may receive an application fee waiver if you belong to one of the following groups. Waivers will be applied automatically when you submit your application.

  • Active duty, reservists, or veterans of the United States military
  • Management Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT) Fellows
  • Forté MBA Launch participants
  • Members of the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management (CGSM)
  • Current and returned Peace Corps Volunteers
  • AmeriCorps and Teach for America participants or alumni
  • Admit.Me Fellows
  • Citizens of countries on the  United Nations’ list of least developed countries
  • Applicants applying to more than one Georgetown MBA program (Full-time MBA, Flex MBA, and Flex MBA Online programs)*

*Fee waiver only applied to an applicant’s 2nd and 3rd applications. Prior to submitting these applications, please email [email protected] for further instructions.

You automatically qualify for a reduced application fee of $100 if you meet the criteria below:

  • Members of Forté
  • U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents who earn less than $30,000 per year
  • Non-U.S. Citizens who earn less than $15,000 per year in U.S. dollars

Attendees of an event listed below will be eligible to receive an application fee reduction code for the current application cycle. Instructions will be sent via email within three business days of the event. Please apply this code when you complete the application and the reduction will be applied to your account. Only one application fee reduction code may be applied.

  • Experience Georgetown Information Session or class visit between July 2023 and June 2024
  • On-campus or Virtual MBA Information Session
  • Focus on Diversity
  • Flex MBA Preview Day

If you have already applied or are applying through the Consortium, then we regrettably cannot refund the amount of the application fee waiver or reduction. 

If you are currently furloughed or laid off due to unforeseen national economic circumstances, please reach out to [email protected] for information about application fee waivers.

Interviews are offered by invitation only. Invitations to interview are extended following each application deadline and will continue up until the decision release date. Additionally, waitlist candidates may be invited to interview after initial decisions are released. The interview period for Fall 2024 Round 2 applicants will begin Thursday, January 18, and go through Friday, March 15, 2024 . The timing of an interview invite has no bearing on the admissions decision or is demonstrative of the strength of the candidacy.

If you submitted an application and received a final decision for the Georgetown MBA Program within the last year and would like to reapply, please email the MBA Admissions Office at  [email protected]  to reset your application account. Please include “Application Reset Request” in the subject line of the email. You will not be able to access the new application until this is completed.

As a re-applicant, you will need to submit the following information:

  • A new application
  • Test score ( view specific program requirements )*
  • Essays (including the re-applicant essay)
  • Updated resume
  • An updated recommendation

* Flex MBA and Flex MBA Online applicants may qualify for a test waiver.  Review our Flex MBA and Flex MBA Online test waiver policy .

We are happy to offer our reapplicants the following benefits:

  • An application fee waiver
  • Personalized coaching between application cycles
  • The opportunity to reuse your previous application essays and video essay, as long as they are still relevant and accurate for your MBA candidacy

International Applicants

Students who have attended or graduated from a non-U.S. college or university must submit their academic documents according to World Education Services (WES) standards, as described below.

  • Academic transcripts must list the course name and grades received
  • A diploma/degree certificate that shows the date that the degree was conferred
  • An official grading scale of the academic institution

If your academic documents are in a language other than English, you must submit the certified translation as well as the original documentation for review. Once admitted and prior to matriculating into the program, translators are required to send our office both the original documentation and certified translation in a sealed envelope. Your translator should certify that the original documentation was received in a sealed envelope from the institution.

* Time Zone Verification: The Flex MBA Online (FXO) program is strictly for students who reside in time zones that are +/- 3 hours of Eastern Time. This program sponsors F-1 visas. FXO class times are set to be held on weekdays between 6:30-9:20 pm ET (except for required in-person residencies on our Washington, D.C. campus and the Global Business Experience ). If you are admitted to and enroll in FXO, you are expected to attend classes online between these times from any time zone this is +/-3 hours of Eastern Time.

Demonstration of English Language Proficiency

Applicants who fit the criteria below are required to upload an unofficial English Language Proficiency Exam score report to the online application.

  • Non U.S. citizens
  • Non U.S. permanent residents
  • Applicants who have not obtained a four-year or advanced degree from a university where the only primary medium of instruction was English

You may choose from one of the following three exams to demonstrate your level of competence in English.

  • We now accept MyBest Scores. Test dates on your MyBest Scores report that are older than two years are expired and not valid. All dates must be valid.
  • We accept the TOEFL iBT at Test Centers or Home Edition (please note we do NOT accept the TOEFL Essentials at this time)
  • IELTS  – We accept only academic module results; the minimum required score is 7. Your test result must not be more than two years old. If you are admitted to the program, official scores must be sent directly from Cambridge (IELTS) to Georgetown University MBA Admissions.
  • PTE  – The minimum required score is 68. Your test result must not be more than two years old. If you are admitted to the program, official scores must be sent directly from Pearson Vue to Georgetown University MBA Admissions.

*Time Zone Verification: The Flex MBA Online (FXO) program is strictly for students who reside in the United States, including international students who have permanent residency in the United States or already reside in the United States on a visa (this program does not sponsor F-1 visas). FXO class times are set to be held on weekdays between 6:30-9:20 p.m. ET (except for required in-person residencies on our Washington, D.C., campus and the Global Business Experience ). If you are admitted and enroll to FXO, you are expected to attend classes online according to Eastern Time from any time zone within the United States.

MBA Advanced Access Program

Georgetown McDonough is excited to invite you to participate in our new MBA Advanced Access Program (MAAP), which allows those in their final year of undergraduate or graduate school who have not previously had professional full-time work experience to apply for deferred enrollment into our Full-time MBA Program.

During your deferral period you will gain access to select speakers and events and have the opportunity to engage and learn more about our community.

MAAP Application Deadline

The deadline to apply is with our Round 4 deadline of April 30, 2024,  only after which your application will be reviewed . The initial deposit is $500. Each following year until matriculation, you will be asked to reconfirm that you meet enrollment requirements and make any subsequent deposits.

Application Workshop

MBA Application Workshop

This virtual workshop provides an in-depth look at the Georgetown MBA application process. Associate Director of MBA admissions Glen Nuenighoff offers tips on how to best prepare the application components.

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Georgetown University

Essay requirements.

Academic Requirements

Costs & Scholarships

All first-year applicants will complete one Georgetown-specific short answer question, and two Georgetown-specific short essay questions.

essay

Short Answer and Essay Questions

All questions have to be answered. Prompts for the last essay vary based on applicants' intended school and program.

Briefly (approximately one-half page, single-spaced) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief personal or creative essay which you feel best describes you and reflects on your own background, identity, skills, and talents.

For Applicants to Georgetown College:

A liberal arts education from the College of Arts & Sciences involves encounters with new concepts and modes of inquiry. Describe something (a class, a book, an event, etc.) that changed your thinking. (Applicants to the sciences, mathematics, public policy or languages are encouraged to include examples related to that field.)

For Applicants to the School of Health:

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care at Georgetown University. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, or Human Science).

For Applicants to the School of Nursing:

Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major Nursing.

For Applicants to the School of Foreign Service:

The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

For Applicants to the School of Business:

The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial, and global perspectives. Please describe your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

Helpful Resources

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How To Answer The “Why This College” Essay Prompt

We’ll go over the best ways to approach the 'Why This College" essay and provide helpful tips to help you write an effective essay that impresses admission officers.

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How To Format & Structure Your College Application Essay

Your essays are a chance for admissions officers to get to know you beyond your grades, test scores, and ECLs. But how do you craft essays that reflect who you are AND impress the admissions officers?

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Everything You Need To Know About The Supplemental Essays

Supplemental essays are required by many highly selective institutions in addition to the personal essay included in your Common Application. You can learn all about what they are and why they’re important here.

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Feel confident when submitting your college application essay by getting it reviewed by a professional admissions expert..

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georgetown university application essay questions

4 Great Georgetown Essay Examples

What’s covered:, essay example 1 – special talents, essay example 2 – personal statement, essay example 3 – the meaning of being educated, essay example 4 – speech and debate, where to get feedback on your essay .

Georgetown is a prestigious university located right outside of Washington D.C. that is known for its great public policy and international relations programs. With so many eager applicants wanting to attend this highly-selective school, you need to have strong essays to stand out from the crowd. In this post, we’ll share real essays students have submitted to Georgetown, and share what they did well and how they could be made even better (Names and identifying information have been changed, but all other details are preserved).

Please note: Looking at examples of real essays students have submitted to colleges can be very beneficial to get inspiration for your essays. You should never copy or plagiarize from these examples when writing your own essays. Colleges can tell when an essay isn’t genuine and will not view students favorably if they plagiarized. 

Read our Georgetown essay breakdown to get a comprehensive overview of this year’s supplemental prompts.

Prompt: Please indicate any special talents or skills you possess. You should write in either paragraph or bulleted-list format. (200-250 words)

Bending down, I pluck a four-leaf clover from a sea of genetically identical Trifolium. After capturing this anomaly on film, I press it, adding it to my collection. Ever since I first discovered four-leaf clovers, I honed my observational skills until I could find them with ease. Now, I am a master of small details and the proud owner of 22 four-leaf clovers. 

My memory for special occasions is unrivaled. Within my brain, I categorize and store dates: birthdays, anniversaries, check-ins, etc. I take pride in remembering my friends’ and family’s important days and being there to celebrate or support, listen or laugh, or simply spend time with them. Attentiveness and thoughtfulness are at the foundation of who I am. 

When I saw the unicycle under the tree, I was elated yet apprehensive. All-day on Christmas, I practiced riding it: I waggled my arms as I sought my balance, caught myself each time I fell, and continued to stand up to try again. Through perseverance and determination, I eventually found my balance, and five months later, I could easily ride alongside my sister’s scooter through the park. 

My party trick is walking on my hands. With a beet-red face and dirty palms, I carefully fall out of my handstand and back into an upright position. I always giggle when I do so, observing the shocked, entertained faces of the people around me. My unusual talent facilitates joy and laughter, and inevitably, connection.

What the Essay Did Well

This essay is successful because of how random it is! When a prompt asks for a special talent or skill, many people might be tempted to write about some extracurricular they excel at or a characteristic they have like leadership or perseverance, but this student chose to share a collection of unrelated fun facts about themselves. We would never know about their collection of four-leaf clovers or how they walk on their hands from the rest of the application. This essay really takes advantage of the prompt to humanize the applicant and share the little details that make them unique.

Another thing this essay does well is combining the suggested structures. The disjointed paragraphs describing a new talent give the effect of a bulleted list, but each skill is contextualized in its own paragraph. They could have just written “ I can ride the unicycle” , but instead we learned about this student’s perseverance through their explanation of riding a unicycle.

Even if they chose to only write about one special talent, this student does a great job of drawing the reader into the moment. We are there, crouching down and looking into the sea of green clovers. We are there, watching them struggle to balance on the unicycle. We are there, hearing them giggle as they dust off their hands and stand rightside up. The inclusion of sensory details like these really brings the reader into the story, making it so much more enjoyable to read.

What Could Be Improved

Since each paragraph is completely unrelated to the others, this essay could benefit from a few transitions to make it clear there’s a jump from one skill to another. If the student wanted to keep the list-like feel, they could start each paragraph with a quick recap and then jump into the rest of the paragraph. For example, the first paragraph would start like “ An eye of four-leaf clovers.” , and then go into the paragraph. 

Prompt: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you. (Approximately 1 page, single-spaced)

Faded dye. Loose threads. Peeling rank stripes. 

On the surface, my Brazilian Jiu Jitsu belts are a display of my martial arts progression. But in each worn belt there are stories of sweat and tears, triumph and loss, challenges and growth. Like the changing colors of a seasonal rank promotion, I myself have changed, adopting new skills with each belt added to my collection. These scraps of fabric are more than my prized possessions; they’re an album of my life’s most defining moments. 

Crisp white and too small, my first belt was worn by a girl who was eager to learn self-defense, but was anxious to try something new. Enraptured, I’d watch higher ranked students grapple, excitedly envisioning myself performing the same graceful Kosoto-gari throws and powerful rear-naked choke holds that I saw on the mats. However, expectations can be a harsh antithesis to reality: any visions of my future martial arts prowess crumbled upon encountering dive roll drills. 

Deceived by its simple, somersault-like appearance, I vaulted my crouched body with gusto, only to flop onto my side like an exhausted cat. No problem. I positioned myself for another attempt. The same “floppy-cat” predicament ensued. Again! This time I rolled into my teammate. Frustrated, I began to ask my coach for pointers, but stopped upon realizing I was holding up the drill line. Over and over, each effort yielded the same undesirable results. Shame coursed through my veins as I returned to the back of the line. 

Now, when I watched my classmates spar, I looked on with envy; it seemed like they were speeding towards a rank promotion while I was drowning in my own incompetence, marked to forever remain a white belt. This dismal attitude followed me until I met my training partner, Ann. She was a higher-ranked teammate and seasoned athlete, so I was flustered by the thought of her seeing me struggle. But when it came time to practice our dive rolls, I was surprised to see her fumble like me. Unlike me, Ann wasn’t one to struggle on her own: she shot her hand into the air, immediately getting our coach’s attention. With a patient smile, he walked us through the technique, occasionally allowing Ann to stop and check that I understood; within minutes, both of us could perform solid dive rolls. While this moment brought a surge of pride, it also opened my eyes to my biggest shortcoming – lacking the courage to advocate for my needs. 

Realizing this problem, I set on the path to correcting my mistakes. Whenever I struggled with a move, I made an effort to consult my coaches and teammates, working to build both my skills and rapport. Forging bonds with my teammates also allowed me to adopt moves from their grappling style, sparking an appreciation for the lessons learned from each training partner. With each week that went by, my progress became more noticeable. Where there were previously gaps in my technique and hesitation in my movements, I could now see my skills improving and my desire to speak up develop. No longer was my white belt crisp and new; it was now faded and grayish, hiding memories of difficult, yet rewarding matches in its stitching.

Ultimately, my biggest mistake was struggling by myself. While jiu jitsu is an individual sport, it’s not an isolated one. Ann, my coaches, and my teammates were more than my competitors; they were my best learning resources and closest supporters. 

Since wearing my first belt, I’ve learned to change my despairing attitude to one of openness and determination. Challenges will continue to come my way, whether they come in the form of a jiu jitsu opponent or a grueling exam. Only I can put in the work to achieve my desired outcomes, but I’ve come to see that I don’t have to face my difficulties alone. Now, I look to the future with anticipation for the next obstacle to overcome. Who knows? Perhaps a black belt awaits.

For a prompt that asked to get to know the applicant better, this is an amazing essay. We learn so much about this student from her response. We know one of her main passions is Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, we get to see her biggest weakness stand in the way of her success and then watch as she overcomes that, and we learn about how she approaches challenges both on and off the mat. 

How is this essay able to convey so much information while still being interesting to read? The author does an excellent job of placing us in the moment by showing us what is occurring. Right from the beginning, we see a little girl with a brand-new belt eagerly watching tumbles and choke holds. Then, rather than just telling us she struggled with dive rolls, she describes the process in detail and compares her failures to a “floppy-cat”. These depictions help bring the reader into the story and make it so much easier to envision what she went through. She also brings us into her mind, telling us about the shame and envy she felt when she originally struggled and how she now understands the importance of getting help.

Also notice how the essay doesn’t come to an end once she has her “aha” moment and her mindset towards approaching challenges shifts. She takes two paragraphs to bring us down from the climax of the essay and continues to show us how she took time to grow once she started asking for help. We aren’t led to believe she immediately became a jiu jitsu master after her one experience, which is a common mistake students make in their essays. It took months, if not years, for her to get to where she is now, so although her mindset shifted when she was younger, we get to see how her new perspective influenced her after that one example.   

One way this essay could be made even greater is by including an internal monologue to show us her emotions. This student already did an excellent job of showing us what happened externally, but when it comes to her feelings and thoughts at the moment, she tells us about them. 

Instead of telling us she was frustrated when she kept messing up the dive rolls, she could have written something like this: “With every failed attempt a little voice in my head nagged at me over and over. You’re never going to get it. You’re terrible at this. Stop holding up the line, it’s not going to work. ” These lines convey so much more emotion than just telling us she was frustrated. It helps us understand how she thinks, as well as make it more relatable because everyone knows what it’s like to feel hopeless and annoyed at yourself when you can’t do something correctly.

Incorporating more of her internal monologue would further elevate this essay which already does a good job of showing us what happened.

Peering out at my 7-year-old constituents, I scratch the stick-on beard around my chin and adjust my top hat. “Ten score and three years ago,” I begin, “Abraham Lincoln was born.”

Even as a child, my fascination with politics extended beyond schoolwork. From memorizing the names of politicians to voluntarily delivering presentations on presidents to my second-grade class, I immersed myself in studying government. But education extends beyond mere memorization; it allows people to directly engage with a diverse array of ideas and perspectives to achieve a deeper understanding of the human experience, and more broadly, the world. To be educated is not a singular state of being; rather, education is a continuous, evolving process. Education empowers individuals with the knowledge and the experience to catalyze societal change. The College of Arts & Sciences will marry instruction in political theory with opportunities for community engagement, which, as an aspiring constitutional lawyer, will enable me to break systemic barriers to civic involvement. 

At Georgetown, I am eager to major in Government, minoring in Justice and Peace Studies, to investigate the role of governing institutions in providing democratic access for underrepresented populations. Georgetown’s wealth of course offerings will allow me to simultaneously receive formal classroom instruction and wield this knowledge to serve underserved communities. Through courses like JUPS 280 “Gender, Immigration, & Social Justice,” I will deepen my understanding of disparities in democratic participation by exploring the intersectionality of race, gender, and socioeconomic status. Combining my passions for academia and volunteerism, I am also eager to engage in CBL courses like UNXD 130 “Social Action” to further my inquiry into the mechanisms driving successful social movements, on both local and global scales. Georgetown’s intimate classroom environment will expose me to the different perspectives of contemporary political theory and foster critical thought about world issues, including civic disengagement. 

Furthermore, pursuing undergraduate research will allow me to continue exploring the limited democratic participation of marginalized communities to understand the mechanisms that inhibit political engagement. Under Professor Nadia Brown, I will concentrate my research on possible legislation to break the barriers to civic engagement for African American women. Through the Royden B. Davis Fellowship, I will apply my research to implement sustainable programs in the D.C. metropolitan area to bridge disparities in voter participation among different racial groups. Georgetown’s array of research opportunities will enable me to connect with a community of diverse-minded changemakers, expanding my exposure to various dimensions of the human condition. Collaborating with my peers through research will not only kindle my insatiable curiosity, but also cultivate an analytical perspective when examining democratic institutions. 

Immersing myself in the college’s mission for cura personalis and social justice will allow me to employ my research and study of the theory of social action in the Georgetown community. Through the D.C. Schools project, for example, I will work to combat the language barrier by providing literacy services to elementary school students in D.C. Or, partaking in multidimensional dialogue with the passionate individuals of Educating Residents about Social Equality (ERASE) will enable me to interact with a community of people varied in culture, passion, and thought. I am aware of my limited perspective; engaging with Georgetown’s diverse student body will allow me to grow cognizant of the wide range of lived human experiences.

The College of Arts and Sciences’ dedication to uniting traditional classroom experience with experiential learning will enable me to venture into the world with the tools and mindset to spur democratic reform and cultivate a more accessible democracy for all individuals. As a Hoya, I will employ my global curiosity and inclusive nature to bolster civic engagement for underrepresented populations, both on campus and beyond. Georgetown will be a haven for my pursuits as a student and an activist, embodying engagement with diverse individuals and ideas to generate social reform.

This prompt is very specific. It’s not asking you to “describe a time” or “reflect on an instance.” It is concrete: admissions officers want answers. When they finish your essay, they should be able to say both:

  • what it means to you to be educated, and
  • how Georgetown will help you become educated.

This student does a great job of answering these questions, and, more specifically, of answering these questions at the right point in their essay . Great points can be difficult to understand if they’re presented in a disorganized way, but this essay’s strong structure ensures the writer’s ideas come across clearly.

First, they provide readers with a goofy image from their childhood, which immediately makes us interested in their story. But they wisely don’t spend too much time on the anecdote, and instead transition to explicitly answering the prompt’s first question: 

“To be educated is not a singular state of being; rather, education is a continuous, evolving process. Education empowers individuals with the knowledge and the experience to catalyze societal change.” 

The student then dives straight into a discussion of the specific resources at Georgetown that will immerse them in this “continuous, evolving process,” including a minor, courses, a professor, and a variety of extracurriculars. 

Seeing as the second half of this prompt is essentially a “Why This College?” prompt, this specificity is crucial, as it shows admissions officers that the student has spent real time thinking about how they would contribute to their school, and they aren’t just applying for superficial reasons related to location or prestige.

What Could Be Improved 

Most of the areas of improvement for this essay involve style and flow. For example, the student uses very long sentences throughout this essay. While those sentences are grammatically sound, constantly having to wade through all those words makes for a less enjoyable reading experience. 

Relatedly, one of the strange realities of college essays is that, while you spend many hours writing and revising your essays, admissions officers have no choice but to read them extremely quickly, because they have so many to get through. That means you want your points to be as easy to digest as possible, and long sentences force your reader to expend more energy tying various threads together.

For example, take the sentence:

“Combining my passions for academia and volunteerism, I am also eager to engage in CBL courses like UNXD 130 ‘Social Action’ to further my inquiry into the mechanisms driving successful social movements, on both local and global scales.”

This sentence goes from two of the student’s passions, to a course at Georgetown, to one of their academic goals. All this jumping around means two things. First, the points don’t get much individual attention, which means the student’s personality gets a little lost. And second, the student needs to spend extra words tying distinct ideas together. A more productive use of words might look something like:

“Ever since I did my first beach cleanup with my dad in 2010, I have had a passion for volunteerism. That project, and most of the others I’ve been involved in over the years, have been geared towards improving my local community. While rewarding, I feel ready to learn more about how to be an activist on a broader scale, through CBL courses like UNXD 130 ‘Social Action.’”

The same point about length applies to paragraphs, as longer paragraphs can be more difficult to follow, and thus your reader is more likely to get lost. If you keep the focus of each paragraph narrow (e.g., each paragraph is about a different value, a different childhood experience, or a different issue within ‘voting rights’), your reader can move through your ideas more efficiently.

For example, at the point in the essay where the “Combining my passions” sentence appears, the writer is pivoting from talking about their interest in government to their interest in activism. Regardless of whether their original sentence or our revised one is used, the student’s progression of ideas would be easier to follow if there was a paragraph break just before, as each paragraph would then be focused on just one thing.

Finally, to expand on a point made above about the student’s personality getting lost at points, there are numerous places in this essay where the student’s writing feels stilted and brochure-like. Having a strong personal voice in your college essays is crucial, as that’s a big way admissions officers can become familiar with your personality. After all, it is you who they are considering admitting to their school. By reciting facts from the course catalog, you aren’t telling them anything they don’t already know.

If you’re worried your essay might not be personal enough, read each sentence, then ask yourself “Why is this point important to me?” Then, try to incorporate that answer into your writing, if it’s not already there.

For example, in this essay, the student writes the following sentences about voting access:

  • “I am eager to major in Government, minoring in Justice and Peace Studies, to investigate the role of governing institutions in providing democratic access for underrepresented populations.”
  • “Through courses like JUPS 280 ‘Gender, Immigration, & Social Justice,” I will deepen my understanding of disparities in democratic participation by exploring the intersectionality of race, gender, and socioeconomic status.”
  • “Through the Royden B. Davis Fellowship, I will apply my research to implement sustainable programs in the D.C. metropolitan area to bridge disparities in voter participation among different racial groups.”

While they make it clear that voting access is important to them, they do not make it personal. They do not tell us why it is important to them, and thus this student doesn’t distinguish themselves from any other applicant who’s passionate about voting access. To fix this problem, the student could write:

“As a young history buff, I was excited to vote from the second I learned what voting was. I imagined the big booths, volunteers with American flag paraphernalia, and ‘I Voted’ stickers left and right. When I got to the voting center, however, I was greeted by a line down the block of women with crying babies, kids late for school complaining about the wait, and disabled individuals resting on curbs. It was devastating to see our communities struggling so hard for their basic rights. Through educating our generation, I think things will change in the future. I am excited to take courses like JUPS ‘Gender, Immigration, & Social Justice’ so that I can understand how disparities in democratic participation come to be and can be better equipped to address them in the future.”

“The bedrock of sustainable democracy is widespread participation,” my voice echoes throughout the room. “By lowering the age to vote, we ensure the voices of American youth are heard in our government.”

Joining my school’s speech and debate program was a natural extension of my passion for global affairs. Engaging in U.S. Extemporaneous Speaking, I was exposed to the breadth of issues facing humanity, from the immorality of lethal autonomous weapons to the barriers to youth civic engagement. By immersing myself in these global questions, public speaking sustains my unrelenting curiosity about the mutli-dimensional human experience.

Beyond my exposure to these global issues, speech and debate sparked conversation with a passionate group of diverse-minded individuals. From spending hours analyzing each other’s speeches to cheering our teammates on in the adrenaline rush of competition, we bonded over our shared zest for speaking. Heated discussions often emerged: “If young people aren’t mature, why are they allowed to drive or get a job?” one teammate asks; “Yet they would still vote for Kanye for president,” another chimes in. I thrived in our disagreement, paving the way for collaboration and growth.

Over the past four years, I’ve grown up with this team. Sifting through photos, my coach finds one of me at my first competition, dressed in a tiny gray blazer and a maroon button-down. My forehead was plastered with wrinkles, eyes paralyzed with fear. In truth, speech and debate invigorated me unlike anything else. In this environment, my voice is imbued with a mixture of passion, determination, and excitement. Discussing these global issues, public speaking is a platform for my emotions, thoughts, and passions.    

Now, as Captain, I watch as ten freshmen note my every hand gesture and vocal inflection. I am eager to witness their eyes twinkle as they speak, eloquently and effortlessly.

This “Extracurricular Essay” has an outstanding structure. It is extremely easy to follow, as each paragraph has a clear, singular focus. First, we learn how speech and debate expanded this student’s awareness of global issues. Then we learn how this activity taught them that disagreement is helpful for growth. Finally, we learn how it helped them come into themself socially. Each paragraph helps the reader gain a deeper understanding of the student, to create a beautiful arc where we are rooting for the student, even though we already know they succeeded.

Additionally, the student uses a conversational yet reflective voice that draws readers in and makes us feel like we’re an old friend of theirs, instead of a total stranger. This connection is achieved through, to give one example, the “heated discussions” about humorous topics they had with their speech and debate teammates. 

Another place where we feel close to the writer is in their description of the photo from their first competition. Their honest, open reflection on how they felt in that moment simultaneously shows humility and how far they’ve come since. That balance, which is really the core of strong college essays, is incredibly difficult to strike, and here this student does so masterfully.

Lastly, the student does a flawless job of subtly pointing out their leadership experience in the last paragraph. They don’t appear to be boasting, but rather position themself as caring about the younger students and invested in the future of this club which has meant so much to them, qualities which admissions officers value highly.

This essay is clear, concise, and compelling, and thus doesn’t have much room for improvement. That said, we all get writer’s block sometimes, or struggle to execute an idea in the way we envisioned. So, with any example essay, it can be useful to think about alternative approaches someone could take. 

Specifically, if you struggle with structure, you might want to approach this kind of extracurricular essay prompt with a narrow, specific focus in mind, rather than covering awareness of global issues, the development of a particular skill, and your own personal growth in the same essay, as this student does. For example, you might choose to highlight just one of the following things:

  • Leadership experience
  • Interpersonal connections
  • Self-growth
  • Academic exploration

It is always better to be more focused than less when writing your college essays. If you are worried that you do not have the finesse to discuss a broad range of ideas in a short amount of space, opt to discuss one idea in a deep and meaningful way.

Want feedback like this on your Georgetown essay before you submit? We offer expert essay review by advisors who have helped students get into their dream schools. You can book a review with an expert to receive notes on your topic, grammar, and essay structure to make your essay stand out to admissions officers.

Haven’t started writing your essay yet? Advisors on CollegeVine also offer expert college counseling packages . You can purchase a package to get one-on-one guidance on any aspect of the college application process, including brainstorming and writing essays.

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georgetown university application essay questions

Georgetown Law

Application requirements, application form.

Our preferred application is our online version, through LSAC. (Please email us to receive a paper application.)

Application Fee or Fee Waiver

A nonrefundable $85 fee must be submitted at the time you apply. This can be done by credit card through LSAC or via check or money order included with a paper application.

Georgetown Law will not issue a refund of the application fee.

Georgetown Law grants merit- and need-based fee waivers on a case-by-case basis. Please note that we cannot grant fee waivers for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS).

Georgetown Law also grants fee waivers to active Teach for America corps members and alumni, Peace Corps volunteers, military veterans and service members, and Truman Scholars. We do not grant fee waivers for AmeriCorps service.

NOTE: You must secure a fee waiver before submitting your application, and applicants who received a fee waiver in the previous admissions cycle are not eligible to receive a waiver. Please allow approximately one week for a response to your fee waiver request.

Your resume should describe your work experience, extracurricular or volunteer activities, academic institutions attended, and any academic honors or awards. There is no page limit, though we recommend a one to two page resume.

All applicants must register with LSAC’s CAS in order to transmit academic transcripts to Georgetown Law. Transcripts from all schools attended must be sent to LSAC directly from the institution.

LSAT, GRE, or GMAT (or GMAT Focus) Score

All applicants are required to submit an LSAT, GRE, or GMAT (or GMAT Focus) score received within the last five years. There are two exceptions to this requirement:

- Applicants seeking to enroll in the Evening Program who do not have a currently valid LSAT score may apply on a test-optional basis. - Applications submitted through the Early Assurance program for Georgetown University juniors do not require an LSAT, GRE, or GMAT score.

The Admissions Committee continues to actively explore other application opportunities, such as JD-Next, for possible future use. Any updates will be posted here and incorporated into the application instructions, as appropriate.

Letter of Recommendation

Georgetown Law requires only one letter of recommendation, but additional letters are welcome. If at all possible, the letter of recommendation should come from a professor who is able to speak to your academic work.

Personal Statement

Georgetown Law does not have a minimum or maximum length for the personal statement, though we recommend around two pages double-spaced. You can write your personal statement on any subject that will enable the Admissions Committee to get to know you.

Conduct Statement

If you answer “yes” to any of the conduct questions in the application, please explain fully in a separate statement.

Optional Statement

At Georgetown Law, we have always taken great pride in having an admissions process that focuses on the individual – We do this one at a time. If you would like to share any additional personal perspectives, reflections, or experiences – whether positive, challenging, a combination of both, or something else entirely – that have contributed to who you are as a person and as a future legal scholar and lawyer, we invite you to do so in an additional statement.

Optional Responses

An optional response is another way for the Admissions Committee to get to know you. If you wish, we encourage you to submit a 250-word statement or one minute video, as applicable, for any of the following:

1. What’s the best (or worst) piece of advice you ever received? 2. If you could “uninvent” one thing, what would it be? 3. Tell us about a moment in your life that you regret. 4. Describe your perfect day. 5. Share a top ten list with us. 6. Prepare a one-minute video that says something about you. Upload it to an easily accessible website and provide us the URL. (If you are using YouTube, we strongly suggest that you make your video unlisted so it will not appear in any of YouTube’s public spaces.) What you do or say is entirely up to you. Please note that we are unable to watch videos that come in any form other than a URL link.

Tips for Applying

The online application is preferred, but a paper application option is also available.

If you have questions about our application requirements, please feel free to visit our FAQ page or contact us at (202) 662-9010 or [email protected].

Home — Application Essay — National Universities — Why Georgetown University: Academic Excellence

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Why Georgetown University: Academic Excellence

  • University: Georgetown University

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Published: Feb 15, 2024

Words: 584 | Pages: 1 | 3 min read

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A rich history, a diverse community, unparalleled academic opportunities, the jesuit tradition.

I have come to realize the significant impact that the choice of an educational institution can have on one's personal and professional development. When considering my future, Georgetown University emerged as the ideal choice due to its rich history, diverse community, and unparalleled academic opportunities.

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Georgetown University's long-standing history serves as a testament to its ability to adapt and thrive in an ever-changing world. Established in 1789, it is one of the oldest universities in the United States. Walking through its historic campus, I can't help but feel a deep sense of connection to the countless individuals who have passed through its doors over the centuries.

Georgetown's commitment to providing a quality education while embracing tradition is evident in its rigorous curriculum. The university fosters a sense of intellectual curiosity and critical thinking, instilling in its students a deep appreciation for knowledge and lifelong learning.

Georgetown's commitment to diversity goes beyond race and ethnicity. The university fosters an inclusive environment that celebrates individuals from various socioeconomic backgrounds, religions, and cultures. This commitment to diversity aligns with my own values and desires to engage with people from different perspectives.

Interacting with individuals from diverse backgrounds not only enhances the educational experience but also prepares students to thrive in a globalized society. Georgetown's emphasis on fostering a sense of community and understanding among its students is a testament to its commitment to producing well-rounded and socially conscious graduates.

One of the main factors that attracted me to Georgetown University is its renowned academic reputation. The university offers a wide range of programs and majors that align with my academic and career interests. The opportunity to study under distinguished faculty members who are leaders in their respective fields is truly invaluable.

Georgetown's location in the heart of Washington, D.C., presents numerous unique opportunities for internships, research, and networking. The proximity to government agencies, international organizations, and prestigious think tanks provides unparalleled avenues for real-world learning and professional growth.

Furthermore, Georgetown's emphasis on practical application of knowledge through experiential learning opportunities, such as study abroad programs and research fellowships, ensures that students graduate with a well-rounded education and a global perspective.

Lastly, Georgetown's Jesuit tradition deeply resonates with my personal values and aspirations. The Jesuit philosophy of education emphasizes the development of the whole person and a commitment to social justice. This aligns perfectly with my desire to make a positive impact on society through my academic pursuits and future career.

I am drawn to Georgetown's emphasis on service and social responsibility, as it provides the platform to not only succeed academically but also contribute meaningfully to the community. The university's commitment to nurturing individuals who are not only intellectually capable but also morally-driven is something I find truly inspiring and appealing.

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In conclusion, my decision to apply to Georgetown University stems from the institution's rich history, diverse community, unparalleled academic opportunities, and alignment with my personal values. I am confident that Georgetown will provide me with the resources, support, and experiences necessary to develop into a well-rounded individual who can positively contribute to society. I eagerly await the opportunity to join the Georgetown community and embark on this transformative journey of growth and learning.

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georgetown university application essay questions

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