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Get top-notch content from the best college paper writing service., what is a college paper heading.

A college paper heading is the array of data located in the upper part of your essay. It’s a quintessential part of your document because it formally states information about the author, grade, college, professor, and more.

In short, it’s the date and name you write at the top of a test. Nevertheless, while most high school students are allowed to choose whatever font and style they prefer, college requires a much more strict approach.

Furthermore, in high school, you may have very few research papers to head. Alternatively, most colleges expect you to head every document you put together because they become official proof of your academic progress. For this reason, we are dedicating the following article: heading of college paper.

In this editorial, you’ll find a thorough step-by-step guide to heading college paper. The information will help your academic endeavors even if you get help from a college paper writer or a freelance professional.

Step by step guide to head a college paper

Before picking up a pen, you should know that there is more than one paper style. Having multiple options means that your professor can ask you to use one or another for different essays. Being able to mix it up means that you are capable, attentive, and organized.

The two main college paper header styles are:

  • Modern Language Association, MLA, is the most used citation style, specific to the Humanities.
  • American Psychological Association, APA, is specific to Sciences, Education, and Psychology as the name suggests.

We’ll explain how the heading for college paper works, and we’ll also specify the requirements for each style.

Step 1: Choose the paper style you need

We previously named the two main styles. So, choose the one that seems more appropriate if your teacher hasn’t expressed their preference. MLA is the most used, but if you’re in Sciences, Psychology, or Education, APA might be better.

Next, check to see if your grammar software or writing app has any options regarding styles. A similar option might make it easier for you to follow the criteria. Dedicated writing apps will help you maintain a specific heading type and will automatically correct you.

Step 2: Margins And Page Format

Start by setting the margins and spacing according to the style you choose.

For this college heading format, you’ll need to set your paper to the standard size (8.5 x 11 inches). All page margins should be one inch while the text is double spaced and typed. Moreover, titles are redundant in MLA unless your professor precisely asked for one.

You can use Times New Roman, Modern, or Arial fonts, as they are the most advised, but don’t forget to pick the 12-point font size. If you want to stand out, you can also select a rarely used font as long as it’s easy to read and not in a script-style. Lastly, when typing the four lines of the heading, don’t skip any lines in-between.

The APA style requires a standard paper with double-spaced typed text, just like the MLA style. The four margins can be broader, around a one-and-a-half-inch.

Unlike MLA, The APA college heading format expects a page title, called a “manuscript header.” To compose a manuscript header, you should pick two essential keywords from your paper title that describes your research. Write them in lower-case letters except for the first letter of each word. Then, add the number of the page. These elements should be directed to the right and one inch below the top margin.

Next, add your title below the manuscript header but centered on the page. The preferred fonts are Times New Roman, Arial, and all the non-script ones.

Step 3: Name and surname

You have to specify the author of your research. So, write your first and last name.

When using the MLA style, you’ll need to add your surname and number of the page to every top right corner in a right-justified format with no punctuation. Then, you’ll write your first and last name to the left.

After the title of your research paper, place your name. It should be centered just like the title.

Step 4: College details

After the name and titles, you can add more information about your course, professor, and institution.

Write your professors’ name, code, and the title of the course, as well as the date (day, name of the month capitalized, and year). Your name and these last lines should appear at the top left of your page. In contrast, the surname and number of the page should be the only thing aligned to the right at the very top.

After your name, write the institution’s name and the department you major in, but make sure it’s all centered.

Step 5: First paragraph

This particular college paper heading format presents your work title before the first paragraph, centered with capitalized words. Avoid underlining or quoting your title.

Starting with the first paragraph, try to make your essay easier to read and understand. You can do so by adding subheadings with titles and a one-space line between two paragraphs.

All of your sections should have a five-space indentation at the beginning of the first sentence.

Lastly, remember to set your text to double-spaced.

For APA, here’s where you start your essay. The abstract is followed by:

  • Text, which can be divided into sections with titles for each one.
  • References and appendices.
  • Author notes.
  • Tables and figures.

Once you finished your paper, each section, such as “References,” should have an appropriate title with centered text.

The APA college paper heading format allows you to have subheadings that you can use to section your thesis. Nonetheless, you might want to ask your professor for advice or consult the APA stylebook.

Practical tips every student can use when writing a college paper heading

Writing a college paper header may seem as simple as can be but make no mistake. It can a valuable occasion for you to show that you are a dedicated student who puts effort into their work.

Pay attention to the details mentioned previously. Keep these tips in mind when revising and proofreading the paper.

Tip 1: Be original

Don’t try to make your paper longer by enlarging the font or copy-pasting words at the bottom. If you want academic success, you should only deliver a genuine product of your intellectual skills.

Moreover, keep in mind that your professors are experienced and knowledgeable. You’ll damage your reputation as a student if you try to deceive your teachers. Better to play it safe.

Tip 2: Use standard formatting

Don’t over-decorate your page. Adding a script-style font and too many figures will make your report less comprehensible and formal. Try to use the standard fonts and if you wish to add some extra elements, ask your professor for advice.

Tip 3: Use punctuation correctly

Use quotation marks and italics for quotations and works you’re mentioning in your paper. Leave your title, name, and most elements free of decorative or particular formatting and punctuation.

Tip 4: Use spaces wisely

Use a spaced line inside paragraphs (every two or three sentences) and between them, but don’t overdo it.

Tip 5: Use software to help you

You can use different software that can ease your work with grammar check and syntax.

Plagiarism is also an important aspect of your work. Only deliver 100% original work. Otherwise, you might be severely penalized academically. To prevent accidental plagiarism, check your work through anti-plagiarism apps.

The way you present your college paper says a lot about you. A proper heading can indicate that the author is passionate, determined, and focused on their work. So, when you’re preparing your next essay, try to follow our guide.

Firstly, choose your style and stick to it. MLA and APA styles are most common, but if you wish to use other formatting styles, gather as much information as you can.

Next, write your name, your professor’s and university’s, and place the title according to the requirements. Divide your paragraphs and keep them clear and easy to understand. Furthermore, try to avoid decorative stile and over-the-top punctuation. Keep a formal outlook and simple syntax. Also, check to see if your grammar is spotless and if your work is original.

We also recommend you ask for help.

The first person who should help you is your professor. It’s their job to guide you and offer valuable advice. So, contact them and ask for clarification. You can also kindly ask them to revise your work. Nonetheless, teachers are busy and may not have the time. Consider hiring a professional writer to help you with your schoolwork.

Additionally, you can offer to revise your peer’s works, and they can do the same. Cross-checking can be useful because we often tend to overlook repetitive mistakes. So, having someone else look at your work might point them out. 

Finally, plenty of reliable sites can help you write from scratch, edit, revise, and format your work. You can get professional help from people who went to the same college as you, thus having an ideal approach for your situation. Just make sure that you pick a highly-rated site that offers you 24/7 customer service and employs professionals. Also, look out for plagiarism checks and reviews.

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, how to format a college essay: 15 expert tips.

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College Essays

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When you're applying to college, even small decisions can feel high-stakes. This is especially true for the college essay, which often feels like the most personal part of the application. You may agonize over your college application essay format: the font, the margins, even the file format. Or maybe you're agonizing over how to organize your thoughts overall. Should you use a narrative structure? Five paragraphs?

In this comprehensive guide, we'll go over the ins and outs of how to format a college essay on both the micro and macro levels. We'll discuss minor formatting issues like headings and fonts, then discuss broad formatting concerns like whether or not to use a five-paragraph essay, and if you should use a college essay template.

How to Format a College Essay: Font, Margins, Etc.

Some of your formatting concerns will depend on whether you will be cutting and pasting your essay into a text box on an online application form or attaching a formatted document. If you aren't sure which you'll need to do, check the application instructions. Note that the Common Application does currently require you to copy and paste your essay into a text box.

Most schools also allow you to send in a paper application, which theoretically gives you increased control over your essay formatting. However, I generally don't advise sending in a paper application (unless you have no other option) for a couple of reasons:

Most schools state that they prefer to receive online applications. While it typically won't affect your chances of admission, it is wise to comply with institutional preferences in the college application process where possible. It tends to make the whole process go much more smoothly.

Paper applications can get lost in the mail. Certainly there can also be problems with online applications, but you'll be aware of the problem much sooner than if your paper application gets diverted somehow and then mailed back to you. By contrast, online applications let you be confident that your materials were received.

Regardless of how you will end up submitting your essay, you should draft it in a word processor. This will help you keep track of word count, let you use spell check, and so on.

Next, I'll go over some of the concerns you might have about the correct college essay application format, whether you're copying and pasting into a text box or attaching a document, plus a few tips that apply either way.

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Formatting Guidelines That Apply No Matter How You End Up Submitting the Essay:

Unless it's specifically requested, you don't need a title. It will just eat into your word count.

Avoid cutesy, overly colloquial formatting choices like ALL CAPS or ~unnecessary symbols~ or, heaven forbid, emoji and #hashtags. Your college essay should be professional, and anything too cutesy or casual will come off as immature.

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Mmm, delicious essay...I mean sandwich.

Why College Essay Templates Are a Bad Idea

You might see college essay templates online that offer guidelines on how to structure your essay and what to say in each paragraph. I strongly advise against using a template. It will make your essay sound canned and bland—two of the worst things a college essay can be. It's much better to think about what you want to say, and then talk through how to best structure it with someone else and/or make your own practice outlines before you sit down to write.

You can also find tons of successful sample essays online. Looking at these to get an idea of different styles and topics is fine, but again, I don't advise closely patterning your essay after a sample essay. You will do the best if your essay really reflects your own original voice and the experiences that are most meaningful to you.

College Application Essay Format: Key Takeaways

There are two levels of formatting you might be worried about: the micro (fonts, headings, margins, etc) and the macro (the overall structure of your essay).

Tips for the micro level of your college application essay format:

  • Always draft your essay in a word processing software, even if you'll be copy-and-pasting it over into a text box.
  • If you are copy-and-pasting it into a text box, make sure your formatting transfers properly, your paragraphs are clearly delineated, and your essay isn't cut off.
  • If you are attaching a document, make sure your font is easily readable, your margins are standard 1-inch, your essay is 1.5 or double-spaced, and your file format is compatible with the application specs.
  • There's no need for a title unless otherwise specified—it will just eat into your word count.

Tips for the macro level of your college application essay format :

  • There is no super-secret college essay format that will guarantee success.
  • In terms of structure, it's most important that you have an introduction that makes it clear where you're going and a conclusion that wraps up with a main point. For the middle of your essay, you have lots of freedom, just so long as it flows logically!
  • I advise against using an essay template, as it will make your essay sound stilted and unoriginal.

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Plus, if you use a college essay template, how will you get rid of these medieval weirdos?

What's Next?

Still feeling lost? Check out our total guide to the personal statement , or see our step-by-step guide to writing the perfect essay .

If you're not sure where to start, consider these tips for attention-grabbing first sentences to college essays!

And be sure to avoid these 10 college essay mistakes .

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How to Head a College Paper

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College is a new experience for students in many ways. From the freedom of scheduling classes at your convenience to finding your way around a new campus, the changes are evident immediately. Even the way you head your research papers may be different from what you have used in high school. There are a few simple rules to follow when heading a college paper. Once you get the format down, it will become second nature and you'll find yourself doing it automatically.

Paper Style

You can use MLA style for most papers you turn including homework assignments. When using this style on a written paper, do not skip lines in between the four lines of the initial heading. Your heading on subsequent pages should consist of your last name followed by the page number in a right justified format. Other paper formats you might use in college can include American Psychological Association (APA) and Chicago Style.

Heading and Margins

Place your heading in the upper left-hand corner of the page. To make sure your typed paper is easy to read on a visual level, use a 12-point font and recognizable font style. While the Times New Roman font is often chosen, Arial, Modern, Lucina and Palermo are also acceptable because they are not script-style fonts. This follows Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting which is the accepted standard for college papers.

First and Last Name

Place your first and last names on the first line. Double space each line of the heading. All lines of the heading are left justified at the left margin.

Professor's Name

Place your professor's name on the next line. Use his first and last name preceded by Professor. For example, "Professor John Doe" goes on this line.

Course Name

Place the name of your course on the next line. For example, you could use "English 101."

Place the date on the final line. To follow MLA formatting, the date should appear as the day in numeral format, the month in written format and the year. For example, "5 January 2011" is appropriate.

Title of Paper

Double space after the last line of your heading, and center the title of your paper on the next line. Use Title Case style to type the title. For example, "A History of Life During the Tudor Period."

First Paragraph

Double space after the heading and begin your paper using a 1-inch indent to begin the first paragraph.

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  • Purdue Online Writing Lab: MLA Formatting and Style Guide
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APA 7th Edition Style Guide: Headings in APA

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What are headings?

Headings, sections, subsections, or levels of subordination are a style of dividing your research paper into major parts, then minor subsections. Most college papers do not need headings, especially if you are only producing two to five pages. However, if your professor requests you use headings or your are writing an especially long or detailed paper, then use headings to help readers navigate your text. Follow the APA style rules for creating the correct level of heading. Always start with a level one heading and drill down to the last subsection possible (five) in order as seen below. Instructions and examples for headings are available on p. 47- 49 of the new APA 7th Edition manual.

Levels of Headings

Additional headings resources.

  • APA Style: Headings This page of the APA Style Blog provides more details about styling paper section headings in APA style.
  • Heading Levels Template: Student Paper APA Style 7th Edition This example student paper clearly illustrates how to style section headings including the paper title and the Introduction section (which should not be labeled Introduction as APA assumes all papers begin with an introduction section).

Proper Title Case vs. lowercase paragraph heading

Proper title case is using both uppercase and lowercase letters in a title. It calls for the major words to be capitalized while any small conjunctions are made smaller, i.e., 

The Title of this Paper is Lengthy

Lowercase paragraph heading calls for the first word to be capitalized along with any proper nouns contained within the heading, i.e., 

        The title of this heading is much shorter and all lowercase except for the first word.

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HOW TO – Format papers in standard academic format (using Microsoft Word)

This guide explains how to format your documents in Microsoft Word so that they follow the standard rules for formatting academic papers as described in most MLA and APA style books for undergraduate writing. These rules apply to most of the papers you will submit in your college classes, but in some cases your professors will want you to follow specific guidelines that may differ from those below. Always clarify with your professor which set of guidelines he or she wants you to follow before you submit a paper.

Using standard formatting for academic papers shows that you understand the customs of the university community and therefore helps to boost your own credibility. Using unusual or highly distinctive formatting, on the other hand, suggests that your previous schooling did not adequately prepare you for university work. Consider the impact of unusual formatting: not only does it call attention to your paper in a way that might not be positive, professors might also see it as a sign that you’re trying to artificially inflate page length.

Note: These instructions apply to all versions of Word for Mac and for the 2003 version of Word for Windows. I haven’t yet updated them to include instructions for the 2007 version of Word for Windows, but the tools should nevertheless be easy to find if you look around on the toolbar at the top.

  • 2 DOCUMENT MARGINS
  • 3 INDENTATION
  • 5 ALIGNMENT
  • 6.1 Heading
  • 6.3 Sample First Page
  • 7 PAGE NUMBERS
  • 8.1 Document Spacing
  • 8.2 Paragraph Spacing
  • 9 CREATE NEW PAGE
  • 10 BLOCKED QUOTATIONS
  • 11 RESOURCES

DOCUMENT MARGINS

Rule : Papers submitted for review or grading should have 1” margins all around. This should be the default for Word, but if your default setting is to have left and right margins of 1.25”, change your default. Page length requirements are based on 1” margins.

Instructions : Go to the Format menu, drag down to Document, change the margins, and the click on the Default button and accept the change to the Normal template. Make sure you leave the gutter set to 0” or you’ll mess up your document formatting.

INDENTATION

Rule : The first line of each paragraph should be automatically indented.

Instructions : This should be the default for Word, but if not, you might want to change your Normal style, as described above. To change the indentation format for a document, choose Select All from the Edit menu. Then go to the Format menu, drag down to Paragraph, look under the “Special” drop-down menu in the Indentation section, and select “First Line.” This setting automatically indents the first line of a new paragraph so that you don’t have to do it manually.

Rule : College papers should be in a standard academic font: either Times New Roman or Cambria, in 12pt size. (If you submit a paper in another font, I will change it on the file I download.)

Instructions : Times New Roman or Cambria 12pt should be the default for Word, but if yours is different then change your default. Go to the Format menu, drag down to Style, make sure “Normal” is selected from the list of styles, and click “modify.” Choose the correct font and size from the Formatting menu. Click “OK” to make the change to your default settings.

Rule : The text of your paper should be left aligned, NOT justified, as justified text is hard to read if it hasn’t been professionally typeset. The default in Word is left alignment, so don’t change it.

FIRST PAGE FORMAT

Rule : In the upper left corner of the first page of your document, type your name, the date, the course number and section (or topic), and the version of the paper (such as Paper 1 Second Draft), each on a separate line. Be sure to change the date and paper version when you submit revisions and final versions. See the sample below.

DO NOT use the “headers” feature from the header/footer menu to create this full heading as that will make it appear on every page, which is not customary in academic writing. Also do NOT use a title page unless the assignment specifically asks for one.

Rule : Skip a line after the heading and center an original title that conveys the topic of your paper. Do not use underlining or italics in the heading (unless you’re referring to the title of a book or periodical). Do not use bold text or ALL CAPS.

Sample First Page

Page numbers.

Rule : All papers should have automatically inserted page numbers that show in the upper right corner on all pages except the first. Do not insert these page numbers by hand. Instead, use Word’s Header/Footer tool.

For documents following MLA format, put your last name and page number in the upper right corner. For documents following APA format, put a short version of your title (instead of your last name) and the page number in the upper right corner.

Instructions : Go to the View menu and choose “Header and Footer.” You’ll see a header box appear at the top and a footer box at the bottom. Click in the header box, type your last name (or title), make it align to the right, and then select Page Numbers from the Insert menu.

When you’re finished, click on the “Close” tab under the Header view. Each page of your document should now display a page number at the upper right that updates automatically when you make changes to the document. It will appear as grayed out text unless you active the Header and Footer tool to make changes.

To change the setting so that page numbers do not display on the first page, go to the Format men, drag down to Document, and click on the Layout button. Then check the box next to “Different First Page.” Click OK. If necessary, remove the header that appears on the first page and insert a header on the second page, which will automatically appear on all subsequent pages as well.

Document Spacing

Rule : The entire paper should be double-spaced, including the heading and bibliography.

Instructions : Choose “Select All” from the Edit menu, go to the Format menu and drag down to Paragraph, and choose “double” from the “line spacing” menu in the Spacing section. Or you can use these keyboard shortcuts. On a Mac, use Cmd-A to select all and Cmd-2 to double-space. On a PC, use Ctrl-A to select all and Ctrl-2 to double space.

Paragraph Spacing

Rule : Papers should have no extra spacing after paragraphs. This should be the default for Word, but if your default setting is to have 10pt spacing after paragraphs, change your default.

Instructions : Go to the Format menu, drag down to Style, make sure “Normal” is selected from the list of styles, and click “modify.” In the lower left corner, select the dropdown menu that starts with “Format” and drag down to Paragraph. In the paragraph settings menu that pops up, change the settings for Spacing After to 0pt.

CREATE NEW PAGE

Instead of using a lot of returns before starting your bibliography, create a new page for it following these instructions.

Go to the Insert menu, drag down to Break, and then drag over to Page Break.

BLOCKED QUOTATIONS

Rule : If a quotation will exceed four lines within a paragraph, you should separate it out by blocking and indenting it. As with any quotation, a blocked quotation should be clearly introduced by the sentence that leads up to it and it should also be properly cited, but the rules for blocked quotations are somewhat different. The blocking take the place of quotation marks, and unlike in a regular in-paragraph quotation, the parenthetical citation goes outside of the final period instead of inside of it (given that the blocked quote might contain several sentences.)

Instructions : Type the quotation in its own paragraph, without quotation marks, and remove the indent from the first line. Type the source in parentheses after the last period of the last sentence. With your cursor, select the quotation, from the first word to the end of the parenthetical citation, and click the Increase Indent button from the Paragraph Formatting menu.

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APA 7th Edition Guide

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Components of an APA Paper

  • Getting Started: Formatting Rules
  • Body of Paper
  • Reference List

Setting Up Your Paper: Formatting Rules

APA Style has specific rules about the format of your paper.  Be sure to select one of the six approved font styles, and set margins and line spacing as follows:

  • Calibri, 11 point
  • Arial, 11 point
  • Lucida Sans Unicode, 10 point
  • Times New Roman, 12 point
  • Georgia, 11 point
  • Computer Modern, 10 point
  • ​ Double space entire document including cover page and References list
  • ​ One inch margins at top, bottom, left, and right of page (Word default setting)
  • First line in paragraphs indented 1/2 inch (one stroke of the tab key)
  • ​ Pages are numbered in the header, flush right, beginning with the title page

APA Paper Template

Download a copy of the pre-formatted APA paper template to use for all of your APA assignments. Watch the companion video!

  • APA 7th Edition Paper Template in Word
  • How to Use the APA 7th Edition Paper Template View this short video demonstration of how to add your content to the APA paper template.

Order of Pages

Pages of an APA paper appear in the following order:

  • Abstract 
  • Text of paper
  • Reference list
  • Tables 
  • Figures 

NOTE:  Sections appearing in  bold font  are always included in an APA paper; other sections are included if needed.

View this helpful guide created by the APA Style Experts to help you set up your paper:

  • APA 7th Edition Setting Up Your Paper Student Guide

The title page of a student paper includes the page number in header and lists the following information centered in the top half of the page:

  • Title of Paper, bolded
  • Student Name
  • Course Number: Course Title
  • Instructor's Name
  • Assignment Due Date   ( Note: For CBE courses, please use the assignment submission date .)

Note that there is a blank double-spaced line between the title and student's name.

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  • APA Style: Title Page Set-Up according to APA 7th edition Provides helpful information to set up the title page for a student paper.
  • APA 7th Edition - Student Title Page Guide This two-page handout provides the APA 7th Edition guidelines for creating a student paper cover page..

Body of the Paper

Formatting basics.

  • Title centered and bolded at top of page
  • One inch margins (Word default margins)
  • Text double spaced
  • Paragraphs begin with 1/2 inch indent (one stroke of the tab key)
  • One space between sentences

Components of a Research Paper

  • ​ Introduces the topic covered in the paper 
  • States the thesis  or position to be supported   in the body of the paper
  • Usually one or two paragraphs in length
  • ​ Main part of paper
  • Points presented in logical order to support thesis, one point per paragraph
  • length of this section varies; usually a minimum of three paragraphs
  • ​ Restates the thesis 
  • Reinforces major points ma de in the body of the paper

One of the goals of the APA Style is to present information in a clear, concise, and logical manner.  One way to achieve this is by organizing content through the use of  Headings .  APA utilizes five levels of headings within the text of the paper:

  • APA 7th Edition Student Paper Heading Levels Template View this APA 7th Edition sample paper for a visual demonstration of how various levels of headings are formatted.

The References List

In academic writing, resources found through the research process are used to support positions, claims, and points made in a paper or essay.  All sources cited within the text of the paper are listed alphabetically in the reference list.  References provide the reader with information needed to access the source material.  The reference list is its own page and appears at the end of the paper.   

An APA reference is composed of four elements:

Author. (Date). Title.   Source Information.

View example references on the Reference page in this Guide.

Reference List Example

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  • APA 7th Edition Quick References Guide This two-page handout provides a visual guide demonstrating how journal and book references are created.
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How to Format and Structure Your College Essay

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College essays are an entirely new type of writing for high school seniors. For that reason, many students are confused about proper formatting and essay structure. Should you double-space or single-space? Do you need a title? What kind of narrative style is best-suited for your topic?

In this post, we’ll be going over proper college essay format, traditional and unconventional essay structures (plus sample essays!), and which structure might work best for you. 

General College Essay Formatting Guidelines

How you format your essay will depend on whether you’re submitting in a text box, or attaching a document. We’ll go over the different best practices for both, but regardless of how you’re submitting, here are some general formatting tips:

  • There’s no need for a title; it takes up unnecessary space and eats into your word count
  • Stay within the word count as much as possible (+/- 10% of the upper limit). For further discussion on college essay length, see our post How Long Should Your College Essay Be?
  • Indent or double space to separate paragraphs clearly

If you’re submitting in a text box:

  • Avoid italics and bold, since formatting often doesn’t transfer over in text boxes
  • Be careful with essays meant to be a certain shape (like a balloon); text boxes will likely not respect that formatting. Beyond that, this technique can also seem gimmicky, so proceed with caution
  • Make sure that paragraphs are clearly separated, as text boxes can also undo indents and double spacing

If you’re attaching a document:

  • Use a standard font and size like Times New Roman, 12 point
  • Make your lines 1.5-spaced or double-spaced
  • Use 1-inch margins
  • Save as a PDF since it can’t be edited. This also prevents any formatting issues that come with Microsoft Word, since older versions are sometimes incompatible with the newer formatting
  • Number each page with your last name in the header or footer (like “Smith 1”)
  • Pay extra attention to any word limits, as you won’t be cut off automatically, unlike with most text boxes

Conventional College Essay Structures

Now that we’ve gone over the logistical aspects of your essay, let’s talk about how you should structure your writing. There are three traditional college essay structures. They are:

  • In-the-moment narrative
  • Narrative told over an extended period of time
  • Series of anecdotes, or montage

Let’s go over what each one is exactly, and take a look at some real essays using these structures.

1. In-the-moment narrative

This is where you tell the story one moment at a time, sharing the events as they occur. In the moment narrative is a powerful essay format, as your reader experiences the events, your thoughts, and your emotions with you . This structure is ideal for a specific experience involving extensive internal dialogue, emotions, and reflections.

Here’s an example:

The morning of the Model United Nation conference, I walked into Committee feeling confident about my research. We were simulating the Nuremberg Trials – a series of post-World War II proceedings for war crimes – and my portfolio was of the Soviet Judge Major General Iona Nikitchenko. Until that day, the infamous Nazi regime had only been a chapter in my history textbook; however, the conference’s unveiling of each defendant’s crimes brought those horrors to life. The previous night, I had organized my research, proofread my position paper and gone over Judge Nikitchenko’s pertinent statements. I aimed to find the perfect balance between his stance and my own.

As I walked into committee anticipating a battle of wits, my director abruptly called out to me. “I’m afraid we’ve received a late confirmation from another delegate who will be representing Judge Nikitchenko. You, on the other hand, are now the defense attorney, Otto Stahmer.” Everyone around me buzzed around the room in excitement, coordinating with their allies and developing strategies against their enemies, oblivious to the bomb that had just dropped on me. I felt frozen in my tracks, and it seemed that only rage against the careless delegate who had confirmed her presence so late could pull me out of my trance. After having spent a month painstakingly crafting my verdicts and gathering evidence against the Nazis, I now needed to reverse my stance only three hours before the first session.

Gradually, anger gave way to utter panic. My research was fundamental to my performance, and without it, I knew I could add little to the Trials. But confident in my ability, my director optimistically recommended constructing an impromptu defense. Nervously, I began my research anew. Despite feeling hopeless, as I read through the prosecution’s arguments, I uncovered substantial loopholes. I noticed a lack of conclusive evidence against the defendants and certain inconsistencies in testimonies. My discovery energized me, inspiring me to revisit the historical overview in my conference “Background Guide” and to search the web for other relevant articles. Some Nazi prisoners had been treated as “guilty” before their court dates. While I had brushed this information under the carpet while developing my position as a judge, it now became the focus of my defense. I began scratching out a new argument, centered on the premise that the allied countries had violated the fundamental rule that, a defendant was “not guilty” until proven otherwise.

At the end of the three hours, I felt better prepared. The first session began, and with bravado, I raised my placard to speak. Microphone in hand, I turned to face my audience. “Greetings delegates. I, Otto Stahmer would like to…….” I suddenly blanked. Utter dread permeated my body as I tried to recall my thoughts in vain. “Defence Attorney, Stahmer we’ll come back to you,” my Committee Director broke the silence as I tottered back to my seat, flushed with embarrassment. Despite my shame, I was undeterred. I needed to vindicate my director’s faith in me. I pulled out my notes, refocused, and began outlining my arguments in a more clear and direct manner. Thereafter, I spoke articulately, confidently putting forth my points. I was overjoyed when Secretariat members congratulated me on my fine performance.

Going into the conference, I believed that preparation was the key to success. I wouldn’t say I disagree with that statement now, but I believe adaptability is equally important. My ability to problem-solve in the face of an unforeseen challenge proved advantageous in the art of diplomacy. Not only did this experience transform me into a confident and eloquent delegate at that conference, but it also helped me become a more flexible and creative thinker in a variety of other capacities. Now that I know I can adapt under pressure, I look forward to engaging in activities that will push me to be even quicker on my feet.

This essay is an excellent example of in-the-moment narration. The student openly shares their internal state with us — we feel their anger and panic upon the reversal of roles. We empathize with their emotions of “utter dread” and embarrassment when they’re unable to speak. 

For in-the-moment essays, overloading on descriptions is a common mistake students make. This writer provides just the right amount of background and details to help us understand the situation, however, and balances out the actual event with reflection on the significance of this experience. 

One main area of improvement is that the writer sometimes makes explicit statements that could be better illustrated through their thoughts, actions, and feelings. For instance, they say they “spoke articulately” after recovering from their initial inability to speak, and they also claim that adaptability has helped them in other situations. This is not as engaging as actual examples that convey the same meaning. Still, this essay overall is a strong example of in-the-moment narration, and gives us a relatable look into the writer’s life and personality.

2. Narrative told over an extended period of time

In this essay structure, you share a story that takes place across several different experiences. This narrative style is well-suited for any story arc with multiple parts. If you want to highlight your development over time, you might consider this structure. 

When I was younger, I was adamant that no two foods on my plate touch. As a result, I often used a second plate to prevent such an atrocity. In many ways, I learned to separate different things this way from my older brothers, Nate and Rob. Growing up, I idolized both of them. Nate was a performer, and I insisted on arriving early to his shows to secure front row seats, refusing to budge during intermission for fear of missing anything. Rob was a three-sport athlete, and I attended his games religiously, waving worn-out foam cougar paws and cheering until my voice was hoarse. My brothers were my role models. However, while each was talented, neither was interested in the other’s passion. To me, they represented two contrasting ideals of what I could become: artist or athlete. I believed I had to choose.

And for a long time, I chose athlete. I played soccer, basketball, and lacrosse and viewed myself exclusively as an athlete, believing the arts were not for me. I conveniently overlooked that since the age of five, I had been composing stories for my family for Christmas, gifts that were as much for me as them, as I loved writing. So when in tenth grade, I had the option of taking a creative writing class, I was faced with a question: could I be an athlete and a writer? After much debate, I enrolled in the class, feeling both apprehensive and excited. When I arrived on the first day of school, my teacher, Ms. Jenkins, asked us to write down our expectations for the class. After a few minutes, eraser shavings stubbornly sunbathing on my now-smudged paper, I finally wrote, “I do not expect to become a published writer from this class. I just want this to be a place where I can write freely.”

Although the purpose of the class never changed for me, on the third “submission day,” – our time to submit writing to upcoming contests and literary magazines – I faced a predicament. For the first two submission days, I had passed the time editing earlier pieces, eventually (pretty quickly) resorting to screen snake when hopelessness made the words look like hieroglyphics. I must not have been as subtle as I thought, as on the third of these days, Ms. Jenkins approached me. After shifting from excuse to excuse as to why I did not submit my writing, I finally recognized the real reason I had withheld my work: I was scared. I did not want to be different, and I did not want to challenge not only others’ perceptions of me, but also my own. I yielded to Ms. Jenkin’s pleas and sent one of my pieces to an upcoming contest.

By the time the letter came, I had already forgotten about the contest. When the flimsy white envelope arrived in the mail, I was shocked and ecstatic to learn that I had received 2nd place in a nationwide writing competition. The next morning, however, I discovered Ms. Jenkins would make an announcement to the whole school exposing me as a poet. I decided to own this identity and embrace my friends’ jokes and playful digs, and over time, they have learned to accept and respect this part of me. I have since seen more boys at my school identifying themselves as writers or artists.

I no longer see myself as an athlete and a poet independently, but rather I see these two aspects forming a single inseparable identity – me. Despite their apparent differences, these two disciplines are quite similar, as each requires creativity and devotion. I am still a poet when I am lacing up my cleats for soccer practice and still an athlete when I am building metaphors in the back of my mind – and I have realized ice cream and gummy bears taste pretty good together.

The timeline of this essay spans from the writer’s childhood all the way to sophomore year, but we only see key moments along this journey. First, we get context for why the writer thought he had to choose one identity: his older brothers had very distinct interests. Then, we learn about the student’s 10th grade creative writing class, writing contest, and results of the contest. Finally, the essay covers the writers’ embarrassment of his identity as a poet, to gradual acceptance and pride in that identity. 

This essay is a great example of a narrative told over an extended period of time. It’s highly personal and reflective, as the piece shares the writer’s conflicting feelings, and takes care to get to the root of those feelings. Furthermore, the overarching story is that of a personal transformation and development, so it’s well-suited to this essay structure.

3. Series of anecdotes, or montage

This essay structure allows you to focus on the most important experiences of a single storyline, or it lets you feature multiple (not necessarily related) stories that highlight your personality. Montage is a structure where you piece together separate scenes to form a whole story. This technique is most commonly associated with film. Just envision your favorite movie—it likely is a montage of various scenes that may not even be chronological. 

Night had robbed the academy of its daytime colors, yet there was comfort in the dim lights that cast shadows of our advances against the bare studio walls. Silhouettes of roundhouse kicks, spin crescent kicks, uppercuts and the occasional butterfly kick danced while we sparred. She approached me, eyes narrowed with the trace of a smirk challenging me. “Ready spar!” Her arm began an upward trajectory targeting my shoulder, a common first move. I sidestepped — only to almost collide with another flying fist. Pivoting my right foot, I snapped my left leg, aiming my heel at her midsection. The center judge raised one finger. 

There was no time to celebrate, not in the traditional sense at least. Master Pollard gave a brief command greeted with a unanimous “Yes, sir” and the thud of 20 hands dropping-down-and-giving-him-30, while the “winners” celebrated their victory with laps as usual. 

Three years ago, seven-thirty in the evening meant I was a warrior. It meant standing up straighter, pushing a little harder, “Yes, sir” and “Yes, ma’am”, celebrating birthdays by breaking boards, never pointing your toes, and familiarity. Three years later, seven-thirty in the morning meant I was nervous. 

The room is uncomfortably large. The sprung floor soaks up the checkerboard of sunlight piercing through the colonial windows. The mirrored walls further illuminate the studio and I feel the light scrutinizing my sorry attempts at a pas de bourrée , while capturing the organic fluidity of the dancers around me. “ Chassé en croix, grand battement, pique, pirouette.” I follow the graceful limbs of the woman in front of me, her legs floating ribbons, as she executes what seems to be a perfect ronds de jambes. Each movement remains a negotiation. With admirable patience, Ms. Tan casts me a sympathetic glance.   

There is no time to wallow in the misery that is my right foot. Taekwondo calls for dorsiflexion; pointed toes are synonymous with broken toes. My thoughts drag me into a flashback of the usual response to this painful mistake: “You might as well grab a tutu and head to the ballet studio next door.” Well, here I am Master Pollard, unfortunately still following your orders to never point my toes, but no longer feeling the satisfaction that comes with being a third degree black belt with 5 years of experience quite literally under her belt. It’s like being a white belt again — just in a leotard and ballet slippers. 

But the appetite for new beginnings that brought me here doesn’t falter. It is only reinforced by the classical rendition of “Dancing Queen” that floods the room and the ghost of familiarity that reassures me that this new beginning does not and will not erase the past. After years spent at the top, it’s hard to start over. But surrendering what you are only leads you to what you may become. In Taekwondo, we started each class reciting the tenets: honor, courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control, courage, humility, and knowledge, and I have never felt that I embodied those traits more so than when I started ballet. 

The thing about change is that it eventually stops making things so different. After nine different schools, four different countries, three different continents, fluency in Tamil, Norwegian, and English, there are more blurred lines than there are clear fragments. My life has not been a tactfully executed, gold medal-worthy Taekwondo form with each movement defined, nor has it been a series of frappés performed by a prima ballerina with each extension identical and precise, but thankfully it has been like the dynamics of a spinning back kick, fluid, and like my chances of landing a pirouette, unpredictable. 

This essay takes a few different anecdotes and weaves them into a coherent narrative about the writer’s penchant for novel experiences. We’re plunged into her universe, in the middle of her Taekwondo spar, three years before the present day. She then transitions into a scene in a ballet studio, present day. By switching from past tense to present tense, the writer clearly demarcates this shift in time. 

The parallel use of the spoken phrase “Point” in the essay ties these two experiences together. The writer also employs a flashback to Master Pollard’s remark about “grabbing a tutu” and her habit of dorsiflexing her toes, which further cements the connection between these anecdotes. 

While some of the descriptions are a little wordy, the piece is well-executed overall, and is a stellar example of the montage structure. The two anecdotes are seamlessly intertwined, and they both clearly illustrate the student’s determination, dedication, reflectiveness, and adaptability. The writer also concludes the essay with a larger reflection on her life, many moves, and multiple languages. 

Unconventional College Essay Structures

Unconventional essay structures are any that don’t fit into the categories above. These tend to be higher risk, as it’s easier to turn off the admissions officer, but they’re also higher reward if executed correctly. 

There are endless possibilities for unconventional structures, but most fall under one of two categories:

1. Playing with essay format

Instead of choosing a traditional narrative format, you might take a more creative route to showcase your interests, writing your essay:

  • As a movie script
  • With a creative visual format (such as creating a visual pattern with the spaces between your sentences forming a picture)
  • As a two-sided Lincoln-Douglas debate
  • As a legal brief
  • Using song lyrics

2. Linguistic techniques

You could also play with the actual language and sentence structure of your essay, writing it:

  • In iambic pentameter
  • Partially in your mother tongue
  • In code or a programming language

These linguistic techniques are often hybrid, where you write some of the essay with the linguistic variation, then write more of an explanation in English.

Under no circumstances should you feel pressured to use an unconventional structure. Trying to force something unconventional will only hurt your chances. That being said, if a creative structure comes naturally to you, suits your personality, and works with the content of your essay — go for that structure!

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Note: The APA Publication Manual, 7 th Edition specifies different formatting conventions for student  and  professional  papers (i.e., papers written for credit in a course and papers intended for scholarly publication). These differences mostly extend to the title page and running head. Crucially, citation practices do not differ between the two styles of paper.

However, for your convenience, we have provided two versions of our APA 7 sample paper below: one in  student style and one in  professional  style.

Note: For accessibility purposes, we have used "Track Changes" to make comments along the margins of these samples. Those authored by [AF] denote explanations of formatting and [AWC] denote directions for writing and citing in APA 7. 

APA 7 Student Paper:

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APA Style (7th ed.): Citation Guide

  • Getting Started with APA

Formatting a Paper in APA

Apa paper visual guide.

  • Citing Sources in APA
  • APA Citation Examples
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  • Sample APA Paper

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  • Paper Formatting
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APA Basic Formatting Rules for Student Papers

The following guidelines are the basic formatting rules outlined in the  APA Publication Manual  7th edition. If your instructor sets different requirements, always use your instructor's guidelines first.

  • clearly legible, regular-sized font
  • recommendations: 12pt Times New Roman, 11pt Arial, 11pt Calibri, 10pt Lucida Sans Unicode, 11pt Georgia
  • double spaced throughout all parts of the paper including title, headings, and footnotes
  • 1-inch margins on all sides
  • Indent the first line of each paragraph by 1/2-inch (tab)
  • left-justified for the body of the paper

Running Head & Page Numbers:

  • not required to include shortened version of the title for student papers- unless requested by your instructor
  • include the page number in the top right corner of all pages

APA Title Page for Student Papers

Page number:.

  • include the page number in the top right margin. (It will be 1 for the Title Page. Continue numbering throughout the paper and References page.)

Heading about a 1/3 of the way down the page:

  • Paper Title : bold, centered
  • Author : your name
  • Institutional Affiliation : Lone Star College- Online
  • Course : your course number and the name of the course (ex. PSYC 2301: General Psychology)
  • Instructor : your instructor's name (ex- Prof. Jane Smith)
  • Due Date:  Month day, year format (ex- January 1, 2024)

APA Headings within the Body of the Paper

Paper title:.

  • include on the first line of the first page of the body of your paper
  • bold and centered

Headings and Sub-headings (use when needed)

  • APA uses a hierarchy of five levels for headings within the paper
  • short paper may not need headings at all

References Page Formatting

The following guidelines are the basic formatting rules outlined in the APA Publication Manual  7th edition. If your instructor sets different requirements, always use your instructor's guidelines first.

  • needs to start on a new page following the end of your paper
  • include the title References centered on the first line of the page
  • everything after the title is left-justified
  • listed in alphabetical order by the first part of the citation (usually the author)
  • double spaced throughout all parts
  • Each citation should have a hanging indent- or it should start at the left margin and then have all lines after it indented by 1/2-inch

Click on the information circles for tips on how to use Microsoft Word to format your paper in APA Style.

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  • Research Paper Format | APA, MLA, & Chicago Templates

Research Paper Format | APA, MLA, & Chicago Templates

Published on November 19, 2022 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on January 20, 2023.

The formatting of a research paper is different depending on which style guide you’re following. In addition to citations , APA, MLA, and Chicago provide format guidelines for things like font choices, page layout, format of headings and the format of the reference page.

Scribbr offers free Microsoft Word templates for the most common formats. Simply download and get started on your paper.

APA |  MLA | Chicago author-date | Chicago notes & bibliography

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Table of contents

Formatting an apa paper, formatting an mla paper, formatting a chicago paper, frequently asked questions about research paper formatting.

The main guidelines for formatting a paper in APA Style are as follows:

  • Use a standard font like 12 pt Times New Roman or 11 pt Arial.
  • Set 1 inch page margins.
  • Apply double line spacing.
  • If submitting for publication, insert a APA running head on every page.
  • Indent every new paragraph ½ inch.

Watch the video below for a quick guide to setting up the format in Google Docs.

The image below shows how to format an APA Style title page for a student paper.

APA title page - student version (7th edition)

Running head

If you are submitting a paper for publication, APA requires you to include a running head on each page. The image below shows you how this should be formatted.

APA running head (7th edition)

For student papers, no running head is required unless you have been instructed to include one.

APA provides guidelines for formatting up to five levels of heading within your paper. Level 1 headings are the most general, level 5 the most specific.

APA headings (7th edition)

Reference page

APA Style citation requires (author-date) APA in-text citations throughout the text and an APA Style reference page at the end. The image below shows how the reference page should be formatted.

APA reference page (7th edition)

Note that the format of reference entries is different depending on the source type. You can easily create your citations and reference list using the free APA Citation Generator.

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The main guidelines for writing an MLA style paper are as follows:

  • Use an easily readable font like 12 pt Times New Roman.
  • Use title case capitalization for headings .

Check out the video below to see how to set up the format in Google Docs.

On the first page of an MLA paper, a heading appears above your title, featuring some key information:

  • Your full name
  • Your instructor’s or supervisor’s name
  • The course name or number
  • The due date of the assignment

MLA heading

Page header

A header appears at the top of each page in your paper, including your surname and the page number.

MLA page header

Works Cited page

MLA in-text citations appear wherever you refer to a source in your text. The MLA Works Cited page appears at the end of your text, listing all the sources used. It is formatted as shown below.

The format of the MLA Works Cited page

You can easily create your MLA citations and save your Works Cited list with the free MLA Citation Generator.

Generate MLA citations for free

The main guidelines for writing a paper in Chicago style (also known as Turabian style) are:

  • Use a standard font like 12 pt Times New Roman.
  • Use 1 inch margins or larger.
  • Place page numbers in the top right or bottom center.

Format of a Chicago Style paper

Chicago doesn’t require a title page , but if you want to include one, Turabian (based on Chicago) presents some guidelines. Lay out the title page as shown below.

Example of a Chicago Style title page

Bibliography or reference list

Chicago offers two citation styles : author-date citations plus a reference list, or footnote citations plus a bibliography. Choose one style or the other and use it consistently.

The reference list or bibliography appears at the end of the paper. Both styles present this page similarly in terms of formatting, as shown below.

Chicago bibliography

To format a paper in APA Style , follow these guidelines:

  • Use a standard font like 12 pt Times New Roman or 11 pt Arial
  • Set 1 inch page margins
  • Apply double line spacing
  • Include a title page
  • If submitting for publication, insert a running head on every page
  • Indent every new paragraph ½ inch
  • Apply APA heading styles
  • Cite your sources with APA in-text citations
  • List all sources cited on a reference page at the end

The main guidelines for formatting a paper in MLA style are as follows:

  • Use an easily readable font like 12 pt Times New Roman
  • Include a four-line MLA heading on the first page
  • Center the paper’s title
  • Use title case capitalization for headings
  • Cite your sources with MLA in-text citations
  • List all sources cited on a Works Cited page at the end

The main guidelines for formatting a paper in Chicago style are to:

  • Use a standard font like 12 pt Times New Roman
  • Use 1 inch margins or larger
  • Place page numbers in the top right or bottom center
  • Cite your sources with author-date citations or Chicago footnotes
  • Include a bibliography or reference list

To automatically generate accurate Chicago references, you can use Scribbr’s free Chicago reference generator .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2023, January 20). Research Paper Format | APA, MLA, & Chicago Templates. Scribbr. Retrieved February 23, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/research-paper/research-paper-format/

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Writing Center: How to Set up an MLA Paper

  • How to Set Up an Appointment Online
  • Documentation Styles
  • Parts of Speech
  • Types of Clauses
  • Punctuation
  • Spelling & Mechanics
  • Usage & Styles
  • Resources for ESL Students
  • How to Set up an APA Paper

How to Set up an MLA Paper

  • Adapt to Academic Learning
  • Audience Awareness
  • Learn Touch Typing
  • Getting Started
  • Thesis Statement
  • The First Draft
  • Proofreading
  • Writing Introductions
  • Writing Conclusions
  • Chicago / Turabian Style
  • CSE / CBE Style
  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Cross-Cultural Understanding
  • Writing Resources
  • Research Paper - General Guidelines
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • History Papers
  • Science Papers
  • Experimental Research Papers
  • Exegetical Papers
  • FAQs About Creative Writing
  • Tips For Creative Writing
  • Exercises To Develop Creative Writing Skills
  • Checklist For Creative Writing
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  • Structure For GRE Essay
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  • Checklist For Multimodal Assignments
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  • GRE Essay Writing FAQ
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  • Checklist For GRE Essays
  • Cover Letter
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  • Chapter 2: Theoretical Perspectives on Learning a Second Language
  • Chapter 4: Reading an ESL Writer's Text
  • Chapter 5: Avoiding Appropriation
  • Chapter 6: 'Earth Aches by Midnight': Helping ESL Writers Clarify Their Intended Meaning
  • Chapter 7: Looking at the Whole Text
  • Chapter 8: Meeting in the Middle: Bridging the Construction of Meaning with Generation 1.5 Learners
  • Chapter 9: A(n)/The/Ø Article About Articles
  • Chapter 10: Editing Line by Line
  • Chapter 14: Writing Activities for ESL Writers
  • Resources for Faculty
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MLA: Step by Step for Newcomers to the Style

How to Set up a Paper

Basic Rules:

1)       Set the margins of your paper to be 1 inch on all sides (go to “margins” under “page layout” )

2)       Use the font: Times New Roman

3)       The font size should be 12 point .

4)       Make sure your paper is double-spaced and that the before and after boxes both read 0 (go to Paragraph and then look under Spacing .)

5)       You text should be aligned left (also go to Paragraph and look under General .)

6)       Indent the first line of paragraphs one half-inch from the left margin. (Use Tab key).

MLA (Modern Language Association) style is commonly used to write papers and cite sources in English and foreign language courses, as well as in other disciplines in the humanities.

General format guidelines:

1)       Follow all basic rules mentioned above.

2)       Create a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right-hand corner, one-half inch from the top and flush with the right margin.

·          Go to Insert , click Page Number and choose Plain number 3 under Top of Page .

·          Type your last name next to the page number and leave one space between your last name and the page number, then double click.

·          Make sure the header is in Times New Roman size 12 font and the header should appear on every page of your paper.

3)       In the upper left-hand corner of the first page, list the following information:

·          Your name (First name + Last name, Ex: Lingshan Song)

·          The professor’s name (Ex: Professor Steve Price)

·          The course number (Ex: English 101)

·          The due day (day/month/year, Ex: 11 August 2011)

4)       On the fifth line, center your title. The title is not bolded, underlined, or italicized.

5)       Start your text on the same page. Use the Tab key to indent the first line of paragraphs one half-inch from the left margin.

6)       Set up a Works Cited page (The Works Cited page is a list of all the sources cited in your paper):

·          This page begins on a new page.

·          This page should be double spaced as well.

·          Center the word Works Cited without underling, bolding, or italicizing it. If there is only one entry, title this page Work Cited .

·          Create a hanging indention for this page:

a)       Go to Paragraph and select Special under Indention

b)       Then select Hanging

Terms in Chinese ( 文档专业名词的中文翻译 ):

1)       Inch: 英寸; 1 inch = 2.54 cm

2)       Font: 字体 / 字形

3)       Times New Roman: 新罗马字体

4)       Font size: 字体大小

5)       Double spaced: 双倍行距

6)       Paragraph: 段落

7)       Spacing: 间距

8)       Aligned left: 向左对齐

9)       General: 常规

10)   Tab key: 跳格键,位于大写锁定键上方

11)   Header: 页眉

12)   Insert: 插入

13)   Page number: 页码

14)   Works Cited Page: 引用页面

15)   Hanging indention: 悬挂式缩进

Video on Formatting an Paper with MLA Seventh Edition

Are you struggling on how to format a paper with MLA Seventh Edition? Check this video out!

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  • Last Updated: Sep 14, 2023 10:30 AM
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IMAGES

  1. How to Write a College Paper

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  2. Mla Essay Style

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  3. 5 Essential Tips: How to Write an APA Style Paper Using the Major Headings

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  4. Top Heading For College Essay ~ Thatsnotus

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  5. How to Write In College Essay Format

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  6. MLA Format--How to set up a paper for English class

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  2. Heading writing in calligraphy style || How to write heading in Assignment file || File heading

  3. How to make cover page design in ms word

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  5. Student Progress Report Front Page Design in Ms word || Front Page for Student Progress Report

  6. How to Create A Custom Cover Design in Ms Word

COMMENTS

  1. How to Format a College Essay: Step-by-Step Guide

    Again, we'd recommend sticking with standard fonts and sizes—Times New Roman, 12-point is a standard workhorse. You can probably go with 1.5 or double spacing. Standard margins. Basically, show them you're ready to write in college by using the formatting you'll normally use in college.

  2. General Format

    General Guidelines Type your paper on a computer and print it out on standard, white 8.5 x 11-inch paper. Double-space the text of your paper and use a legible font (e.g. Times New Roman). Whatever font you choose, MLA recommends that the regular and italics type styles contrast enough that they are each distinct from one another.

  3. PDF Student Paper Setup Guide, APA Style 7th Edition

    Text Setup Text Elements Repeat the paper title at the top of the first page of text. Begin with an introduction to provide background and context. Use descriptive headings to identify other sections (e.g., Method, Results, Discussion for quantitative research papers). Sections and headings vary depending on paper type and complexity.

  4. How to Write and Format Headings in Academic Writing

    Although heading and titles are similar, they are distinct: A title leads the entire document and captures its content in one or two phrases; a heading leads only a chapter or section and captures only the content of that chapter or section. Read more in our article on writing good titles in academic writing.

  5. A step-by-step guide for creating and formatting APA Style student papers

    This article walks through the formatting steps needed to create an APA Style student paper, starting with a basic setup that applies to the entire paper (margins, font, line spacing, paragraph alignment and indentation, and page headers). It then covers formatting for the major sections of a student paper: the title page, the text, tables and ...

  6. APA Headings and Subheadings

    Table of contents Additional guidelines for APA headings How many heading levels should you use? When to use which APA heading level Section labels vs headings Sample paper with APA headings Using heading styles in Word or Google Docs Additional guidelines for APA headings

  7. Title page setup

    Follow the guidelines described next to format each element of the student title page. Place the title three to four lines down from the top of the title page. Center it and type it in bold font. Capitalize major words of the title. Place the main title and any subtitle on separate double-spaced lines if desired.

  8. College Paper Heading: a Step-by-Step Tutorial with Writing Tips

    Start by setting the margins and spacing according to the style you choose. MLA For this college heading format, you'll need to set your paper to the standard size (8.5 x 11 inches). All page margins should be one inch while the text is double spaced and typed. Moreover, titles are redundant in MLA unless your professor precisely asked for one.

  9. PDF Heading Levels Template: Student Paper, APA Style 7th Edition

    Begin your paper with the paper title at the top of the first page of text. The paper title acts as a de facto Level 1 heading: It is centered and in bold title case font. Do not use the heading "Introduction"; text at the beginning of the paper is assumed to be the introduction. APA Style headings have five possible levels.

  10. How to Format A College Essay: 15 Expert Tips

    How to Format a College Essay: Font, Margins, Etc. Some of your formatting concerns will depend on whether you will be cutting and pasting your essay into a text box on an online application form or attaching a formatted document. If you aren't sure which you'll need to do, check the application instructions.

  11. How to Head a College Paper

    First and Last Name Place your first and last names on the first line. Double space each line of the heading. All lines of the heading are left justified at the left margin. Professor's Name Place your professor's name on the next line. Use his first and last name preceded by Professor. For example, "Professor John Doe" goes on this line.

  12. APA 7th Edition Style Guide: Headings in APA

    Text begins as new paragraph. 3. Flush Left, Bold, Italics, Upper and Lowercase Heading. Text begins as new paragraph. 4. Indent, Bold, Uppercase and Lowercase Heading with a Period at the End. Text begins on the same line. 5. Indent, Bold, Italics, Uppercase and Lowercase Heading with a Period at the End.

  13. HOW TO

    1 OVERVIEW 2 DOCUMENT MARGINS 3 INDENTATION 4 FONT 5 ALIGNMENT 6 FIRST PAGE FORMAT 6.1 Heading 6.2 Title 6.3 Sample First Page 7 PAGE NUMBERS 8 SPACING 8.1 Document Spacing 8.2 Paragraph Spacing 9 CREATE NEW PAGE 10 BLOCKED QUOTATIONS 11 RESOURCES DOCUMENT MARGINS Rule: Papers submitted for review or grading should have 1" margins all around.

  14. Creating an MLA Header

    Double-spaced Left-aligned 12 point standard font (e.g. Times New Roman) Put each piece of information on a separate line, and don't use periods or other punctuation at the end of each line. The header and title should be in plain text, without any styling. Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check. Try for free MLA running head

  15. PDF Formatting a Research Paper

    Do not use a period after your title or after any heading in the paper (e.g., Works Cited). Begin your text on a new, double-spaced line after the title, indenting the first line of the paragraph half an inch from the left margin. Fig. 1. The top of the first page of a research paper.

  16. Setting Up Your Paper

    APA Style has specific rules about the format of your paper. Be sure to select one of the six approved font styles, and set margins and line spacing as follows: Typeface: APA 7th edition allows six type faces: Calibri, 11 point. Arial, 11 point. Lucida Sans Unicode, 10 point. Times New Roman, 12 point.

  17. MLA Format

    Download Word template Open Google Docs template (To use the Google Docs template, copy the file to your Drive by clicking on 'file' > 'Make a copy') Table of contents How to set up MLA format in Google Docs Header and title Running head Works Cited page Creating MLA Style citations Headings and subheadings Tables and figures

  18. General Format

    Margins should be set at no less than 1". Typeface should be something readable, such as Times New Roman or Courier. Font size should be no less than 10 pt. (preferably, 12 pt.). Major Paper Sections Title Page. According to Turabian style, class papers will either include a title page or include the title on the first page of the text.

  19. How To Make A Paper Look Good

    But by keeping a one-inch margin around the entire page, students make it easier for their instructors to read and mark their papers . It's also a good way to make sure that you're paying attention to the guidelines set out by your instructor, so double-check your paper before turning it in. 3. An Original Title.

  20. How to Format and Structure Your College Essay

    There are three traditional college essay structures. They are: In-the-moment narrative. Narrative told over an extended period of time. Series of anecdotes, or montage. Let's go over what each one is exactly, and take a look at some real essays using these structures. 1. In-the-moment narrative.

  21. APA Sample Paper

    Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Media Files: APA Sample Student Paper , APA Sample Professional Paper This resource is enhanced by Acrobat PDF files. Download the free Acrobat Reader

  22. Formatting a Paper in APA

    Centered, Bold, Title Case Heading. Text begins as a new paragraph. 2: Flush Left, Bold, Title Case Heading. Text begins as a new paragraph. 3: Flush Left, Bold Italic, Title Case Heading. Text begins as a new paragraph. 4: Indented, Bold, Title Case Heading, Ending With a Period. Text beings on the same line and continues as a regular paragraph. 5

  23. Research Paper Format

    The main guidelines for formatting a paper in APA Style are as follows: Use a standard font like 12 pt Times New Roman or 11 pt Arial. Set 1 inch page margins. Apply double line spacing. If submitting for publication, insert a APA running head on every page. Indent every new paragraph ½ inch.

  24. Writing Center: How to Set up an MLA Paper

    How to Set up a Paper. 1) Set the margins of your paper to be 1 inch on all sides (go to "margins" under "page layout" ) 3) The font size should be 12 point. 4) Make sure your paper is double-spaced and that the before and after boxes both read 0 (go to Paragraph and then look under Spacing.) 5) You text should be aligned left (also go ...