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Writing the Personal Statement

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This handout provides information about writing personal statements for academic and other positions.

The personal statement, your opportunity to sell yourself in the application process, generally falls into one of two categories:

1. The general, comprehensive personal statement:

This allows you maximum freedom in terms of what you write and is the type of statement often prepared for standard medical or law school application forms.

2. The response to very specific questions:

Often, business and graduate school applications ask specific questions, and your statement should respond specifically to the question being asked. Some business school applications favor multiple essays, typically asking for responses to three or more questions.

Questions to ask yourself before you write:

  • What's special, unique, distinctive, and/or impressive about you or your life story?
  • What details of your life (personal or family problems, history, people or events that have shaped you or influenced your goals) might help the committee better understand you or help set you apart from other applicants?
  • When did you become interested in this field and what have you learned about it (and about yourself) that has further stimulated your interest and reinforced your conviction that you are well suited to this field? What insights have you gained?
  • How have you learned about this field—through classes, readings, seminars, work or other experiences, or conversations with people already in the field?
  • If you have worked a lot during your college years, what have you learned (leadership or managerial skills, for example), and how has that work contributed to your growth?
  • What are your career goals?
  • Are there any gaps or discrepancies in your academic record that you should explain (great grades but mediocre LSAT or GRE scores, for example, or a distinct upward pattern to your GPA if it was only average in the beginning)?
  • Have you had to overcome any unusual obstacles or hardships (for example, economic, familial, or physical) in your life?
  • What personal characteristics (for example, integrity, compassion, and/or persistence) do you possess that would improve your prospects for success in the field or profession? Is there a way to demonstrate or document that you have these characteristics?
  • What skills (for example, leadership, communicative, analytical) do you possess?
  • Why might you be a stronger candidate for graduate school—and more successful and effective in the profession or field than other applicants?
  • What are the most compelling reasons you can give for the admissions committee to be interested in you?

General advice

Answer the questions that are asked

  • If you are applying to several schools, you may find questions in each application that are somewhat similar.
  • Don't be tempted to use the same statement for all applications. It is important to answer each question being asked, and if slightly different answers are needed, you should write separate statements. In every case, be sure your answer fits the question being asked.

Tell a story

  • Think in terms of showing or demonstrating through concrete experience. One of the worst things you can do is to bore the admissions committee. If your statement is fresh, lively, and different, you'll be putting yourself ahead of the pack. If you distinguish yourself through your story, you will make yourself memorable.

Be specific

  • Don't, for example, state that you would make an excellent doctor unless you can back it up with specific reasons. Your desire to become a lawyer, engineer, or whatever should be logical, the result of specific experience that is described in your statement. Your application should emerge as the logical conclusion to your story.

Find an angle

  • If you're like most people, your life story lacks drama, so figuring out a way to make it interesting becomes the big challenge. Finding an angle or a "hook" is vital.

Concentrate on your opening paragraph

  • The lead or opening paragraph is generally the most important. It is here that you grab the reader's attention or lose it. This paragraph becomes the framework for the rest of the statement.

Tell what you know

  • The middle section of your essay might detail your interest and experience in your particular field, as well as some of your knowledge of the field. Too many people graduate with little or no knowledge of the nuts and bolts of the profession or field they hope to enter. Be as specific as you can in relating what you know about the field and use the language professionals use in conveying this information. Refer to experiences (work, research, etc.), classes, conversations with people in the field, books you've read, seminars you've attended, or any other source of specific information about the career you want and why you're suited to it. Since you will have to select what you include in your statement, the choices you make are often an indication of your judgment.

Don't include some subjects

  • There are certain things best left out of personal statements. For example, references to experiences or accomplishments in high school or earlier are generally not a good idea. Don't mention potentially controversial subjects (for example, controversial religious or political issues).

Do some research, if needed

  • If a school wants to know why you're applying to it rather than another school, do some research to find out what sets your choice apart from other universities or programs. If the school setting would provide an important geographical or cultural change for you, this might be a factor to mention.

Write well and correctly

  • Be meticulous. Type and proofread your essay very carefully. Many admissions officers say that good written skills and command of correct use of language are important to them as they read these statements. Express yourself clearly and concisely. Adhere to stated word limits.

Avoid clichés

  • A medical school applicant who writes that he is good at science and wants to help other people is not exactly expressing an original thought. Stay away from often-repeated or tired statements.

For more information on writing a personal statement, see the personal statement vidcast .

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How To Write A Personal Statement (With Examples)

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Whether you want to apply to colleges, graduate programs, or competitive jobs, writing a persuasive personal statement will give you a leg up over the other applicants. A personal statement gives you a chance to express your qualifications, motivations, and long-term objectives in a way that gets hiring managers and admissions boards excited to meet you.

No matter why you’re writing a personal statement, we’re here to help you stand out from the crowd.

Key Takeaways:

To write a personal statement, first brainstorm, then narrow down your ideas, and start with an intro that leads into your qualifications.

Make sure to proofread your personal statement before submitting.

Personal statements describe your interests, skills, and goals, with a particular focus on your passion.

Personal statements are typically found in academia, however some professional organizations may also request one.

How To Write A Personal Statement (With Examples)

What Is a Personal Statement?

How to write a personal statement, tips for writing a strong personal statement, questions to ask yourself when writing a personal statement, when do i need a personal statement, academic personal statement examples, professional personal statement example, personal statement faq.

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A personal statement is a written work that describes your skills, areas of interest, accomplishments, and goals. It is typically included with a college or scholarship application, and sometimes used as part of job applications as well.

Personal statements are a chance for you to show an admissions board or a hiring committee what makes you special outside of your resume . Think of it as an in-depth cover letter where you get to detail not only your skills, but why you’re so passionate about the subject.

Short of an interview, it’s the best way to show your personality in a way that (hopefully) convinces someone to hire or admit you.

When you’re ready to write your statement, there are a few ways you can approach it. We’re going to go over a seven-step process so you can keep your thoughts organized and work through a process. Feel free to switch up the method, so it works for you.

Understand the prompt. Before you put pen to paper, make sure you understand the prompt and what is being asked of you. If there’s a specific set of questions you need to respond to, make sure you frame your thinking that way instead of just choosing a topic.

Brainstorm. Think of some ideas and an outline before you start writing. Consider how you can answer the prompt you’re given and what unique experiences you can bring to the table. The more options you have, the better off you’ll be.

Narrow it down. An excellent way to pick your final approach to draft a statement would be to jot down a few sentences for each idea you had. This helps you tell what topic is easiest to write about or what you feel most confident. No matter how you narrow down your ideas, you need to settle on the strongest one to convey your qualifications.

Start with an intro. Once you’re ready to write, you’ll want to write your opening paragraph first. This is a chance for you to introduce yourself and let people know who you are. Try to keep this paragraph short since it’s just an intro, and you’ll have more space to get into your qualifications in the next paragraph.

Write about your qualifications. When you write about your skills, make sure you align them with the job description or the program’s goals or university.

You can expand this section to a few paragraphs (if word count allows) and be sure to cover your achievements, qualifications, skills, talents, goals, and what you can bring to the program or organization.

One to three body paragraphs should suffice, with scholarship and graduate school personal statements being the longest of the bunch, and job personal statements being the shortest.

Sum up your argument. Your statement is a persuasive argument for why the committee should pick you. It should be a compelling summary of your qualifications, and it should show that you have a clear desire to work for the company.

Proofread. Look for any spelling or grammar errors and check to make sure your writing is clear and concise. Cut out anything that doesn’t fit or help paint a good picture of what kind of student or employee you are. You might want to show your draft to a few people to ensure everything sounds right.

No matter what approach you take to writing your statement, a few things hold. We’ll give you some tips to make your statement stand out from the rest.

Write to your audience. Chances are you have a good idea of who will be reading your application and personal statement, so try to gear your writing toward them. Think of what will persuade or impress them and incorporate that into your writing.

Stay truthful. It might be tempting to exaggerate the truth or smudge a little bit, but make sure you stay truthful. If you claim to have skills or experience that you don’t have and land the job, it might be pretty easy to tell that your writing doesn’t exactly align with your experience.

Tell a story. If you can, try to weave your narrative into a story. Not only will it be more engaging for your reader, but it will also show if you can use your skill to create a story. It doesn’t need to be elaborate, but tying everything together into a narrative will impress your readers.

Use your voice. To make your statement more personal and unique, you should write in your voice. Don’t try to copy examples of statements you find or let your editor drown out what makes you unique. Make sure you keep your personality and qualifications front and center since it’s a personal statement.

Get specific. Instead of generally talking about skills you have, find ways to show your reader when you used those skills. Being specific and giving examples will make your argument more compelling and show your reader that you’re a master.

Use simple language. Since personal statements are so short, it’s not the time for long and complex sentences. Keep it concise and easy to read. You don’t want to risk confusing your reader since committees usually have a few minutes to consider your candidacy, and you don’t want to lose their attention.

Sometimes, especially during the brainstorm process, it can help to ask yourself questions to get your mind focused. These questions can help realize what you want to write in your personal statement.

Some questions you can ask yourself include:

“Why am I interested in this application? What about it makes me want to apply?”

“What are my strengths and weaknesses?”

“What type of work gets me excited and deeply engaged?”

“What is my life story and how does it relate to this application?”

“Where do I want to go?”

“Who do I want to be?”

“What have I learned from my past?”

“How can I explain my past experiences?”

“How would my friends and family describe me to a stranger?”

“What obstacles have I overcome and how does it make me who I am today?”

Asking yourself questions like these will open up your mind to new ideas on how to write your personal statement.

You may need to write a personal statement for a university, scholarship, or job application.

University application. When you’re writing a personal statement for a school application, you’ll usually have a few paragraphs to get your point across. These prompts tend to be more open-ended and give you a chance to explain why you want to attend that school, how you align with their program, and why you are an excellent fit for the school’s culture.

A personal statement for a graduate program needs to be much sharper and more focused. At this point in your education, you’re expected to know precisely where you’d like to turn your academic focus and be able to communicate that efficiently.

Scholarship application. When you need to write a personal statement for a grant or scholarship application, you want to make sure you align your values and purpose with the providers. These can be tricky to write, but they’re like a careful balance between personal statements for school and work.

Job application. For work-related personal statements, you’ll want to focus on your skills and qualifications more than your personality. Employers are more concerned with how you can meet their skill requirements. Professional personal statements tend to be shorter, so there’s less space to talk about anything but your qualifications.

Here are two examples of shorts personal statement for graduate program applications:

From the moment I stepped into the lab, smelled the clean scent of fresh lab coats, and saw the beakers glistening under the light, I felt an excitement to learn that hasn’t left me since. Each time I enter the lab, I feel the same flutter of my heart and a sense of purpose. I want to continue to chase this feeling while contributing to a broader scientific knowledge catalog, which I know the Graduate Biology Program at City University will allow me to do. I want to continue the research I started in college on communicable diseases while gaining a critical education. City University’s program emphasizes in-class and hands-on learning, a perfect combination for my learning style.
As a graduate of State University with a B.S. in Biology, I have the foundation to build my knowledge and experience. While at State University, I worked in a lab researching the efficacy of a new flu vaccine. There, I managed other student researchers, worked as a liaison between the professor running the lab and students and managed the data reports. I am ready to bring my extensive experience to City University classrooms while learning from my peers. I am eager to begin the coursework at City University, and I believe I am uniquely prepared to contribute to the campus culture and research efforts. I look forward to stepping into City University’s lab in the fall and feeling the familiar excitement that drives me to pursue a graduate program and learn more about public health.

If you need to write a professional personal statement, here’s a sample you can model yours after:

As a recent graduate of State University with a B.A. in Communications, I am prepared to take what I have learned in the classroom and bring my work ethic and go-getter attitude to ABC Company. I believe that I have the skills and experience to excel as a Marketing Coordinator from my first day. My classes in Digital Communication, Social Media Marketing, and Business Management and my work as Outreach Chair of the university newspaper have prepared me to take on responsibilities as I learn more about the field. I also believe that my dedication to animal welfare aligns with the ABC Company’s goal of finding loving homes for all of their foster pets and makes me especially interested in this position.

What do I write in a personal statement?

A personal statement should include an introduction, your relevant skills/experiences, and your goals. You want to keep your personal statement relevant for the program or job in question. Make sure to show your passion and indicate what you’d like to do with the degree or opportunity.

How do you start off a personal statement?

Start your personal statement by introducing yourself. Give a brief snapshot of your background that also describes why you’re passionate about this field or area of study in particular. Another powerful way to start off a personal statement is with a significant accomplishment that immediately speaks to your relevant skill set and experience.

What exactly is a personal statement?

A personal statement is a brief statement that sums up your qualifications. A personal statement is a brief written document that university admissions boards, scholarship programs, and sometimes hiring managers require from applicants. A personal statement’s purpose is to show the reader that you are qualified, fully invested in the aims of the program, and have plans for what you would do if granted the opportunity.

How do you write a 500-word personal statement?

To write a 500-word personal statement, start by writing without worrying about the word count. If your personal statement is too long, look for sentences that include skills, experiences, or qualifications that aren’t strictly related to the requirements or aims of the program/job you’re applying for and remove them.

If your personal statement is too short, go back to the program, scholarship, or job description. Make note of the preferred experiences and required skills. For example, if you’ve included a skill in your personal statement without experience to back it up, consider adding a brief story that shows you putting that skill into action.

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Amanda is a writer with experience in various industries, including travel, real estate, and career advice. After taking on internships and entry-level jobs, she is familiar with the job search process and landing that crucial first job. Included in her experience is work at an employer/intern matching startup where she marketed an intern database to employers and supported college interns looking for work experience.

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  • Last updated October 4, 2022

How to Write a Personal Statement for a Job (with Examples)

Take this one personally

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If you need to write a personal statement, here's your guide. We'll cover: 

  • What a personal statement is

The 3 essential parts of a personal statement

  • Tips for writing a personal statement
  • Examples of a personal statement

What is a personal statement? 

A personal statement is a brief description of why you’re qualified for and interested in the job you’re applying for. Your personal statement should tell employers why your training, education, experience, and career goals make you the best fit for the job.

You may include a personal statement at the top of your resume (similar to an objective statement or resume summary ) or the employer may request that you attach a personal statement to your application (though this is not the same thing as a cover letter , which is longer and more detailed).

When writing your personal statement, start by telling the employer who you are as a professional. Maybe you’re a marketing consultant with five years of paid media experience, or maybe you’re a teacher with in-depth knowledge of diverse learning styles and the Montessori method.

2. The what

What skills, abilities, or qualities do you have that would be useful in the position? 

Do you have a relevant degree or hold an industry certification ? Do you have soft skills —like public speaking, mentorship, or adaptability —that are particularly relevant to the role?

Use this section to share why you want the job you’re applying for or why you’re passionate about the industry or the population you will serve in the role. For example, if you’re applying for a social media manager job, you could mention that you enjoy running a platform that helps people stay connected and that you like coming up with new ways to engage online followers.

The why is particularly important for those pursuing a career change or career shift. 

Read ore: How to List Work History on Your Resume

Tips for writing your personal statement

Do use a professional tone. 

Don’t include personal information, like your marital status, ethnicity, or age.  

Do include relevant skills, such as project management or data analysis, or qualities, like collaborative or flexible. 

Don’t use the personal pronoun I if the personal statement appears on your resume. If it is a separate part of your application, you can use the first person I.

Do adhere to word count requirements if the employer stipulates them. Otherwise, keep it brief—roughly three to five sentences (or fifty to sixty words).

Example #1 - Personal statement that does not appear on resume

I’m an experienced copywriter with 10+ years of experience writing quality digital content and adept at conveying the unique tone of a brand across channels. In my previous role, I increased clients’ social media followers from 15K to 30K in less than three months. I’m excited about using my writing, editing, and content management skills to fulfill the senior marketing copywriter position with XYZ Marketing. 

Example #2 - Personal statement that appears on resume

Web developer with wide-ranging knowledge of programming languages, including Java, HTML, Python, and SQL. Proficient in creating, maintaining, and improving user-friendly websites for B2B companies. Able to translate technical language and concepts to non-technical user groups. Eager to bring experience in UX/UI design, testing, and search engine optimization to a forward-thinking startup. 

Example #3 - Personal statement for a career change, does not appear on resume

I’m a tenacious customer service professional who can balance competing tasks while maintaining service quality. I’m empathetic, focused, and detail-oriented, and I’m skilled at training customers on products and services and increasing client adoption. I am seeking a role in product management where I can use my experience in customer service, product use cases, training, and client retention to build tools that drive business. 

Example #4 - Personal statement for a career change, appears on resume

Certified electrician with more than seven years in the field and five years as a manager seeking a role in maintenance project management. Experienced in contract work as well as staff positions with private companies and government agencies. Strong attention to detail that is useful when completing wiring installations, reviewing contracts, and performing quality checks. Prepared to bring a team-oriented approach to your organization.

Read more:  How to Ace a Panel Interview

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How To Write a Personal Statement for Job Searching

Madeleine Burry writes about careers and job searching for The Balance. She covers topics around career changes, job searching, and returning from maternity leave, and has been writing for The Balance since 2014.

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Different Types of Personal Statements

What you should include, tips for writing a job search personal statement, examples of personal statements.

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What's a personal statement, and why do you need one when you're job searching? A job search personal statement is a place to share why you're interested in a position and why you're a good match.

In your statement, you can get a bit personal—use the space to share details and insights about yourself, and forge a connection with potential employers. Here are some tips on how to write a successful personal statement that will further your job search.

A personal statement may be included in your curriculum vitae  or CV. Much like an in-person elevator speech or the summary section within a resume, a CV personal statement highlights your objectives and abilities. Since a CV may stretch over several pages, this allows you to showcase must-see details from within the document. You'll want to write just a few sentences for a personal statement in a CV.  

Or, you may need to write a personal statement as part of a job application. This helps hiring managers to separate out candidates applying for every job in a category (e.g., putting in applications for any "production manager" position) from more engaged candidates, who are interested in the company.

Write something that matches the application's requested word count; if one isn't provided, aim for 250 to 500 words. Regardless of where it appears, your goal in a personal statement is the same: try to connect your background and goals with the job at hand.

In your personal statement, you want to make a connection between yourself and the position. Think of this as a three-part process:

  • Share Some Details About Yourself: Who are you? You may say things like "Highly seasoned production manager" or "Recent graduate with honors."
  • Highlight Your Most Relevant Experience and Talents and Share What You'd Bring to the Company: Think: "Strong, speedy writer capable of crafting ad copy that engages and enchants." or "In my years as a project manager, I've never let a detail slip; I've won internal awards for the best team player. My projects release on time and match requested specifications."
  • Provide a Bit of Information About Your Career Goals: For instance, "Looking for a staff writer position" or "Eager for placement in a mid-sized firm as an audit supervisor" or "Seeking a position as a production assistant to further develop my skills in television and put my time management abilities to the test."

While it's called a personal statement, avoid over-sharing. Only include information that's relevant to the job at hand. That is if you're applying for a position as an accountant, no need to mention your goal of becoming a staff writer at a magazine.

Remember, the main goal of your personal statement is for it to further your job search.

Your personal statement should always be personalized—it's a mistake to reuse the same personal statement for every job you apply for. You don't need to write the personal statement from scratch each time—just make tweaks so it reflects the needs of the company and the qualities requested in the job description.

Here are more tips for writing a successful job search personal statement:

  • Know Your Audience: Target your personal statement to a specific job position and company. Spend a bit of time researching the company to get a sense of what they're looking for in a candidate. Decode the job description so you understand the company's needs in a candidate. Take notes on where your qualifications are a good match for the position.
  • Make Some Lists: What have you done that employers should know about? Make a list of your accomplishments (and keep in mind that while splashy awards are important, so too is reorganizing a chaotic system that gives everyone hives to make it user-friendly). Brainstorm a list of your talents as well as your soft, communication, and general skills.
  • Go Long on Your First Draft—Then Cut It Down: Hopefully, your time spent thinking about the company's needs and what you have to offer has given you plenty of fodder to get started writing your personal statement. At this point, don't worry about length; write as much you want. Then, go back and edit—aim for a few sentences for a CV and around 250 to 500 words in an application. Cut unnecessary words and clichés that don't add meaning. Instead, use action verbs . While it's fine to write in the first person, avoid overusing the word "I." Try to vary the composition of sentences.
  • Make It Targeted: You have lots of skills and interests and work experience. What you want to emphasize in one position is not necessarily what you want to highlight in another. If you are qualified as both a writer and an editor, choose which talent to call out in your personal statement—and make it the one that's most relevant to the job you want.

Here are some examples of personal statements to use as inspiration:

  • I'm a seasoned accountant with CPA and CMA certification and more than 10 years of experience working in large firms. Oversaw audits and a department of ten. My positive attitude and detail-oriented spirit help ensure that month-end financial wrap-ups go smoothly and without any inaccuracies or fire drills. Looking for a leadership role in my next position.
  • Recent college graduate with freelance writing experience at major print magazines as well as online outlets and the college newspaper. A strong writer who always meets deadlines, and matches the company tone and voice. In search of a staff writer position and eager to learn the magazine trade from the ground up.
  • I'm an award-winning designer in children's clothes looking to make the transition to adult athletic year. At Company X, I developed a new line for toddlers and traveled to Asia to oversee production. I'm a fast learner and am eager for a new challenge in the growing field of athleisure.   
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CV Personal Statement Examples and Tips

CV Personal Statement

Your personal statement is the first thing a recruiter or hiring manager will read when flicking through what will usually be a huge pile of CVs. With so much competition, you need a personal statement that grabs their attention for all the right reasons. But how do you write one? Here’s our guide along with a couple of personal statement examples for inspiration.

What is a personal statement?

A personal statement is a concise paragraph that sits at the top of your CV just below your name and contact details and tells the reader why you would be a fantastic asset for their company. It should include a summary of your most relevant skills and experience and give the recruiter an insight into your ambitions and character.

Your personal statement should explain:

  • Who you are
  • Your suitability for the role and the value you can add
  • Your career goals

Conveying all that information in just a few sentences is certainly not easy, but with research suggesting that recruiters spend an average of just six seconds reviewing each CV before deciding whether the applicant is a good fit, you must get it right.

How to write a winning personal statement for your CV

No one has your specific skills and experience, so your personal statement must be unique. However, there are some universal tips you can follow.

  • Length, formatting and tone of voice

Probably the biggest challenge you’ll face when writing a personal statement for your CV is keeping it between 50 and 150 words, or around four or five lines of text. It should be clean and concise, formatted consistently and written in the same font and point size as the rest of your CV.

Personal statements can be written in the first (“I am a marine biologist”) or third-person (“Marine biologist looking for”), but whatever voice you choose, keep it consistent throughout your CV.

Recruiters read so much hyperbole and waffle that being honest and understated will help you stand out. This is not The Apprentice, so buzzwords, empty promises and meaningless metaphors should be avoided at all costs.

  • Back up your claims

Cliches like ‘hard worker’ or ‘experienced’ are just empty words that recruiters see hundreds of times a day. Instead, establish your credentials with relevant vocational qualifications or professional memberships you have and quantify the level of experience you have. For example, “I am a RICS qualified surveyor with eight years’ experience working for a property development company”.

  • Include statistics from your career

Including specific data or statistics in your personal statement will immediately make it stand out from the hundreds of others recruiters read every day. Metrics of success are far more memorable than simply listing your achievements. For example, “I introduced a new lead qualification tool that increased sales by 15 percent”.

  • Remove pronouns in the third person

The personal statement on your CV is the one place where it’s okay to talk about yourself in the third person. However, using pronouns, for example, “he is a conscientious worker with 12 years of experience...” is a step too far. Instead, drop the pronouns, so that would become “A conscientious worker with 12 years of experience…”

Personal statement examples

Here are a few examples of personal statements to keep you on the right track and hopefully provide a little inspiration.

Written in the first person by a graduate looking for their first professional role.

I am a recent graduate with a first-class degree in economics, specialising in econometrics and international trade. I have commercial experience in the finance sector courtesy of an internship with a UK corporation, where I developed the technical data engineering skills you are looking for. I have a proven ability to meet deadlines and produce consistently high-quality work, as evidenced by my degree, and would relish the chance to develop my skills within your organisation.

Written in the third person by an experienced purchasing manager looking to climb the ladder.

Purchasing manager with 12 years of experience who wants to progress to a more senior role within the aviation industry. Has developed strong and lasting relationships during previous managerial positions in the sector and wants to put this strong network to good use to add value to your business.

Time to get hired

Writing a winning personal statement that you’re happy with and that summarises your skills and experience effectively in just a few lines will take time. However, using these tips and examples as a guide and editing your personal statement for every role is an important piece of the puzzle.

To hear Guardian Jobs reader Elia’s story and how her Personal Career Management programme helped land her ideal job watch the video .

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Personal Career Management can offer you a  free review to assess your needs and to see which programme is right for you.

To book call Personal Career Management on 01753 888 995 or fill in the contact form .

Personal Career Management are Career Management Partners for the Guardian and are a specialist career coaching and outplacement company.

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Writing a Winning Personal Statement for a Job

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When you walk into a new place, your immediate instinct is to greet and introduce yourself to the people around you. This is the same way a job application works; you don’t want to shove your resume into the employer’s face. Let them know who you are and what you can do first by introducing your skills with a personal statement for a job . 

A personal statement is often the first thing employers read when reviewing your application, so it’s your opportunity to make an excellent first impression. This guide will teach you how to write an exceptional personal statement that will intrigue the recruiter.

What Is a Personal Statement?

A personal statement is a short document you write as part of your job application. It is a summary of your skills, experience, and accomplishments , often the first thing employers read when reviewing your application. This document highlights the qualities and experiences that make you a good fit for the job and explains why you’re interested in the position. 

A well-written personal statement can help you stand out from other job applicants and make a positive impression on potential employers. It also enables you to make a strong impression on employers and increase your chances of landing an interview and, ultimately, the job.

How Long Should a Personal Statement Be?

There is no standard length for a personal statement for a job. In general, it should be as long as it needs to be to highlight your skills, experience, and accomplishments effectively. But not so long that it becomes boring or challenging to read.

Your personal statement can be between one and two pages long. This should allow you to include enough information that provides an overview of your skills and experiences. But not so much that you overwhelm the reader.

It’s essential to keep in mind that a personal statement is not a replacement for your resume. It should complement your resume and provide enough information that showcases your skills and experiences without overwhelming the employer.

How to Write and Structure a Personal Statement

person walking holding brown leather bag

It’s essential to structure your statement in a clear, direct, and easy-to-read manner. The structure of your statement will depend on the specific requirements of the job you are applying for.

Here are some tips to note.

1. Start With an Introduction.

The introduction is your chance to grab readers’ attention and encourage them to keep reading. Start with something interesting, unique, and catchy to engage the employer and get them to read the entire piece.

2. Provide an Overview of Your Skills and Experience

Briefly summarize your skills and experiences. This could include any relevant education, training, or experience that makes you a good fit for the job. Keep it brief and to the point. Avoid including unnecessary detail.

3. Write Your Achievements

In your personal statement, you should also highlight your accomplishments. This could include any awards or recognition you have received, projects you have worked on. Or specific skills or experiences that set you apart from other candidates.

4. Write About Your Interest in the Job.

The next thing to write in your statement is why you are interested in the job and the company. This could include any specific reasons you are drawn to the industry, the company’s mission or values. Or any other factors that make the job appealing.

5. Write a Compelling Conclusion.

The conclusion of your statement is your final opportunity to make an impression on the employer. End with something memorable, such as a call to action or a statement of your future goals.

Tips for Writing a Personal Statement for a Job

Here are some important tips for writing a personal statement for a job:

  • Research the company and the job. Before you begin writing your personal statement, it’s essential to do some research on the company and the job you are applying for. This will help you understand the company’s culture and values. And give you a better idea of what the recruiter is looking for in an applicant.
  • Tailor your statement to the job. 
  • Be direct in your statement 
  • Use specific examples to engage the employer.
  • Always proofread and edit your statement to ensure it is spelling and grammar error-free. 

Examples of Personal Statements for a Job

I am a highly motivated and organized individual with a passion for problem-solving and great attention to detail. A graduate of Administration with over five years of experience in customer service. Confident in my capability to excel in a fast-paced work environment. Skilled in communication, time management, and conflict resolution, and I am always looking for ways to improve processes and exceed expectations. I am excited about the privilege of joining your team and contributing to the success of your organization.

I am a graduate of [university name] with a degree in English Language and Literature. I have always been passionate about language and its ability to communicate ideas and emotions. During my time at the university, I developed strong writing skills and an understanding of the nuances of rhetoric. My experiences working as a proofreader for a publishing company have given me valuable experience dealing with different types of text production. From academic essays to brochures.

I am applying for the Output position at your company because it combines two things close to my heart: communication and technology. In this role, I would ensure that all material output from the company is error-free and meets established standards regarding style, grammar. My educational background and previous work experience make me perfectly suited for this job. I look forward to using my skills to contribute positively to your organization.

I am a highly accomplished and results-driven sales manager with over ten years of experience. I have a proven track record of driving growth and profitability in global and regional businesses. This is through innovative sales strategies, strong team leadership, and effective customer management.

My skills encompass all aspects of the sales process, from lead generation to contract negotiation and closing. I am also an expert at optimizing channel partnerships to maximize market reach. In addition to my technical expertise, I possess excellent communication skills that enable me to build relationships with clients. Driven by challenge and success, I am looking for a new opportunity to utilize my skill set to achieve my desired goals.

I am a highly motivated and skilled professional with over five years of experience in the retail industry. Eager to apply for the position of Manager at your company. My strong background in customer service and team leadership, and my passion for exceeding sales targets, make me a perfect fit for this role.

As Assistant Manager at XYZ Retail, I successfully implemented several initiatives that increased customer satisfaction and boosted sales. I developed and implemented a new training program for our sales team. This led to a 20% increase in sales within the first three months. Additionally, I was consistently recognized for building and maintaining solid relationships with customers, vendors, and other stakeholders.

I am excited to bring my experience and skills to your team and contribute to your company’s success. Thank you for considering my application. 

Wrapping Up

Your personal statement is your first impression on the employer , and a wrong first impression ruins everything. So take care to write a compelling and intriguing personal statement. Highlight your unique skills and capabilities that distinguish you from other applicants.

Ensure that your statement is direct, professional, and catchy enough to make the employer consider you for the job.

Writing a Winning Personal Statement for a Job

Abir Ghenaiet

Abir is a data analyst and researcher. Among her interests are artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing. As a humanitarian and educator, she actively supports women in tech and promotes diversity.

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Personal Statement Examples For Jobs (11 Powerful Samples)

If you plan writing a personal statement, going through personal statement examples for job application can help you in crafting a winning personal statement that will make you stand out among other applicants.

Generally, personal statements are most used for job application or universities program application. It is a tool that highlights a candidate’s skills, qualifications, experiences, and interests relevant to the position he/she is applying for.

Looking for winning personal statement examples? In this guide, we will show you 11 persuasive personal statement examples for job application.

Personal Statement Examples for Jobs

If you are applying for a job, a personal statement which you can include on your resume or CV can help sell you as the right candidate for the job. It is a great tool you can use to showcase your experience, qualification, skills, and interests relevant to the job you are seeking.

Below are persuasive personal statement examples across different industries you can go through to get a better idea on what to include when writing your personal statment.

Nursing personal statement example

Caring and efficient Nurse committed to safeguarding the medical needs and wellbeing of my patients and their families. Particularly skilled at building rapport with anxious patients and focused on providing a high standard of care that lead to improved patient recovery. Experienced in a number of specialist and complex fields including geriatrics, cardiac and maxillofacial. Excellent observational and record keeping skills to ensure continuity of care and team support. Looking to now develop experience in other clinical areas within a high performing Trust.

Career Change Personal Statement Example

As an experienced sales manager, my tenacious and proactive approach resulted in numerous important contract wins. My excellent networking skills have provided my team with vital client leads, and my ability to develop client relationships has resulted in an 18% increase in business renewals for my current organization. After eight years in sales, currently seeking a new challenge which will utilise my meticulous attention to detail, and friendly, professional manner.

Career Change Personal Statement Example #2

Working for the past 10 years as a regional sales manager has allowed me to develop keen skills in building strong working relationships and lucrative networks. My ability to communicate well with everyone from a variety of different backgrounds enabled me to win vital customer contracts that saw an increase of 20% in sales revenue over 3 years for my current employer. I am now ready to take on a new challenge and want to work in the charity sector so that I can use my skills to give something back for the direct benefit of others. I pay close attention to details and have a friendly, confident and professional manner that would be suitable for the role on offer with your organization.

Accounting Personal Statement Example

I’m a seasoned accountant with CPA and CMA certification and more than 10 years of experience working in large firms. Oversaw audits and a department of ten. My positive attitude and detail-oriented spirit help ensure that month-end financial wrap-ups go smoothly and without any inaccuracies or fire drills. Looking for a leadership role in my next position.

Accounting Personal Statement Example #2

Experienced and qualified Accountant with a sound understanding of financial controls and processes. A strong commercial awareness combined with the ability to analyze and produce high quality management reports to tight deadlines. Specific experience of developing cost saving practices, budget management and forecasting within the retail and utilities sectors. Now looking to broaden experience specifically in an IT firm.

Marketing personal statement example

Intuitive Marketing Executive skilled at increasing sales through diligent research and efficient resource allocation. Especially adept at managing complex projects while also developing key stakeholder relationships. Able to maximize profits whilst working within a tight marketing budget. Enjoy identifying client needs and delivering practical short and long term solutions. Now looking or a new role to develop my digital marketing skills.

Teaching personal statement example

Passionate Science Teacher striving to make a real difference to young people’s lives through engaging lessons matched to individual learning needs. Excellent behavioural management skills gained through vast experience of working in diverse academic settings. Experienced in developing lessons for a wide range of students. Now looking for a teaching role that offers more responsibility and management experience within a challenging and proactive school.

Customer service personal statement example

A well-presented, patient and friendly Customer Service Advisor with a proven track record of building relationships by providing information on additional products and services and helping customers find the right ones to meet their needs. A genuine ‘can-do’ attitude demonstrated through a number of staff awards, and an excellent telephone manner combines to contribute to the growth of any business. Trained in effectively resolving customer complaints and now looking for a suitable position to take on more responsibility and expand retail experience.

More Personal Statement Examples

A highly driven merchandiser with over 8 years’ experience at leading fashion chain retailers. Helped deliver increased team sales in excess of 10% per year over the last 3 years, despite challenging market. Particular expertise in new product development, contributing to packaging design of 3 new lines in current role. Valuable experience in developing e-commerce business alongside high street retail.

I am a highly motivated, fully trained engineer with 15 years experience in the telecoms industry. I carry a proven track record working with XYZ Telecoms Ltd. as a field engineer and project team leader. I have managed many large commercial telecoms infrastructure installations. Currently unemployed due to the relocation of the company. I am looking for a fresh opportunity to use my many years of expert knowledge and supervisory experience to bring a high level of quality and service to a well-established and respected company.

A professional charity fundraiser with senior level experience spanning direct marketing and capital fundraising campaigns. Have spent two years initiating and launching a campaign for a top 50 charity that raised £6 million within 9 months. Adept at using social media, TV,  telemarketing  and face to face fundraising methods. Now seeking to use my skills in a part-time role at a smaller charity, to have more hands-on input.

Personal statements are effective piece of information you can use to your advantage to show you are the best candidate for the position you are applying. In addition to the personal statement examples, you can also check out how to write an outstanding personal letter statement that stands out for both jobs our universities program application.

That is it on our guide on persuasive personal letter examples

Hope you found it helpful?

Which of the examples do matches what you are looking for?

Feel free to drop your comment below

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Building Better Opportunities - How To Write A Personal Statement For A Job?

How To Write A Personal Statement For A Job? Employment

Personal statements are often used in job applications, but can also be used for college and university applications, too. Here, we’ll give you some hints and tips for creating a personal statement for a job that goes the distance. Read on to find out more! 

What is a personal statement? 

First thing’s first…what is it?

A personal statement for a job is usually a paragraph about you that goes on the top of your CV. It’s sometimes known as a personal profile, professional profile, or even a career objective – so keep an eye out for these kinds of terms too in your job hunt.

Your personal statement should be an ‘ overview of you ,’ covering things like: who you are, why you think you are suitable for the role, what you will bring to the job, and your career goals. 

If you are wondering why a personal statement is important (after all, shouldn’t all that be in your CV anyway?) it’s worth knowing that recruiters get 100s of CVs sent to them every single day. And on average they spend about 6 seconds looking at a CV before making a decision on the candidate. So, having a personal statement at the top of your CV gives a brief, easy to read summary that will hook the recruiter in and make them want to call you in for an interview. 

Example of a personal statement for a job: 

A friendly and enthusiastic individual, currently looking to return to a retail assistant role after spending the last 3 years raising a family. I possess excellent communication and listening skills, and I work extremely well in a team, as well as being able to work confidently on my own. I have recently volunteered at a local charity shop, as a sales assistant, to refresh my skills, and I am committed to continuing my career on a full-time basis. 

How to write a personal statement

Like the example above, your personal statement should be short and sweet. Remember, your aim is to catch the attention of the recruiter so they read your CV in more depth before inviting you to interview. 

Before you start, it’s best to sit down with your updated CV and make a list of all of your relevant skills and experience. Examples of skills you could include are: 

  • Communication 
  • Numeracy (i.e. good at working with money)
  • Problem solving 
  • Organisation 
  • Creativity 
  • Confidence 

Once you have a list of these things, it should be a lot easier to pull together an effective personal statement. 

What if I have no work experience? 

Having no work experience doesn’t mean you can’t write a good personal statement. There are plenty of other ways you can demonstrate your skills. Do you have a hobby or an interest? If you do, it’s likely you use key skills to do this and the best part is you can put this in your personal statement. Similarly, if you were involved in any clubs, teams or projects at school. 

The key to writing an effective personal statement is keeping it relevant to the role you are applying to. So make sure you read the job advert and any accompanying information thoroughly to understand what the employer is looking for! 

What do I put at the start of my personal statement? 

Many, many people struggle to write about themselves. So, if this is you, don’t worry! To kick off your personal statement, see if you can come up with a short, sharp statement (no longer than one sentence) that describes you accurately. 

This could be one that highlights your previous work experience: 

‘A flexible construction worker with three years’ experience in bricklaying, roofing, plastering and plumbing.’ 

Or one that shows skills and experience you have from hobbies, interest or education: 

‘A hardworking individual with a passion for creativity alongside a Distinction in Level 3 Graphic Design.’

Again, keep it short. And don’t forget to big yourself up a little bit! Make the recruiter believe that you are the best person for the role you are applying for. 

What goes in the middle of a personal statement?

When it comes to writing your personal statement, it’s best to have at least a loose structure in mind to help you get everything down that you need to. You could include: 

  • Why are you applying?
  • Why are you suitable for the role?
  • What relevant job experience or training do you have?
  • What projects or experiences have you taken part in that could show your abilities ?
  • What makes you the perfect person for the job?

Use the answers to these questions to write your personal statement. 

What goes at the end of a personal statement? 

The end of your personal statement should make it clear to whoever is reading what your goals are professionally. For example, the construction worker above may put: 

‘Looking to take on my next challenge in the world of construction, and develop my skills with a reputable local business.’

Or, for the aspiring graphic designer: 

‘Looking for a start in the exciting world of graphic design, where I can learn from the best with a creative and innovative company.’ 

Remember: keep it brief! 

Do’s and Don’ts for your personal statement 

To help you on your way, here is a list of the do’s and don’ts for your personal statement. 

  • Make sure your tone is polite, friendly and (most importantly) professional. 
  • Keep it short and sweet. Your personal statement should only be around 3 or 4 sentences long.
  • Include relevant information, such as previous experience. 
  • Highlight your key skills. 
  • Make it clear what kind of role you are looking for – this will help highlight your suitability for the one you are applying for. 
  • Use the job advert, person specification and any other information you have about the company to inform your personal statement. 
  • Make your achievements clear! Blow your own trumpet! 
  • Use slang words or be too conversational
  • Include any personal information that’s not relevant. For example: how many children you have, whether you are single or married, etc. 
  • Be negative! 
  • Lie or exaggerate the truth. 
  • Take a template from online without personalising it! 

Need a bit more help?

If you need help in writing your CV or personal statement, we can help. For a detailed and private 1-2-1 with one of advocates who can advise, please call 01902 96228 or fill in the form below to request a callback.

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How to Write a Top MBA Personal Statement (With Examples)

how to write an mba personal statement with examples

Working on your MBA application? You aren’t alone. In 2021, over 200,000 students graduated with an MBA degree making it the number one choice for graduate students for the 10th year in a row. And there’s good reason for this. According to the National Center for Education Statistics , post-MBA, grads can earn significantly more at work—experts estimate an additional $20,000 each year depending on the industry. 

During the application process, you’ll want to stand out. A well-crafted personal statement will help distinguish you from other applicants. It serves as a powerful tool to showcase your unique experiences, skills, and aspirations to admissions committees. To make a lasting impression, tailor your personal statement to each MBA program you’re applying to, highlighting how your background aligns with their values and goals. For additional support, keep reading for some MBA personal statement examples and guidance. 

Understanding the Foundations – Word Count, Templates, and Pricing

When you start your personal statement, keep the word count in mind. Make sure to write your statement succinctly. Templates can give crucial structure to a first draft and make sure you hit necessary points. Finally: is it worth it to hire a professional proofreader? We break down the pros and cons. 

Word Count Considerations

A well-written personal statement is often the deciding factor in the business school admissions process. Conveying your thoughts concisely is a crucial skill in the business world, and future peers will be grateful for your brevity.

One strategy is to start with a longer draft and edit it down when revising. Remove unnecessary details and tighten wordy language. Focus on improving the quality of your content over meeting the maximum word count. 

Templates as a Starting Point

Templates can help to organize your thoughts. Use them to provide structure and give your writing direction. By planning ahead, you can decide how much space you want to dedicate to each element—this can also help you meet the word count.

Remember: popular templates are popular for a reason, and following them too strictly can make your statement feel rigid and unoriginal. To avoid that pitfall, personalization is key. Your individual experiences, goals, and perspectives are all unique. What would a Master’s in Business Administration mean to you? Don’t be afraid to customize any template to fit your voice. 

Professional Proofreading

Graduate schools know what a well-written personal statement looks like—and so do professional proofreaders. Experts can help catch small grammatical errors and improve clarity in your writing. It can be challenging to review personal writing from an objective standpoint. A good proofreader will streamline your writing and ensure overall coherence, improving your odds with your preferred school of business. 

Unfortunately, this can be expensive. Pricing for these services can easily cost hundreds of dollars. If hiring one isn’t in the budget, here are some alternatives: 

  • Find writing groups online or in person. Not only will you receive feedback, you’ll get a better idea of what other personal statements look like. Be prepared to help edit other statements.
  • Reach out to peers and mentors. Turn to people who know your voice and can tell when your writing is authentic. Make sure they aren’t afraid to give negative feedback.
  • Utilize free online resources. Writing tools like Grammarly or Hemingway help check grammar and sentence structure. They won’t help with essay format and aren’t infallible; double-check any changes they might suggest.
  • Read your statement out loud. This can help make sure your statement has a good rhythm and flows naturally.
  • Take breaks. Be your own set of fresh eyes. When you’re in the thick of writing, you might glaze over easy-to-spot details while you’re thinking of the big picture. Allow yourself to recharge and clear your head before you get back to it. 

proofreading mba personal statement

Tailoring Your Personal Statement to Top MBA Programs

Make sure to personalize your essays to specific MBA programs . Include details about specific classes and faculty, unique opportunities, and the strengths that make this program stand out. 

Then, tie yourself into the narrative. What role would you fill as a graduate student or an alumnus? Consider your own strengths and where they align with this specific program. What career goals could this opportunity help you achieve? 

Remember to mention your soft skills and other details that may not show up elsewhere on your application. Finally, shine a spotlight on your unique contributions in past roles. 

Write a Captivating Introduction

A beautiful personal statement will be overlooked unless the introduction captivates the audience. You can begin with compelling anecdotes, personal stories, or influential quotes. Tie this introduction into your reason for pursuing an MBA. Make the reader care before launching into your achievements. Then, clearly state why you’re pursuing an MBA. Example: “From the dynamic intersections of global markets to the intricate strategies driving corporate success, the realm of business has always beckoned to me as a realm of boundless opportunity and perpetual evolution..” 

Discuss Academic and Professional Background

Now it’s time to discuss what you’re bringing to the table. It’s okay to brag! Think about any key achievements or acquired skills that are transferable to an MBA program. What motivated you to apply? Example : “As a project manager at XYZ Corp, I navigated intricate challenges, demonstrating resilience and strategic thinking – skills I am eager to refine in a top-tier MBA program.” 

Answer the Questions: Why an MBA? Why Now? 

What does an MBA mean for your career goals ? Break down your short and long-term goals to answer this essay question. How do the skills you gain from earning an MBA connect to your plan? Research the program you’re applying for and use examples from the curriculum. Example : “My immediate goal is to transition from project management to strategic consulting, and Crummer’s MBA program’s focus on experiential learning and global business strategy perfectly complements my aspirations.” 

Emphasize Soft Skills

Think about moments you demonstrated personal growth or teamwork. Are there any moments you stepped up to lead a project or team? Your past experiences will influence your habits in a graduate school setting. Example :  “Leading a cross-functional team on a high-stakes project not only honed my leadership skills but also taught me the importance of collaborative problem-solving, a cornerstone of Crummer’s MBA program. “

Spotlight Unique Contributions

What sets you apart from other applicants? Moreover, what impact will your unique perspective bring to the MBA cohort? Explain how your background will enrich the learning environment. Detail personal qualities and experiences that showcase your value. 

how to make an mba personal statement engaging

Key Elements for a Powerful Personal Statement

Take a holistic approach to strike the right chord in your personal statement. Give admissions committees a more concrete impression of you. Weave in your qualifications, experiences, and aspirations. Don’t just mention your professional achievements—detail all of your positive qualities. 

Showcase Work Experience 

Be strategic when discussing your real-world work experience. If you can, including measurable results is a great way to show your professional impact. Earnings numbers, statistics, and other metrics will show off your professional experiences. 

Articulate Career Goals and Aspirations

When discussing career goals for an MBA application, detail your short and long-term objectives clearly. Ambiguity can weaken your statement’s impact. Whether you’re joining a family business, starting your own business, or looking to go abroad for international business you should discuss how you see yourself navigating the business world. Connect these career aspirations to the MBA program. 

Incorporate Extracurricular and Real-World Experiences

Touch on any extracurricular experiences like internships or entrepreneurship. Explain how these real-world experiences impacted your analytical skills, business acumen, and decision-making. If you’re an entrepreneur, touch on your journey or discuss the vision for your next startup. 

You can also talk about moments where you demonstrated leadership and communication skills. Teamwork is critical to business leaders. Reflect on your leadership experience—the successes you’ve won and the lessons you learned. 

writing an mba personal statement internships

Maintain Authenticity

Write authentically. Admissions officers want genuine stories. Give readers a reason to empathize with you. Overly formal and generic language can depersonalize your statement and keep readers at arm’s length. 

Also, use conversational language. If something sounds clunky or unnatural, it probably also reads that way. Plus, the way you speak naturally showcases your personality. While you should always use proper grammar, don’t suck the life out of your statement in the name of sounding more “academic.” Use this opportunity to demonstrate your communication skills. 

Navigating Common Challenges

Crafting your personal statements can be challenging! Let’s answer some FAQs. 

How Do I Balance the Personal and Professional Aspects?

Be intentional about what you choose to mention from your personal life. Use elements that either contrast or emphasize your professional experience. How does your background influence your business philosophy? Make sure to keep a professional tone and align your statement with the admissions committee’s expectations and be prepared for any questions the interviewer could ask.

How Do I Handle Sensitive Topics?

If you’re writing about a sensitive topic, do so thoughtfully. You don’t know what type of people will be reading your statement, so be considerate and intentional about any details you choose to share. 

However, your application essay should be a reflection of you. Sensitive subjects often play a major role in personal growth and development. Discuss what you learned from this challenging experience and how it influenced you. 

How Do I Make My Writing Stand Out? 

We’ve touched on all of the story elements you need—now trim the fat. Avoid common clichés and generic statements. Common phrases will dilute the unique perspectives in your personal statement. Make sure the language aligns with you. Avoid language that could apply to everyone when possible. 

Other MBA Application Process Essentials – GMAT Score, GPA, and Statement of Purpose

The MBA application process is multifaceted and holistic. Alongside your statement, admissions committees also consider your GMAT scores and GPA. GMAT scores are used to gauge applicants’ aptitude for business studies, while GPA showcases your readiness for MBA rigor. If you have a lower score in either category, address these challenges by highlighting your other strengths, relevant experience, and resiliency. Remember: committees consider the entire application, not just scores. 

The other factor in the application process is your Statement of Purpose or SOP. This will complement your personal statement. Make sure your SOP articulates your academic and career goals without echoing your other application essay. Avoid redundancy. Focus on the future: link the MBA program to your long-term plan. Take a forward-looking perspective and demonstrate how the MBA will work as a natural progression in your life. 

Your personal statement should be as unique as you are. Start with a compelling narrative and a plan. Proofread your essay, and don’t be afraid to seek help from peers or professionals. Explain how your personal and professional life gives you the necessary skills to thrive at your desired program and be specific about what you want to do there. This is your chance to differentiate yourself from other applicants—take advantage!

Crummer is the #1 ranked MBA program in Florida. You can learn more about what we offer and when you’re ready, start working on your application . 

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how to write a personal statement for a job

Status.net

50 Inspiring Examples of Career Goal Statements

By Status.net Editorial Team on February 7, 2024 — 12 minutes to read

A career goal statement is a clear and concise description of your professional aspirations: it outlines what you aim to achieve in your career path, providing direction and serving as a guide for your professional decisions. Crafting this statement requires self-reflection to identify what truly matters to you in your career.

Think of your career goal statement as a compass. It helps you navigate through opportunities and choices, aligning them with your long-term objectives. A well-defined goal statement includes specific job titles or roles, industry preferences, skills you want to acquire or use, and the values that matter to you in a work environment.

For example, your statement might be, “I aim to become a Senior Software Developer at a tech company that values innovation, in the next five years.” This statement is direct, time-bound, and reflects personal and professional values.

When writing your own career goal statement, start by asking yourself some questions:

  • What am I passionate about?
  • Where do I see myself in five, ten, or fifteen years?
  • What skills do I need to develop to reach my goals?

Your statement can evolve as your career advances and your goals change. Remember, it’s a living document meant to grow along with you. Keep it precise, make it inspiring for yourself, and let it reflect who you are and who you want to become professionally. By doing so, you’ll create a powerful tool to steer your career decisions and help achieve your ambitions.

Components of a Strong Career Goal Statement

A strong career goal statement effectively communicates where you see yourself in the future and how you plan to get there. The keys to crafting this include clarity in your aspirations and how your current path aligns with your long-term objectives.

Clarity and Specificity

Your career goal statement should clearly articulate the position you’re aiming for and the steps you plan to take to achieve it. For example, instead of saying “I want to grow in the tech industry,” specify “My goal is to become a Senior Software Engineer at a renowned tech firm within the next five years by honing my skills in mobile applications development and leadership.”

Alignment with Career Objectives

Ensure that your statement aligns with your broader career objectives. For instance, if you’re determined to enter the field of environmental sustainability, your goal statement could specify, “I will secure a role as a Sustainability Project Manager by gaining expertise in renewable energy solutions and contributing to conservation projects.”

Brevity and Conciseness

Keep your statement concise; it shouldn’t be longer than a short paragraph. A crisp, well-worded statement would look like, “Within three years, I aim to advance to a Lead Graphic Designer position by consistently delivering innovative designs and taking on more strategic projects.”

Personal Motivation

Include a sentence about what drives you towards this goal, which gives a personal touch to your career goal statement. You might say, “I am committed to becoming an industry-recognized financial analyst by developing cutting-edge quantitative models, fueled by my passion for data-driven decision making.”

The Purpose of Career Goal Statements

A career goal statement helps you and others understand where you’re aiming in your professional life. It serves as both a guide and a benchmark for your career progression.

Professional Development

Your career goal statement is a powerful tool for professional development. It’s a declaration of your ambitions, which often falls into specific categories like acquiring new skills, achieving certifications, or reaching a new position. For example, you might aim to become a certified project manager within the next two years, highlighting the steps and skills you’ll need to get there.

Job Search Focus

When you’re on the job hunt, having a career goal statement gives you a lens to evaluate potential job opportunities. Imagine you’re an engineer seeking roles in renewable energy projects; your career goal statement would specify this preference, allowing you to target your job search and tailor your applications to match your aspirations.

Performance Management

During performance evaluations, your career goal statement offers a clear outline of what success looks like for you. It can act as a communication tool between you and your supervisor, ensuring that you’re both aligned on your targets. If your goal is to lead a team, your performance metrics might include leadership training and successful project outcomes.

Personal Reflection and Growth

Your career statement doubles as a checkpoint for personal reflection and growth. By setting specific goals like enhancing your public speaking skills or learning a new programming language, you create a framework for personal progress, tying these improvements back to your broader career objectives.

Writing Your Career Goal Statement

A career goal statement is a clear and concise description of your professional aspirations. It’s important to chart a course for your career by setting strategic goals and outlining the steps you plan to take to achieve them.

Self-Assessment

Start by evaluating your interests, strengths, weaknesses, and values. This step helps you align your career trajectory with your personal attributes and ambitions.

  • If you enjoy creative problem-solving, you might aim for a role in strategic development.
  • Someone with a natural talent for communication might target a career in public relations.

Research and Exploration

Learn about the industries and positions that align with your interests and skills. Find out what qualifications you may need and what career advancement may look like in those roles.

  • Researching the field of data science might show you the importance of skills like programming and data analysis.
  • Exploring the healthcare industry could lead you to consider roles ranging from a health administrator to a nurse practitioner.

Articulating Your Goals

Clearly state your short-term and long-term career objectives. Make them specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART).

  • Short-term goal: Completing a professional certification in digital marketing within the next year.
  • Long-term goal: Becoming a chief marketing officer at a technology company within the next ten years.

Revising and Refining

Your career goals are not set in stone. Periodically review and adjust them to reflect your growing skills, changes in the industry, and personal life changes.

  • Revising your goal to include leadership skills if you’re aiming for management positions.
  • Refining your goals to focus more on work-life balance if personal circumstances change.

Examples of Career Goal Statements

When crafting your career goal statement, be specific and align your goals with your desired career path. This section will provide examples for different career stages to guide you.

For Recent Graduates

As a recent graduate, your goal statement should reflect your eagerness to apply your education in a practical setting and grow professionally. For example:

  • “My goal is to secure a role as a software developer at a forward-thinking tech company where I can contribute to innovative projects and hone my coding skills in real-world applications.”

For Mid-Career Professionals

For you in mid-career, a statement should focus on advancing your current skills and taking on larger responsibilities. For instance:

  • “I aim to elevate my expertise in digital marketing to become a marketing manager, where I can lead strategic campaigns and impact the company’s growth directly.”

For Career Changers

As someone looking to change careers, your statement needs to leverage your transferable skills and express your commitment to the new field. Consider this example:

  • “I intend to transition into the field of data analysis, leveraging my extensive background in market research to deliver actionable insights and drive decision-making processes.”

For Executive-Level Positions

Your executive career goal statement needs to showcase your vision for leadership and your ability to steer the company to new heights. An example could be:

  • “I am determined to apply my 15 years of managerial experience to a Chief Operations Officer role, focusing on optimizing company-wide operations to boost profitability and efficiency.”

50 Examples of Career Goal Statements

  • 1. “To secure a challenging position in a reputable organization to expand my learnings, knowledge, and skills.”
  • 2. “Seeking a role at (…) Company where I can contribute to the team’s success while developing my skills as an accountant.”
  • 3. “To achieve a lead position in software development that allows me to design innovative solutions and manage a dynamic team.”
  • 4. “To become a primary school teacher that inspires young minds and fosters a love of learning.”
  • 5. “Aiming to leverage my experience in customer service to become a leading sales representative within the next five years.”
  • 6. “To grow into a senior role within the marketing department, contributing to the company’s strategic goals and brand development.”
  • 7. “Seeking a position as a clinical practice assistant for a health organization that focuses on the development of innovative medical treatments.”
  • 8. “To secure a position as a human resources manager and contribute to an organization’s employee engagement and professional development strategies.”
  • 9. “My goal is to become a project manager within a progressive tech company, leading innovative projects to successful completion.”
  • 10. “Aspiring to be a top journalist within a major media outlet, reporting on significant global events that shape our world.”
  • 11. “To develop a career in finance, eventually becoming a chief financial officer for a well-established corporation.”
  • 12. “To obtain a managerial position in the hospitality industry, providing exceptional guest experiences and leading a successful team.”
  • 13. “Looking to apply my graphic design skills in a dynamic advertising agency, producing high-quality work for a variety of clients.”
  • 14. “To establish myself as a leading real estate agent within the community, known for diligently serving clients and achieving their property dreams.”
  • 15. “To become a senior software engineer, specializing in machine learning and artificial intelligence, contributing to cutting-edge technology advancements.”
  • 16. “Aspire to join an international non-profit organization, focusing on human rights advocacy and contributing to meaningful change.”
  • 17. “To earn a position as a lead researcher in a top-tier biotech firm, focusing on the development of life-saving pharmaceuticals.”
  • 18. “To be recognized as an expert in environmental law, working to protect natural resources and promote sustainability.”
  • 19. “To secure a role as an art director within a prestigious agency, driving creative strategy and inspiring a team of designers.”
  • 20. “Aiming to become a chief operations officer, optimizing organizational processes and enhancing overall efficiency.”
  • 21. “To advance my career in the field of education technology, developing innovative tools that facilitate learning and growth.”
  • 22. “Seeking to become a master electrician, overseeing complex projects and mentoring apprentices in the trade.”
  • 23. “To climb the ranks to a senior data analyst role, transforming data into actionable insights that drive business strategy.”
  • 24. “To become a leading figure in digital marketing, known for crafting high-impact strategies that generate measurable results.”
  • 25. “Aspiring to be an executive chef in a Michelin-starred restaurant, creating world-class cuisine and leading a top-tier culinary team.”
  • 26. “To secure a position as a cybersecurity expert, protecting sensitive information from threats and vulnerabilities.”
  • 27. “Aiming to be a respected leader in the field of public health, influencing policy and improving community health outcomes.”
  • 28. “To establish a career as a professional musician, performing internationally and sharing my passion for music with diverse audiences.”
  • 29. “Seeking a role as an aerospace engineer with a focus on sustainable design and innovation in air travel.”
  • 30. “To become a leading architect, known for designing eco-friendly and innovative structures that enhance the urban landscape.”
  • 31. “To grow into a senior role in supply chain management, optimizing logistics and contributing to the company’s profitability.”
  • 32. “Aspiring to become a senior content creator, producing engaging and informative content that resonates with a wide audience.”
  • 33. “To secure a position as a labor and delivery nurse, providing compassionate care and supporting families during a pivotal life event.”
  • 34. “To become a principal consultant, offering expert advice and solutions to businesses in my area of expertise.”
  • 35. “Aiming to be a top sales manager, driving team performance and exceeding company sales targets consistently.”
  • 36. “To secure a leadership position within the field of environmental science, contributing to research and advocacy for climate change mitigation.”
  • 37. “To become a recognized expert in user experience design, creating intuitive and user-friendly digital products.”
  • 38. “Seeking a role as a professional event planner, executing unforgettable events that exceed client expectations.”
  • 39. “To advance to a senior technical writer position, producing clear and concise documentation that supports product development.”
  • 40. “Aspiring to be a chief diversity officer, fostering an inclusive workplace culture where all employees can thrive.”
  • 41. “To become a lead mechanical engineer in the automotive industry, contributing to the development of innovative and efficient vehicles.”
  • 42. “To secure a position as a business analyst, helping organizations to improve processes and systems for better performance.”
  • 43. “Aiming to become a senior environmental consultant, providing actionable strategies for sustainable business practices.”
  • 44. “To establish myself as a professional photographer, capturing moments and stories through my lens for global publications.”
  • 45. “Seeking a role as an investment banker, helping companies to grow and investors to achieve their financial goals.”
  • 46. “To become a thought leader in digital transformation, guiding enterprises through the integration of new technologies.”
  • 47. “Aspiring to be a senior policy advisor, influencing legislation and policy decisions that impact the public sector.”
  • 48. “To secure a position as a professional interpreter, facilitating communication in multiple languages for international organizations.”
  • 49. “Aiming to become a leading expert in nutritional science, contributing to healthier lifestyles and dietary choices.”
  • 50. “To establish a career as a professional speaker and author, sharing my expertise and inspiring others in my field.”

Frequently Asked Questions

How can you write an effective career goal statement for your resume.

When you write a career goal statement for your resume, start by reflecting on your strengths, skills, and experiences. Then, identify the kind of position you’re aiming for and how your career path aligns with the goals of the company. Use action words and quantify achievements where possible.

What are some examples of short-term career goals in professional development?

Short-term career goals might include obtaining a professional certification, improving specific job-related skills such as public speaking or technical proficiency, or networking to connect with industry leaders. These goals are typically achievable within a few months to two years.

What should be included in a personal career goal statement?

Your personal career goal statement should include your career interests, the competencies you wish to utilize, the type of environment you thrive in, and how you see your career progressing. It gives employers a glimpse into your aspirations and professional philosophy.

Can you give examples of comprehensive goal statements for students?

An example for a student might be: “Graduate with a degree in Environmental Science and secure an internship with a leading sustainability organization, to contribute to effective climate change solutions.” This states the education aim and the practical, immediate objective after graduation.

How do you frame a career goal statement for entry into graduate school?

A career goal statement for graduate school should express your academic interests, how the program aligns with your career plans, and what you intend to accomplish professionally with the advanced degree. This could be working towards a specific research field or role in academia.

What elements make up a compelling and succinct one-sentence career goal?

A compelling one-sentence career goal is specific, mentioning the desired industry or role, is realistic, and includes a timeframe. For example, “To become a certified project manager within the next year and lead technology-related projects in a Fortune 500 company.”

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Writing a Personal Statement for Law School

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how to write a personal statement for a job

Writing a Personal Statement for Law School was originally published on College Recruiter .

In order to gain entrance into law school, prospective students are required to write an essay detailing the reasons why they want to become lawyers. Unlike the college entrance application, personal statements for law school are essays that have an open format. Successful lawyers are high achievers long before they enter law school. They exude confidence and accomplish their goals. When you write your law school statement, you need to write in a way that shows your skills, competence, and achievements. Think of the person reading your essay as you write. He or she will want to know what you have to offer society as a lawyer. That person also has an interest in your motivations for wanting to be a lawyer and what it is that makes you a better prospect than other law school applicants. Remember that admissions officers review hundreds of applications. Tell them the true story of the things in your life that made you decide to become an attorney. Do not embellish or say anything false because they will see through it. Do not use cliches that you have heard from someone else or tell them what you think they want to hear. For instance, if you really enjoy helping the homeless, write it down in such a way that it shows your reasons rather than telling them. What qualifies you to be a lawyer? What character traits, skills, and talents do you have that would make you a good lawyer? Describe everything you know about yourself that you feel qualifies you above other people. Don’t be disingenuous by exaggerating your skills and accomplishments. If you have any weaknesses that you feel may potentially disqualify you from law school, how do you get around them in your personal statement? That is a tough question. If you have a period of time where you had below average grades, using excuses is not the solution to your dilemma. Try to find something positive that you learned that helps you overcome the flaw. In the case of grades, you could tell how you improved them. One writer’s technique that works effectively on essays and personal statements is active voice. Use active verbs in your senses. Passive voice sounds weak and that is not the way you want to come across to the admissions board. That however does not mean that you should try to impress anyone with your knowledge of legal terminology. A personal statement does not mean writing your complete personal life memoirs. In other words, don’t write a book. Instead, write a 1 to 2 page statement using the tips contained here. When you’re finished, ask people you know to read your statement. Take their suggestions seriously. This is perhaps the most important step of all in writing your personal statement. Revise once. Set it down for a day. Revise twice. Set it down for another day. Read it again and revise and edit once more. Let someone read it again and get their opinion of your statement. Writing our personal statement for law school is not rocket science. When you put the time and effort into writing it, you will likely end up with a personal statement that will effectively get the notice of the Board of Admissions. Tip: Get a head start on writing your own personal statement by starting with a sample personal statement . Your writing will be faster, easier, and more professional as a result. Jason Kay is a professional writer offering advice in a number of areas including resume writing and personal statement writing. You can learn more useful tips at his resume writing blog .

how to write a personal statement for a job

Create a form in Word that users can complete or print

In Word, you can create a form that others can fill out and save or print.  To do this, you will start with baseline content in a document, potentially via a form template.  Then you can add content controls for elements such as check boxes, text boxes, date pickers, and drop-down lists. Optionally, these content controls can be linked to database information.  Following are the recommended action steps in sequence.  

Show the Developer tab

In Word, be sure you have the Developer tab displayed in the ribbon.  (See how here:  Show the developer tab .)

Open a template or a blank document on which to base the form

You can start with a template or just start from scratch with a blank document.

Start with a form template

Go to File > New .

In the  Search for online templates  field, type  Forms or the kind of form you want. Then press Enter .

In the displayed results, right-click any item, then select  Create. 

Start with a blank document 

Select Blank document .

Add content to the form

Go to the  Developer  tab Controls section where you can choose controls to add to your document or form. Hover over any icon therein to see what control type it represents. The various control types are described below. You can set properties on a control once it has been inserted.

To delete a content control, right-click it, then select Remove content control  in the pop-up menu. 

Note:  You can print a form that was created via content controls. However, the boxes around the content controls will not print.

Insert a text control

The rich text content control enables users to format text (e.g., bold, italic) and type multiple paragraphs. To limit these capabilities, use the plain text content control . 

Click or tap where you want to insert the control.

Rich text control button

To learn about setting specific properties on these controls, see Set or change properties for content controls .

Insert a picture control

A picture control is most often used for templates, but you can also add a picture control to a form.

Picture control button

Insert a building block control

Use a building block control  when you want users to choose a specific block of text. These are helpful when you need to add different boilerplate text depending on the document's specific purpose. You can create rich text content controls for each version of the boilerplate text, and then use a building block control as the container for the rich text content controls.

building block gallery control

Select Developer and content controls for the building block.

Developer tab showing content controls

Insert a combo box or a drop-down list

In a combo box, users can select from a list of choices that you provide or they can type in their own information. In a drop-down list, users can only select from the list of choices.

combo box button

Select the content control, and then select Properties .

To create a list of choices, select Add under Drop-Down List Properties .

Type a choice in Display Name , such as Yes , No , or Maybe .

Repeat this step until all of the choices are in the drop-down list.

Fill in any other properties that you want.

Note:  If you select the Contents cannot be edited check box, users won’t be able to click a choice.

Insert a date picker

Click or tap where you want to insert the date picker control.

Date picker button

Insert a check box

Click or tap where you want to insert the check box control.

Check box button

Use the legacy form controls

Legacy form controls are for compatibility with older versions of Word and consist of legacy form and Active X controls.

Click or tap where you want to insert a legacy control.

Legacy control button

Select the Legacy Form control or Active X Control that you want to include.

Set or change properties for content controls

Each content control has properties that you can set or change. For example, the Date Picker control offers options for the format you want to use to display the date.

Select the content control that you want to change.

Go to Developer > Properties .

Controls Properties  button

Change the properties that you want.

Add protection to a form

If you want to limit how much others can edit or format a form, use the Restrict Editing command:

Open the form that you want to lock or protect.

Select Developer > Restrict Editing .

Restrict editing button

After selecting restrictions, select Yes, Start Enforcing Protection .

Restrict editing panel

Advanced Tip:

If you want to protect only parts of the document, separate the document into sections and only protect the sections you want.

To do this, choose Select Sections in the Restrict Editing panel. For more info on sections, see Insert a section break .

Sections selector on Resrict sections panel

If the developer tab isn't displayed in the ribbon, see Show the Developer tab .

Open a template or use a blank document

To create a form in Word that others can fill out, start with a template or document and add content controls. Content controls include things like check boxes, text boxes, and drop-down lists. If you’re familiar with databases, these content controls can even be linked to data.

Go to File > New from Template .

New from template option

In Search, type form .

Double-click the template you want to use.

Select File > Save As , and pick a location to save the form.

In Save As , type a file name and then select Save .

Start with a blank document

Go to File > New Document .

New document option

Go to File > Save As .

Go to Developer , and then choose the controls that you want to add to the document or form. To remove a content control, select the control and press Delete. You can set Options on controls once inserted. From Options, you can add entry and exit macros to run when users interact with the controls, as well as list items for combo boxes, .

Adding content controls to your form

In the document, click or tap where you want to add a content control.

On Developer , select Text Box , Check Box , or Combo Box .

Developer tab with content controls

To set specific properties for the control, select Options , and set .

Repeat steps 1 through 3 for each control that you want to add.

Set options

Options let you set common settings, as well as control specific settings. Select a control and then select Options to set up or make changes.

Set common properties.

Select Macro to Run on lets you choose a recorded or custom macro to run on Entry or Exit from the field.

Bookmark Set a unique name or bookmark for each control.

Calculate on exit This forces Word to run or refresh any calculations, such as total price when the user exits the field.

Add Help Text Give hints or instructions for each field.

OK Saves settings and exits the panel.

Cancel Forgets changes and exits the panel.

Set specific properties for a Text box

Type Select form Regular text, Number, Date, Current Date, Current Time, or Calculation.

Default text sets optional instructional text that's displayed in the text box before the user types in the field. Set Text box enabled to allow the user to enter text into the field.

Maximum length sets the length of text that a user can enter. The default is Unlimited .

Text format can set whether text automatically formats to Uppercase , Lowercase , First capital, or Title case .

Text box enabled Lets the user enter text into a field. If there is default text, user text replaces it.

Set specific properties for a Check box .

Default Value Choose between Not checked or checked as default.

Checkbox size Set a size Exactly or Auto to change size as needed.

Check box enabled Lets the user check or clear the text box.

Set specific properties for a Combo box

Drop-down item Type in strings for the list box items. Press + or Enter to add an item to the list.

Items in drop-down list Shows your current list. Select an item and use the up or down arrows to change the order, Press - to remove a selected item.

Drop-down enabled Lets the user open the combo box and make selections.

Protect the form

Go to Developer > Protect Form .

Protect form button on the Developer tab

Note:  To unprotect the form and continue editing, select Protect Form again.

Save and close the form.

Test the form (optional)

If you want, you can test the form before you distribute it.

Protect the form.

Reopen the form, fill it out as the user would, and then save a copy.

Creating fillable forms isn’t available in Word for the web.

You can create the form with the desktop version of Word with the instructions in Create a fillable form .

When you save the document and reopen it in Word for the web, you’ll see the changes you made.

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  1. How To Write a Good Personal Statement (With Examples)

    Show Transcript Video: How To Write a Standout Personal StatementJenn, a certified career coach, shares her key steps for crafting a personal statement that is authentic, impressive and helps you stand out from the crowd. College admissions and scholarship committees may require you to submit personal statements with your applications.

  2. 16 Winning Personal Statement Examples (And Why They Work)

    A personal statement is a written account of who you are, what interests you and what your goals are in life. Learn how to write a compelling personal statement for a job or school with 16 examples and a template. See how to tailor your statement to the employer or school and showcase your skills, experience and education.

  3. 9 winning personal statement examples for a job

    Learn how to write an engaging personal statement for a job application or a graduate school with nine examples of winning personal statements. Find out what makes a personal statement unique, relevant and memorable for different purposes and audiences.

  4. How to Write a Powerful Personal Statement

    1. Write a personal introduction Write an introduction that reflects you and your personality. It should say why you are interested in the job or degree and, if appropriate, your recent experience with the job type or course topics. Starting a personal statement with sentences that show who you are can help encourage the recipient to read further.

  5. Writing the Personal Statement

    1. The general, comprehensive personal statement: This allows you maximum freedom in terms of what you write and is the type of statement often prepared for standard medical or law school application forms. 2. The response to very specific questions:

  6. How to write a personal statement for a job

    A personal statement is your CV's opening statement, a brief section summarising what you can offer an employer in relation to the job you're applying for. Learn how to write a personal statement that makes you stand out, includes the right information, and tailors it to the job or industry. See personal statement examples and a template.

  7. How To Write A Personal Statement (With Examples)

    Key Takeaways: To write a personal statement, first brainstorm, then narrow down your ideas, and start with an intro that leads into your qualifications. Make sure to proofread your personal statement before submitting. Personal statements describe your interests, skills, and goals, with a particular focus on your passion.

  8. How to Write a Personal Statement for a Job (with Examples)

    1. The who When writing your personal statement, start by telling the employer who you are as a professional. Maybe you're a marketing consultant with five years of paid media experience, or maybe you're a teacher with in-depth knowledge of diverse learning styles and the Montessori method. 2. The what

  9. How To Write a Personal Statement for Job Searching

    Here are more tips for writing a successful job search personal statement: Know Your Audience: Target your personal statement to a specific job position and company. Spend a bit of time researching the company to get a sense of what they're looking for in a candidate. Decode the job description so you understand the company's needs in a candidate.

  10. How to Write a Personal Statement

    1. Create an outline Before you begin writing, start by organizing your thoughts in an outline to decide what you want to say. This will not only help you to create the personal statement more quickly but will also ensure that it flows smoothly from one topic to the next.

  11. Resume Personal Statement: How to Write & 7+ Good Examples

    Otherwise, your target employer may worry your focus would be divided between your work for their company and your side hustles. 3. Consider your audience. Tailor every word of your personal statement to your audience — the recruiter, hiring manager, and anyone else at your target employer who might read your resume.

  12. Personal Statements: Examples, Do's and Don'ts

    A personal statement is a small section on various forms of CVs that summarises your skills, experience and job fit. Learn how to write a personal statement that will make you stand out from the crowd, with tips on structure, tone, conciseness and relevance. See examples of personal statements for different roles and industries.

  13. How To Write an Attention-Grabbing Personal Statement

    A personal statement is a brief personal summary outlining your skills, experience and personal attributes. Learn how to write a personal statement for a job or a university application with tips on how to make a strong introduction, structure, and edit your statement.

  14. How to Write a Personal Statement That Gets Noticed (With ...

    1. Write an introduction that introduces yourself and your goals Write an introduction that introduces who you are and why you applying for the job or university program. Note why your interests align with the role or degree and any experience you have with this type of job or the course topics.

  15. CV Personal Statement Examples and Tips

    A personal statement is a concise paragraph that sits at the top of your CV just below your name and contact details and tells the reader why you would be a fantastic asset for their company....

  16. How to write a personal statement (With example)

    1. Write a personal introduction. The first part of your statement can introduce your background and personality to the reader. Here, you can discuss your interest in the industry and describe how it relates to your characteristics. You could also discuss previous experience you have in the field.

  17. Writing a Winning Personal Statement for a Job

    Table of Contents What Is a Personal Statement? How Long Should a Personal Statement Be? 1. Start With an Introduction. 2. Provide an Overview of Your Skills and Experience 3. Write Your Achievements 4. Write About Your Interest in the Job. 5. Write a Compelling Conclusion. Tips for Writing a Personal Statement for a Job

  18. How to write a personal statement

    A personal statement is a brief summary of your skills and experience that sells you to the employer. Learn how to write one for your CV or university application, with tips on structure, content, grammar and examples. Find out what to include, how to start, and how long to spend on it.

  19. Personal Statement Examples For Jobs (11 Powerful Samples)

    I pay close attention to details and have a friendly, confident and professional manner that would be suitable for the role on offer with your organization. Accounting Personal Statement Example I'm a seasoned accountant with CPA and CMA certification and more than 10 years of experience working in large firms.

  20. How to write a good personal statement when applying for jobs

    Keep it short and concise. The personal statement should be no longer than a paragraph or two. It summarises who you are and what you can offer the company. Therefore, it should be concise and to the point. Ensuring it is accurate shows the employer that you know what they are looking for. It also shows your summarisation skills as you can ...

  21. How To Write A Personal Statement For A Job? Employment

    Your personal statement should only be around 3 or 4 sentences long. Include relevant information, such as previous experience. Highlight your key skills. Make it clear what kind of role you are looking for - this will help highlight your suitability for the one you are applying for. Use the job advert, person specification and any other ...

  22. How to Write a Top MBA Personal Statement (With Examples)

    Moreover, what impact will your unique perspective bring to the MBA cohort? Explain how your background will enrich the learning environment. Detail personal qualities and experiences that showcase your value. Key Elements for a Powerful Personal Statement. Take a holistic approach to strike the right chord in your personal statement.

  23. 50 Inspiring Examples of Career Goal Statements

    A well-defined goal statement includes specific job titles or roles, industry preferences, skills you want to acquire or use, and the values that matter to you in a work environment. For example, your statement might be, "I aim to become a Senior Software Developer at a tech company that values innovation, in the next five years."

  24. 4 Steps for Writing a Personal Statement for a Career Change

    How to write a personal statement for a career change. Here are steps you could follow when drafting your personal statement during a career change: 1. Review the job description. Before you can begin customizing your personal statement to address the job you're pursuing, it can be helpful to learn what traits and abilities the employer values.

  25. Writing a Personal Statement for Law School

    Writing our personal statement for law school is not rocket science. When you put the time and effort into writing it, you will likely end up with a personal statement that will effectively get the notice of the Board of Admissions. Tip: Get a head start on writing your own personal statement by starting with a sample personal statement. Your ...

  26. Create a form in Word that users can complete or print

    Show the Developer tab. If the developer tab isn't displayed in the ribbon, see Show the Developer tab.. Open a template or use a blank document. To create a form in Word that others can fill out, start with a template or document and add content controls.

  27. How To Start a Personal Statement in 5 Steps (With Tips)

    Personal mission, ethics or core values. Academic or professional goals. Volunteer or work experience. 2. Include relevant background information. After dividing the elements of your personal statement, you can write about your experience, accomplishments and any goals you have regarding your education.

  28. What records are exempted from FERPA?

    Records which are kept in the sole possession of the maker of the records, are used only as a personal memory aid, and are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the records. Records of the law enforcement unit of an educational agency or institution. Law enforcement unit records are ...