• Festivals Of India Essay

Festivals of India Essay

500+ words essay on the festivals of india.

India is a land of fairs and festivals. People of different religions and communities live here and therefore, many festivals are celebrated in India every year. One can capture the Indian tradition and culture best at its fairs and festivals marked by dance, music, sweets, etc. All the festivals are celebrated with great enthusiasm and happiness in a colourful atmosphere. An Essay on Festivals in India is a very common topic and is expected to be asked in the English exam. So, students are recommended to practise essays on this topic to score high marks in the writing section. This sample Essay on Festivals of India will give them some ideas and tips to organise their thoughts to form an effective essay.

Different Types of Indian Festivals

India is well known for its cultural and traditional festivals all over the world. As it is a secular country full of diversity in religions, languages, cultures and castes, every month, some festival celebration happens. Among these festivals, some are religious, some are based on the seasons and some are of national importance. Each and every festival is celebrated uniquely in different ways according to the various rituals and beliefs. Each festival has its own history, legend and significance of the celebration. Festivals bring bonding, love, cross-cultural exchange and happiness among people.

National Festivals

Festivals and fairs are significant parts of Indian cultural life. Some of the festivals are celebrated at a national level, whereas others are at a regional level. National festivals such as Gandhi Jayanti, Independence Day and Republic Day are celebrated by people of all religions across the entire nation. These festivals fill us with great pride and remind us of the freedom fighters who sacrificed their lives to make India independent and free from British rule. The whole nation unites together to celebrate these festivals and the spirit of togetherness, patriotism and nationalism can be found everywhere.

Religious Festivals

There are some religious festivals which are celebrated as a whole by different communities.

These include Diwali, Dussehra, Rakhsha Bandhan, Eid-ul-Fitr, Eid-ul-Zuha, Christmas, Ganesh Chaturthi, etc., which are accompanied by religious rituals of one kind or the other. These traditional festivals have two aspects. One is worship which is performed according to specific religious norms. Another is composite culture, as the members of any community can participate in and celebrate these religious festivals. Thus, our festivals represent unity and encourage social bonding.

Seasonal Festivals

In India, most festivals are seasonal in nature. They announce the change in the season and mark the harvesting seasons. All the seasonal festivals are celebrated during two harvesting seasons, Kharif and Rabi. Besides, spring is another period of seasonal festivals. In Punjab, the Lohri festival indicates the harvesting of the winter crop. Pongal, Bihu and Onam celebrations mark the harvesting of paddy crops. Similarly, Holi and Baisakhi are celebrated to mark the harvesting of new rabi crops. Thus, these festivals symbolise the arrival of joy and wealth to farmers’ lives.

It is said that the “Greatness of a culture can be found in its festivals”. India has proved this saying as a variety of festivals are celebrated with full joy and happiness across the country. Different cultures and religions get tied together in bonds of love with invisible threads of celebrations. That’s why India is also known for unity in cultural diversity. Festivals teach us how to fight evil and falsehood and establish the truth. The festivals are marked by fervour, hope, and prayers for a better tomorrow.

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Frequently Asked Questions on Festivals of India Essay

Why are festivals given so much importance in india.

India has several religions and Indians enjoy celebrating these festivals. Festivals also involve the worship of various deities and also increase the interaction between family members.

What are some of the largely celebrated festivals in India?

Some of the festivals celebrated in India: 1. Diwali 2. Christmas 3. Ramzan 4. Ganesh Chaturthi 5. Dussehra/Vijayadashami

What are some of the values associated with the celebration of festivals?

1. Family bonding and interaction 2. Charity and helping the needy 3. Thanksgiving and showing gratitude

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Essay on Indian Culture for Students and Children

500+ words essay on indian culture.

India is a country that boasts of a rich culture. The culture of India refers to a collection of minor unique cultures. The culture of India comprises of clothing, festivals, languages, religions, music, dance, architecture, food, and art in India. Most noteworthy, Indian culture has been influenced by several foreign cultures throughout its history. Also, the history of India’s culture is several millennia old.

Components of Indian Culture

First of all, Indian origin religions are Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism . All of these religions are based on karma and dharma. Furthermore, these four are called as Indian religions. Indian religions are a major category of world religions along with Abrahamic religions.

Also, many foreign religions are present in India as well. These foreign religions include Abrahamic religions. The Abrahamic religions in India certainly are Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Besides Abrahamic religions, Zoroastrianism and Bahá’í Faith are the other foreign religions which exist in India. Consequently, the presence of so many diverse religions has given rise to tolerance and secularism in Indian culture.

The Joint family system is the prevailing system of Indian culture . Most noteworthy, the family members consist of parents, children, children’s spouses, and offspring. All of these family members live together. Furthermore, the eldest male member is the head of the family.

Arranged marriages are the norm in Indian culture. Probably most Indians have their marriages planned by their parents. In almost all Indian marriages, the bride’s family gives dowry to bridegroom. Weddings are certainly festive occasions in Indian culture. There is involvement of striking decorations, clothing, music, dance, rituals in Indian weddings. Most noteworthy, the divorce rates in India are very low.

India celebrates a huge number of festivals. These festivals are very diverse due to multi-religious and multi-cultural Indian society. Indians greatly value festive occasions. Above all, the whole country joins in the celebrations irrespective of the differences.

Traditional Indian food, arts, music, sports, clothing, and architecture vary significantly across different regions. These components are influenced by various factors. Above all, these factors are geography, climate, culture, and rural/urban setting.

Get the huge list of more than 500 Essay Topics and Ideas

Perceptions of Indian Culture

Indian culture has been an inspiration to many writers. India is certainly a symbol of unity around the world. Indian culture is certainly very complex. Furthermore, the conception of Indian identity poses certain difficulties. However, despite this, a typical Indian culture does exist. The creation of this typical Indian culture results from some internal forces. Above all, these forces are a robust Constitution, universal adult franchise, secular policy , flexible federal structure, etc.

Indian culture is characterized by a strict social hierarchy. Furthermore, Indian children are taught their roles and place in society from an early age. Probably, many Indians believe that gods and spirits have a role in determining their life. Earlier, traditional Hindus were divided into polluting and non-polluting occupations. Now, this difference is declining.

Indian culture is certainly very diverse. Also, Indian children learn and assimilate in the differences. In recent decades, huge changes have taken place in Indian culture. Above all, these changes are female empowerment , westernization, a decline of superstition, higher literacy , improved education, etc.

To sum it up, the culture of India is one of the oldest cultures in the World. Above all, many Indians till stick to the traditional Indian culture in spite of rapid westernization. Indians have demonstrated strong unity irrespective of the diversity among them. Unity in Diversity is the ultimate mantra of Indian culture.

FAQs on Indian Culture

Q1 What are the Indian religions?

A1 Indian religions refer to a major category of religion. Most noteworthy, these religions have their origin in India. Furthermore, the major Indian religions are Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism.

Q2 What are changes that have taken place in Indian culture in recent decades?

A2 Certainly, many changes have taken place in Indian culture in recent decades. Above all, these changes are female empowerment, westernization, a decline of superstition, higher literacy, improved education, etc.

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Festivals of India

To experience the festivals of India is to experience the grandeur and richness of the Indian cultural heritage.

The festivals of India thrive in a culture of diversity, and the celebration of these festivals has become a time for cross-cultural exchanges. Filled with rituals, music, performances, culinary treats, and more, each festival presents its own fascinating history and unique charm. A large diversity of customs, traditions, and tales are also associated with festivals.

Learn about the cultural diversity, customs and traditions, as well as the fascinating stories associated with the festivals presented in the categories below, or explore the vibrant festivals of the states by clicking on the map.

indian culture and festivals essay

The section delves into the festivals celebrated in communities across the country, as well as regional differences in customs and celebration rituals.

indian culture and festivals essay

This section offers celebrations of social folk customs, revering nature, preserving social traditions, and honouring deities from across the states.

indian culture and festivals essay

This section illuminates the tale of cultural euphoria associated with nature, agriculture, ancestors, and tribal deities as narrated through tribal festivals.

indian culture and festivals essay

This section gives insight into the tradition of congregation for fairs and pilgrimages, celebrating a region's customs and history.

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✍️Essay on Festivals: Samples in 150, 250 Words

indian culture and festivals essay

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  • Nov 2, 2023

Essay on festivals

Festivals are the special occasions celebrated in every religion and country to follow their tradition . They are generally celebrated worldwide to pay tribute to God and Goddesses and to spread joy and positivity. India, known for its diversity and multiculturalism celebrates many festivals throughout the year. Festivals are the best part of the year as they contribute to the unity of the nation and add prosperity to the life of the people. India celebrates different categories of festivals such as regional festivals, seasonal festivals , annual festivals, and national festivals. Stay tuned and read the following essay on festivals!

Also Read: Speech on Dussehra in English

 Essay on Festivals of India 200 Words

Festivals in India are celebrated with great zeal. Indian festivals are worth witnessing as they are the most popular and colourful festivals. Be it Holi, the Queen Festival of Colours or Diwali the festival of crackers and rangoli, all are marked with great historical significance that tells about Indian Mythology. One of the most popular and biggest festivals in the world, Kumbh Mela, is also celebrated in India, where millions of devotees gather to offer their prayers.

Every festival has its own story and belief. People follow and respect their traditional values and do fasting on festivals like Chhath Puja , Govardhan Puja , Bhai Dooj , and Karwachauth. All these Indian festivals play an important role in uniting people belonging to different cultures in the same society. 

Apart from these festivals, Onam, Dussehra , Christmas, New Year, Raksha Bandha, etc are also celebrated in India. Republic Day , Gandhi Jayanti , and Independence Day are the National festivals of India which are government holidays in the Indian Calendar. 

Religious festivals include Eid-Ul-Fitr which ends with Ramadan celebrated by the Muslim community, Guru Nanak Jayanti held on 27 November 2023 to commemorate the birth anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev Ji celebrated by Sikhs, and Christmas celebrated on 25 December every year by Christians. 

Also Read: Why is Onam Celebrated: The Festival of Joy in Kerala 

Essay in Festivals 250 Words

India’s rich diversity and festivals unite people from different backgrounds. It joins people from different states and religions in a single thread for the celebration. Every occasion in India and different countries is celebrated with happiness and joy. Festivals bring joy and prosperity and create a sense of oneness.

The Kumbh Mela is one of the largest festivals in the world, which takes place at four pilgrimage sites in India; Ujjain, Prayagraj, Haridwar and Nashik. On this occasion, devotees take a ritual dip in the holy rivers of Shipra in Ujjain, Ganga-Yamuna-Sarasvati in Prayagraj, the Ganges in Hardwar, and Godavari in Nasik.

People follow the tradition of exchanging sweets and gifts on special occasions. National festivals are marked as Government holidays such as 2 October celebrated as Gandhi Jayanti, 26 January celebrated as Republic Day, and 15 August celebrated as Independence Day.

One thing which you find common in all festivals is cleaning the house, decorating, and worshipping God. Festivals are auspicious occasions that bring good health, wealth, joy, and prosperity into the lives of people. 

Apart from the National festivals, Pongal, Onam, Baisakhi and Bihu celebrated in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Punjab and Assam respectively are the seasonal festivals celebrated with very high energy by the people of that particular state. Farmers in India worship God and Goddess of agriculture on such seasonal festivals to seek their blessings and wish for good yields for the successive years.

Thus, the festivals in the given essay on festivals tell about various cultures and diversity in a particular country and about the customs followed by the people in festivals to make them grand and happening.

Also Read: Importance of Makar Sankranti

Relevant Blogs

Festivals hold a significant role in the human life. They are important to continue the traditional culture, religion, and practices of that particular religion and region. It plays a key role in uniting people and filling up the communication gaps thereby increasing the social dependency of people.

Festivals are extraordinary events celebrated to commemorate the traditions followed by our ancestors. It holds a significant role in joining the society and passing on the traditions to the future generations. They create an ambience of positivity, joy, and prosperity all around. Every region and religion follows their own festivals worldwide. 

Festivals are the source of happiness. They are the best part of the year. Festivals are celebrated with people belonging to different cultures and religions and it helps in uniting them and enjoying the feeling of oneness and togetherness. 

Here are 10 lines on why we celebrate festivals: Festivals are a chance for everyone to unite for a cause; It is considered auspicious to conduct prayers and worship God and Goddess. ; People of different religions follow different customs and practices to celebrate festivals.; Festivals create a happy atmosphere all around; In India, people celebrate many festivals throughout the year; Holi and Diwali are the two main festivals in India; Decorating the surroundings, cleaning the house, worshipping god, wearing new clothes, and sharing good wishes, and gifts are some of the important elements of any festival; Festivals are considered incomplete without sweets; The special occasion builds friendship among the people and increases interdependency; These special days are celebrated with utmost pomp and enthusiasm. 

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Essay on Indian Culture and Tradition 1000+ Words

Indian culture and tradition, akin to a captivating mosaic, are comprised of myriad vibrant components that constitute the nation’s multifaceted heritage. With deep historical roots, they are commemorated through various avenues such as festivals, art forms, and daily customs. As we embark on this essay, we will delve into the profound essence and importance of Indian culture and tradition. This exploration will encompass their distinctive attributes, their societal significance, and their enduring pertinence.

Diversity in Unity

Indian culture and tradition are renowned for their diversity. India is home to a multitude of languages, religions, cuisines, and customs. Despite this diversity, there is a strong sense of unity that binds the nation together.

Historical Significance

India’s culture and traditions have evolved over thousands of years. The Indus Valley Civilization, the Vedas, and the teachings of ancient sages have all played a role in shaping the culture we see today.

Festivals and Celebrations

India is known for its vibrant festivals, such as Diwali, Holi, Eid, Christmas, and more. These celebrations bring people together, fostering a sense of unity and joy.

Cultural Art Forms

Indian culture finds expression in various art forms such as classical dance, including Bharatanatyam and Kathak, as well as music, encompassing Carnatic and Hindustani traditions, and theater. Furthermore, these art forms boast a rich historical heritage and persistently flourish in contemporary times.

Traditional Clothing

Indian clothing is a reflection of culture and tradition. Attire like the saree, dhoti, and kurta are not just clothing items but symbols of identity.

Expert Opinions

Cultural scholars like Dr. Kapila Vatsyayan emphasize the role of culture in shaping society and providing a sense of identity. They believe that culture is a dynamic force that evolves with time.

Spiritual Practices

Religion and spirituality play a significant role in Indian culture. Practices like meditation, yoga, and visiting temples or mosques are common ways for individuals to connect with their spirituality.

Traditional Medicine

Ayurveda, India’s traditional system of medicine, has been practiced for centuries. It emphasizes holistic well-being and natural healing methods.

Family Values

Indian culture places a strong emphasis on family values. Respect for elders, strong family bonds, and the concept of joint families are integral to Indian society.

Conclusion of Essay on Indian Culture and Tradition

In conclusion, Indian culture and tradition, as a testament to the country’s rich history, diversity, and unity, provide a sense of identity and belonging to millions of people. Moreover, as India continues to evolve in the modern world, it is crucial to preserve and celebrate these cultural treasures. By valuing diversity, promoting cultural exchange, and passing on traditions to future generations, we can ensure that Indian culture and tradition continue to thrive and enrich the lives of all who embrace them. Consequently, India’s cultural heritage is a source of pride and inspiration, forming a tapestry of traditions that we must cherish and protect for generations to come.

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  • National Festivals of India Essay

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Essay on National Festivals of India

Vibrant, cheerful and joyful – are the words to describe the festivals of India. There are umpteen number of festivals which are celebrated joyfully in India.On top of these festivals, there are few National festivals that the whole of India proudly comes together to celebrate irrespective of their religion or caste. This National Festivals of India essay is for kids studying in Class 5 and above. The language is kept plain and simple to make it easy for students to understand well. They will be easily able to write a short National Festivals of India essay in English after going through this article.

Long Essay on National Festivals of India

India is a culturally diverse country. It is home to many religions, castes and communities. People celebrate many different festivals in the way the respective festivals are celebrated in their respective communities. But these national festival days have been immensely important in the chapters of Indian history. National festivals help bring in a sense of patriotism. It reminds us that despite all our differences, our love for our country unites us all. We commemorate these festivals with great pomp and show to celebrate the milestones of India’s history. National festivals in India constitute Independence Day, Republic Day and Gandhi Jayanti.

Independence Day falls on the 15th of August. On this day, in 1947, the colonization of India by the British came to an end, which had lasted for two hundred years. It took a long drawn out struggle to free the country and its citizens from the shackles of British rule. The likes of Mahatma Gandhi, Bhagat Singh, Sarojini Naidu and Bal Gangadhar Tilak, those who fought for our freedom are honored on this day. This day also marks the partition of India and Pakistan. To commemorate this day, first the President addresses the nation through a broadcast on the eve of 15th August. In the morning of the day, the present prime minister arrives at the Red Fort in New Delhi and the guard of honour greets him. The Indian national flag is hoisted and then the national anthem is sung across the nation. The prime minister addresses the nation from Red Fort, exactly the way Jawaharlal Nehru, the first prime minister of India, had done back in 1947. It is followed by a parade by the Indian military and paramilitary forces. Selected performances by school children are also carried out. Flag hoisting is done across India, majorly in schools and colleges. Every government building in the country sports the tri-color on its terrace. Kids and elders enjoy flying kites and playing with colors of our tri-color. Different plays and movies are showcased on various platforms, to remind the new generation of the contributions and sacrifices the freedom fighters made for us to be able to breathe in the free air.

On 26th of January 1950, the Constitution of India came into effect and our country became a republic. On this day in the year 1929 the Indian National Congress had proclaimed “Poorna Swaraj” against the Dominion status offered by the British Regime. The final draft of the Constitution took two years and eleven months to be ready. It contained the preamble and fundamental rights that are guaranteed to each and every Indian citizen. The commemoration begins with the parade from RashtrapatiBhavan to Rajpath. Unlike Independence day, the President presides over the Republic Day celebration. The armed forces march towards the India Gate, the flag hoisting is done and the national anthem is sung. Armed forces and tableaus from various states, selected by the ministry of defense participate in the parade. Bravery awards are presented, the graves of those who sacrificed their lives for the country are garlanded- a leader from a foreign country is invited as a chief guest to honor the event. People wake up early on a Republic Day morning to watch the parade.

To remember the Father of the Nation Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi also known as Mahatma Gandhi, his birth anniversary is commemorated as Gandhi Jayanti. It falls on the 2nd October. He was one of the revered freedom fighters and is known for his ideologies of non-violence. His beliefs are still practiced. The Prime Minister pays homage at Raj Ghat, his crematorium. This day is observed in the schools too. Students take part in various events like essay competitions, poem recitation and banner-making promoting nonviolence. This day is also celebrated as the International day of Non-Violence in honor of Mahatma Gandhi.

Short Paragraph on National Festivals of India

Three national festivals are celebrated in India. They are Independence Day, Republic Day and Gandhi Jayanti. People celebrate the National Festivals of India with as much magnificence as the regional religious festivals. The citizens of the nation get doused in patriotism on all three occasions. Many different events- big and small, get organized all over the country at various locations to celebrate the three festivals.To add splendor to the festive mood, schools, colleges, squares, roads, market spaces, offices, buses etc. are all decked up with flags, balloons, flowers, fairy-lights, and drapes in tri-colour. Essay writing, poem recitation, debates, skits, fancy dress competitions, plays, and many other cultural activities are carried out as a part of these National Day Festival celebrations.In a country like India with so much cultural diversity, festivals like these really help the citizens of the country stay united.

What Are The Major National Festivals Of India? 

India is a very vast country with a wide variety of cultures, religions, etc. So, you can see diversity in festivals celebrated in India as well. These festivals are in huge numbers. Therefore, we will only discuss some of the major national festivals of India. These are as follows:

Diwali (Deepavali): It is one of the most important festivals that is celebrated all over India in October - November. This festival is marked by people - lighting earthen lamps, distributing sweets to friends, family and relatives and bursting firecrackers. 

Holi: It is also one of the most popular festivals celebrated across the country. It is also named the festival of colours as it is marked by people putting colours on each other's faces, clothes, etc. This festival is celebrated with the start of the spring season. 

Navratri: This is one of the major festivals celebrated by the Hindu community. It is celebrated all over India. Navratri is a Sanskrit word and means nine nights. So, as the name suggests, this festival lasts for nine days and nine nights. In some parts of India, people dance during this festival as well. 

Durga Puja: If we talk about the major festivals of India, we can't skip Durga Puja. This festival is celebrated all over India by millions of Hindus. It lasts for four days and during those four days, people worship Goddess Durga. All the people wear new dresses during this festival. 

Dussehra: This festival is celebrated when Navratri ends or even when Durga Puja ends. Dussehra is also known as Vijayadashami. In different parts of the country, you will see that this festival is celebrated differently. In Mysore, Dussehra is celebrated in the best possible way by decorating the Mysore Palace with dazzling lights. 

Janmashtami: It is also one of the most prominent festivals celebrated all over the country. This festival is celebrated on the day of the birth of Lord Krishna. On this day, people from all parts of India worship Krishna either at their homes or at temples. 

Ganesh Chaturthi: This festival is also known as Vinayaka Chaturthi. It is a significant festival for all the Hindus all over India. This festival marks the birth of Ganesha and is celebrated for over 10 days. 

Eid-ul-Fitr: This is one of the most important festivals for the Muslim community of India. It marks the end of Ramadan (the most sacred month for Muslims). It is celebrated on the first day of Shaban (Islamic Month). On this auspicious occasion, all the people wear new clothes, pray Eid Namaz in mosques and visit their relatives' houses. 

Christmas: This is the most popular festival in the world as it marks the birth of Jesus Christ. In India, it is celebrated on a large scale as well. It is celebrated on the 25th of December, every year and is followed by the New Year. 

There are other National Festivals that are celebrated in India as well. These include Maha Shivratri, Pongal, Onam, Baisakhi, Rakshabandhan, Gurpurab, Makar Sankranti. 

The national festivals of India are very important days to be celebrated in honor of our great leaders and to draw inspiration from their unparalleled deeds. It gives us an opportunity to keep the history of our nation close to our hearts even after so many years. It facilitates keeping aside the differences of the citizens and getting united with each other. The events organized to celebrate these days offer us to feel proud of our nation and help us to bond with our neighbors, colleagues and other near and dear ones over patriotism. Students in school develop patriotism from a very early age.

A lot of students find it very hard to write a good essay as they struggle to put the right words in the right place. If you are struggling with your essays as well and want to learn more about essay writing then this article will be very helpful for you. To write a good essay, you first need to do detailed research about the topic on which you are writing your essay. When you grasp all that information, then you should be able to pen it down in such a way that it looks attractive, and it should be able to draw the attention of readers. Your words should be simple and easy to understand and you should not make it too long as readers would get bored if they have to read a very long text. You should not write it short either as you won't be able to fit all the information in it. So, your essay should be of medium length. 

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FAQs on National Festivals of India Essay

1. What are the National Festivals Commemorated in Our Country?

We have 3 national festivals, namely, Independence Day, Republic Day and Gandhi Jayanti.

2. Why are National Festivals Celebrated?

It’s to stay in touch with our country’s history and to honour those who have been brave to fight for the freedom we have today.

3. State the difference between Religious Festivals and National Festivals?

Religious festivals are celebrated differently amongst different communities whereas national festivals are celebrated by all Indians in the same way irrespective of their religion, caste or community.

4. How do I write a good essay on National Festivals in English? 

To write a good essay on the National Festivals, you first need to do detailed research on the different festivals that different people celebrate all over the country. Once you have the data related to all these festivals, you can then frame your essay accordingly. You have to go through all the important festivals and collect information about them. You can then put all that information in your essay which will make it more attractive. 

5. What are the different types of festivals celebrated in India? 

India being a secular country experiences a variety of festivals. All these festivals in one way or another bring people together. You will see a diverse range of cultures related to each of these festivals. Some of the most popular festivals celebrated in India are Diwali, Holi, Eid, Christmas, Guru Nanak Gurpurab, Onam, Pongal, etc. All these festivals are associated with different religions of India. All these festivals are a major source of happiness and joy for people across religions. 

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Essay on Indian Festival

Students are often asked to write an essay on Indian Festival in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Indian Festival

Introduction.

India, known as the land of festivals, celebrates numerous events throughout the year. These festivals, rich in culture and traditions, bring people together in celebration.

Significance

Indian festivals are significant as they act as a medium of social interaction, promoting unity and diversity. They teach moral values and respect for all.

Types of Festivals

There are religious festivals like Diwali, Eid, Christmas, and cultural ones like Pongal and Baisakhi. Each festival has its unique customs and rituals.

Festivals in India are a true reflection of its cultural wealth. They bring joy, peace, and harmony, strengthening the social fabric of the country.

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  • Paragraph on Indian Festival

250 Words Essay on Indian Festival

India, a country of cultural diversity, is renowned for its myriad of colorful and vibrant festivals. These festivals, celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy, are an integral part of the Indian tradition, reflecting the country’s rich cultural heritage.

Cultural Significance

Each Indian festival carries a unique cultural significance. For instance, Diwali, the festival of lights, symbolizes the victory of light over darkness and knowledge over ignorance. Holi, the festival of colors, celebrates the arrival of spring, love, and end of winter. These festivals not only bring joy but also impart moral values, strengthening the social fabric.

Unity in Diversity

Despite the diverse cultural backgrounds, Indian festivals promote unity. Whether it’s Eid-ul-Fitr, Christmas, or Pongal, every festival is celebrated by people of all religions, transcending regional and religious boundaries. This unity in diversity is a testament to India’s secular ethos.

Impact on Economy

Indian festivals significantly impact the economy. They stimulate consumption, leading to a surge in demand for goods and services. From sweets and clothes to decorations and gifts, festivals drive a significant portion of economic activities.

In conclusion, Indian festivals are not just about celebrations, but they are a reflection of India’s cultural richness, unity, and economic vibrancy. They offer a unique way of seeing and understanding the diverse and complex cultural fabric of India, making them an integral part of the Indian identity.

500 Words Essay on Indian Festival

India, often referred to as the land of festivals, has a rich tapestry of culture and tradition that is vividly displayed through its numerous festivals. These festivals, celebrated with great fervor and enthusiasm, not only add color and joy to life but also have a deep-rooted significance, often reflecting the country’s diverse cultural, religious, and social facets.

Significance of Indian Festivals

Indian festivals are not merely about celebration; they also carry a profound philosophical message. They serve as a platform for communal harmony, as people from different religions, castes, and social backgrounds come together to celebrate. These festivals also act as a bridge to the past, connecting us to our ancestors and their traditions. They often revolve around the themes of victory of good over evil, harvest seasons, or commemoration of mythological events or deities.

Indian festivals can broadly be classified into religious, seasonal, and national festivals. Religious festivals like Diwali, Eid, Christmas, Navaratri, and Pongal are celebrated by different communities across the country. Seasonal festivals like Baisakhi and Makar Sankranti are centered around the agricultural cycle. National festivals like Republic Day, Independence Day, and Gandhi Jayanti are celebrated with patriotic fervor across the entire nation.

Role in Preserving Culture

Festivals play a crucial role in preserving and promoting the rich cultural heritage of India. They are the custodians of the country’s folk art forms, music, dance, and cuisine. The unique rituals, customs, and traditions associated with each festival offer a glimpse into the diverse cultural fabric of the country. For instance, the dance forms of Garba during Navaratri or Bhangra during Baisakhi are integral parts of these festivals.

Social Impact

Indian festivals also have a significant social impact. They foster a sense of community and belonging, reinforcing societal bonds. They provide an opportunity for families and friends to come together and celebrate, strengthening interpersonal relationships. Moreover, they also play a role in economic stimulation as festivals like Diwali and Eid lead to increased consumer spending, benefiting businesses and the economy.

In conclusion, Indian festivals are a vibrant and integral part of the country’s cultural identity. They serve as a mirror reflecting the diversity, unity, and rich heritage of India. As we celebrate these festivals, we not only partake in joy and festivities but also contribute to preserving and promoting our invaluable cultural legacy. In the midst of rapid modernization and globalization, these festivals are a reminder of our roots and the values that define us as a nation. They instill in us a sense of pride and belonging, reinforcing our Indian identity.

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Festivals of India Essay for School Students [Easy Words*]

February 4, 2021 by Sandeep

Festivals of India Essay: India is a diverse land with many festivals. Every Year people eagerly wait for the arrival of festivals. Indian festivals reflect the culture and religious diversity. The atmosphere is filled with zeal and happiness. Whether a person is poor, middle-class or rich, every individual celebrates festival according to its financial capability. Festivals are divided as religious, national and seasonal. Religious festivals are- Diwali, Dussehra, Durga Puja, Ganesh Chaturthi, etc. Seasonal festivals include Holi, Bihu, Pongal, Onam, Baisakhi, etc. National Festivals are-Independence Day, Republic Day and Gandhi Jayanti. Holi and Diwali are the famous festivals of India.

This article provides an extensive write-up on Festivals of India, helpful for school students during essay and paragraph writing competitions.

Essay on Festivals of India 250 Words in English

Below we have provided an Indian Festival Essay, usually given for class 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6.

Festivals add colour and vitality to our life. They act as an interval from the mundane tasks and fill us with bliss and happiness. It invigorates us with new spirit and liveliness. Furthermore, it allows us to celebrate small and big things in our life. They can be religious or be events which feature music, dance, poetry, movies etc. India is a diverse and cultural oriented country; it celebrates several festivals. It is further divided into religious, national and seasonal festivals.

Diwali, Raksha-Bandhan, Eid, Christmas , Dussehra, Ganesh Chaturthi , etc. are India’s religious festivals. These festivals are celebrated by different community with great pomp and splendour. The atmosphere is infused with festive energy everywhere. People wear colourful clothes and gather together to enjoy the festival.

Baisakhi, Holi , Pongal, Bihu, Onam, etc. are seasonal festivals. They are celebrated to welcome spring and harvest. It marks the advent of bright summer. The Farmers worship the Sun, cattle, and crops and offer thanks to the Almighty by providing a bountiful harvest. Holi is a festival of colours where people smear powder colours on each other.

National festivals like Independence Day, Republic Day, and Gandhi Jayanti celebrate the freedom struggle and freedom fighters that freed India from the shackles of British Raj. A flag hoisting program inaugurated followed by music, dance and parade. A feeling of patriotism pervades in every individual and fills us with pride and dignity.

In conclusion, festivals make our life enthusiastic and passionate. It brings the people of different communities together irrespective of their caste differences. They symbolize victory over evil and spreads joy and mirthful energy across. It strengthens the bond and promotes harmony among the human race.

Essay on Indian Festival 500 Words in English

Below we have provided the Festival of India Essay in English, suitable for class 6, 7, 8, 9 & 10.

India is a land known for fairs and festivals. The vast diversity of different cultures, languages, and religions makes it distinctive and unique in the world. The celebration of the various festivals brings out a new change among the individuals as it breaks the monotony of life. People come in unity and enjoy each festival with great joy and happiness. Most of the festivals have a religious origin, but there are seasonal and national festivals in India.

“The Greatness of a culture can be found in its festivals”, is rightly stated by Siddharth Katragadda, a famous writer of India. India’s diverse culture culminates varied festivals that glorify the greatness of India. People enjoy them with sheer devotion and love. Festivals in India are divided into three-religious, national and seasonal.

Religious Festivals

Diwali: It is the festival of light and victory over darkness. It is India’s most magnificent festival and falls in the winter season. People decorate their houses with lights, candles and earthen lamps and draw Rangoli outside the homes.

Dussehra: Dussehra is the festival that marks the end of the nine-day festival of Navratri. It is celebrated to acknowledge Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana. The huge effigy of Ravana is built and placed at different avenues to be burnt by an arrow of fire.

Ganesh Chaturthi: This is the festival celebrated with much grandeur and fervour. It marks the homecoming of Lord Ganesha. The festival lasts for ten days, commenced by the installation of Lord Ganesha’s idol.

Navaratri: It is celebrated to honour Goddess Durga. It is associated with the prominent battle between Goddess Durga and demon Mahishasura. These nine days represent the victory of good over evil. It is believed that Goddess Durga takes nine Avatars, hence named Navdurga or Navaratri.

Christmas: Christmas is celebrated to memorialise the birth of Jesus Christ. It falls in winter on the 25th of December each year. People decorate the Christmas tree and house and exchange gifts.

Eid-Ul-Fitr: Ramadan or Eid-Ul-Fitr is celebrated by the Muslim community and is considered the holiest month of the Islamic Calendar. People observe fast, prayers and religious contemplation. The festival ends by breaking the fast and gathering for celebration and prayers.

Seasonal Festivals

Baisakhi: One of the renowned festival of the Sikhs. It marks the harvest of Rabi crops and therefore heartily celebrated among Punjab’s farmer community.

Holi: Holi is celebrated to welcome spring and harvest. It is a festival of colours where people smear powder colours on each other. Dance, music, savouries are the highlights of the festival.

Bihu: Bihu is the three main festivals celebrated in Assam. It is divided into Rongali, Kongali and Bhogali Bihu where farmers and people offer prayers and gratitude for a good harvest. The celebration extends for a month. Bihu dance is the festival’s speciality and is performed in different styles.

National Festivals

Republic Day : Republic Day is celebrated to honour the day on which India’s Constitution came into effect. It falls on 26th January every year.

Independence Day: Independence Day is celebrated on 15th August each year to revere and commemorate the 200-year-old British Raj’s freedom.

Gandhi Jayanti: It is celebrated to mark Mahatma Gandhi’s birth annually on 2nd October. Popular activities include prayer meetings, ceremonies in schools and colleges, etc.

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Indian Festivals Essay

India is a land of festivals. It encompasses people from different religions and cultures and thus celebrates numerous religious festivals. Indians also celebrate three national festivals. Festivals in India are awaited all year long and are celebrated with great pomp and show. The entire atmosphere is filled with joy and enthusiasm during the festive season.

People of India love their festivals and celebrate even the less significant ones with enthusiasm. India is a land of different religions and cultures; hence, every religion has its own festivals and customs. Despite the diversity, every festival is celebrated together by the people of various faiths and beliefs. Festivals of India reflect the rich cultural heritage of its people; their faith in each other’s religious beliefs; mutual harmony among the people of India and their love for the nation and its heritage.

Long and Short Essays on Indian Festivals in English

Here we are giving short and long essays on Indian Festivals of varying lengths to help you with the topic in your exam.

You can select any Indian Festivals essays as per your need in your school’s essay writing competition, debate or speech giving.

After reading the essays you will get a close idea of the festivals of India and their significance for the people of India.

You will also know that how the festivals are a way of keeping centuries old traditions and beliefs alive among the masses.

Short Essay on Indian Festivals – Essay 1 (200 words)

Indians give special importance to their festivals. Special arrangements are made for the celebration of various festivals each year. Be it the villages or the big cities there is joy all around. All the places are decked up during the festival season. Some of the main Indian festivals include Diwali, Holi, Raksha Bandhan, Ganesh Chaturthi, Durga Puja, Dussehra, Pongal and Bhai Duj.

People in our country love celebrating the festivals with their near and dear ones. Each Indian festival has its own unique way of celebration and people follow the tradition while celebrating the same. However, some things remain common for instance people decorate their houses with flowers and lights during the festivals and wear new clothes. They visit each other and exchange gifts. Special sweets are prepared at home to treat the guests.

People of India also hold great regard for the National festivals of the country. Gandhi Jayanti, Independence Day and Republic Day are the three national festivals of our country. These festivals are a symbol of unity and progress. They remind us of our patriotic leaders who served the country selflessly. National festivals are celebrated with equal zeal. The entire atmosphere is filled with the feeling of patriotism during these festivals.

All in all, Indians celebrate both religious and National festivals with great enthusiasm. Children as well as elders look forward to the festive celebrations.

Essay on Indian Festivals and Students – Essay 2 (300 words)

Introduction

In India festival time is awaited all year round particularly by the students. They look forward to the festivals owing to various reasons. One of the main reasons for this is that the schools and colleges are closed during the festivals and this offers a respite from the mundane routine and strict study schedule. Students also love festivals as it is time to meet their cousins and relatives who bestow them with gifts. Besides, they get to eat a lot of delicious sweets and wear new dresses.

Celebrations in Schools/Colleges

Festivals in India are not only celebrated at home with family but are also celebrated in schools and colleges. The educational institutes are decked up with flowers, lights, beautiful posters and colourful drapes during festivals. Students are asked to come in ethnic wear to add to the colour of the festivals.

The usual classroom sessions are replaced by fun activities on these days. Cultural programs and other interesting activities form a part of the festive celebrations in schools and colleges. Students as well as teachers participate in these activities whole heartedly and the entire atmosphere is filled with joy and laughter.

These celebrations are usually done a day before the festival as it is a holiday on the day of the festival.

Understanding the Cultural Roots

Indian festivals are a reflection of the culture of the country. The celebrations held on the festivals acquaint the students with the culture and tradition of our country. Each festival has a religious connotation and a tradition attached to it. Festival time is a great opportunity to make the students understand about the cultural roots of our country and help them connect with it.

Indian festivals are thus important for the students in more than one way. These are a great way to bond with the near and dear ones and also to know about the country’s rich cultural past.

Essay on Importance of Festivals in India – Essay 3 (400 words)

Indians give special importance to their festivals. Be it regional festivals or national festivals – all the festivals in our country are celebrated with love and joy. There is holiday in schools, colleges and offices on most of these festivals.

Religious Connotation Renders Importance to Festivals

The importance of festivals in India can very well be seen in the way these are celebrated. People do not only celebrate festivals at home but also visit their near and dear ones to celebrate them together. The celebrations are also done in schools and workplaces. Our culture holds high regard for religious practices. People in India are mostly God fearing.

Since, the Indian festivals have certain religious connotations attached to them, Indians celebrate these with all their heart to please their deities and bring in positivity and happiness in their life. For instance, Diwali is celebrated to celebrate Lord Rama’s return to his home town, Ayodhya. Janamashtmi celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna, Durga Puja is celebrated to offer prayers to Goddess Durga and her various avtars and Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated to offer prayers to Lord Ganesha.

Festival Time is Considered Auspicious

Festival time is considered to be auspicious as per the Hindu religion. This is another reason why people give so much importance to this time. They wait for this time to start anything new in life so as to begin on a good note. For instance, people believe moving to new house during Navratras or on the occasion of Diwali brings in good luck, similarly joining a new job during the Ganesha festival or on Makar Sankranti can prove to be good for them.

Similarly, many other festivals such as Baisakhi, Guru Purnima, Pongal, Maha Shivratri, Rama Navami, Basant Panchami and Akshaya Tritiya are considered highly auspicious and are specially awaited to begin with something new such as buying a new shop, starting a business, signing a big business deal, fixing wedding date, etc.

National Festivals are Equally Important

Our national festivals especially Independence Day reminds us of the struggle and sacrifice that our people went through to gain independence. All three national festivals of India are given special importance. The whole country gets immersed in patriotism during this time. These festivals are celebrated in full swing across the country. These are a way to pay respect to our brave patriotic leaders.

Thus, festivals hold high importance for Indians. Whether they live in India or abroad, Indians give special importance to their festivals and celebrate them with joy and happiness.

Essay on India is a Land of Festivals – Essay 4 (500 words)

India is often called the land of festivals because of the numerous colourful and joyous festivals celebrated here. People belonging to different castes, culture and tradition reside in different parts of our country. Each religion has its set of festivals based on its religious beliefs.

The people belonging to the south have their own festivals; people from the north give importance to some other festivals while those living in the East celebrate some other festivals. However, there are certain festivals that are celebrated throughout the country with equal enthusiasm. Some such festivals include Diwali, Holi and Raksha Bandhan.

Main Festivals of India

The main festivals of India are the ones that people belonging to all the religions and regions in our country look forward to and celebrate with great fervour. Here are some of these festivals:

Diwali is one of the main festivals of our country. People celebrate it with great joy and enthusiasm. The preparation for its celebration begins almost a month before the festival. People clean their houses and shop for decorative items to deck up their place. The houses are decorated with lights, candles and diyas. People make rangolis, worship Goddess Lakshmi and Lord Ganesha and burn fire crackers to celebrate this festival. The entire country lights up on this day.

Holi is the festival of colour. It is one of the most fun-filled Indian festivals. Though it has a religious connotation to it, the whole purpose on this day is to have fun and let lose. People apply colour on each other and eat sweets. This festival is celebrated collectively in housing societies and residential colonies.

People gather around to colour each other and throw water on one another as a part of Holi celebration. Loud music is played at most places and people groove to the beats of foot tapping songs as they enjoy this festival. At some places, people even beat each other with sticks and throw mud on each other as a tradition.

  • Raksha Bandhan

Raksha Bandhan is yet another Indian festival which is celebrated all across the country. This festival is celebrated to strengthen the brother-sister bond. Sisters visit their brothers on this day and tie rakhi on their wrist. The brothers in turn promise to protect their sisters and be there for them in the hour of need. This is followed by exchange of sweets. The brothers also bring special gifts for their sisters on this day. Those who cannot visit each other send rakhi and gifts via post.

This is indeed a beautiful tradition which is being followed since ages. There are many mythological stories behind the celebration of Raksha Bandhan. This is not only a time for the brothers and sisters to bond but is also a time to strengthen the familial ties. The celebration takes place early in the morning and it is followed by family brunch.

Ganesh Chaturthi, Janamashtmi, Navratri, Eid Ul Fitr, Baisakhi, Onam, Pongal, Bihu, Gurupurab, Navratri, Guru Purnima, Ram Navami, Vasant Panchami, Durga Puja, Chhath and Dussehra are among some of the other festivals that are celebrated with immense zeal in different parts of India with some of these being specific to a particular region. No wonder, our country is called a land of festivals.

Long Essay on Indian Festivals and Religious Beliefs – Essay 5 (600 words)

Indian festivals are based on religious beliefs. Indians worship various Gods and Goddesses and the various festivals they celebrate are dedicated to one deity or the other. These festivals are a way to offer prayers to the deities and seek their blessings to bring in happiness, prosperity and love.

Indian Festivals Based on Religious Beliefs

Here are some of the Indian festivals and the religious beliefs attached to them:

It is believed that it was the day when Lord Rama killed Ravana to free Sita from his clutches. It marks the victory of the good over the evil. Huge effigies of Ravana, Kumbhkaran and Meghnath are burned in different parts of the country on this day to celebrate the occasion.

Diwali or Deepawali is said to be the day when Lord Rama returned to Ayodhya along with his wife Sita and brother Lakshman after an exile of 14 years. The entire town was lit with diyas to welcome them. The occasion is celebrated until today. Each year, people clean their houses and deck them up with lights, diyas and candles to celebrate the return of Lord Rama.

Lord Ganesha and Goddess Lakshmi are worshipped during the evening hours on this day as it is believed that this brings in prosperity and good luck.

The auspicious nine days of Navratras are dedicated to Goddess Durga. It is said that Goddess Durga was created jointly by Lord Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva and was bestowed with power by all these Gods to render strength to her. She was created to kill demon Mahishasura who had been killing innocent people. Goddess Durga fought with him for nine days and beheaded him on the tenth day. This again was the battle between the good and evil and it was the good that emerged victorious.

People observe fast during navratras and worship different avatars of Goddess Durga each day to seek her blessings.

  • Ganesh Chaturthi

Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated to rejoice the birth day of Lord Ganesha. The festivities continue for ten days. It is believed that Lord Ganesha comes to Earth during these days every year and spreads joy everywhere. His devotees believe that whoever worships Lord Ganesha during these days is freed from all the problems and negativity in life.

Idols of Lord Ganesha are brought home and prayers are sung in his praise every day. These idols are then immersed in river on the last day of the pooja.

  • Makar Sankranti

Makar Sankranti is another major Hindu festival. It is known by different names in different parts of the country. In Assam it is known by the name Bihu, in Tamil Nadu it is referred to as Pongal, in Gujarat it is called Uttarayan and in Bengal it is known as Poush Parbon.  The day is extremely auspicious for the Hindus. It is believed that taking holy dip in the sacred river Ganga on this day can help get rid of all the bad deeds and cleanses ones aura.

  • Karva Chauth

This is mostly celebrated in North India. On this day, women observe fast for the long life of their husbands. It is believed that fasting on this day pleases God who renders good health and long life to the husbands. Women don’t eat or drink anything during the day. They dress up traditionally during the evening and perform pooja. They have food and water only after seeing the moon at night.

Similarly, Krishna Janmashtami is celebrated to commemorate the birthday of Lord Krishna, Maha Shivratri is celebrated to offer prayers to Lord Shiva and Gurpurab is celebrated to rejoice the birth of Guru Nanak Dev, the first Sikh guru.

Apart from the National festivals of India, all the other festivals have some religious beliefs tied to them. On these festivals, people offer prayers to their deities, wear ethnic clothes and make merry with their near and dear ones.

Related Information:

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An Indian Festival Paragraph

An Indian Festival Paragraph: Celebrating Rich Culture and Traditions

An Indian Festival Paragraph: India is a country known for its diverse culture and rich traditions. One of the most significant aspects of Indian culture is the celebration of festivals. Indian festivals are not only a time for celebration and joy but also a reflection of the country’s cultural diversity and heritage. In this article An Indian Festival Paragraph, we will explore the importance of Indian festivals and how they contribute to preserving the country’s rich cultural identity.

An Indian Festival Paragraph

In this blog An Indian Festival Paragraph, we include the An Indian Festival Paragraph, in 100, 200, 250, and 300 words. Also cover the An Indian Festival Paragraph belonging to classes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and up to the 12th class. You can read more Essay Writing in 10 lines, and about sports, events, occasions, festivals, etc… An Indian Festival Paragraph is also available in different languages.

Overview Of Indian Festivals

India is a land of festivals, with each state having its unique set of traditions and celebrations. The country celebrates a plethora of festivals throughout the year, ranging from religious to cultural and secular. Some of the major festivals celebrated across India include Diwali, Holi, Durga Puja, Eid, Christmas, and New Year. Each festival has its significance and is celebrated with great zeal and enthusiasm.

  • Diwali, also known as the festival of lights, is one of the most widely celebrated festivals in India. It marks the victory of good over evil and symbolizes the triumph of light over darkness. People light diyas, decorate their homes with rangolis, and burst firecrackers to celebrate this festival.
  • Holi, on the other hand, is a festival of colors and signifies the arrival of spring. People smear each other with colors, dance to music, and enjoy traditional sweets and snacks during the festival. Durga Puja, celebrated predominantly in West Bengal, is a ten-day-long festival that honors Goddess Durga and her victory over the demon Mahishasura.
  • Eid is a significant Muslim festival celebrated across India and marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. It is a time for prayers, feasting, and exchanging gifts with family and friends. Christmas and New Year are also celebrated with great fervor, with people decorating their homes, exchanging gifts, and enjoying delicious food and drinks.

Overview Of Indian Festivals

Significance Of Indian Festivals

Indian festivals are not just celebrations but are associated with different myths, legends, and religious beliefs. Each festival has its significance and is rooted in the country’s cultural and religious traditions. Festivals provide a platform for people to express their cultural identity and showcase their traditional arts, music, and dance forms.

  • For instance, during Durga Puja, people across West Bengal create elaborate pandals, depicting various themes and cultural aspects of the state.
  • They also participate in traditional dance forms like Dandiya and Garba during Navratri, the nine-day-long festival that precedes Durga Puja.
  • Similarly, during Diwali, people decorate their homes with intricate rangolis and light diyas to honor Lord Rama’s return to Ayodhya after defeating Ravana.

The Impact Of Indian Festivals On Society

Indian festivals play a significant role in promoting unity and harmony among people from different cultures and religions. During festivals, people come together, forget their differences, and celebrate as one community. Festivals provide a platform for people to connect with their roots and foster a sense of belongingness and pride in their cultural heritage.

Festivals also have a positive impact on the economy, with increased spending on food, clothing, and other items. For instance, during Diwali, people buy new clothes, sweets, and gifts, contributing significantly to the country’s economy.

The Importance Of Preserving Indian Festivals

Despite the significant cultural and social significance of Indian festivals, many of these celebrations are at risk of fading away. As India becomes more modernized and urbanized, the younger generations may not value these traditions as much as their parents and grandparents did. Many young people prefer to celebrate Western holidays and traditions, which they perceive as being more modern and fashionable.

  • This shift away from Indian festivals has led to concerns about the preservation of the country’s cultural heritage. If these festivals are not preserved, India risks losing a crucial part of its identity and cultural heritage. Therefore, it is essential to take measures to ensure that these festivals continue to be celebrated and valued by future generations.
  • One way to preserve Indian festivals is to raise awareness about their cultural and social significance. It is crucial to educate young people about the history and traditions associated with these festivals. Schools and colleges can play an important role in this by organizing cultural events and educational programs that highlight the significance of Indian festivals.
  • Another way to preserve Indian festivals is to make them more accessible and inclusive. Often, festivals are restricted to certain communities or social groups, which can lead to the exclusion of others. Making festivals more inclusive can help to bring people from different backgrounds together and promote greater social harmony.
  • In addition, it is crucial to support and encourage traditional arts and crafts associated with these festivals. Many traditional artisans and craftsmen have been practicing their crafts for generations, but are now facing challenges due to a lack of recognition and support. By promoting and supporting traditional arts and crafts, we can not only preserve these traditions but also help to promote the livelihoods of those who practice them.

In conclusion, Indian festivals are an integral part of the country’s rich cultural heritage. They bring people together, promote unity and harmony, and showcase the country’s diverse traditions and customs. It is crucial to continue celebrating these festivals in the face of modernization and globalization to preserve India’s unique cultural identity.

By celebrating Indian festivals, we can connect with our roots, promote unity, and foster a sense of pride in our cultural heritage. You can also read about An Indian Festival Paragraph in the given below link.

Read More: Festival Of Tripura Paragraph

FAQs On An Indian Festival Paragraph

Question 1. What is the Indian festival essay? Or an Indian festival paragraph?

Answer: The Indian festival essay would typically be an essay that explores the rich cultural heritage of India, its diverse religious traditions, and the colorful festivals that are celebrated throughout the year. It would discuss the historical and cultural significance of these festivals, their rituals and customs, and the social and spiritual dimensions of these celebrations.

It would also reflect on the spirit of unity and harmony that these festivals evoke, bringing people of different backgrounds together in a shared sense of celebration and joy.

Question 2. What is a festival paragraph?

Answer: A festival paragraph is a brief piece of writing that describes a festival or celebration. It typically includes information about the cultural or historical significance of the festival, the traditions and customs associated with it, and the ways in which it is celebrated.

The paragraph may also reflect on the social or spiritual dimensions of the festival and its significance for the community that celebrates it. Overall, a festival paragraph aims to capture the spirit and essence of a festival, conveying its richness and diversity to the reader.

Question 3. How do you write a Diwali paragraph?

Answer: Here is an example of a paragraph on Diwali:

Diwali, also known as the Festival of Lights, is one of the most important festivals in India. It is a five-day celebration that marks the triumph of good over evil and the victory of light over darkness.

During Diwali, people light diyas or earthen lamps to decorate their homes and temples and burst firecrackers to drive away evil spirits. The festival is also a time for family gatherings, feasting, and exchanging gifts. Overall, Diwali is a joyous and colorful festival that symbolizes the power of love, hope, and faith.

Question 4. What is a festival in 50 words?

Answer: A festival is a cultural or religious celebration that is marked by a special event or ceremony. It typically commemorates an important historical or mythological event or honors a particular deity or saint. Festivals often involve music, dance, food, and other forms of cultural expression, and serve as a means of promoting community solidarity and cultural heritage.

Question 5. Why do we celebrate festival 10 lines?

Answer: Here are 10 reasons why we celebrate festivals:

  • To commemorate significant events or milestones in history or mythology.
  • To express religious or spiritual devotion and seek blessings.
  • To honor and remember our ancestors and forefathers.
  • To promote cultural diversity and exchange.
  • To strengthen social bonds and build community solidarity.
  • To provide an opportunity for leisure and recreation.
  • Enjoy good food and indulge in festive treats.
  • To showcase traditional arts, crafts, and music.
  • To instill a sense of pride in our cultural heritage and identity.
  • To find joy, happiness, and hope amidst the challenges of life.

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Table of Contents

  • The dimensions of Hindu nationalism in India
  • India’s Muslims express pride in being Indian while identifying communal tensions, desiring segregation
  • Muslims, Hindus diverge over legacy of Partition
  • Religious conversion in India
  • Religion very important across India’s religious groups
  • Near-universal belief in God, but wide variation in how God is perceived
  • Across India’s religious groups, widespread sharing of beliefs, practices, values
  • Religious identity in India: Hindus divided on whether belief in God is required to be a Hindu, but most say eating beef is disqualifying
  • Sikhs are proud to be Punjabi and Indian
  • 1. Religious freedom, discrimination and communal relations
  • 2. Diversity and pluralism
  • 3. Religious segregation
  • 4. Attitudes about caste
  • 5. Religious identity
  • 6. Nationalism and politics
  • 7. Religious practices
  • 8. Religion, family and children
  • 9. Religious clothing and personal appearance
  • 10. Religion and food
  • 12. Beliefs about God
  • Acknowledgments
  • Appendix A: Methodology
  • Appendix B: Index of religious segregation

India is home to a wide range of religious traditions, which is evident in the blend of beliefs held by its people – some of which cross religious lines.

For instance, not only do most Hindus and Jains believe the Ganges River has the power to purify – a belief with roots in Hindu scripture – but substantial minorities of Indian Christians and Muslims believe this as well. And Muslims are just as likely as Hindus (77% each) to believe in the concept of karma, which is not inherent to Islam. Meanwhile, a majority of Hindus, Muslims and Christians all believe in some form of heaven.

At the same time, some beliefs that may seem mainstream for a certain group are not held by most members of that group. Although many people might consider reincarnation a core teaching in several religions native to South Asia, in no religious community does a majority express belief in reincarnation. Just 40% of Hindus, 23% of Jains and 18% of both Buddhists and Sikhs in India say they believe in reincarnation. Similarly, although miracles are central to the story of Jesus in Christian scripture, only about half of India’s Christians (48%) say they believe in miracles.

On a variety of religious beliefs measured by the survey, there are consistent patterns. In general, men, younger adults (ages 18 to 34) and those who have a college education are less likely to hold these beliefs. For instance, while a minority of men say they believe in the evil eye – the idea that certain people can cast curses or spells that cause bad things to happen to others – most Indian women believe this (44% vs. 55%). And college-educated Hindus are less likely than other Hindus to believe the Ganges has the power to purify (73% vs. 82%).

Politics plays a role as well. Hindu supporters of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) are more likely than Hindus who have an unfavorable view of the party to express devotion to various tenets of their religion. For example, Hindus who hold a favorable view of the BJP are more likely than other Hindus to say they believe in reincarnation, karma and the purifying power of the Ganges.

In addition, members of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes are more likely than members of General Category castes to hold a variety of religious beliefs, with a particularly notable gap among Christians (see “ Lower-caste Christians much more likely than General Category Christians to hold both Christian and non-Christian beliefs ” below). And those who have faced a financial hardship in the previous year – that is, those who did not have enough money to pay for food, medical care or housing – are more often believers than other Indians.

The rest of this chapter looks in more detail at individual religious beliefs, including what types of treatments people trust for their and their family’s health problems. For information about the nuances of Indians’ belief in God, including whether God can be manifest in people, see Chapter 12 .

More Hindus say there are multiple ways to interpret Hinduism than say there is only one true way

Most Indian Muslims say there is only one true way to interpret Islam

The survey asked respondents whether there is “only one true way” or “more than one true way” to interpret the teachings of their religion.

Most of India’s Muslims (63%) say there is only one true way of interpreting Islam, while fewer (28%) feel there are multiple ways of interpreting their religion. Christians also lean toward the view that there is one true way to interpret their faith.

Hindus are the sole religious group in India whose followers are more likely to say there are multiple ways of interpreting their religion (47%) than that there is only one correct interpretation (38%).

At least one-in-ten Indians in all religions do not offer a clear answer to this question. For example, among Sikhs, 44% say there is only one true way to interpret Sikh teachings, 35% say there are multiple ways, and roughly one-in-five do not take either position (21%).

Hindus differ regionally in their views on this theological question. In the South, a majority of Hindus (56%) say there are multiple ways to interpret the teachings of the religion. By comparison, Hindus in the Northern and Central parts of the country are more evenly divided: 44% of Hindus in the North say there is only one true way to interpret the teachings of Hinduism, and a nearly identical share (45%) say there can be multiple understandings of the religion.

Hindu college graduates are somewhat less inclined than other Hindus to say there is only one true interpretation of Hinduism (31% vs. 39%). And Hindus who say religion is very important in their lives are significantly more likely than others to express this view (41% vs. 23%). Similarly, Sikhs who say religion is very important also are more likely to say there is only one true interpretation of Sikh teachings (46% vs. 30%).

Among Hindus, partisanship makes a difference as well. A majority of those who have an unfavorable view of the BJP (54%) say there are multiple ways to interpret Hinduism, while those with a favorable view of the party are more evenly divided on the question: 43% say there is only one true interpretation of the religion, compared with 46% who see multiple understandings.

Majorities of Muslims across different regions say there is only one true way to interpret Islam. And older Muslims (i.e., those ages 35 and older) are slightly more likely than younger Muslim adults to see a singular interpretation of their religion (65% vs. 60%). Muslim men are also slightly more inclined than women to say that there is only one true interpretation of Islam (65% vs. 60%). Among Christians, the gender pattern is reversed: Christian men are less likely than Christian women to say Christianity has only one true interpretation (49% vs. 56%).

Most Indians across different religious groups believe in karma

Equal shares of Hindus, Muslims believe in karma

Most Indians of all religions surveyed believe in karma, the idea that people will reap the benefits of their good deeds, and pay the price for their bad deeds, often in their next life. This includes roughly three-quarters of Hindus (77%), Muslims (77%) and Jains (75%) who share this belief.

Indian adults of different ages and educational backgrounds generally believe in karma. The one exception to the widespread belief in karma is the Southern region: About half of Southern Indians say they believe in karma (51%), compared with much higher percentages in other parts of the country (72% or more). This regional pattern holds true for Hindus as well as Muslims.

Among Hindus, those who have a favorable view of the BJP are slightly more likely than those who have an unfavorable view of the party to believe in karma (79% vs. 70%). And among Indians overall and Hindus specifically, those who pray daily are more inclined to believe in karma. But the opposite is true among Muslims: Those who pray daily are less likely than other Muslims to believe in karma (75% vs. 83%).

Most Hindus, Jains believe in Ganges’ power to purify

About one-third of Christians, quarter of Muslims in India say Ganges can purify

The Ganges River originates in the Himalayan mountains, crosses the Northern, Central and Eastern parts of India, and has special significance in Hinduism. Indeed, the vast majority of Indian Hindus (81%) say that the Ganges has the power to purify, and most Jains (66%) share this view. This belief is considerably less common among other religious groups in India, but, still, about one-third of Christians (32%) and Sikhs (32%) and roughly a quarter of Muslims (26%) feel that the Ganges has the power to purify.

Large majorities of Hindus across all regions of India believe that the Ganges River can purify. Hindus in the Central region, which includes some of the Ganges’ most sacred cities, such as Varanasi, are especially inclined to hold this belief (90%). Rural Hindus also are somewhat more likely than those who live in urban locations to believe the Ganges can purify (83% vs. 76%), while college-educated Hindus are somewhat less inclined than other Hindus to believe in the Ganges’ purifying properties (73% vs. 82%).

Hindus who have a favorable opinion of the BJP are more likely than Hindus who have an unfavorable view of the party to believe the Ganges can purify (84% vs. 74%). Similarly, among Muslims, BJP supporters are more likely than BJP detractors to say the Ganges purifies (34% vs. 24%). And while just under half of Christian BJP supporters say the Ganges purifies (46%), fewer than one-quarter of Christians who view the ruling party unfavorably believe this (21%).

Belief in reincarnation is not widespread in India

Roughly a quarter of Muslims believe in reincarnation

Reincarnation is a mainstream teaching in Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism and Jainism. But fewer than half of Indians in each of these groups say they believe in reincarnation. 22 For example, 40% of India’s Hindus believe in reincarnation. And Christians (29%) and Muslims (27%) are more likely than Sikhs (18%) to hold this belief.

Personal religious observance makes little difference: 38% of both Indians who pray daily and those who pray less often believe in reincarnation. Among Hindus, those who say religion is very important in their personal lives are only slightly more likely than other Hindus to hold this belief (41% vs. 37%).

Older Indians are a bit more inclined than younger Indians to believe in reincarnation: 40% of Indians ages 35 and older believe in reincarnation, compared with 35% of those 18 to 34. Conversely, older Buddhists are less likely than younger Buddhists to believe in reincarnation (13% vs. 22%).

College-educated Indians are slightly less likely than others to say they believe in reincarnation (32% vs. 38%). While people in different caste categories do not vary much in their belief in reincarnation, there are bigger differences within the Christian community (see “ Lower-caste Christians much more likely than General Category Christians to hold both Christian and non-Christian beliefs ” below).

Among Hindus, those who favor the BJP are somewhat more likely than those who hold an unfavorable view of India’s ruling party to believe in reincarnation (42% vs. 34%). Muslim supporters of the BJP also are slightly more likely than other Muslims to hold this belief (29% vs. 22%).

More Hindus and Jains than Sikhs believe in moksha (liberation from the cycle of rebirth)

More Jains, Hindus believe in moksha than kaivalya

Different religions or traditions teach that people can escape reincarnation’s cycle of rebirth through various means. Achieving this liberation is often referred to as moksha , or the related concept of kaivalya . The survey asked Hindus, Sikhs and Jains if they believe in moksha and kaivalya; Buddhists were asked if they believe in nirvana , a term more often used in Buddhist teachings to refer to the state of liberation from the cycle of rebirth (see below).

Nearly half of Hindus (47%) and a majority of Jains (56%) say they believe in moksha. And among both groups, much larger shares believe in moksha than kaivalya. Sikhs are the least likely of the three groups to believe in both moksha (17%) and kaivalya (5%).

The concept of kaivalya is more closely associated with Jain teachings. And the survey finds that nearly a quarter of Jains (23%) believe in the concept. Jains also are the most likely to answer the question at all when asked about their belief in kaivalya, suggesting a higher level of familiarity with the term. Only about one-in-ten Jains do not answer this question (11%), compared with about three-in-ten Hindus (31%) and Sikhs (28%).

Older Hindus are somewhat more likely than younger Hindus to believe in moksha and kaivalya. For example, nearly half of older Hindus (ages 35 and older) believe in moksha, while closer to four-in-ten younger Hindu adults (ages 18 to 34) hold this belief (49% vs. 43%).

Nearly four-in-ten Buddhists believe in nirvana

About four-in-ten Indian Buddhists believe in nirvana (39%).

Buddhist women are significantly more likely than men to believe in nirvana (45% vs. 34%). And Buddhists with a favorable view of the BJP are more inclined than other Buddhists to say they believe (46% vs. 31%).

Most Hindus, Muslims, Christians believe in heaven

Most Indians say they believe in heaven (55%), though teachings about heaven vary widely across India’s religions. Some religions teach that heaven is the final destination for those who have lived a good life, others teach that it is a  temporary home between rebirths , and still others teach that heaven is a state of being that people can aspire to experience during this life .

Nearly two-thirds of Christians believe in heaven

Majorities of Christians (64%), Muslims (58%) and Hindus (56%) believe in heaven. Among other religious groups, belief in heaven is less common, particularly among Buddhists (24%).

As with many other religious beliefs, those with more education are less likely to believe in heaven: 47% of Indians with a college degree say they believe in heaven, compared with 56% of those with less education.

Among the Muslim community, members of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes are significantly more likely than General Category Muslims to believe in heaven (63% vs. 51%).

Belief in angels more prevalent than belief in demons

About half of Indians (49%) believe in angels or benevolent spirits. This includes roughly two-thirds of Christians (68%), about half of Muslims (53%) and Hindus (49%), and far fewer among Jains (25%), Buddhists (24%) and Sikhs (17%).

Across religious groups, Indians are generally less likely to believe in demons or evil spirits (37%). For instance, just four-in-ten Christians (41%) say they believe in demons, far lower than the share who believe in angels.

Christians most likely to believe in angels

Indian women are slightly more likely than men to believe in both angels and demons. And among Buddhists, women are twice as likely as men to believe in angels (32% vs. 16%).

A majority of Indians who have recently faced financial hardship believe in angels, compared with fewer than half of those who have not faced such challenges in the past year (56% vs. 43%). And Indians who pray daily are more likely than others to believe in angels or benevolent spirits (52% vs. 44%); this contrast is especially strong within the Christian community (71% vs. 57%). At the same time, Muslims who pray daily are slightly less likely than other Muslims to believe in demons or evil spirits (43% vs. 50%).

Nearly half of Indian Christians believe in miracles

Roughly four-in-ten Indians (41%), including nearly half of Christians (48%), say they believe in miracles. Among Hindus and Muslims, about four-in-ten hold this belief (42% and 38%, respectively). Similar to belief in angels and demons, far fewer Sikhs (20%), Jains (15%) and Buddhists (14%) believe in miracles.

Across India, women are slightly more likely than men to profess belief in miracles (43% vs. 39%), with gender differences particularly pronounced among Christians (53% vs. 43%).

Relatively few Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains believe in miracles

Different caste groups generally believe in miracles at similar rates. Among Muslims, however, members of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes are significantly more likely than other Muslims to believe in miracles (42% vs. 32%).

Hindus with a favorable view of the BJP are more likely than other Hindus to believe in miracles (45% vs. 34%).

Most Muslims in India believe in Judgment Day

About half of India’s Christians believe in Judgment Day

Often considered a core doctrine of both Islam and Christianity, Judgment Day refers to an end-of-time belief that the dead shall rise and be judged for their life’s works. A majority of Indian Muslims (71%) say they believe in Judgment Day, as do about half of Christians (49%).

Across a wide range of personal characteristics, including age group, education level and gender, majorities of Muslims believe in Judgment Day. And the Northeast is the only region where fewer than half of Muslims believe in Judgment Day (46%).

Among Christians, women are more likely than men to believe in Judgment Day (53% vs. 44%). And Christians who say religion is very important in their lives are more likely than other Christians to say they hold this end-times belief (52% vs. 40%).

Most Indians believe in fate, fewer believe in astrology

Indians generally (70%) say they believe in fate, the idea that events in one’s life are largely predestined. Majorities of Hindus (73%), Muslims (63%) and Sikhs (59%) say they believe in fate.

Hindus more likely than other religious groups to believe in fate, astrology

Fewer Indians believe in astrology (44%), or the idea that the position of the planets and the stars can influence events in people’s lives. (Still, 83% of Indians say they fix important dates based on auspicious dates or times. See Chapter 7 .)

Hindus are the most likely of India’s six major religious groups to say they believe in both fate (73%) and astrology (49%).

Both beliefs are more common among those who are older. For example, roughly two-thirds of Indians ages 18 to 25 (65%) believe in fate, compared with nearly three-quarters of those ages 35 and older (73%).

The Northeast is the only region where fewer than half believe in fate (40%), and Western Indians are the least likely to believe in astrology (32%).

Many Hindus and Muslims say magic, witchcraft or sorcery can influence people’s lives

Many Indians say people’s lives can be influenced through the evil eye (49%) or through magic, witchcraft and sorcery (39%).

About half of both Hindus and Muslims (51% each) say they believe in the evil eye – the notion that certain people can cast curses or spells that cause bad things to happen to others. And roughly four-in-ten among both Hindus (40%) and Muslims (43%) say that magic, sorcery or witchcraft can influence people’s lives. Among other religious groups, these beliefs are less common. For example, 27% of Sikhs say they believe in the evil eye, and 15% say they believe in the influence of magic, witchcraft or sorcery.

Most Indian women believe in evil eye

Women are more likely than men to hold both beliefs: A majority of Indian women say they believe in the evil eye, compared with fewer than half of men (55% vs. 44%). And those with less education are much more likely than other Indians to say they believe in both magic and the evil eye. For example, just under half of those who did not receive any formal education believe in magic’s influence on people’s lives, but fewer than a third of college graduates share this view (46% vs. 29%).

Members of General Category castes are less likely than Indians in Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes to say they believe that magic can influence people’s lives (33% vs. 42%). Caste differences are particularly pronounced among Christians (see “ Lower-caste Christians much more likely than General Category Christians to hold both Christian and non-Christian beliefs ” below for full analysis).

Roughly half of Indians trust religious ritual to treat health problems

Indians far more likely to trust medical science than ayurveda, homeopathy, religious ritual to treat health problems

The survey asked the Indian public how much they trust different types of treatments for their own health or their family’s health – medical science, ayurveda or home remedies, homeopathy, or religious rituals.

Nearly all Indians (94%) trust medical science at least to some degree, including 81% who say they trust medical science “a lot.” A majority of Indians (60%) also trust ayurvedic treatments. Meanwhile, roughly half say they trust homeopathy or religious rituals at least somewhat (47% each) to treat their or their family’s health problems.

An overwhelming 98% of Buddhists trust medical science, but they are much less inclined than members of other religious communities to trust religious ritual to treat health problems (22%).

As might be expected, Indians who say religion is very important or who pray daily tend to trust religious ritual more than other Indians. But these highly religious individuals are also more likely than other Indians to trust the other forms of treatment.

Similarly, people who invite religious leaders to their home to conduct religious rites are more likely than other Indians to trust religious rituals and other treatments to manage their family members’ health problems.

Indians in North and Northeast most trusting of religious ritual to treat health problems

Members of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes are slightly more likely than those in General Category castes to trust religious rituals to treat health conditions (48% vs. 44%). And Indians who have received less education are more likely than college-educated adults to trust religious rituals (47% vs. 39%).

Trust in religious rituals also varies widely by region. While majorities in the North (57%) and Northeast (64%) trust religious ritual to some degree, only about one-third of Indians in the West say they trust religious rituals to treat health problems (31%).

Those who have faced financial hardship in the last year are more inclined than other Indians to trust religious ritual for health care needs (52% vs. 42%).

Lower-caste Christians much more likely than General Category Christians to hold both Christian and non-Christian beliefs

Members of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes are more likely than others to hold a variety of religious beliefs. For example, about half of lower-caste Indians believe in angels or benevolent spirits (52%), while roughly four-in-ten of those in General Category castes share this belief (41%).

Lower-caste Hindus, Christians more likely to believe in demons, magic

This pattern certainly applies to the Hindu majority. For instance, 43% of lower-caste Hindus believe that magic, sorcery or witchcraft can influence people’s lives, compared with 33% of General Category Hindus.

But the belief gap between lower and upper castes is considerably larger among Christians – and this applies to beliefs that are typically associated with Christianity as well as with those that are not.

For example, a majority of Christian members of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and other lower castes say they believe in karma (58%), compared with 44% among upper-caste Christians – a gap of 14 percentage points. And about half (51%) of lower-caste Christians believe in demons or evil spirits, while just 12% of upper-caste Christians do. In both cases, these gaps in belief are much less pronounced among Hindus.

The vast majority of Christians in India identify with either Scheduled Castes (33%), Scheduled Tribes (24%) or Other Backward Classes (17%); see Chapter 4 for details.

  • While reincarnation broadly is understood as a belief that after physical death, the essence of a being will be reborn into another physical body, there are many interpretations of how this occurs. ↩

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indian culture and festivals essay

Festival of India is being organized in Russia from September 2018 to March 2019. It was in 1987 that such a festival called “Apna Utsav” was organized last time. People of Russia still remember that festival and high artistic skills of Indian performers.

The festival will embrace 22 cities across the length and breadth of Russia. It will showcase the traditional vibrancy and diversity of the Indian culture woven in a flavor of fusion and modern technology. It is an incarnation of privileged, time-tested friendship between Russia and India.

58 main artists, along with their troupes belonging to different performing arts from India will be performing in multiple cities of Russia – Moscow, St.Petersburg, Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Ufa, Samara, Grozny, Sochi, Kaliningrad, Vladivostok, Rostov on Don, Astrakhan, Volgograd, Arkhangelsk, Khabarovsk, Novosibirsk, Irkutsk and Ulan Ude.

The series of events planned under the Festival include performances of Indian classical dances, contemporary Indian dance and music, Indian films, food festivals and art exhibitions. 11 incoming cultural delegations will perform at 31 venues in 22 cities spread across Russia.

A grand opening of the Festival of India took place on September 6, 2018 at the Kremlin Palace Theatre.

For more information, please visit https://indiafestival.ru/

Opening at the State Kremlin Palace in Moscow

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At Cannes, Indian Filmmakers Show There Is More Than Just Bollywood

This year’s edition of the annual film festival features a prominent presence of Indian stories and storytellers that celebrates the country’s independent cinema.

A scene in a film in which two women are seen looking into a red pot.

By Nicolas Rapold

For the first time in 30 years at the Cannes Film Festival, an Indian film will compete for the Palme d’Or in the main competition, alongside new movies from Francis Ford Coppola, Yorgos Lanthimos and Andrea Arnold .

The dry spell might come as a surprise for a country with film industries in multiple regions producing hundreds of films per year, including international sensations like last year’s Oscar-nominated “RRR.”

But the inclusion of “All We Imagine as Light,” directed by Payal Kapadia, reflects a growing recognition of the independent cinema made in the shadow of the country’s mainstream hits.

Thierry Frémaux, the artistic director of Cannes, noted the new generations of filmmakers in India when he announced the lineup in April. These movies offer what the critic Namrata Joshi calls “a young, probing, and provoking gaze at Indian reality.” Indian publications have celebrated the country’s prominent presence at the festival, whose inaugural edition in 1946 included a film from India, Chetan Anand’s “Neecha Nagar,” in its grand prize category.

“All We Imagine as Light” joins a generally notable selection of Indian stories and storytellers across this year’s edition, which begins on Tuesday. Santosh Sivan will be the first Indian filmmaker to receive the Pierre Angénieux prize for career achievement in cinematography, and in the Un Certain Regard competition, Sandhya Suri’s “Santosh” follows a widow who takes on her husband’s policeman post.

In Directors’ Fortnight, a parallel program during Cannes, Karan Kandhari’s “Sister Midnight” portrays a defiant newly married woman who seeks vengeance. And in ACID (Association for the Distribution of Independent Cinema) — a parallel program at Cannes devoted to independent film — an Indian feature will screen for the first time, “In Retreat,” directed by Maisam Ali.

“It’s great because quite often we don’t have so many films from India represented in this way at Cannes,” Kapadia said in an interview from Paris where she was putting finishing touches on her film.

Centering on two roommates, “All We Imagine as Light” is, Kapadia says, “about women who’ve come to Mumbai to work.” She returns to Cannes after winning best documentary in 2021 for her university-set reflection on love and protest, “A Night of Knowing Nothing.” But independent Indian productions can face a long road to screens at home because of domestic funding challenges and markets more accustomed to mainstream fare.

“If you want to do something that’s a little experimental, it becomes challenging to find funding,” Kapadia said. “There are a few funds, but it’s a really big country and there are a lot of people.”

Despite the obstacles, Indian films of modest budgets and artistic ambition have won awards abroad recently in major festivals like Sundance, “All That Breathes” in 2022; Rotterdam, “Pebbles” in 2021; and Venice, “The Disciple” in 2020.

The Museum of Modern Art in New York opened a 2022 showcase of independent movies from India by proclaiming: “Indian cinema’s diversity has been energized by a growing number of impressive independent works.” And documentaries have especially garnered the spotlight recently with Academy Award nominations, including “All That Breathes” and “Writing with Fire,” despite having no consistent theatrical distribution within India.

“I think the spirit of independent films in India has always been strong,” Deepti DCunha, artistic director of the Jio MAMI Mumbai Film Festival, said. “But very few people have the access and they can find it difficult to get their movies seen anywhere.”

What’s helped many Indian filmmakers are co-productions with European countries, and the chance to get exposure to potential producers at the annual Film Bazaar, an event in Goa with a curated market for Indian films, producers and programmers visiting from abroad, and work-in-progress labs. But another nexus for a recent generation of independent filmmakers is film school. The Film and Television Institute of India (F.T.I.I.) in Pune, which Kapadia attended, is one such bastion, as is Jamia Millia Islamia in New Delhi.

“The F.T.I.I. has provided an indefatigable supply of not only technicians in terms of editors, sound people, D.O.P.s [directors of photography] and so on, but also directors,” Shaunak Sen, who directed “All That Breathes,” said in an interview from Delhi.

Sen counts himself lucky: his film about two brothers running a bird clinic in Delhi went to Sundance, Cannes and the Oscars, and was picked up by HBO. But he sees what independent filmmakers can face in India, “where you know you’re staring at this mammoth industry of Bollywood, working in a tiny nook, and trying to will a film into existence.”

Kapadia’s film was in development since late 2018, taking time to find funding. She was writing the script for “All We Imagine as Light” while she was still making her documentary “A Night of Knowing Nothing.” The F.T.I.I. was central to Kapadia’s career, and where she met her partner, whom she also works with, and other “go-to film companions.”

But an international connection was important: She worked on both films with a young French company, learning together as they moved from small documentary production to a sometimes 80-person crew for “All We Imagine as Light.” (“Big crew, small film!” she said with a laugh.) The French co-production also had support from the Netherlands through the Hubert Bals Fund of the International Film Festival Rotterdam, which supports filmmakers across the globe at various stages of creating their movies.

“The independent film industry in Europe is really well designed. They support you at every stage,” Kapadia said, listing off grants for script writing, production, postproduction and distribution.

She mused what it would be like if India could adopt the French system of levying taxes on ticket sales that can be used to support independent filmmaking. (She’s not alone in wondering: An editorial in the Indian Express said Kapadia’s inclusion offered “an opportunity to introspect on why it has taken three decades for a film from one of the world’s top film-producing nations to once again make it to this eminent stage.”)

These are the challenges that filmmakers like Kapadia must master, not just to make their movies but to find audiences. Programmers at international festivals can help with encouraging independent voices, viewing works in progress in India or through links.

In the case of the ACID selection, “In Retreat,” the filmmaker Ali (another F.T.I.I. graduate) submitted the film, which was one of hundreds considered by the programming team. Shot in the high-altitude Ladakh region, it’s the story of a middle-aged man trying to return home to a mountain town for his brother’s funeral.

“I didn’t know the director was young, because when you see the film, it’s incredibly deep, really mature,” Pamela Varela, one of ACID’s programmers, said, before bestowing the highest auteurist compliment. “This is really a film by someone. You see it from the first sequence, which is amazing.”

The up-and-coming generations of Indian independent filmmakers share a willingness to experiment formally and, outside of the demands of a studio and mass market, might have more freedom to confront political issues of inequality or caste, for example. “Especially if it’s a French co-production,” Kapadia said with a smile. “They are very much for free speech, so they are quite supportive of whatever you want to do.”

These filmmakers find kinship both at home and abroad. Kapadia compared making films to “making a quilt, a craft” and mentioned the Indian filmmakers Yashaswini Raghunandan and Ekta Mittal.

Like cinephiles globally, filmmakers are in tune with directors from across the world, though Sen also cited the particular “neighborly” bond with other South Asian cinemas that reflect a postcolonial modernity.

When it comes to the independent “new wave,” though, don’t call it a comeback: By all accounts, the talent was always there. Cannes just presents a dazzlingly bright spotlight and opportunity.

“I don’t think it is that we have recently seen a new wave in talent,” DCunha said. “It’s more that now Europe is paying attention, or America’s paying attention.”

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indian culture and festivals essay

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Festivals of india-ussr promise to be a spectacular extravaganza, the festivals promise a spectacular extravaganza. while 2,500 russians will descend on india, not even the kremlin will be spared india's cultural invasion..

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indian culture and festivals essay

The two countries intend to show off their classical best as well as their kitsch modern. Thus it is the Bolshoi ballet and symphony (with an orchestra if a pit can be made in Siri Fort in time), the pick of European art from the incomparable Hermitage of Leningrad, as well as their gymnasts and circuses. India will send the best from its classical arts, as well as the wandering performers from apna utsav . And over 200 works of some 80 painters from the collection in the National Gallery of Art - in addition to the exhibitions of Jamini Roy, Amrita Shergill and Rabindranath Tagore. But in the end, numbers will be all. The aim of the countries is to put on not only the greatest show on earth, but the biggest. The bigger the better.

indian culture and festivals essay

In Nashua, Vasant Festival celebrates the birth of spring and the culture of India

The India Association of New Hampshire welcomed spring with its Vasant Festival this weekend at Nashua High School South.

The Vasant Festival was hosted by the India Association of NH.

Jyoti Sharma is part of the India Association of New Hampshire , which hosts the annual event. She says India is a diverse country, and this is a place for the diaspora to share their cultural heritage.

" What we are doing here is just felicitating the Indian community to come and share their talents, especially the kids over here," she said. "They go to a lot of, you know, dance classes, music classes, and that's one way for Indian parents to educate their kids about Indian culture, which is otherwise very difficult because, you know, we have to create that environment for them in order for them to understand."

The festival also included judged arts events including live-drawing, music and dance.

Among the cultural highlights of the Vasant Festival 2024, classical and non-classical dance took center stage May 18, 2024 in Nashua, NH.

Sneha Swaminathan of Merrimack was one of the participants.

" This is about the Basant or the spring. So there's a lot of happiness," she said. "There's different festivals in different parts of India. Which is to celebrate the birth of spring, which kind of coincides with the U.S. also. So it brings joy, happiness, you know, harvest things like that. So it's very special, especially [in] my home state."

indian culture and festivals essay

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The Great Indian Food Festival  Berlin 2024 | Wedesi

The Great Indian Food Festival Berlin 2024 | Wedesi

Experience the rich flavors and cultural diversity of India at The Great Indian Food Festival in Berlin on 3rd of August 2024

Date and time

Jules Biergarten & Café

Refund Policy

Fun Events and Flea Market

About this event

  • 10 hours 30 minutes

Experience the rich flavors and cultural diversity of India at The Great Indian Food Festival in Berlin on 3rd August 2024. From 12:00 hrs to 22:30 hrs, indulge in aromatic and delicious Indian food and drinks, prepared by Berlin's biggest Indian chefs and Indian pop-up concepts from Germany.

More information for food menu on the website - https://wedesi.de

The event also features a food market and various attractions for a truly immersive experience.

Mark your calendars and join us for a memorable culinary journey.

If you would like to be part of The Great Indian Food Festival, please contact [email protected] or apply for a stall from website.

Artists of all kinds are always welcome to enrich us. The more art and culture, the better!

For a relaxed entrance without having to queue, you can book your ticket 🎫 for only 5, - € in advance.

Rejoice with us:

15 + Food Popups and Trucks

You can expect traditional and modern Indian delicacies with popular food concepts coming from all over Germany to Berlin.

Bollywood Vibes

You get to be part of an Immersive Bollywood music spectacle with Indian DJ's and live music.

For our younger guests we offer a varied children's program.

Much More Attractions to be Announced.

Children up to 14 years free.

Contact Organizer for partnerships or sponsorship - [email protected]

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indian culture and festivals essay

Kinnari Jain On Her Cannes Debut In Support Of 'Manthan': Says, '...Brings Indian Culture On A Global Platform'

In an interview with abp live over email, kinnari talked about her journey of being a fashion influencer and what drew her to support 'manthan' at the cannes film festival..

Cannes Film Festival 2024 Kinnari Jain Talks About Her Cannes Debut In Support Of Smita Patil Starrer Manthan Kinnari Jain On Her Cannes Debut In Support Of 'Manthan': Says, '...Brings Indian Culture On A Global Platform'

Kinnari Jain, a Mumbai-based fashion influencer and wardrobe consultant, best known for her engaging content in body inclusivity, personal styling and wearable fashion, will be present at the Cannes Film Festival, marking her debut at the event. She will be gracing the red carpet and attending the screening of the Indian film, 'Manthan' as well as the Cannes Official Afterparty.

The restored version of veteran filmmaker Shyam Benegal’s 1976 film ‘Manthan’ by the Film Heritage Foundation, will be screened under Cannes Classics, a section created 20 years ago that features celebrations, restored prints and documentaries. Co-written by Benegal and celebrated playwright Vijay Tendulkar, Gujarat-set ‘Manthan’, starring Smita Patil, is the first crowd-funded Indian film which was entirely crowdfunded by 500,000 farmers who donated ₹2 each. The film won two National Film Awards in 1977: for Best Feature Film in Hindi and Best Screenplay for Tendulkar. It was also India’s official entry to the 1976 Academy Awards in the Best Foreign Language Film category.

The film was inspired by the pioneering milk cooperative movement of Verghese Kurien, who led ‘Operation Flood’ to transform India from a milk-deficient country to the world’s biggest milk producer.

In an interview with  ABP Live  over email, Kinnari talked about her journey of being a fashion influencer and what drew her to support 'Manthan' at the Cannes Film Festival.

ALSO READ: Flashback Friday: Not Just Cannes, Here Is Why We Should Also Watch Manthan

Here Are Some Excerpts From The Interview:

  • Can you tell us about your journey from being a technology consultant at Deloitte to becoming a prominent fashion influencer and content creator?

I started my journey in the IT industry in 2019 after completing my Masters from the Kelley School of Business. At that time I had already developed an inclination towards styling but never thought of pursuing it as a career or starting an insta page. It was only after I moved to India in 2022 that I realized that even though there were many fashion content creators, there was a dearth of personal style content creators which is why I decided to start this page. I juggled this along with my IT 9 to 5 at Meesho as a product manager for about a year before I reached 250K followers and decided to pursue content creation full-time.

  • How is it being selected to attend the Cannes Film Festival for the first time? What does this opportunity mean to you?

I received a call from the Film Heritage Foundation about 15 days before the Cannes Film Festival commenced. They invited me to attend the world premiere of the 4K restoration of Shyam Benegal’s milestone film 'Manthan’(1976). I was ecstatic and was in disbelief for quite some time that I was given the privilege and honour to support the social cause that is conveyed through this film. My team and I worked endlessly to put everything together for the big day. I am extremely grateful to the Film Heritage Foundation for bestowing me with this opportunity. This opportunity means the world to me. It makes me feel that my work is being validated and thus pushes me to work even harder and provide my audience and fans with more quality content. 

          View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Kinnari Jain (@thepearshapedstylist)
  • What drew you to support the screening of the film 'Manthan' at Cannes, and what significance does this film hold for you?

It is any Indian’s dream to represent the country on an International platform and when I was given this opportunity, I was over the moon. And that too for Manthan! Manthan is more than a movie. It represents a movement that has had such an impact not just in India but globally for decades, and is still going strong to this day. This Dairy development program is a shining example of the power of India and its citizens to great such a massive impact. Manthan as a movie so wonderfully captures this and is epitomized further by how the film has been funded by the farmers of this nation. As an Indian, it is an extremely proud moment to have this film showcased on the world stage and it was a no-brainer for me to support it in whatever capacity I could.

  • 'Manthan' is a film that highlights the story of the milk cooperative movement in India. How do you see fashion intersecting with social and cultural narratives, as depicted in this film?

Manthan brings Indian culture and heritage on a global platform with the Cannes Film Festival. It brings the Indian attire of the heartland to the forefront and allows it to be recognised worldwide. So many of my international followers message me about trying out Indian Wear cause they are influenced to do so by the content we create. That’s the power of the traditional garments of India. They are so unique, elegant & beautiful and have stood the test of time due to the materials used and their versatility, and they deserve all the attention of the world!

ALSO READ: 'Dreamt Of It Since I First Saw Aishwarya Rai In 2002...': Deepti Sadhwani On Her Cannes Debut

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COMMENTS

  1. Festivals of India Essay for Students in English

    500+ Words Essay on the Festivals of India. India is a land of fairs and festivals. People of different religions and communities live here and therefore, many festivals are celebrated in India every year. One can capture the Indian tradition and culture best at its fairs and festivals marked by dance, music, sweets, etc.

  2. Indian Culture and Tradition Essay for Students

    500+ Words Essay on Indian Culture and Tradition. India has a rich culture and that has become our identity. Be it in religion, art, intellectual achievements, or performing arts, it has made us a colorful, rich, and diverse nation. The Indian culture and tradition essay is a guideline to the vibrant cultures and traditions followed in India.

  3. Essay on Indian Festivals in 500 Words in English

    Check out the essay on Indian festivals in 500 Words in English for school students. ... Indian festivals show the rich Indian culture and diversity. People from all sections of society participate in festive celebrations and rituals, where they offer prayers to gods, exchange sweets and delicious food, and wear traditional clothes. ...

  4. Festivals of India Essay for Students and Children

    The religious festivals are one of the most famous festivals not only throughout India but over the world. Some of the most prominent religious festivals are Diwali, Eid-Ul-Fitr, Christmas, Guru Nanak Jayanti, Holi and many more. Diwali and Holi are the most prominent festivals of the Hindu religion. They are very colorful and full of lights.

  5. Essay on Indian Culture for Students and Children

    500+ Words Essay on Indian Culture. India is a country that boasts of a rich culture. The culture of India refers to a collection of minor unique cultures. The culture of India comprises of clothing, festivals, languages, religions, music, dance, architecture, food, and art in India. Most noteworthy, Indian culture has been influenced by ...

  6. Essay on Indian Culture in 500 Words

    Paragraph on Indian Culture. Indian culture is one of the oldest, most diverse, and richest cultures in the world because of several factors. Our welcoming attitude towards everyone is encouraged all over the world. There is diversity in every aspect of our culture, from religious practices to festivals, foods, and traditional art forms.

  7. Indian Culture and Tradition Essay for Students in English

    Indian Culture and Tradition. India enjoys a wide variety of cultural and traditional presence amongst the 28 states. Indian origin religions Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism are all based on dharma and karma. Even, India is a blessed holy place which is also a native place for most of the religions. Recently, Muslim and Christianity also ...

  8. Festivals of India

    The festivals of India thrive in a culture of diversity, and the celebration of these festivals has become a time for cross-cultural exchanges. Filled with rituals, music, performances, culinary treats, and more, each festival presents its own fascinating history and unique charm. A large diversity of customs, traditions, and tales are also ...

  9. Festivals of India Essay for Students in English

    These festivals form the rich heritage of the country. The main festivals of India include Diwali, Holi, Rakhi, Navaratri, Guru Purnima, Khubh Mela, Shivratri, Ganesh Chaturthi, and so on. Being a multicultural country, India celebrated all these festivals with great zest and full-blown experiences.

  10. Culture of India

    Indian culture is the heritage of social norms and technologies that originated in or are associated with the ethno-linguistically diverse India, pertaining to the Indian subcontinent until 1947 and the Republic of India post-1947. The term also applies beyond India to countries and cultures whose histories are strongly connected to India by immigration, colonisation, or influence ...

  11. Essay on Festivals: Samples in 150, 250 Words

    Essay in Festivals 250 Words. India's rich diversity and festivals unite people from different backgrounds. It joins people from different states and religions in a single thread for the celebration. Every occasion in India and different countries is celebrated with happiness and joy. ... They are important to continue the traditional culture ...

  12. Essay on Indian Culture and Tradition 1000+ Words

    Indian culture and tradition, akin to a captivating mosaic, are comprised of myriad vibrant components that constitute the nation's multifaceted heritage. With deep historical roots, they are commemorated through various avenues such as festivals, art forms, and daily customs. As we embark on this essay, we will delve into the profound ...

  13. National Festivals of India Essay for Students in English

    Essay writing, poem recitation, debates, skits, fancy dress competitions, plays, and many other cultural activities are carried out as a part of these National Day Festival celebrations.In a country like India with so much cultural diversity, festivals like these really help the citizens of the country stay united.

  14. Indian Culture and Tradition Essay

    Festivals play an important role in Indian culture and tradition. People from different religions celebrate different festivals in India. Popular festivals like Diwali, Dussehra, Navratri, Janmashtami, Shivratri, Ganesh Chaturthi, etc. are celebrated by Hindu people in India.

  15. Essay on Indian Festival

    Paragraph on Indian Festival; 250 Words Essay on Indian Festival Introduction. India, a country of cultural diversity, is renowned for its myriad of colorful and vibrant festivals. These festivals, celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy, are an integral part of the Indian tradition, reflecting the country's rich cultural heritage.

  16. Festivals of India Essay for School Students [Easy Words*]

    Festivals of India Essay: ... Indian festivals reflect the culture and religious diversity. The atmosphere is filled with zeal and happiness. Whether a person is poor, middle-class or rich, every individual celebrates festival according to its financial capability. Festivals are divided as religious, national and seasonal.

  17. Long and Short Essay on Indian Festivals in English for Children and

    Short Essay on Indian Festivals - Essay 1 (200 words) Indians give special importance to their festivals. Special arrangements are made for the celebration of various festivals each year. Be it the villages or the big cities there is joy all around. All the places are decked up during the festival season.

  18. Indian Culture Essay

    Indian Culture Essay (200 words) Indian culture is a fascinating blend of traditions, spiritual beliefs, festivals, arts, and languages cultivated over thousands of years. It reflects the values, social norms, and artistic expressions that define the people of India.

  19. An Indian Festival Paragraph: Celebrating Rich Culture and Traditions

    March 28, 2023 by Prasanna. An Indian Festival Paragraph: India is a country known for its diverse culture and rich traditions. One of the most significant aspects of Indian culture is the celebration of festivals. Indian festivals are not only a time for celebration and joy but also a reflection of the country's cultural diversity and heritage.

  20. Religious beliefs across India

    Just 40% of Hindus, 23% of Jains and 18% of both Buddhists and Sikhs in India say they believe in reincarnation. Similarly, although miracles are central to the story of Jesus in Christian scripture, only about half of India's Christians (48%) say they believe in miracles. On a variety of religious beliefs measured by the survey, there are ...

  21. Festival of India

    Festival of India is being organized in Russia from September 2018 to March 2019. It was in 1987 that such a festival called "Apna Utsav" was organized last time. ... Indian films, food festivals and art exhibitions. 11 incoming cultural delegations will perform at 31 venues in 22 cities spread across Russia. A grand opening of the Festival ...

  22. Cannes Film Festival: More From India Than Just Bollywood

    May 11, 2024. For the first time in 30 years at the Cannes Film Festival, an Indian film will compete for the Palme d'Or in the main competition, alongside new movies from Francis Ford Coppola ...

  23. Festivals of India-USSR: Cultural conquest

    The skies over Moscow will turn Indian this summer. The drab July sky will be broken into myriad mosaics of bright reds, blues, and greens as lasers draw Indian motifs on it during the inauguration of the Festival of India in the Soviet Union. Not even the untouchable Kremlin will be spared India's cultural invasion.

  24. In Nashua, Vasant Festival celebrates the birth of spring and the

    Jyoti Sharma is part of the India Association of New Hampshire, which hosts the annual event.She says India is a diverse country, and this is a place for the diaspora to share their cultural heritage.

  25. Events

    August 15 - 18, 2024 India Day. The festival program combines all the best that beautiful and mysterious India can show: from extraordinary indian dances and henna painting to a grand procession of chariots and views of your favorite Indian cinema. India day is one of the biggest events in Moscow, Russia dedicated to Indian Independence day!

  26. Timeless beauty of Indian culture unveiled at Kendra Dance Festival 2024

    Timeless beauty of Indian culture unveiled at Kendra Dance Festival 2024. 8h • 2 min read. The Shriram Bharatiya Kala Kendra, an institution dedicated to preserving and promoting India's rich ...

  27. The Great Indian Food Festival Berlin 2024

    Experience the rich flavors and cultural diversity of India at The Great Indian Food Festival in Berlin on 3rd August 2024. From 12:00 hrs to 22:30 hrs, indulge in aromatic and delicious Indian food and drinks, prepared by Berlin's biggest Indian chefs and Indian pop-up concepts from Germany.

  28. Kinnari Jain On Her Cannes Debut: 'Manthan Brings Indian Culture On A

    Kinnari Jain, a Mumbai-based fashion influencer and wardrobe consultant, best known for her engaging content in body inclusivity, personal styling and wearable fashion, will be present at the Cannes Film Festival, marking her debut at the event. She will be gracing the red carpet and attending the screening of the Indian film, 'Manthan' as well as the Cannes Official Afterparty.