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GCSE English Literature

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  • Answers and commentaries (2)
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  • Question papers (32)
  • Paper 1 (14)
  • Paper 1M (8)
  • Paper 1N (8)
  • Paper 1P (8)
  • Paper 2 (18)
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Showing 61 results

Mark scheme: Paper 1M Modern prose and drama - June 2022

Published 14 Jul 2023 | PDF | 359 KB

Examiner report: Paper 1N The 19th-century novel - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 139 KB

Question paper: Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 306 KB

Examiner report: Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 138 KB

Examiner report: Paper 1M Modern prose and drama - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 118 KB

Question paper (Modified A4 18pt): Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 182 KB

Question paper (Modified A3 36pt): Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 193 KB

Question paper: Paper 1M Modern prose and drama - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 379 KB

Examiner report: Paper 2 Shakespeare and unseen poetry - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 142 KB

Question paper (Modified A4 18pt): Paper 1M Modern prose and drama - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 171 KB

Question paper (Modified A3 36pt): Paper 1M Modern prose and drama - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 180 KB

Question paper: Paper 2 Shakespeare and unseen poetry - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 365 KB

Question paper (Modified A4 18pt): Paper 2 Shakespeare and unseen poetry - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 212 KB

Question paper (Modified A3 36pt): Paper 2 Shakespeare and unseen poetry - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 225 KB

Mark scheme: Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 254 KB

Question paper: Paper 1N The 19th-century novel - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 368 KB

Mark scheme: Paper 1N The 19th-century novel - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 281 KB

Question paper (Modified A4 18pt): Paper 1N The 19th-century novel - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 211 KB

Question paper (Modified A3 36pt): Paper 1N The 19th-century novel - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 226 KB

Mark scheme: Paper 2 Shakespeare and unseen poetry - November 2021

Published 29 Jul 2022 | PDF | 308 KB

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

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Lord of the Flies

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William Golding

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A+ Student Essay: Would Piggy Have Made a Good Leader?

In any group of children, it’s a given that some will be popular and powerful while others will be teased and rejected. In the real world, adults use their authority to control these divisions and maintain a balanced group dynamic. In Lord of the Flies , however, children must fend for themselves and elect their own leader—and Piggy, wise but scorned, is never seriously considered. Though Piggy is intelligent, rational, and innovative, he lacks the charisma and facility with language that both Ralph and Jack possess, traits that the book suggests play crucial roles in establishing their authority. Piggy may have the tactical smarts to be a good leader, but because he cannot convincingly act the role, he would not be able to marshal the boys if given the chance.

Although his contributions often go unappreciated, Piggy comes up with some of the most important innovations on the island. He sees the conch’s potential as a rallying device and firmly believes in its ability to keep operations running smoothly. He understands the importance of taking a census, which the other boys recognize only after the little boy with the mulberry birthmark goes missing and they can’t determine how many other littluns were killed in the fire. Piggy’s glasses provide the spark for the signal fire, metaphorically demonstrating how intellect can spark great progress. The scholarly, sensible Piggy is a born administrator, one who understands how to categorize and effectively utilize information. He also shows surprising personal strength, both in his ability to tolerate the cruel taunts from the other boys, including his supposed friend Ralph, as well as in his willingness to voice the unpleasant truth about the likelihood of rescue.

However, despite these admirable qualities, Piggy is resoundingly unsuccessful on those few occasions in which he does attempt to lead. He stubbornly holds onto outdated customs, such as the use of the conch, long after Ralph and Jack realize that the shell no longer holds sway over the group. Piggy insists on the rules even when the rules are clearly irrelevant, and this stickler attitude, along with his constant speechmaking and self-righteous complaining, drives people away. Ralph and Jack intuitively know how to rally followers, while Piggy seems to repel them relentlessly. Piggy is so unsuccessful, in fact, that he ultimately dies in the act of trying to lead: He is crushed while waving the conch, fruitlessly ordering others to listen to him.

Piggy’s total lack of success in a leadership role suggests that there are significant differences between a “leader” and a “thinker.” Ralph has an aura of poise and capability that wins him trust. His authority is rooted in personality rather than innovation—he relies on Piggy for that—and he understands the importance of rhetoric in winning followers. For example, he speaks in the language of rescue, playing into the boys’ deepest hopes and fears to bolster his hold over them. Jack wields power effectively as well, and boys are drawn to his glamour and charisma. Jack’s leadership is rooted in intimidation, which appeals to the boys once the island turns savage. The boys’ negative reaction to Piggy’s physical unattractiveness emphasizes the role external personas play in establishing command; the boys’ don’t so much reject Piggy because he is ugly, but because he does not know how to play the role of a leader.

Piggy’s failure as a leader points to an important theme of the novel: the failure of civilization in the face of savagery. Piggy represents rationalism and discipline, the very qualities that Jack himself identifies as making “the English . . . the best at everything.” Despite Jack’s initial support of rules and regulations, however, The Lord of the Flies suggests that absent the structures of school, family, and government, which prop up civilization, human beings will always choose anarchy and hedonism over law and order. Piggy represents the wild boys’ strongest link to civilization: Once he is killed, the hope of regaining it is lost forever, and only chaos remains.

Lord of the Flies SparkNotes Literature Guide

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Lord of the Flies (Grades 9–1) York Notes GCSE Revision Guide

GCSE Study Notes and Revision Guides

Lord of the flies (grades 9–1) york notes, william golding, lord of the flies (grades 9–1) essay wizard.

Not sure how to write a fluent and structured Lord of the Flies (Grades 9–1) essay for your GCSEs ? Use this planning and writing tool to organise your key points effectively and build up evidence to support your views on Lord of the Flies (Grades 9–1). Express your ideas and boost your vocabulary with the helpful hints provided. When you are ready, you can save your Lord of the Flies (Grades 9–1) essay to your desktop to edit it further or print it out for homework or revision.

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Lord of the Flies (William Golding)

lord of the flies essay aqa

These pages look at William Golding's Lord of the Flies and provide revision notes about the key characters, island, symbols and the order versus the savagery.

  • Introduction
  • Key Characters
  • Key Literary Terms
  • Order v Savagery
  • Quotes (Lord of the Flies)
  • REVISION RESOURCES
  • Summary and Video

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GCSE English Literature AQA: Lord of the Flies (notes)

GCSE English Literature AQA: Lord of the Flies (notes)

Subject: English

Age range: 14-16

Resource type: Assessment and revision

Alicia's Shop

Last updated

13 May 2023

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lord of the flies essay aqa

A complete guide to Lord of the Flies by William Golding, suitable for GCSE students. Includes context, chapter summaries, character analysis and theme analysis. Covers all the AOs that are required of AQA and Edexcel. Useful for creating essay plans or revising for an overall understanding of the novel.

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GCSE English Literature AQA: Lord of the Flies (notes and essays)

A complete revision guide to **Lord of the Flies** suitable for GCSE students. Covers all characters and major themes, including context, language analysis and chapter summaries. Comes with a set of **13** essay plans for all **main characters and themes.** Highlighted to clearly show **Golding’s intentions, language analysis, context and quotations.** Suitable for **AQA or Edexcel.**

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Themes - AQA Evil in Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies contains themes which have fascinated mankind. Using a group of schoolboys as a society in miniature form, William Golding is able to examine just what it means to be human.

Evil in Lord of the Flies

The savage tribe

Although the boys in the novel come from a civilised background, it is not very long before the savagery inside them begins to take hold and drive events forward. From a group of playful schoolboys they become violent hunters, destroying their environment and killing their fellow human beings.

Golding had seen first-hand the evil that was unleashed by the Nazis in World War Two. As a teacher he also understood that without rules and civilising influences, a group of schoolboys would quickly revert to a primitive state.

How is the theme of evil shown in the novel?

In Lord of the Flies , William Golding examines evil from a number of angles. Some of the key aspects are:

  • increasing violence
  • the Lord of the Flies

Social and historical context

At the time when William Golding was writing Lord of the Flies , Britain was a very different society. Although World War Two had ended in 1945, the after-effects were still being felt. For instance, food rationing did not fully end until 1954, the year of the novel's publication. The war had ended with the dropping of two atomic bombs on Japan. The world then entered a period of uncertainty as various nations began to develop their own nuclear weapons and there was a constant dread that a nuclear war would break out. In Golding's novel he imagines that this terrible event has actually taken place and the boys who are being evacuated to safety are stranded after their plane crashes.

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Exploring the theme of evil in Lord of the Flies

Analysing the evidence

Roger gathered a handful of stones and began to throw them. Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in diameter, into which he dare not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life.

How does Golding foreshadow later events in the novel?

Show answer Hide answer

  • Roger is throwing stones in the direction of Henry rather than directly at him.
  • He is stopped from going any further at this point by the civilising influences with which he has grown up.
  • Later, as evil develops and civilisation is forgotten, he will have no such worries.
  • In an act of pure murder, Roger releases the rock which will kill Piggy.

Golding shows the reader that small and apparently unimportant acts of violence can eventually grow to become bigger and far more significant.

More guides on this topic

  • Plot summary - AQA
  • Characters - AQA
  • Form, structure and language - AQA
  • Sample exam question - AQA

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IMAGES

  1. AQA Lord of the Flies Ch4

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  2. Lord of the flies essay character comparison ralph vs jack

    lord of the flies essay aqa

  3. GCSE English Literature AQA: Lord of the Flies (essays)

    lord of the flies essay aqa

  4. Lord of the Flies Final Essay

    lord of the flies essay aqa

  5. Symbolism in Lord of the Flies: William Golding Essay Example

    lord of the flies essay aqa

  6. Lord Of The Flies

    lord of the flies essay aqa

VIDEO

  1. Lord of the Flies essay Roger conclusion

  2. Flies Of The Lord • 1

  3. Lord of the Flies Video Essay

  4. Lord Of The Flies Part 6

  5. Lord of the Flies essay outline

  6. Lord of the Flies essay Intro

COMMENTS

  1. AQA

    Assessment resources. Examiner report: Paper 1N The 19th-century novel - November 2021. Examiner report: Paper 1M Modern prose and drama - November 2021. Question paper (Modified A4 18pt): Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021. Question paper (Modified A3 36pt): Paper 1P Poetry anthology - November 2021.

  2. Lord of the Flies

    3. Modern Texts The Lord of the Flies: Overview Lord of the Flies is Section A of Paper 2 of your GCSE English Literature examination. You are expected to write one essay-length answer to one set question (from a choice of two) and, unlike with the Shakespeare and 19th-century novel questions, you will not be given an extract from the text.

  3. PDF Gcse English Literature

    Lord of the Flies ' 13 - 14 1 3 AQA Anthology ' Telling Tales ' 15 - 16 14 George Orwell ' Animal Farm ' 17 - 18 1 5 Kazuo Ishiguro ' Never Let Me Go ' 19 - 20 1 6 Meera Syal ' Anita and Me ' 21 - 22 1 7 Stephen Kelman ' Pigeon English 23 - 24 18

  4. Lord of the Flies: Context

    Golding wrote Lord of the Flies during the Cold War The Cold War was a rivalry between the Soviet Union and the West, and can be seen as a war between two very different styles of government: The West championed democracy and free speech The Soviet Union was seen by the West as authoritarian and autocratic

  5. Lord of the Flies: Writer's Methods and Techniques

    AQA GCSE English Literature Revision Notes GCSE English Literature AQA Revision Notes 3. Modern Texts Lord of the Flies Lord of the Flies: Writer's Methods and Techniques Lord of the Flies: Writer's Methods and Techniques Writer's Methods and Techniques The best responses at GCSE don't limit their analysis to individual words and phrases.

  6. Lord of the Flies

    AQA Lord of the Flies Part of English Literature Lord of the Flies Plot summary - AQA Lord of the Flies by William Golding looks at the dark side of humanity as a group of boys turn...

  7. GCSE English Literature AQA: Lord of the Flies (essays)

    Subject: English Age range: 14-16 Resource type: Assessment and revision File previews pdf, 359.11 KB A collection of 13 essay plans covering the main characters and themes of Lord of the Flies. Suitable for GCSE students. Organised into distinct paragraphs with language analysis, context, quotations and author's intentions highlighted clearly.

  8. Themes

    Three main ones are: evil power the island Social and historical context In his first novel, Lord of the Flies, William Golding examined themes which he would return to again and again...

  9. Sample exam question

    Lord of the Flies - Analysing the extract Take a look at a sample exam question and answers for William Golding's Lord of the Flies with BBC Bitesize GCSE English Literature (AQA).

  10. How to Write a Grade 9 GCSE Literature Essay: AQA 2018 Past ...

    Tutoring with Gavin 6.47K subscribers 4.6K views 2 years ago How to write a grade 9 GCSE Literature essay This video on how Simon is presented in Lord of The Flies by William Golding provides...

  11. Sample Essay

    Sample Essay . Quick revise. How does William Golding set the scene for the novel in the opening chapter? The opening chapter of 'Lord of the Flies' is very effective in laying the foundation for the rest of the plot. Characters become instantly recognizable and significant. The surroundings around the characters become very clear and leave ...

  12. Lord of the Flies: A+ Student Essay: Would Piggy Have Made a Good

    Lord of the Flies Questions & Answers What is the conch and what does it symbolize? How does Simon die? Why does Jack start his own tribe? Do the boys get rescued from the island? Why is Ralph chosen to be the chief? Why does Jack think he should be the chief? Why are Piggy's glasses important? Who is the first boy to die on the island?

  13. Lord of the Flies: Themes

    Perhaps the central concern of Lord of the Flies is a question: is it more natural for human beings to work together and create a community (civilisation), or do people naturally tend towards their individualistic impulses (savagery)? Knowledge and evidence:

  14. Lord of the Flies (Grades 9-1) GCSE Essay Writing Wizard

    When you are ready, you can save your Lord of the Flies (Grades 9-1) essay to your desktop to edit it further or print it out for homework or revision. Your free preview of York Notes Plus+ 'Lord of the Flies (Grades 9-1)' has expired. ... AQA GCSE 9-1 ... A Christmas Carol: AQA Rapid ... A Christmas Carol: AQA Rapid ... A Doll's House: A ...

  15. Full Scheme of Work: Lord of the Flies AQA GCSE

    Full Scheme of Work: Lord of the Flies AQA GCSE Subject: English Age range: 14-16 Resource type: Unit of work This resource contains a full scheme of work for the Lord of the Flies AQA English Literature GCSE.

  16. Sample exam question

    Sample answer 1 Ralph has a realisation at this point in the book. His realisation is that the boys have done terrible things such as kill Simon and set fire to the island. The writer uses a simile...

  17. Lord of the Flies (William Golding)

    These pages look at William Golding's Lord of the Flies and provide revision notes about the key characters, island, symbols and the order versus the savagery. Introduction. Key Characters. Key Literary Terms. Order v Savagery.

  18. GCSE English Literature AQA: Lord of the Flies (notes)

    Subject: English Age range: 14-16 Resource type: Assessment and revision File previews pdf, 632.25 KB A complete guide to Lord of the Flies by William Golding, suitable for GCSE students. Includes context, chapter summaries, character analysis and theme analysis. Covers all the AOs that are required of AQA and Edexcel.

  19. Lord of the Flies: Plot Summary

    Overview Lord of the Flies is a 1954 novel by English author, and former schoolteacher, William Golding. The novel is set in the midst of a worldwide nuclear war on a deserted island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

  20. Lord of the Flies Essay

    3 Pages • Essays / Projects • Year Uploaded: 2021. A full essay discussing the idea that William Golding presents a depressing view of human society and civilisation in LOTF.

  21. Lord of the Flies: Key Quotations

    In Lord of the Flies, meetings and rules symbolise society: Meetings and rules also represent an attempt to create a community with shared values: Paired quotations: "Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Spill her blood." - The hunters, Chapter 4 "At once the crowd surged after it, poured down the rock, leapt on to the beast, screamed, struck, bit, tore."

  22. Themes

    03:43 Exploring the theme of evil in Lord of the Flies Analysing the evidence Roger gathered a handful of stones and began to throw them. Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in...

  23. Lord of the Flies: Characters

    Piggy. In Lord of the Flies, Golding uses Piggy to represent reason and rational thinking: He is the most intelligent of all the boys. He is behind many of the group's innovations and ideas: It is his idea to use the conch shell in meetings. It is his idea to first create shelters.