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How to write a personal statement for nursing school.

sample personal statement nursing

Reviewed by:

Jonathan Preminger

Former Admissions Committee Member, Hofstra-Northwell School of Medicine

Reviewed: 6/19/23

Writing a personal statement for nursing school can be a daunting task, but we’re here to help! Here’s everything you need to know about writing a personal statement for nursing school.

Writing your personal statement is a nerve-wracking experience, no matter what program you’re applying for . You may be wondering: “what are nursing schools looking for in a personal statement?” or, “how can I make my personal statement for nursing school stand out?” Lucky for you, we’ve got some answers. 

Here we’ll cover everything you need to know about writing a personal statement for nursing school. We’ve included a breakdown of the components to include, examples of nursing school personal statements, and tips to improve your own. 

Let’s get started!

Students practicing to write a personal statement for nursing school

Get The Ultimate Guide on Writing an Unforgettable Personal Statement

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What Is a Nursing School Personal Statement?

When applying to nursing schools , you’ll most likely notice that most applications require a personal statement. A personal statement is a short essay, typically no longer than two pages, that tells your target schools a little bit about who you are. 

Each school has different expectations for the length and contents of your personal statement, so make sure to check the specific requirements of your target schools. Some common topics include your personal goals for nursing school and why you want to become a nurse.

Nursing School Personal Statement Format

Before writing your personal statement for nursing school, you should plan out what you want to include. If your school does not ask you to answer a specific question with your essay, here is a list of what you should include in your nursing school personal statement.

An Introduction

The introductory paragraph should focus on what brought you to this point. Your school primarily wants to get to know you as a candidate through your personal statement. Your intro should include things like:

  • How you first became interested in nursing
  • What inspires you about becoming a nurse
  • What you intend to achieve through a nursing degree

In this paragraph, your main goal is to introduce yourself and give the admissions committee a bit of background on your passion for nursing. Perhaps you have a family member who inspired you to pursue nursing, you grew up near a hospital, or you’ve struggled with health issues yourself - these are all great examples of an origin story. 

Think to yourself: “If my journey into nursing school was a movie, how would it begin?”

Body Paragraph(s)

In the body paragraph(s) of your nursing school personal statement, you can include a bit about your achievements. However, this isn’t the place to simply list your achievements. 

Think about how your experiences helped you to develop skills for nursing school . Include things like:

  • How you’ve furthered your interest in nursing through experience (both in and out of school)
  • How your achievements make you a good fit for the program
  • Specific things about the program that interests you

The body portion of your essay should contain the majority of the information you want to include. Make sure to only include accomplishments if they help to explain how you’ll contribute to the program. Your CV will list any other achievements that don’t come into play here.

A Strong Conclusion

Your personal statement should end on a positive note. Think about summarizing your statement by looking toward the future. Include things like:

  • Your future ambitions following nursing school
  • What you’ll be able to contribute to the program 

The end of your body paragraph(s) should mention what you hope to achieve in the future with your nursing degree and lead into your conclusion. The final sentences of your personal statement should further state your passion for your program and how you’ll be a great fit at your target school. 

What Not to Write in a Personal Statement for Nursing School

Before getting into our tips and examples, let’s go over what not to include in your personal statement for nursing school. Here are some common mistakes to avoid when crafting your personal statement. 

Keep it Simple

Your personal statement should be authentic and genuine, but make sure to keep the brief in mind while you’re writing. As mentioned above, a personal statement is typically no longer than two pages in length. 

You should absolutely include some personal anecdotes; in fact, we encourage it! Just make sure to stick to the relevant parts of your story and not to elaborate too much on areas that are not relevant to your application. 

Do Not Reiterate Your CV

Your personal statement is an essay, not a resume. Keep in mind that your application already contains all of your achievements on your CV, transcripts, and other application materials. 

Your personal statement is about understanding your passion and motivations. You can use examples from your CV to further assert your interest in the program, but only if you can elaborate on how they’ve specifically helped you on your journey to nursing school. 

Tips for Writing a Stellar Nursing Personal Statement

Let’s go over a few tips on how you can improve your personal statement. Using these tips can help to make your personal statement and essays for your nursing school application stand out while remaining authentic and genuine. 

Create A Timeline

When writing your personal statement, your focus should be on telling your story. Creating a clear timeline of events can help to effectively tell the story of how you decided to apply for nursing. 

Start with how you became interested in nursing, develop your story with experiences that have cultivated your knowledge, and conclude by talking about your program and your future goals. A timeline will make your essay easy to read and give the admissions committee a good idea of your journey so far.

Stick To the Brief

If your target school(s) give you a specific prompt for your personal statement, make sure to refer back to the prompt while writing your essay to ensure you’re staying on track. 

For example, if your prompt asks you a question, be sure to answer the question at the beginning, the end, and throughout your essay. Your personal statement shouldn’t be vague or veer too far off course. 

Speak From the Heart

It is crucial in your nursing personal statement to share what makes you unique . This is your chance to show the admissions committee why you’d be a perfect fit in their program and demonstrate what you bring to the table. 

Include genuine experiences that have pushed you toward nursing throughout your life. Conveying your passions and motivations is critical in your personal statement for nursing school.

Do Your Research 

One great way to make your nursing personal statement stand out is to do thorough research on your program and include it in your piece. Showing your passion for the specific program. you’re applying to can give you an edge over others and impress the admissions committee. 

When you include your research, be sure to add it organically into your writing. Use your research as a way to connect your personal experiences to the program rather than simply listing information.

Nursing School Personal Statement Examples

Here are two nursing personal statement examples that were written successfully. We’ve also included explanations of how they are good examples to help you improve your own personal statement. 

*Important note: Do not use our samples in your nursing school application. These examples are meant to serve as a guide when crafting your own original personal statement for nursing school. 

Example #1: Indeed ’s Nursing School Personal Statement Sample

“I walked backward down the hill, my arms supporting the weight of the wheelchair as its wheels rolled slowly in reverse. Sunlight danced through the trees around us and shone in my grandmother's hair as she sat inside the wheelchair. I couldn't see my grandmother's face from that angle, but I could hear her laughing with joy as she enjoyed the outdoors for the first time in weeks. My grandmother came to live with my family two years ago after breaking her hip. Although she completed much of her recovery at our home, Nurse George came by every day to perform my grandmother's personal care tasks, monitor her vital signs and assist with her physical therapy exercises. George also taught me some basic patient care practices, such as how to support a wheelchair correctly while going downhill. I had never considered a career in nursing before, but George helped me see the rewards of helping people with their medical conditions and injuries. I am excited by this opportunity to apply to Fern Hill's College of Nursing because I appreciate your program's specialization in rehabilitation nursing. Being a part of my grandmother's recovery team has inspired me to pursue a nursing career that helps patients recover from injuries or medical conditions. I believe that your school's emphasis on assisting patients in regaining their independent skills can help me achieve these professional aspirations. Since realizing that I want to become a nurse, I have become a regular volunteer at Jefferson Rehabilitation Center. I mentor young people struggling with drug addictions and provide childcare for the children of rehabilitation patients. There is no feeling comparable to when a mentee or outgoing patient offers you a sincere "thank you." I can no longer imagine pursuing a career where I do not get to help people overcome their challenges and navigate their way to recovery. My experiences helping my grandmother and patients at Jefferson have taught me the value of empathy and communication. Frequently, my mentees simply want someone to listen to them. I do my best to give them a judgment-free space in which to share their stories. Whether the medical issue is emotional or physical, patients appreciate working with flexible and considerate people. I believe I embody these qualities by actively listening and letting patients talk at their own pace. I am ready to pursue a nursing career and learn about helping patients in a more professional and technical capacity. Fern Hill's College of Nursing is the ideal place to prepare for my future nursing career.”

Why this is a good example: In this example, the writer has done an excellent job of telling the story of how they became interested in nursing. They also develop a clear timeline of events from when they first thought about nursing to how they began developing their skills through volunteering. 

Most importantly, the candidate mentions specific reasons why they’re interested in the program and how they feel they can contribute to the school and field. 

Example #2: Johns Hopkins University Nursing Personal Statement Sample

“I grew up close to a hospital, where I watched patients go through the double doors for a variety of ailments. From a young age, this drove me to develop a strong interest in the field of medicine. I knew that I wanted to pursue a career in the future that would allow me to take care of those in need. Through my courses in the natural sciences as well as social studies, I have continued to develop my knowledge in the field in order to be ready to continue my education. Now, I am ready to take the next step in my education by applying for the Nursing program at Johns Hopkins University.  Three years ago I completed a nursing shadowing internship that opened my eyes to many of the daily struggles of being a nurse. During my time in the clinic and on the wards, I had the opportunity to work In the critical care and trauma ward as well as In obstetrics and geriatrics. These various experiences showed me the diverse role that nurses play in a healthcare setting, and emphasized the importance of empathy and dedication to patient care.  Johns Hopkins University Is known worldwide for its focus on patient wellness and medical research. As a nursing student at Hopkins, I hope to not only further the institution's goal of providing exceptional patient care, but also to assist with the many clinical trials ongoing at the hospital that pave the way for new treatments. Through hands-on training with knowledgeable staff, I know that I will be able to make the most of my nursing training at Johns Hopkins and become a nursing professional that is capable of enhancing patient wellness in a healthcare setting.”

Why this is a good example: In this example, the writer develops a clear timeline and clearly defines their relevant information. The writer covers when they first became interested in nursing, courses they’ve taken, and what experiences have made them get serious about the profession. 

Finally, they include why they are specifically interested in the program at Johns Hopkins and conclude by adding what they will add to the program as a student.

FAQs: How to Write a Personal Statement for Nursing School

Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about nursing school personal statements. 

1. Do All Nursing Schools Require A Personal Statement?

Almost all nursing schools require a personal statement, which can typically be described as a short essay (2 pages or less) that explains who you are and why you want to attend the school’s nursing program.

2. Is a Personal Statement for Nursing School an Essay?

Yes, a personal statement is a short essay that briefly describes your past, present, and future experiences in relation to nursing.

3. How Long Should A Nursing Personal Statement Be?

Each nursing school has different length requirements, which can typically be found in the prompt. If no length is specified, two pages or less is recommended. 

4. What Should I Include In My Nursing School Personal Statement?

Your nursing personal statement should include:

  • Why you want to become a nurse
  • What inspires you about nursing
  • Elaborate on the experiences you’ve had that have taught you about nursing
  • Program-specific reasons for your interest in the school
  • How you intend to contribute to the program and the field of nursing

If your school’s personal statement asks a specific question, that question should be answered throughout your essay. 

5. Does Nursing Require Essays?

Yes, most nursing program applications require personal statement essays, and some require secondary (or supplemental) essays as well.

6. When Should I Write My Personal Statement for Nursing School?

You should begin writing your personal statement(s) for nursing school as soon as you receive the prompt. Make sure to give yourself an adequate amount of time to complete all sections of your application before the deadline.

7. How do you Start a Personal Statement for Nursing School?

To start a compelling nursing personal statement, there are a few different writing techniques you can use. You can start by introducing yourself, start by talking about how you became interested in nursing, or you can start “in the action” by cutting right into your story. 

Final Thoughts

Your personal statement for nursing school should be genuine, heartfelt, and express how you will make an excellent addition to your target school’s nursing program through a series of examples. 

Each personal statement you write should be adjusted to suit the individual program you are applying for. Sending a general personal statement with every application you submit is impersonal and not recommended. Make sure to follow your brief closely and map out your essay before writing it to ensure you include all of the relevant information. 

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The College Application

How to Write the Nursing School Personal Statement: Steps, Tips, And Samples

A smiling nurse with a stethoscope around her neck. Her nursing school personal statement was accepted when she applied into a nursing program.

Introduction

A nursing career allows individuals to help patients in a nurturing environment, and to find their existential fulfillment. As a result, many learners decide to pursue a career in the field, and you are one of these individuals!

Eager to receive an acceptance letter? You know that you’ll need to submit the application material in a timely fashion, and part of that process involves crafting a stellar personal statement for nursing school.

According to a  report by CNN , many applicants are rejected from nursing schools, unfortunately. Even when you feel that you have solid writing skills, you must hone these talents and gear them specifically toward that nursing school personal statement.

After all, you are looking to boost your chances of acceptance. Following a process and learning key pointers about this essay will help you to succeed.

Preparatory Work

Don’t simply sit down at the computer and start clicking away on the keyboard. Crafting a compelling personal statement for your target nursing school involves a significant amount of preparatory work. As seasoned writers know, the art of writing is a process.

Step 1: Research the Schools

Each school is going to have its unique requirements, and you want to know what those requirements are. Researching different programs serves multiple purposes. For example, you can start to rank the programs in order of your preference. Secondly, you get to determine what schools are reach schools and which institutions are your safety schools.

This process will also help you to get a sense of how competitive your personal statement should be. The best According to a ranking of  2023 Best Colleges for Nursing in America , the University of Pennsylvania, Emory University, and Duke University are listed as the top three.

If you’re applying to one of those institutions, you should go through your personal statement with a fine-tooth comb!

Step 2: Write Freely

At some point in your educational career, you’ve likely been asked to write freely about a topic. As you start seeing the prompts from different nursing programs, feel free to type your ideas, preferably, in a word-processing program on your computer.

You could challenge yourself to address one or more of the following prompts:

  • What was your reason for choosing nursing as a career? Do you have any additional information that you would like the admissions committee to know about you that has not been previously considered in the application? (2000 characters)
  • Discuss your interest and understanding of the clinical nurse leader role.   What experiences have contributed to your interest?  (2000 characters)
  • The goal of the Doctor of Nursing Program is to prepare nurse leaders at the highest level of nursing practice to improve patient outcomes and translate research into practice.  Describe experiences that exhibit your leadership skills. (2000 characters)
  • Discuss the clinical specialty area you are interested in pursuing. What experiences have contributed to your interest? (2000 characters)
  • Discuss a population of interest in your work setting. What experiences have you had with this population? What health care needs do you see in this target group? (2000 characters)

Check out more  nursing school personal statement questions .

While the schools to which you are applying might not ask the exact questions, you have at least started to get your creativity flowing in terms of what you might write.

Step 3: Talk to an Admissions Counselor

As you’re narrowing down your choice of nursing schools, consider scheduling an appointment with an admissions counselor. Aim to schedule an on-campus appointment if possible as this gives you a real feel of the school environment. Where it is impossible to get one, as with the current Covid-19 pandemic, consider a virtual or telephone appointment.

An admissions counselor will provide you with guidance that is specific to their nursing school’s acceptable personal statement. In other words, different schools have varying expectations. While the admissions counselor may not answer all your questions, you still have a chance to receive valuable insight.

Step 4: Review Genre Conventions

Whether you applying at the undergraduate level or graduate level, you are already familiar with certain genre conventions. What you must recognize is that a personal statement can be quite different from other academic pieces that you have done. Penn State offers some great pointers on  elements that characterize a personal statement .

For example, you might think that a personal statement needs to follow a five-paragraph format with a thesis statement as the last sentence of the introduction. While some personal statements take on this format, others employ a more reflective structure.

Step 5: Thoroughly Check Requirements

You want to make sure you know exactly how many nursing school personal statements you have to write for your application and what the requirements are for each one. Take an example from medical school. When students apply to medical school, they typically have to write one larger essay followed by several shorter ones.

Knowing the expectations of the specific programs to which you are applying can help you budget your time appropriately. Pay close attention to deadlines as well. Submitting an application after the posted deadline is a sure way to seriously lower your odds of getting admitted.

The Writing Process

Once you have completed the research phase and gathered preliminary information, you may think that you’re ready to craft the final version of your essay. However, writing is an intricate process. Allowing yourself adequate time to go through this process will heighten your chances of drafting a captivating essay.

Step 1: Print or Write down the Prompt

You must adhere to the prompt. Period. Keep in mind how crucial it is to follow protocols in the field of nursing. If you cannot follow the guidelines for a nursing school personal statement, the admissions committee may doubt your abilities in the field.

Printing out the prompt or jotting it down is quite useful because you can visually assess if you have checked off all of the requirements. Pay attention to how the prompt is worded. Further, note any length requirements; you may have to write at least a certain number of words or ensure that your essay does not exceed a specified number of characters.

When essays have character limits, make sure to find out if the character limit includes or excludes spaces. As you go through the writing process, you can check off each requirement on the prompt.

Step 2: Use a Brainstorming Strategy

I am confident you have great brainstorming techniques up your sleeves. If not, The Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers some very handy  brainstorming techniques  that you could use.

Try to resist the urge to skip right ahead to the full first draft. Brainstorming allows you to get your ideas out. For example, you might look at the prompt and make a list of whatever ideas comes to your mind. You don’t need to worry about organizing them or fully developing the content yet. You could also craft a formal outline as you brainstorm ideas. See which strategy works best for you.

Some writers like to use the actual writing out of sentences as a brainstorming technique. With this approach, you could just write or type whatever ideas come to mind. Setting a timer for this activity is useful. Then, you can go back in to shape your ideas.

Step 3: Craft the First Draft

Writing can be intimidating. You might feel as though you are totally committing to whatever words you put on paper. But the drafting process helps to overcome this anxiety. Sitting down to write the first draft means that you know you will make changes. As a result, you do not feel as pressured.

For some, writing is an enjoyable process; for others, just the thought alone is enough stress and a nuisance. If you fall into the latter group, budget your time. You could allocate an hour each day for a week to put together the first draft. This strategy works even when you love writing.

Step 4: Start with What You Know

Many writers become so concerned with the first sentence of their introduction that they end up losing valuable ideas for the rest of the essay. For example, imagine that you have four main ideas that you would like to explore in your nursing school personal statement. Your natural inclination might be to write about the experience that happened earliest chronologically before you tackle the others.

Consider the fact that you might feel more comfortable writing about the second or third chronological experience instead. Start with those paragraphs. You can then build the essay around them. Getting started is often the most difficult part of a writing project, so starting with what you know can help to inspire the rest of the piece.

Step 5: Prioritize Higher-Order Issues

In writing, topics such as organization, addressing the prompt, and developing ideas are often considered more important than issues like grammar and spelling. Of course, you want to present polished grammar and proper sentence structure in your nursing personal statement, but these issues are less important in your first draft.

When you are creating your first draft, pay attention to the content. Work to get the paragraphs into reasonable order, and aim to develop your ideas as much as you can. You will worry about the grammar, sentence structure, and proofreading issues when you go to revise.

Step 6: Put the Essay Aside

As mentioned earlier, planning your time is vital when it comes to the writing process. Therefore, as unorthodox as it may sound, you need to disconnect yourself from the work for quite some time before reviewing. Putting your work away for at least a day is a smart move. By doing so, you have the proper amount of time to really assess the changes that you want to make.

It’s tempting to immediately go into your paper to revise after writing the first draft, and this urge is particularly strong when the deadline is soon. You might miss important information though. Waiting allows you to recall more important details that you want to be included in the essay. Taking a break from your personal statement allows you that necessary mental space to potentially come up with fresh ideas.

Removing yourself from the project for some time also helps with editing. When you are first writing, you may include some unnecessary details about events related to nursing or your reasons for becoming a nurse. These details may be important to you, but they might not be important for your essay. Putting your work aside for some time will help you gain that perspective.

Besides, picking up on proofreading and editing errors is difficult when you have just written the paper. Your mind is likely to read the work as though it is correct because you just wrote it and you know what the text is supposed to say.

When you come back to read the text later, you are likely to catch these mistakes. For some, printing out the essay and editing it by hand seems to work great. Make sure to read the text out loud to catch errors. In other words, you may hear issues more readily than you see them.

Step 7: Visit a Writing Center

If available to you, a writing center is extremely valuable. Ben Rafoth in  Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing  explains  why writing centers are so valuable.  The main idea here is that you get the chance to review the work with a tutor. Having the insight of a professional or a peer on your work is crucial.

Writing centers function in a variety of ways. Some tutors may require students to read their papers aloud while others might make markings on the student’s paper. If you are already a student at a college, you likely have access to a writing center right on campus.

If you do not, ask a few people to read over and review your essay ( me shamelessly plugging in our services page here 🤦). Sharing your work with others might feel frightening, but keep in mind that an outside reader can offer you important insights.

Step 8: Revise and Revise Some More

One round of revisions is typically not enough for an important piece of writing. You want to make sure that your personal statement for your target nursing school is as polished as it gets. Now you will have to decide how many times is enough revision.

But as a rule of thumb, aim for at least 3 rounds of revisions. As you go through each essay each round, you will likely notice grammar and sentence-level issues that need fixing. At some point, however, you will feel confident with your paper. Then, you are ready to submit the document.

Related: 8 Best TEAS Prep Courses Today, According to Nursing Students

Topics and Approaches to Consider

In addition to allowing your writing to develop over time, you also need to make sure you are selecting appropriate content. But remember, you must always strive to address the specific prompt from your target nursing program. Consider the following clever tips to make your writing shine:

Tip 1: Start with an Anecdote

You want to grab the attention of your readers at the beginning of your nursing school personal statement. Beginning with an authentic anecdote is one way to do so. For example, you might bring in a specific experience that encouraged you to want to become a nurse or a situation that had a profound influence on your life.

Remember the importance of authenticity when taking this approach. You might feel like you need to manipulate the experience to make it sound more dramatic than it was. However, bear in mind that a commitment to honesty is imperative to your nursing goals.

As a word of caution, the admissions team has quite possibly read numerous nursing personal statements in the past, which means they can sniff out your inauthenticity from a mile away! You do not want that, now do you?

Tip 2: Talk about Yourself

Many students fall into the trap of talking about other people more than they discuss themselves. You might have a profound story about how a medical situation with one of your grandparents inspired you to become a nurse, or you might want to share details about an internship that you had with a particular nurse.

What you do not want to do is end up writing more about your grandparent or the nurse with whom you worked than you do about yourself.

While these individuals may very well have played a crucial role in your decision to pursue a nursing career, they are not the ones applying to a nursing school. You are essentially trying to sell yourself to the admissions committee. Talk about how these experiences shaped you and what you learned from the situations. Keep the focus on yourself.

Tip 3: Discuss the Target School

Chances are that you are applying to multiple nursing programs. If you are thinking of applying to only one program, casting your net wider is definitely wiser. After all, you don’t know for certain that you will gain admittance into your program of choice. When you apply to different schools, you should tailor the personal statement to each institution.

It’s quite possible that each school will ask you a similar question or that the prompts will resemble each other. While you might be compelled to do a one-size-fits-all personal statement for each of the nursing schools, that would be a sure recipe to get a rejection letter. The writing will sound as though it has been repurposed.

The admissions committee wants to see why you are a good fit for that specific school, not simply nursing schools in general. Now, of course, you can potentially use the same base. For example, you might want to share the same volunteer experiences or internship experiences with each school. However, you should have a section that is thoughtfully tailored to the individual school.

Incorporate specific details about the school that show why you want to go there. You could highlight particular classes that interest you or discuss a few of your role models who are that school’s alumni- basically, anything that, without a doubt, demonstrates that your essay is intended for the specific school.

Take a look at the following excerpt from an actual personal statement. While it is not for a nursing application, it should elaborate on the point.

“RIT is an excellent choice for me because it has successfully carved out a reputation for itself as a leading technology university. The availability of top-notch facilities, like the Simone Center for Student Innovation and RIT Venture creations Incubator, continue to set the university apart from its peers. As a result, the university sports a vibrant entrepreneurial culture that is leveraged on technology to inspire learners to identify problems that require innovative solutions. Importantly, I believe the MS TIME program will enable me to experience entrepreneurship in a reimagined way, like never before.”

Tip 4: Know What to Avoid

You already know that you should avoid manipulating personal stories and writing generic essays. You should also avoid begging for admission into the school. Further, avoid integrating clichés into your writing. Instead, look for personal ways to convey your ideas instead of simply regurgitating.

Avoid plagiarism as it can affect you professionally. Running your work through a  plagiarism checker  will weed out accidental plagiarism. When you read samples, you absolutely must not copy them.

Nursing School Personal Statement Examples

How about we examine (and comment on) some excerpts from samples of personal statements- to give you a general idea and hopefully get you started. Ready? Let’s go!

“Nursing is a very versatile field and the subjects I am currently studying have many links with adult nursing. Studying psychology has made me aware that the mental health of a patient is just as important as their physical well-being. I have learnt that the brain and the body are never in harmony, which can explain why we are such a diverse species in the way we act, or the beliefs we hold…”

– Read the rest  here

Commentary : The student does a splendid job of connecting his educational experience to the nursing field. He might want to watch for absolutes, such as the word “never.” But as long as you can back up your assertion, you are free to say what’s on your mind. The student should, however, break down this wall of text into two separate paragraphs, for readability purposes.

“After a series of illnesses and injuries during my early childhood, I was introduced to the role and care of Nurses. It was from here I became fascinated and realised this could be a satisfying future outlet for my empathetic self. I feel that nurses are truly inspirational professionals. They provide an inestimable service to society whilst working in a highly demanding and very challenging career, assisting individuals and their families through difficult times when they are at their most vulnerable. I feel I am ready to embark on this career and start to fulfill this ambition of mine to become a children’s nurse.

I believe nursing is a career in which I will excel because of my compassion for those who are at their most vulnerable. My ability to empathise with individuals would provide a positive nurse and patient relationship, putting the child and family at ease, allowing the family to approach me for support and guidance and therefore meet specific needs of the child and their family. Self-confidence is something I consider to be highly important within a nursing career. Having self-belief when working under pressure and in stressful situations is crucial when ensuring high quality care is delivered. Nursing can be a stressful career where traumatic situations are common…”

Commentary : This is an excellent example of how to start a personal statement for nursing school, and transition effortlessly from the introductory paragraph to the next. The student here clearly connects her experiences as a child to her desire to be a children’s nurse. And just from reading this sample, you feel she is well qualified for admission!

“I want to be a nurse to do something worthwhile with my career, I don’t want to waste my days working behind a computer, I want to be a nurse to utilise all of the best parts of my character…”

– Read the rest  here

Commentary : What’s useful here is that the student speaks with confidence. He seems to have a pretty clear direction from the start. However, the writing does contain comma splices, which is a grammar mistake. While the word “something” is vague, it wouldn’t be if the student elaborated on the same paragraph or the next one.

Also, the student here could better consider the audience. In this case, the audience might consist of admission committee members who work on a computer all day, and they might feel a little offended from reading the first line. Even if their personal feelings aren’t supposed to come into play when assessing the essay, the readers are likely not going into the rest of the essay brimming with enthusiasm.

In addition, the student should consider improving the opening line by focusing more on his specific goals and by eliminating information that could potentially alienate the audience.

“My motivation towards nursing did not emanate from anywhere. I relate it to the experiences that I have had since I was young. As I reflect on my life back, I remember that I grew in a family where my father and mother were nurses in the nearby hospital. I witnessed the care and love they extended to the infirm, some of who came to the hospital in dire conditions. As we lived in the staff quarters, I got a chance to sneak to my father’s office and saw how he handled the patients of different ages. I was encouraged to see him listen and take the history of every patient, something that enabled him to make an accurate treatment decision. since then, I wanted to extend the good works that I witnessed with my immediate parents…”

Commentary : This student does not have very advanced writing skills, which is why you can see her commit some grammar mistakes. For example, she ought to write “sneak into” instead of “sneak to”. However, she does a great job demonstrating how her past has led her to want to pursue a career in nursing. Do not be afraid to tell such a story on your nursing school personal statement. Just don’t dwell too much on it. And ensure the story is legit.

Writing a personal statement might seem like an overwhelming endeavor. After all, you do have to take several steps before you are ready to submit a polished essay and hopefully get accepted into your program of choice.

Keep in mind that your efforts will be worth it. Obviously, other aspects of your application come into play- Factors such as your GPA, recommendation letter, etc.

However, it is on your nursing school personal statement that you have the chance to really  craft your story how you deem fit  and showcase yourself in the best possible light. By putting the necessary time and effort into it, you could find yourself studying to become a nurse when the next semester begins.

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Tips for Writing a Great Nursing Personal Statement

When preparing to apply to a graduate nursing program, there are many requirements and submission guidelines to remember. The component that allows you to tell your unique story — your personal statement — is one of the most important.

Writing a compelling personal statement for an MSN program, like the Nursing@Simmons online  Family Nurse Practitioner  (FNP)  or Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner programs, takes time and can be challenging for some applicants. Just as a poorly written essay can hinder your chances of acceptance, a great one can set you apart from other applicants. Below are three steps to writing a personal statement that will make a positive impression on any admissions committee.

sample personal statement nursing

1. Plan Your Story

Very few people can sit down at a keyboard and craft the perfect personal statement without preparation. It may take several weeks of thinking about how to communicate your story, so give yourself plenty of time to plan, jot down thoughts, and make an outline as ideas come to you. Use the following tips to gather the information you’ll need to create an excellent statement.

  • Consider how your work experience as a registered nurse (RN) has influenced you and shaped your goals for the future.  How will an advanced education promote your professional growth and help you transition into the role of an FNP or PMHNP?
  • Think beyond your resume.  What traits, strengths, and accomplishments aren’t captured there? Consider your interests, including how they will contribute to your success in the program. Provide examples of nursing goals, leadership, mentorship, or growth you have accomplished or experienced. Write these down and keep them in mind as you begin your draft.
  • Choose appropriate topics for your statement.  Avoid soapbox issues, and don’t preach to your reader. This kind of statement can come across as condescending and obscure the point you’re trying to make.
  • Research the program.  Make sure you understand the school’s values and reputation. Do they align with yours? How so?

sample personal statement nursing

2. Create Your Draft

  • When it is time to start putting your thoughts on paper, try to avoid overthinking your work.  Strive for a natural voice. Pretend you are talking to a friend and write without fear — you can edit and polish your piece to perfection in the next stage.
  • Avoid cliches and nursing generalities.  Generic descriptors, such as “caring,” “compassionate,” “people person,” and “unique,” have been so often overused that they no longer carry much weight with an admissions committee. They also don’t address your personal experience in the nursing sphere. Try not to start your story with phrases like “for as long as I can remember” or your audience may stop reading.
  • Show, don’t tell.  Strong storytelling is grounded in personal details that illustrate who you are, both as a nurse and a person. Be specific by describing how many patients you managed, how you earned promotions, or a time when your supervisor praised your professionalism and clinical abilities. Here are examples that illustrate the difference between telling and showing: 

“I perform well under pressure.”

“Although my patient arrived for a different ailment, I suspected that her symptoms were consistent with a serious infection. As a result, I was able to advocate for a care plan that prevented further damage.”

  • Use specific examples when talking about your experience with direct patient care and evidence-based practice.  Provide details about how your clinical experiences have demonstrated patient advocacy, leadership, communication, or confidence.
  • Discuss how earning a  Master of Science in Nursing  aligns with your career plans and why you want to become a FNP  or PMHNP .  Explain that you understand the commitment required and that you have the skills and dedication to become an FNP   or PMHNP. Be sure to let the admissions committee know why you are choosing their program and what makes their program stand apart from the rest. Reflect on the school and program research you did during your planning stage.

sample personal statement nursing

3. Edit and Perfect

Even the best writers have to edit and polish their work. Reviewing and revising your personal statement ensures that the piece is clear, organized, and free of errors.

  • Once you have written your first draft, take a break and distance yourself from your work.  This will allow you to return to the draft with a clear head to review objectively and spot potential issues and errors.
  • Read your statement aloud.  Does it sound like you? Does it reflect your best qualities and the strengths you’ll bring to a nursing program?
  • Always use spell check on your essay, but be careful as it won’t catch every spelling error.
  • Use a grammar editing tool, such as  Grammarly .
  • Ask a friend, family member, or mentor to review your statement. This is a great way to catch errors or awkward phrasing that you may have missed.

Your nursing personal statement should be a window into your life. Use it to share specific experiences that have influenced your decision to advance your nursing education. Adhering to professional standards and presenting yourself in a positive, open, and honest way will help the admissions committee determine your fit and future in an FNP or PMHNP program.

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  • Nursing School

Nursing School Personal Statement: 5 Best Examples

Read our top 5 sample statements.

Nursing School Personal Statement

These outstanding nursing school personal statement examples have been approved by our admission experts who have helped countless students get into their top choice nursing programs. Whether you are at the beginning stages of a nursing career looking to apply to nursing school or wanting to further your career by becoming a nurse practitioner or a clinical nurse specialist, you will probably have to write a nursing school personal statement to gain admission to your program of choice. Your nursing school personal statement is one of the best ways to stand out in a nursing school application . In this blog, we are going to guide you in the process of crafting a strong personal statement that highlights your skills as well as the characteristics you possess that make you a good fit for the program.

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Article Contents 20 min read

Nursing school personal statement examples, nursing school personal statement sample 1.

I stood there not knowing what to do and being completely sure I had made the biggest mistake of my life. My decision to travel to a remote area of the Amazon jungle in Colombia to work as an elementary school tutor felt like the right one at first, but as soon as I got there, I regretted it. Being faced with the harsh reality of a struggling community made me feel completely out of place. It was heart breaking to witness such a palpable scarcity of resources and realize that there was not much that I could do. It took a lot of determination and adaptability to overcome the shock. Eventually, I learned to navigate this new world and embrace my role in the community. I planned lessons for the children and used all my free time to teach their parents to read and write. I developed teaching materials adapting them to my students’ context in order to make them meaningful. In the end, I realized I had become part of their lives, and I was humbled to have met such an amazing group of people. This experience taught me the true meaning of altruism and the value of hard work. This, alongside the cultural sensitivity that I developed, is what I am bringing with me to this new step in my life.

Becoming a nurse has been my goal for a long time. As a child, due to an unfortunate kitchen accident, I burned my arms with hot water and had to stay in the hospital for serval days. I remember being very scared and in pain, but there was a lady in a white uniform who would come to visit me every afternoon. I always enjoyed seeing her because she spoke to me in a way that almost seemed like she was telling me a story, and that put me at ease. One day, I asked her why she always wore white, and she said she was a nurse. ‘A nurse’, I said to myself, thinking that was exactly what I wanted to be when I grew up. She was kind and compassionate, and she knew how to explain things. Those traits that I learned from her are the same skills that I have been honing ever since, as I know they will be essential in my future profession.

I could see my breath crystalize in the air as I exhaled, dribbling and dodging the opposing players on my way to the goal. “I’m open,” shouted my teammate, poised right in front of the penalty box, waving his arms. Two more players stood between me and the goal. I hesitated, wondering if I should trust my teammate or try to score the winning point. Turning, I launched the ball into the air with a swift kick, and watched nervously as my teammate stopped it and sent it soaring above the goalie’s head. As the crowd erupted in celebratory cheers, the game time buzzer rang out across the field and I knew I had done the right thing. Every team victory that season was a personal victory, sparking a feeling of elation that I seek to replicate as a member of whichever health care team I have the privilege of joining.

My biggest soccer fan was always my grandmother, who even brought orange slices for the team to practices, claiming, “The little things are the most important!” Several winters ago, my grandmother unknowingly exposed me to nursing when she was hospitalized with pneumonia so severe that we were unsure if she would survive. Though her whole care team was dedicated, her nurse, Jackie, always went above and beyond to make sure my grandmother was comfortable and happy. Every day, Jackie would pop her head into the room and say “How’s my girl today?” or stop what she was doing to run a cool cloth over my grandmother’s feverish forehead. Each time I had to leave the hospital was gut-wrenching, but I felt better knowing that nurse Jackie treated my grandmother with such empathy. I remember being in awe of her kindness when I found out she left my grandmother sticky notes filled with encouraging messages while she was sleeping. When my grandmother asked her why she spent so much time on such little things when she had so many patients to attend to, Jackie winked and whispered, “The little things are the most important!” While I did not know I wanted to be a nurse in that moment, observing the profound impact Jackie made on my grandmother sparked a strong desire to explore the medical field.

Inspired by Jackie’s compassion for patients like my grandmother, I aimed to make the same difference when I signed up to volunteer at Riverview Hospital. With lofty goals of becoming a physician, I threw myself into my volunteering efforts, often coming in early or staying late to help stock supplies. Whenever I had a spare moment, I would chat with a patient, rearrange their pillows, or a myriad of other small things. One of the most striking aspects of my volunteering experience was how little time Riverview doctors were able to spend with their patients due to the sheer number of people to whom they had to attend. Nurses, on the other hand, had near constant interaction with longer-term patients: assisting them to the bathroom, administering medications, or changing IV fluid bags while chatting with them about how they were feeling. I was reminded of Jackie when I watched how tenderly one of the nurses changed their wincing patient’s bandages, all while trying to distract them with friendly conversation. Even aside from the comforting gestures I witnessed so frequently, it was the little things that made such a huge difference in patients’ wellbeing. Without nurses there to help execute the game play, the team would never score! Always a team-player, I knew I wanted to be a nurse.

Though my time spent on the soccer field is less and less these days, I am thrilled about the possibility of joining a new team and working hard to bring us to victory. My introduction to nursing through nurse Jackie could not have been better. Seeing the relief she brought to my grandmother in her most vulnerable state inspired me to do the same for others. Watching the nurses at Riverview Hospital expertly fulfill their duties while treating each patient as an individual cemented my desire to become a nurse who remembers that the little things are the most important. I want to be there with the assist right before the buzzer, helping my patients win, because every victory on a care team will be personal. (Word count: 719)

Nursing School Personal Statement Sample 3

“Help!” my friend Jack screamed as his faced swelled up due to an extreme allergic reaction to a candy bar he had just eaten. At the time, I did not know what to do, except to call for an ambulance. As we arrived at the hospital, I stayed by my friend’s side to offer my support. I saw the physicians and nurses swarmed around him, ready to take action. After my friend’s condition had been stabilized, he was left with the fear of another anaphylactic episode. It was his nurse that was able to calm his fears as she educated him on anaphylaxis and how to make the appropriate dietary changes. While I did not know how to respond with medical attention when my friend needed me, I gained a new purpose. I was inspired to become a nurse and to guide patients in times of uncertainty through compassion and education.  

To build my understanding of the nursing profession, I pursued experiences that would allow me to gain first-hand experience in the healthcare field. I secured a volunteer position at a children’s hospital where I was responsible for checking patients in and ensuring they were comfortable as they waited for their appointments. I was eager to practice helping calm patient nerves, just as the nurse had done for my friend Jack. Through consoling a memorable patient, named ‘Ryan,’ I learned the importance of working in a team of professionals. ‘Ryan’ was crying as he waited for his appointment since he was experiencing pain due to a broken leg. I talked to Ryan in an attempt to calm him down, but I was initially unsuccessful. To hone my approach, I asked a nurse on staff at the hospital how she approached children that are in pain. She shared with me that it is helpful to try to get their mind off the pain, for example by distracting them with an entertaining story. The next time I saw a patient crying like ‘Ryan’ had been, I was armed with funny jokes and engaging stories from my own childhood that I could share to take their mind off of the pain they were experiencing. From my time as a hospital volunteer, I learned that feedback from a team is critical to advancing professionally and providing optimal patient care. I look forward to becoming a nurse myself and working with my team of healthcare professionals to achieve this common goal. 

In my final year of university, I became involved with clinical research; as a research assistant, I approached patients in the same children’s hospital in which I had earlier been a volunteer, but now I worked to enroll patients in our research study. My purpose was to explain the goal of the study to families in the hospital, educating them on its potential impact and answering any questions they had about enrolling. This task was challenging because I was approaching families that I had not yet built a rapport with, and I needed to establish trust before asking if they wanted to enroll their child in our study. This required empathy for the hardship they were experiencing with a sick child, as well as an understanding of how to relay complex information in a way that was approachable to a variety of audiences. I learned that it is best to first ask the patient, or their family, what their understanding of a topic is to establish a baseline from which to build a conversation. In the future, as a nurse, I hope to apply what I have learned to build rapport with patients and their families for greater healthcare outcomes while ensuring that my patients are comfortable under my care. 

Since my friend Jack’s anaphylactic episode, I have taken the initiative to explore the field of nursing and to build the teamwork and communication skills needed to be a successful future nurse. I look forward to my first day of nursing school where I will be surrounded by peers that share the same vision for the future as me: to train as a nurse in order to provide outstanding care to those in distress alongside a team of dedicated professionals. (696 words)

Nursing School Personal Statement Sample 4

Nursing school personal statement sample 5.

The process of creating a strong nursing personal statement starts even before you begin writing. There is a certain amount of preparation that should take place to identify the specific information you want to include in your essay. So, make sure you take all the necessary steps before you are faced with the daunting, but fun, task of writing your first draft. Remember to give yourself between 6 to 8 weeks to write your statement. Be prepared to write several drafts as you edit and change your essay!

The Brainstorming Stage

The first step is what we call the brainstorming stage. You will need to do some soul searching and write many ideas as they come to you. Working on this step can take you anywhere between a couple of hours to a whole week. It really depends on you and how much you can actually remember from your personal history. There are two types of information that you will need to focus on at this stage: 

#1 Personal experiences

The goal behind this step is to start gathering information about your personal story and about any experiences that you have had from which you learned something valuable. The lessons you learned should relate directly to nursing or have contributed to your decision to become a nurse . You want to answer the question: “ Why do you want to be a nurse? ”

In order to do this, think about your life as a child, the characteristics of the place where you were born and raised, any meaningful experiences that may have sparked your interest in the nursing field, any contact that you had with the healthcare world, or any healthcare workers in your family that had some influence on you. Then consider your high school and teenage years and any events that may have increased your interest in becoming a nurse. How did you finalize your decision to apply to nursing school? Did you have an ‘a-ha’ moment, or was it a more gradual process? Whatever the answers to these questions may be, be sure to identify these key moments because they will be useful for addressing the thesis of your essay, which is why you decided to devote your life to a career in nursing.

Here are some examples of meaningful experiences that can potentially spark, or validate, an individual’s interest to become a nurse or what nursing means to you :

  • Being raised in a rural area with limited access to health care and wanting to do something about it in the future;
  • Growing up in an urban setting where great social disparity is evident and identifying opportunities to contribute to levelling up these differences;
  • Experiencing a personal injury or diagnosis that created opportunities to interact with nurses in a clinical setting;
  • Watching the illness of a loved one and seeing the impact that nurses have on a patient’s journey;
  • Volunteering at something related to the health sciences or an unrelated field with plenty of opportunities for helping others and interacting with them;
  • Conducting research in something related to the field;
  • Being involved in extracurricular activities that can lead to reaching a high level of compassion or maturity

Remember to always follow show, don’t tell in any personal statement you write:

#2 Nursing school research

Gather as much information as you can about the program so you can identify the specific things you like about it. It is very important to know the reason, or reasons, why you want to apply to a specific program.

In order to do this, you can look at the program’s website and pinpoint two or three specific aspects that interest you. Do you like the program’s curriculum? If so, what do you like about it? Do you like the research lab? Why do you like it? Have you done research in the past? Has this prepared you to make good use of this lab and contribute to whatever research they do here? Do you like the extracurricular initiatives the program offers? Do these align with any extracurricular activities you did in the past? Do you like the opportunities for patient interaction that the program provides? Why? Have you had patient interactions before? What did you learn from them that you can use moving forward? Knowing the specific reasons why you have chosen this program in particular is essential to write a strong essay later on.

Remember that besides telling universities what you hope to get from them, you will also need to show how you can complement their program. Showing what you can bring to the table, by referencing specific experiences you have had in these areas of interest, is the best way for programs to know that you will be successful if you are admitted. 

Look at these skills that are essential in the nursing field, and which are highly valued by nursing schools. You have probably already developed many of these throughout your life and through your experiences. Try to match these values and traits directly to your personal experiences in your essay.

As previously mentioned, the main goal of the brainstorming stage is to identify your reason for wanting to become a nurse as well as the relevant personal experiences that you can reference to support this decision. We suggest you make a list of five to seven experiences that you could potentially include in your essay. This list is going to be significantly reduced later to one or two, but it is good to have a good amount to start with.

As soon as you identify these meaningful experiences, be sure to also identify what you learned from them; that is, the skills you developed, the characteristics you refined, or any learning that resulted from going through these events in your life. Think about this carefully and select those skills that align with the ones your program of choice values. The information collected here is going to be essential later on when you start writing your essay.

Like any other academic essay, your nursing school personal statement should follow an academic structure and be organized in three major sections: introduction, body, and conclusion. See below for information on what each of these sections should include:

1. Introduction

This is your opening paragraph and, as such, it is the first impression you are going to cause on your readers; that is, the members of the admission committee. The purpose of an introduction is to act as a road map that allows the reader to understand where your story is going.

Important to remember here is the fact that an introduction can make or break your essay, so you need to come up with a very good opening sentence. This is the one that will draw the reader in and make them want to keep reading. Your opening sentence can be a quote, an anecdote, an event, or any idea that is captivating and enticing.

For example:

  • “It was three in the morning, and I was sitting in an empty room trying to think how my life had come to this.”
  • “He did not need to say anything; I knew something was wrong just by looking at him.”

Sentences such as these ones will leave the reader wanting to know more. There is a reason opening sentences are also called ‘hook’ sentences. Can you think of a good hook sentence to open your essay with? 

2. Body Paragraphs

The body of your essay is where you elaborate on the ideas introduced in your opening by providing personal examples. Remember all the brainstorming we asked you to do? This is where that information comes in handy. Your body paragraphs should include information about those meaningful experiences that you have gone through that have sparked and solidified you interest in pursuing a career in nursing.

Depending on the word limit required by your program, you will decide how many of these experiences to include. We asked you to come up with five to seven during the brainstorming stage of the writing process. Now, since our recommendation is quality over quantity, you should plan to include maximum two or three experiences and present one experience in each paragraph. Of course, one experience per paragraph is not all it takes. Besides presenting the experience, you need to include what skills or characteristics you developed because of this event and how you will be able to apply these skills moving forward in your nursing profession.

In case the program provided a specific question or prompt to be addressed, add a fourth paragraph where you answer this question. It is important to tell the program what they want to know, so do not forget to include this information as part of your body paragraphs.

Mention how your skills can be drawn upon in the future in order to give the admissions committee a glimpse of the type of nurse and professional you are going to be. Remember some of the essential skills in the nursing profession that we mentioned above and see how they connect to your past experiences. 

3. Conclusion

The same way we place great importance on the introduction of a nursing school personal statement, we also want to emphasize the big role that your concluding paragraph has on your entire text. The most important thing we can tell you is that a conclusion should not be a summary. It should, instead, be a place to emphasize some of the major ideas you previously discussed and, when possible, it should circle back to the introduction.

Conclusions have to be insightful and captivating. They should convey a sense of closure and an invitation to keep reflecting on the ideas that were presented in the essay. Think that this is the very last thing that the admissions committee will read from you. What is the last impression that you want to leave on these people? Be creative! 

Here are some more nursing school personal statement examples to help you!

Here are some other aspects about drafting your personal statement to be considered:

Besides all the information that you brainstormed from your own personal history and from the programs\u2019 websites regarding the areas that interest you, there is something else that should be part of the content of your essay, and that is the prompt. You need to be aware of the prompt of the essay provided to you by the program, and you always want to address it. Some programs will ask for a general essay describing your motivations to become a nurse, in which case the information you gathered during the brainstorming stage will suffice, while others will give you a specific question to answer, in which case one paragraph of your essay should be devoted to answering said question.  ","label":"Content","title":"Content"}]" code="tab1" template="BlogArticle">

No matter how much effort and time you put in writing your personal statement, there is a high probability that the committee members will not spend too much time reading it. Do not take this personally. They go through many application documents from many applicants like you and do not want to waste too much time reading one single essay, especially if it is not interesting enough. They want, instead, to be able to identify in a few minutes whether you are the person they are looking for.

This, of course, creates the need for applicants to write essays that have great content, great structure, and that have that ‘it’ factor that will make them stand out in a nursing school application . Your essay should be easy to read and have a great narrative. It should not read like a nursing school application resume or list every single experience you have had in chronological order. As we mentioned before, quality is better than quantity, and your nursing school personal essay should have precisely that: quality.

What experiences should end up in your body paragraphs? That is up to you. What we can suggest is that you diversify the content by highlighting experiences from different dimensions of your life. Having one of the paragraphs address a personal experience, the second address a research or academic experience, and the third address a volunteering or extracurricular activity is much better than including three experiences related to only research, for instance. Be strategic in how you showcase your skills!

Follow these steps to start drafting you essay: 

  • Remember all the information you brainstormed earlier? The first thing you need to do is identify the top three experiences from your life that you want to include. 
  • Once you have them, write them in bullet points. Create one bullet point for each that mentions what the experience is. 
  • Then, expand each bullet point into sentences and these sentences into paragraphs. 
  • As we mentioned above, each paragraph should have three essential elements: what the experience was (i.e., the meaningful experience), the main takeaways you got from it (i.e., skills you developed, characteristics you enhanced, etc.), and future applications (i.e., how you can apply this learning moving forward). 
  • Once you have your paragraphs ready to go, make sure you start each one of them with a good opening sentence. Each paragraph should follow the same structure of the general essay. This will create flow and cohesion between ideas.
  • You can look at sample medical school personal statements and think how these medical school essays could be applied to the nursing field.

Ok, so you finished writing your first draft. Good job! However, this is only the beginning. Once you are happy with your first draft, you will need to receive expert feedback on it. Having a professional like a nursing school admissions consulting service look at your essay and suggest changes to enhance what you have written is vital to create a strong product. You will see that, more often than not, these experts will be able to identify weak areas and ineffective ideas that you will not perceive.

Once someone else looks at your essay, be sure to incorporate their suggestions, work on editing and polishing up your document, and do another revision. Crafting the perfect essay that will grant you admission to your dream program is a process that should be done carefully and conscientiously. That means multiple revisions and edits are essential. In general, writing a strong competitive essay does not happen overnight. The whole process can take several weeks. So, be prepared to put in the effort and remember to do some happy writing!

The nursing school personal statement should highlight some of your most meaningful personal experiences and the skills you gained through them that will make you a great nursing professional. It should provide a good narrative that will help the admissions committee know more about you as a person and about your chance to be successful in their program. By showing that you possess certain skills that are important in the nursing profession, the committee members will see that you are a good fit.

Writing your personal essay is not an easy task and should not be taken lightly, but when you finally finish writing and look at the amazing essay you have created, you will feel satisfied with the job you did and will be able to show your program of choice why they need to have you.

No. Essays may or may not be required, depending on the program. You can check this portal and this portal to learn more.

No. There are a few steps that you wan to follow before you actually start writing. One of those is the brainstorming stage, and it will help you come up with all the ideas and information that you will need to write a good essay.

Personal information and information about the program or the areas that interest you.

Personal experiences that have been meaningful enough and that have allowed you to develop different skills that are important in the nursing field.

You need to identify the two or three areas of the program that attract you the most and see how those relate to your own experiences.

To identify the reasons that have led you to pursue a career in nursing.

It should have an academic structure and include an introduction, three or four body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Yes, it is! You need to stay within the limit in order to show that you can be concise and also follow instructions.

Then you make sure you address it. Do not leave this information out, as it is essential to provide the program with the information they want to know.

Because it is the first impression that you are going to have on your readers.

It should begin with a captivating opening sentence in the introduction. A statement, quote, or anecdote that is creative and that sparks curiosity on the reader.

You want to describe one meaningful experience per paragraph (i.e., personal example), include the main takeaways from this experience, and how this learning can be applied in the future.

You need to have an expert give you feedback on it. You may think it is already perfect, but personal essays usually require lots of revisions before they can be at the competitive stage.

It depends on the writer, but it is usually something that does not happen overnight. It usually takes several weeks. It depends on how much access you have to professionals who can provide good feedback and how much time you devote to incorporating their suggestions.

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sample personal statement nursing

Nursing Bay

College personal statement examples and writing tips.

A crucial step in your nursing journey is learning how to write a personal statement that resonates with admissions committees and vividly portrays your passion for healthcare. This collection of amazing personal statement examples is curated to guide and inspire you as you articulate your aspirations, experiences, and motivation to pursue nursing.

What is a Personal Statement?

A personal statement is a written narrative that typically forms a significant part of an application to universities, colleges, or professional programs, particularly in fields like nursing. It’s an opportunity for junior year applicants to present themselves beyond test scores and grades, offering insights into their personalities, experiences, goals, and motivations.

In a personal statement, applicants explain why they are interested in a specific field of study or profession, what they hope to achieve through the program, and how their background and experiences have prepared them for this path. It’s a chance to highlight unique attributes, significant life experiences, challenges overcome, or special achievements that make them an ideal candidate for the program.

Why Read Personal Statement Examples?

Reading personal statement essay examples is immensely beneficial for several reasons, especially when preparing your own statement for applications to nursing programs:

  • Inspiration and Ideas: Examples can inspire you and provide ideas on structuring your statement, what kind of content to include in your application essay, and how to convey your story and passion effectively.
  • Understanding Expectations: They offer insight into what admissions committees look for, helping you understand the level of detail, tone, and approach that resonates successfully in such applications.
  • Learning from Others: Seeing how others have articulated their experiences, challenges, and aspirations can guide you in reflecting upon and articulating your own journey and motivations.
  • Avoiding Common Mistakes: By examining a range of examples, you can identify common pitfalls and clichés to avoid, ensuring your statement stands out and feels genuine.
  • Gaining Confidence: Reading successful common app essays can boost your confidence, showing you that crafting a compelling narrative that combines personal experiences with professional aspirations is possible.
  • Diverse Perspectives: Examples offer a glimpse into the diversity of paths and motivations that lead people to nursing, potentially broadening your perspective and enriching your own approach to writing your statement.

How Long Should a Personal Statement Be?

The length of your personal statement should ideally align with the guidelines provided by the institution or program you are applying to. Personal statements are expected to be concise yet comprehensive, often ranging around 500 to 650 words , translating to about one to two pages. 

This word count allows enough space to clearly articulate your experiences, motivations, and aspirations without overloading the reader with information. It’s important to always adhere to the program’s specific word or character limits to demonstrate your ability to follow instructions and present your thoughts.

What Should a Personal Statement Include?

A well-written college admissions essay should include several key elements to effectively communicate your suitability for the program or position you are applying for. Here’s what to typically include:

Introduction

Your personal statement should begin with an engaging introductory paragraph that captures the essence of your motivation for pursuing your chosen field. This could be a brief narrative of a defining moment, an experience that ignited your passion, or a clear articulation of your interest and enthusiasm.

The introduction sets the tone and should intrigue the reader, providing a glimpse into your unique journey and motivation. It’s important that this section hooks the reader’s attention and provides a compelling reason to continue reading your statement.

Academic and Professional Background

In this section, brainstorm and detail your relevant academic and professional experiences that have prepared you for this next step. Highlight key academic achievements, coursework, research, or projects that align with the field you are pursuing.

Also, include any relevant work experience, internships, or positions that have given you practical skills and insights. This part of the statement is crucial for showcasing your foundational knowledge and preparedness for advanced study or professional development and gaining a scholarship in your chosen area.

Extracurricular Activities and Volunteering

Your involvement in extracurricular activities and volunteering can significantly enrich your personal statement. This section should reflect how these activities have contributed to your personal growth, skills development, or understanding of your field.

Whether it’s a hobby, leadership roles in clubs, participation in sports teams, or volunteer work in community organizations, these experiences demonstrate your broader interests, commitment, and ability to balance multiple responsibilities. It’s an opportunity to show aspects of your character and values that academic achievements alone might not convey.

Personal Qualities and Skills

Reflect on and draft the personal qualities and skills that make you suited for your chosen path. This might include traits like resilience, empathy, critical thinking, or effective communication. Use specific examples or experiences to demonstrate how you have developed and applied these traits.

This personal reflection not only provides depth to your statement but also gives the admissions committee a clearer picture of who you are as an individual, beyond academic and professional achievements.

Career Goals and Aspirations

Discuss your career aspirations and how the program or position you are applying for aligns with these goals. This section should convey a clear vision of where you see yourself in the future and how the specific program or role will be a stepping stone toward that vision.

It’s important to show that you have a direction and purpose and that you see this opportunity as integral to your career journey. This not only demonstrates foresight and planning but also shows your commitment and seriousness about the path you are choosing.

Reasons for Choosing the Specific Program or Institution

Clearly articulate why you are applying to this particular program or institution. Discuss what specific aspects of the program, faculty, institution’s philosophy, or opportunities available are particularly attractive to you and why they resonate with your goals and preferences.

This shows that you have done your research and are making a well-informed decision. It also indicates that you have a genuine interest in what the program or institution uniquely offers, rather than a generic application.

Conclude your statement with a strong, memorable closing that encapsulates your main points and reaffirms your enthusiasm and suitability for the program or career. This is your final opportunity to leave a lasting impression, summarizing why you believe you are an ideal candidate.

The conclusion should tie back to your opening, creating a cohesive narrative that leaves the reader with a clear understanding of your passion, commitment, and readiness for the next step in your academic or professional journey.

What Does an Admissions Officer Look for in a Personal Statement?

When reviewing a personal statement, admission officers are looking for several key elements to assess the suitability of a candidate for their program:

  • Clarity of Purpose: Admissions officers want to see a clear understanding of why the applicant wants to pursue a particular field or program. The statement should convincingly articulate the candidate’s passion, motivation, and how the program aligns with their career goals.
  • Personal Insight and Self-Reflection: A strong personal essay offers insight into the applicant’s personality, experiences, and the factors that have shaped their decision to pursue a specific path. Admissions officers look for depth of reflection and a sense of how past experiences have driven the candidate’s current ambitions.
  • Relevant Experience and Skills: It’s important for the statement to highlight any relevant academic, professional, or volunteer experiences that demonstrate preparedness for the program. Admissions officers are interested in how these experiences have contributed to the development of skills and knowledge pertinent to the field.
  • Writing Quality and Structure: The ability to communicate effectively and coherently through writing is crucial. Admissions officers pay attention to the overall quality of writing, including grammar, clarity, coherence, and the ability to organize thoughts logically.
  • Individuality and Authenticity: They seek to understand what makes each applicant unique. A personal statement should reflect the individual’s authentic self, showcasing unique perspectives, diverse experiences, and personal growth.
  • Commitment and Passion: Demonstrating genuine enthusiasm and a strong commitment to the field is essential. Admissions officers look for candidates who are likely to thrive in the program and contribute positively to their field.
  • Alignment with Program Values and Goals: Candidates who show that their personal and professional values align with those of the program or institution often stand out. Admissions officers look for indications that the candidate has researched the program and understands how it fits into their broader aspirations.
  • Future Potential: Finally, they are interested in the applicant’s potential for future success and contribution to the field. A compelling statement should give a sense of the candidate’s ambition to go to college and how they intend to utilize the education and opportunities provided by the program to achieve their long-term goals.

The Best Personal Statement Examples

Here are some examples that illustrate effective writing styles, clear articulation of goals, and the ability to connect personal experiences to broader career or academic aspirations:

Personal Statement Example #1 

Personal statement example #2, college essay example #3, personal statement example #4, application essay example #5, personal statement example #6, personal statement example #7, personal statement example #8, personal statement example #9, personal statement example #10, personal statement example #11, personal statement example #12, personal statement example #13, personal statement example #14, personal statement example #15, key takeaways for writing a great personal statement.

When reflecting on the nursing personal statement examples provided, several key takeaways emerge that are crucial for anyone crafting their statement. These insights are vital for effectively conveying your passion, commitment, and suitability for a career in nursing:

  • Clearly articulate your personal motivation for choosing nursing.
  • Highlight your relevant healthcare experiences and achievements.
  • Specify your interest in any particular nursing specialty.
  • Showcase qualities and skills that make you suitable for nursing.
  • Outline your long-term professional aspirations in nursing.
  • Acknowledge the challenges and rewards in the nursing profession.
  • Express dedication to ongoing learning and professional development.
  • Ensure clarity, structure, and coherence in your statement.
  • Customize your statement for each specific nursing program.
  • Maintain authenticity and genuineness throughout your statement.

Final Thoughts: Personal Statement Essay Examples

These nursing personal statement examples and key takeaways provide valuable insights for anyone aspiring to enter the nursing freshman year. They demonstrate the importance of a well-crafted statement that blends personal motivation, relevant experiences, and a clear understanding of the nursing profession’s demands and rewards. 

An effective personal statement is not only a reflection of your qualifications and aspirations but also a testament to your passion, empathy, and commitment to the field of nursing. It’s a unique opportunity to showcase your individuality and suitability for a career that is as challenging as it is rewarding. 

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How to Write a Nursing School Personal Statement: What to Include, Examples, and Mistakes to Avoid

RoCarpenter

So, you have decided to go to nursing school, or advance your nursing career by furthering your education. Now is the time to become familiar with the application process, get your transcripts and letters of recommendation in order and compose the, in some cases dreaded personal statement. Writing a personal statement is a common part of the application process when working to advance your education. However, the term "Personal Statement" is a bit of a misnomer. The universities and colleges asking for this essay are not looking for your life story. Instead, they want you to demonstrate what makes you uniquely qualified as a candidate for their program. In this post you will find the information necessary to make you stand out among hundreds of other applicants, create a personal statement tailored to your personal goals as well as to your potential institutions, and find out what common mistakes are made and how to avoid them.

Although some institutions will give you a specific prompt to discuss when applying to the program, many will request a general personal statement (aka a statement of purpose). There are some commonalities among all of these essays for which you will find appropriate advice here, to different degrees, depending on the program application requirements. Each of these essays should be written for the specific program you are applying to, so be wary of differences not only in essay type or topic but also appropriate formatting and length. Above all, be aware that you are writing to present yourself as a professional capable of caring for the lives of others; following their provided guidelines and avoiding familiar language (such as contractions and common word abbreviations) will allow you to present yourself in the best possible light.

General guidelines

The personal statement.

Although you want to refrain from telling the story of your life, you still want to make it personal. Be sure to illustrate with specific and unique examples why you are cut out for this career and the specific program you are applying to. There are many things that can be included in this category, not all of them will be right for each applicant to discuss or appropriate for the prompts that each individual provides. However, this list should give you an idea of what the evaluators are looking for in a strong candidate:

Educational background

  • Did you take advanced biology classes in high school? If so, you may want to highlight this background and how it demonstrates your devotion to health care.
  • Have you gone out of your way to learn relevant skills? Perhaps you can discuss your CPR certification training.
  • Have you been administering insulin to a diabetic cat for years? This demonstrates a devotion to health care and the ability to learn transferable skills. In fact, my long history of doing this has come up in highly successful interviews in the past, which was the inspiration for this particular example. Although I was medicating a different species than I would be working with, this history demonstrates the ability to regulate insulin levels, properly store medication, fill a syringe safely, and correctly administer a subcutaneous injection.

Volunteer work

  • Volunteer work at a hospital is likely a common point of discussion for aspiring nurses. e sure to tell a story about a situation that makes you stand out which solidified your certainty that this is the right field for you.
  • Assisted living facilities, caring for special needs children, working at animal shelters, or volunteering at homeless shelters (among other things) may also be sources of inspiration that allow you to highlight why you should be accepted into the program.
  • Supervisors in these types of positions may also be great resources for recommendation letters or potential proofreaders for the initial draft of your personal statement.

Work experience

  • If you have worked in a related field in a paid position, this should definitely be not only included in your essay, but considered a potential source of a particularly persuasive letter of recommendation.
  • Your employer may also be an excellent resource to ask for feedback regarding rough drafts of your personal statement.

Personal motivation

  • Do you have a unique story that has compelled you to want to pursue the field of nursing; perhaps you helped care for a family member? These personal motivations are also excellent ways to set yourself apart.

Relevant acquired skills

  • Have you acquired a particular skill set relevant to nursing outside of traditional means? This is the time to highlight that achievement. Perhaps you have experience working in a pharmacy or have proven yourself in high-stress situations; these characteristics translate well into the field of nursing.
  • Another asset that you might find to be in your favor is fluency in a foreign language, or ASL. This unique skill set might make you a valuable candidate as well as a more highly sought after employee once you graduate.

Unique traits that make you stand out

  • Thousands of applicants to nursing programs write that they have "always wanted to go into nursing", sometimes even in their opening line. Find a way to stand out.
  • For example, in my personal statement, I wrote about how I actually did not have a traditional story that culminated in my pursuit of higher education. I found my way from grill cook and karate instructor to medical research science. Embrace the fact that you may not be conventional. Letting your personality, background and voice come through in your personal statement will help the admissions committee determine if you are a great fit for their program.

Embrace the fact that you may not be conventional.

The right fit

As with any educational program, fit is important when looking into pursuing a nursing degree. Demonstrating that you have researched the program, and illustrating in your essay why it is the place for you, will set you apart from other applicants. Additionally, if your long term goal is to be an ER nurse, for example, and you are applying to a program known for a different type of nursing, application reviewers will see this in a negative light.

Essay topics

In some cases, colleges and universities will give you a specific prompt for this essay or ask for a series of short essays addressing particular questions. In these cases, be sure to answer their questions thoroughly and be aware of formatting guidelines and word count limitations. Equally important, be sure to demonstrate ways in which you are a good fit for not only the program, but also the nursing profession. This is a position that is both incredibly personal and physically demanding, but also a situation where you need to be cool under fire and fastidious with your work. Use any opportunity you can to demonstrate that you possess these characteristics in a way that makes you a highly competitive candidate and a potential star in your chosen field.

If you have applied for continued education in the past and have written this kind of essay before, you may have noticed that applying to nursing programs is a bit unique. Particularly, there is a more empathic slant to writing these essays. As personal statements go, writing one for a nursing program is much more 'personal' than preparing one for academic study. To put this all in context, below are some sample essay prompts used by nursing schools in the past. Following this, some advice from successful career nurses will lend an additional perspective from professionals directly working in the field you aspire to join.

Sample prompts

The Vanderbilt University website currently gives the following information regarding the personal statement portion of the application process:

Your Statement of Purpose should reflect your understanding of the role of the advanced practice nurse and your interest in a particular patient population. Before writing your statement of purpose, please carefully review information about the specialty on our web site so that you clearly indicate to the faculty that your career goals are a fit with the specialty. If you are applying to a dual specialty, be sure to address the scope of practice in each specialty area. Students are offered admission to their selected specialty; it is not possible to enter the program undecided about your specialty area. Vanderbilt University

As you can see, this program focuses on your understanding of what it takes to work in the nursing field and puts a particular emphasis on the patient population you want to work with and the reason behind this decision. They also focus on familiarity with the program, as discussed above. These are points that likely generalize to numerous programs and to personal statements for this field in general.

Yale University has the following requirements, according to a website which generates advice specific to nursing personal statements. This site offers the following advice, which echoes the focal points found here, and may offer further information as you pursue your continued education and refine your personal statement. As you can see, Yale differs in its requirements and constrains the length of the personal statement considerably.

Yale University nursing requires you to write a 250-word essay with free choice of your subject. In writing your essay, it is important that this provides you the advantage to stay ahead of your competition. You should be able to include intellectual development, skills, interests, potential contribution to the progress of National University nursing and among many others. It is important to note that Yale University school of nursing utilizes strict admission process so you should be able to comply with top-notch standards. Do not compromise your admission simply by sending out a poorly written personal statement. To improve your chances in Yale University school of nursing, your essay should be able to reflect your dedication, excellence, commitment, and genuine interest to belong to Yale. In your Yale University nursing personal statement, you should also be able to highlight components of your background from academic to personal that will provide the admissions committee an overview of who you are and what you can deliver. To guarantee your admission in National University Nursing, you should be able to provide your readers with information that is unique and interesting that is not shown in any part of your application. Yale University

The essay requested in this case is considerably short, however, it allows you to write about the topic of your choice. This gives you the opportunity to present yourself as a unique candidate. In this personal statement, it is still important to choose a topic that allows you to address all of their listed points of concern to the best of your ability within the constraints of the allotted space. This excerpt also stresses the focus on compliance to high standards necessary to successfully complete the nursing program. Although this is a very short essay, it is emphasized how important it is to ensure that this work is well composed. Writing a rushed essay will be obvious to those reviewing applications and reflects poorly on your ability to perform at a high level, both academically and as a potential future nurse. Additionally, it is re-emphasized in this piece that it is important to understand the program to which you are applying. As they state, it is important to demonstrate a "genuine interest in belonging to Yale"; this is true of all program applications. Always focus a portion of your essay on demonstrating why this particular program is right for you and what unique skills you bring to the table that other applicants do not. Finally, always remember not to simply reiterate information that already has been included elsewhere in your application; be sure to tell the committee something new and interesting that gives you a competitive edge.

This differs from Fairfield University's DNP program , which requires that the applicant:

  • Discuss a practice problem in your field that, in your experience, has a broad impact on patient care outcomes.
  • State professional goals for the next 5-10 years.
  • Explain how a DNP will help you reach your goals.

As you can see, depending on the institution and level of degree program that you are interested in, the requirements for application can vary greatly. In the case of the Doctor of Nursing Program offered at this university, the personal statement is more focused on the background of the applicant directly relating to their previous experience in their nursing careers. There is also a focus on the ability to think critically about the field, its shortcomings, and how they can be amended. This institution also has an interest in your long-term career development and plans for up to the next 10 years. Remember that reflecting on this in your personal statement allows you to demonstrate your potential to raise the reputation of the university in the long term, a topic that they have a demonstrated interest in learning about you as an applicant. Planning your long term career goals will also assist you in deciding which programs are the best fit for you and will allow you to gain the appropriate background to reach these goals over your career.

Planning your long term career goals will also assist you in deciding which programs are the best fit for you.

What degree program is right for you?

It is important to know that there are a variety of nursing degrees that can be applied for, even within a single university. Each of these offers a different career path, and potential for further education or future job promotion. Before you decide which program you want to attend, you should research the many options available within the nursing field. An example of the options that should be considered can be found at the University of Rochester website :

  • Accelerated Programs for Non-Nurses (BS & MS) for students with a non-nursing bachelor's degree and want to become a nurse in just 12 months.
  • RN to BS program: for students who want to earn a bachelor's degree in as little as 16 months with part-time coursework.
  • Clinical Nurse Leader (MS) for licensed registered nurses who already hold a bachelor's degree in nursing.
  • Health Care Organization Management and Leadership (MS) for all applicants with a bachelor's degree.
  • Nursing Education (MS) for nurses who aspire to teach at either a college of nursing or within a clinical setting.
  • Nurse Practitioner program (MS) for nurses who want to provide another level of care for their patients.
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) for nurses entering at the post-baccalaureate or post-master's level.
  • PhD in Nursing & Health Practice program for all licensed health professionals who already hold a master's degree.
  • Legal Nurse Consultant Course for registered nurses or advanced practice nurses.
  • Care Manager Education program for nurses or other health professionals currently working in a care manager capacity, or entering this growing field.
  • RN First Assistant program for CNOR or APRN's.

This may not be a comprehensive list, but it gives you an idea of the level of diversity available to you. Become familiar with the programs at each institution you apply to and ensure that they will give you the appropriate foundation to achieve your long-term goals, both in your career and in potentially continuing your education further.

What do nurses say?

Discussions with successful nurses who have completed this process have revealed that, unlike personal statements for academic programs, this essay has a more personal bent. Revealing your altruism and desire to help people, as well as your motivation toward expanding your knowledge and personal growth are appropriate in these essays. You should also highlight how your increased knowledge and growth will allow you to help your patients and become a more effective practitioner. Emphasizing these things while telling an anecdotal story about volunteer work, an aid job, or other experiences will allow you the ability to express these things while demonstrating your unique skills and understanding of the field. Another point often made by individuals who have been successful in furthering their education, and therefore in writing these letters, is that it is sometimes appropriate to discuss your background disadvantages; perhaps you did not achieve top grades because you also had to work full time, for example. Communicating this to reviewers demonstrates that you can persevere in times of hardship and remained committed to your education.

Recapitulation of key points:

  • Emphasize what makes you a unique applicant.
  • Discuss why you want to be a nurse, and in what field, in a way that conveys your personality and sets you apart.
  • Remember that this is a professional document; use formal language, not contractions.
  • Do not start your personal statement essay with "I have always wanted to be a nurse." or "I have always wanted to help people." These, and similar sentiments, are common in these essays. An intriguing opening statement will get the attention of the application review committee and make you more memorable. Remember, the reviewers are reading hundreds of these a day, if not more.
  • Refrain from reiterating the information that can be found in your application. Not only is this redundant, but you will be forfeiting the opportunity to demonstrate to the review panel how you stand apart from the other applicants.
  • Research each program and write a letter that demonstrates why the program is a good fit for you.
  • Remember to showcase any skills you have developed that will make you a successful student as well as a long-term asset to the program.

These techniques will allow you to compose a more competitive personal statement for any program you choose. A well-researched and written essay will give you an edge during the application process. Make yourself stand out from the rather large crowd of applicants with a compelling introductory statement and remember to be your (professional) self. This will help to ensure that you get accepted into a program that is a good fit for you, your education, and your career goals. Apply to multiple programs at a variety of levels of competitiveness, you will not get admitted into every program you apply to, but hopefully you will get into the right one.

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PERSONAL STATEMENT EXAMPLE Adult Nursing Personal Statement

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Adult Nursing Personal Statement

I have always been eager to pursue a career where it’s my job to care and fend for people that are unable to care for themselves efficiently. Nursing is very challenging and demanding, however, I believe that it is also very rewarding. I have also come to understand that a career in nursing is about compassion, courage, communication, competence, care and commitment. I believe I have all these values and skills and I believe I am ready to make a difference to people and assist them and their families through difficult times when they are feeling at their lowest. The role of nursing is ever-changing as nurses are now more involved in the welfare of patients. I believe I am ready to take on this challenge and I am hopeful that the opportunities I receive will help develop my skills which in time will help further my career.

To better explore a career in nursing, I took the initiative to undertake a week-long work experience placement in St Georges’ hospital, in the Intensive Care Unit. On my placement I was given the opportunity to shadow doctors and nurses to see what they do in a typical day. I developed my communication skills as well as my empathetic skills. I was able to ‘’put myself in the patients shoes’’ in order to understand how they were feeling. I had to use this skill quite regularly as patients in the intensive care unit have life threatening illness/injuries and are in a large amount of pain.

Nurses need to have high attention to detail as they need to be able to notice any changes in the condition of the patient. I developed this skill while doing work experience in a pharmacy. I had to help the chemists dispense medication to customers, this required speed and accuracy. I had to make sure that the customers were given the right medication at the right dosage. The results of a overdose could be devastating.

The ability to keep calm under difficult, high pressure situations is an essential skill for a nurse to have. I developed this skill while taking part in the Hebe Foundation's Junior Apprentice, where we were presented with problems and provide a solution before the deadline. I learnt that you have to take initiative to resolve situations such as clients' needs and ensure the best possible outcome for each client. I understand that no day of work in a hospital is going to be exactly the same. Every day I will meet new people and I will have to work with different situations, sometimes things won’t go to plan and I have to be ready to ‘’think on my feet’’ in order to solve a unexpected situation quickly and calmly.

On a family holiday to Guyana, I was able to experience what healthcare was like in a developing country. The conditions were devastating; the nurses there were unable to attend to the patients’ needs and the general condition of the hospital was terrible. There was a shortage of beds many patients had to sleep on the floor even mothers with their new-borns. This broke my heart. My experience in there made me promise to myself that one day I will become a nurse and make sure that people that are ill are looked after in the best way possible.

I've practiced Shotokan Karate for over 5 years and competed nationally, in karate I learnt determination, discipline and respect. These values will prove helpful in a career as a nurse.

Every day as a nurse, I know I will learn something new from my colleagues and patients, which will inspire me to explore deeper knowledge of the techniques and procedures I use. I understand that nursing is not an easy route as there will be 24 hour care and on-call shifts as well as dealing with the deaths of patients, but I know that I am ready undertake this challenge and prove to myself that I can do anything I want to. The welfare of the patients is what will matter most to me, if they are happy I will be happy as well.

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How to write a nursing personal statement for your first nurse job application

sample personal statement nursing

  • Chloe Registered Mental Health Nurse
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Your personal statement could be the difference between getting your first nursing job and just missing out, so make sure yours is as good as it can be.

sample personal statement nursing

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Draft everything together

Once you have a rough idea of everything you want to include, get it down on paper.

Don’t worry about length or organisation of the statement at this stage, just get down everything you think you want to say.

Carefully read the job description to make sure you’ve highlighted how you fit those requirements.

If you’re applying for a job where you don’t quite meet all the requirements, explain how you’re going to ensure you are able to meet this element of the job if they give you the position.

Revise and edit

Your first draft is likely to be a mess as you include things as they spring to mind. So this is your opportunity to rework it into a more cohesive piece.

Make sure it flows and group similar talking points together so that you’re not jumping back and forth talking about different things.

Have an objective, experienced and motivated voice throughout.

Ensure that you sound confident and professional.

Make sure you’ve addressed all the essential criteria and any desirable ones that you fulfil. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking you aren’t experienced just because you haven’t worked as a fully qualified nurse before.

You’ve just spent the last 2-3 years training and learning, so you do have some knowledge and experience.

Once you’re happy with it the next step is to proof read. Ask a friend or family member to do this for you if you can, as they’re more likely to spot mistakes that you might have missed.

Or you can always take a couple of days away from it, then come back to read it again with fresh eyes.

Be strict with yourself. Ask yourself if this is necessary and relevant to mention.

Chop out any unnecessary words or parts where you’re repeating a point you’ve already made.

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Personalise your statement to the role

Unless you’re applying for multiple very similar roles, you should always seek to change up your statement for each application.

Even very similar roles might have slightly different criteria for different employers, so its worth checking that your statement is relevant for each job you are applying for.

Once its written it won’t take you long to tweak it each time for different roles.

It will be easy for employers to spot a generic personal statement that isn’t tailored to their role, and it doesn’t exactly display commitment to the role if you haven’t even bothered to re-write your personal statement.

To look at how to sharpen your CV for your job search, check out a blog I wrote on how to build your nursing CV . This will ensure you stand out amongst other candidates when applying for nursing jobs .

Looking for a nursing job?

Next steps..., create an account., we will help you build a cv as part of that process., this will get you ready to start searching for jobs., about the author.

I qualified as a Mental Health Nurse (RMN) in August of 2018 and started as a newly qualified nurse shortly after. On top of nursing I juggle creating content for both my YouTube channel and blog.

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Adult nursing personal statement example 5.

I am so very proud to be able to share aspects of my life that are not apparent from my academic record.

After being encouraged to pursue my degree by both friends and family, I found that going back to school is a character-defining time in my life, causing me to face many challenges such as financial hardship and manage responsibilities associated with family and school.

Being raised in a large family of nurses and allied health professionals, for a long time, I felt out of place because I did not want to go into the medical field.

However, I started working at a local hospital out of necessity and after a length of time I realised how appropriate my background made me for nursing. I already knew a lot of medical terminology, basic anatomy and physiology, and was learning more about lab work and medications at my workplace.

I also was granted the blessing of being was able to work with some exceptional nurses that really cared for and about their patients; Nurses that would do everything in their power to make a patient feel better emotionally and physically. That is what I hope to be able to do: provide extraordinary care everyday.

Maybe someday I can be an inspiration to others to strive for a higher level of care just as those I look up to were for me.

By now one may deduct that I plan on majoring in nursing. This career path will be a challenging one, I have no doubt, but I intend to push through and be rewarded for my hard work.

I am very interested in the care of women and children. Having worked on a labor and delivery ward and in both a full-term nursery and an intensive care nursery, I know that it can be stressful and emotional, but the rewards are also high. Seeing a loving family taking a healthy infant home will be a triumph!

I have had to overcome adversity to get this far into my academic career, and am sure to face even more the farther along I go.

Financially, I have been challenged because working outside the home was too much to do on top of taking care of my children and the housework, assisting with the care of my elderly grandfather, and keeping decent grades.

Therefore, our family's income was cut in half. Then my husband lost his job. After searching for a new job in Northwest Arkansas for two months, he got an out-of-state job that keeps him, five days a week, 300 miles away that barely pays our car payment and a few other payments.

My parents remodeled their garage into a two bedroom apartment for us. They have allowed us to move in to save us the expense of rent and utilities of our own place. We try to put money towards bills when we can, but it still has put a large cramp on their budget. All of this to help me get through school.

Such a busy schedule does not allow for much community service, but I do get to participate in our church choir for special events and holidays. Singing for me is a stress-buster.

My 87-year old grandfather lives with my parents also, and I help take him to monthly appointments at the Veteran's Hospital in Fayetteville. I have many events to attend at my oldest daughter's elementary school, too.

I have been invited to join Gamma Beta Phi, and earned a place on the Dean's list. These achievements make my mother especially proud.

She attended college when I was in junior high, and received these honors as well. I am also a member of the Arkansas Student Nurse Association. This organisation helps me to keep on task with my career goals and up-to-date on current nursing news.

Profile info

There is no profile associated with this personal statement, as the writer has requested to remain anonymous.

Related Personal Statements

Too much information about.

Fri, 01/08/2008 - 23:06

Too much information about your personal life. You also give the impression that you may have been pressured into a career in nursing because of your family's background. I admire the fact that you've overcome the problems in your life and you are still determined to fufil your ambition but universities aren't intrested in what your husband does for a living or how much money you have. It's about you and your commitment to the course. Good luck. It sounds like you'll be an excellent nurse.

great statement

Wed, 10/09/2008 - 19:27

i think this statement is fantastic the profesional as as well as the personal great content good luck am in the same position just now although i am not living with my parents i hope you get through this you would be a fantastic role model for your family !!! thank you for sharing this

The personal statement does

Sat, 04/02/2012 - 19:26

The personal statement does have some good words, but I think you've gone about your personal life a bit too much, because universities don't want to know about your converted garage or your husbands income :/ but still......good luck.

Add new comment

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Nursing Personal Statement Examples in 2023

In this article, we look at the best nursing personal statement examples in 2023 along with tips and advice for writing a great personal statement for a nursing program.

nursing personal statement examples

Table of Contents

What is a nursing personal statement, what should you include in your nursing personal statement, how to write an outstanding nursing personal statement, nursing personal statement example #1, nursing personal statement example #2, nursing personal statement example #3, related articles.

  • FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Keep reading for 3 examples of nursing personal statements and the 7 things you should include in your statement. Also, find out how taking care of her grandmother at home inspired one student to go into nursing.

A nursing personal statement is an essay or statement that is usually part of a list of requirements for admittance to a nursing program.

The purpose of a nursing personal statement is to give the selection committee information about your character and qualities so they can see you will be a good fit for the program.

The goals that should be included in a nursing personal statement are:

  • Passing all of your exams and receiving an honours degree in general nursing.
  • Becoming a registered nurse and securing a job as a nurse.
  • Helping a certain group of people (for example children, the elderly, and vulnerable youth)

2. Professional Experience

Any professional experience related to nursing should be included in a nursing personal statement. This could include:

  • Hospital, clinic and GP practice experience
  • Any other relevant work with people such as volunteering or mentoring roles
  • Any paid work that has given you administrative or client-facing experience
  • Previous work experience in healthcare settings such as residential care demonstrates your ability to handle complex situations and care for patients.

For example, one student wrote about how working in a dental clinic helped her to start to consider nursing as a career.

3. Interests and motivation

When writing a nursing personal statement, it is important to explain your motivation for pursuing a career in nursing. Possible interests to include in your statement include:

  • Your desire to help others and make a difference in people’s lives
  • You were inspired by a family member, teacher or neighbour who was a nurse
  • Your interest in providing care and support to those who need it most when they are at their most vulnerable
  • The positive impact that nurses have on their patients’ lives, both physically and mentally
  • Your desire to work as part of a team with other healthcare professionals
  • Your commitment to providing high-quality, compassionate care for all patients, regardless of their background or lifestyle choices.

One of the students profiled below wrote I have a particular interest in pain management and the non-traditional methods of holistic care to support patients, such as hypnosis.

4. Qualifications

When writing a nursing personal statement, it is important to include details of the qualifications you have earned or are currently working towards. These should include:

  • A degree in nursing or a related field.
  • Certification in CPR, advanced life support techniques, and other relevant skill sets.
  • Strong scores in High School science, math and related subjects.

5. Personal Traits

When writing a personal statement for nursing programmes, it is important to include personal qualities such as:

  • Honesty and integrity – you should be honest about your abilities and experience, as well as your intentions for pursuing a career in nursing.
  • Empathy – being able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes and understand their perspective is an essential trait of a good nurse.
  • Compassion – having compassion for others will help you provide them with the best possible care.
  • Initiative – taking the initiative when needed shows that you are capable of taking on responsibilities without being told what to do.
  • Maturity – having maturity means being able to think rationally in stressful situations, even if emotions may be running high around you.

When writing your nursing personal statement, you should include the following skills:

  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • Strong critical thinking and problem-solving abilities
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Knowledge of medical terminology and healthcare systems
  • Knowledge of various treatments, protocols, policies, and procedures related to nursing practice.

Make it clear that you know you have a lot to learn and that you are looking forward to a steep learning curve!

7. Achievements

Achievements that could be included in a nursing personal statement include, but are not limited to:

  • Awards and honours received for academic or other achievements
  • Volunteer work or community service activity awards related to nursing
  • Extra-curricular activities that have helped you develop the necessary skills for nursing school, such as tutoring or mentoring programs
  • Accomplishments related to previous jobs or internships related to healthcare professions (e.g., certifications)

Step 1: Research the Schools

Researching the schools you are applying to can help with writing an outstanding nursing personal statement because it gives you an idea of what each school is looking for and what their requirements are.

This process will help you rank the programs in order of preference, determine which schools are reach schools and which institutions should be your ‘safety schools’, if you are not selected by your number one choice.

You could identify any specific topics or themes that each school tends to favor in their applications.

This knowledge will allow you to craft an effective personal statement that stands out from the rest.

Step 2: Get Ready to Talk about Yourself

  • Start by brainstorming: Read the prompt carefully. If it asks you to talk about anything other than your motivation for nursing school (for example, a time when you helped someone) highlight it and brainstorm it separately.
  • Write down any experiences, traits, or qualities that make you an outstanding candidate for the nursing program.
  • Select the best stories and anecdotes: Choose those that demonstrate your strengths and show why you are an ideal fit for the program.
  • Edit thoroughly: Go through each section multiple times to ensure it is relevant and well-written, then reread it with a critical eye to catch any mistakes or typos that may have slipped through in the editing stages.

Step 3: Write the Essay in free-form

  • Sometimes getting started is the hardest part! If you know the examples you are going to talk about and have a rough plan for your essay, write the example that’s most important to you first.
  • To begin, don’t worry about grammar or making it sound perfect. Say what you want to say, and let your passion for nursing shine through.
  • Then, refine your ideas by shaping them and going back in to shape them further if needed. Sometimes, taking a break overnight will give you time to subconsciously improve your ideas.
  • Ensure that your essay is captivating by giving yourself adequate time to go through this process thoroughly before starting on the final draft of your essay.

Step 4: Revise and Revise Some More

  • Read through the entire essay carefully and make notes of any areas that need improvement.
  • Make corrections to grammar and sentence structure issues, as well as any other minor mistakes or typos you find along the way.
  • Re-read your essay multiple times to make sure it flows smoothly from start to finish without any awkward transitions or sections that need further clarification or expansion. Ask trusted guidance counsellors, teachers or study partners to read it and give you some feedback.
  • Read it through again after making changes if necessary, double-check that you have completed the whole application and attached your supporting documents, then submit your application when it’s ready.

In 2023, an example of a successful nursing school personal statement might look something like this:

“The week after I turned 16, I was walking backwards down a hill, my arms supporting the weight of the wheelchair as its wheels rolled slowly in reverse.

Sunlight danced through the trees around us and shone in my grandmother’s hair as she sat inside the wheelchair.

I couldn’t see my grandmother’s face from that angle, but I could hear her laughing with joy as she enjoyed the outdoors for the first time in weeks. My exhausted parents were finally trusting me as a caregiver and it changed my life.

My grandmother came to live with my family two years ago after breaking her hip. She completed much of her recovery at our home, but Nurse George came by every day to perform personal care tasks, monitor vital signs and assist with physical therapy exercises.

George also taught me some basic patient care practices such as how to support a wheelchair correctly while going downhill and emphasised the importance of positive mental health in patient recovery.

I am excited by this opportunity to apply to Seaton’s College of Nursing because I appreciate your program’s specialization in rehabilitation nursing; it is exactly what inspired me pursue a career helping people recover from injuries or medical surgery!

Additionally, your focus on assisting patients to regain their independent skills will help me achieve these professional aspirations I have set for myself.

“I grew up close to a hospital, where I watched patients go through the double doors for a variety of ailments. From a young age, this drove me to develop a strong interest in the field of medicine. I knew that I wanted to pursue a career in the future that would allow me to take care of those in need.

Through my courses in the natural sciences as well as social studies, I have continued to develop my knowledge in the field and prepare for my future education.

Listening to my mother talk about her patients and their families at Jackson Pediatrics Center has taught me the value of empathy and communication.

Frequently, they simply want someone to listen; I do my best to give them a judgment-free space where they can share their stories.

Whether it’s an emotional or physical issue they’re facing, patients appreciate working with flexible and considerate people like myself who understand how important it is for them feel comfortable talking about their struggles or concerns without fear of judgement or criticism from others around them. I want to be that kind of nurse in the future.

Additionally, being able to help young people overcome their challenges and navigate their way back towards recovery is something that excites me about pursuing this career path.”

“I first thought of nursing and a career in health when I started a part-time job at a local dental practice. My job was secretarial but almost immediately I was spending some time interacting with patients and became interested in working in the healthcare industry.

I have a particular interest in pain management and the non-traditional methods of holistic care to support patients, such as hypnosis which was used successfully at the practice to help patients with phobias and extreme anxiety prepare for treatment.

This experience helped inspire me to apply for nursing school with the goal of becoming an RN someday because it showed me how rewarding it could be helping people access healthcare.

Since then I have volunteered at our local drop-in health clinic at the community centre; there is no feeling comparable when they offer you their sincere thank yous! Furthermore, these experiences have taught me the value of community support when trying to encourage members of minority communities to access healthcare.

If they know someone who has had a positive experience at the clinic they are much more likely to attend. Going forward, I would like to focus on pain management in the community because I think there is huge scope for development in this field.”

What should be included in a nursing personal statement?

When writing your nursing personal statement, make sure to include:

  • Why you want to become a nurse
  • What inspires you about nursing
  • The experiences you’ve had that have taught you about nursing
  • Program-specific reasons for your interest in the school
  • How you intend to contribute to the program and field of nursing

What format should be used for a nursing personal statement?

The outline of the format should include:

  • Half-inch indentations for each paragraph
  • Left-align or justify your essay
  • Double spacing between sentences and paragraphs
  • One-inch margins all around
  • Times New Roman font style (12 points) with no title or headings.

Note – the nursing school may provide more specific guidance. Use the above if they do not include formatting advice.

What topics can be discussed in a nursing personal statement?

Topics that can be discussed in a nursing personal statement include:

  • Why you want to study nursing and what sparked your interest in the field.
  • Your skill sets, such as patience, empathy, teamwork and communication.
  • Any experiences that have shaped who you are today or influenced your decision to become a nurse (e.g., an unwell family member).
  • Any personal details that are relevant to why you should be accepted into the program (e.g., life experiences).
  • Any personal challenges that may impact your ability to access the course, like severe financial hardship or a disability and the specific suppport you would need.

How do I write a great nursing personal statement?

  • Determine your purpose
  • Research the school
  • Brainstorm ideas
  • Write down key points

What is the difference between a nursing program and a nursing school?

The difference between a nursing program and a nursing school is Nursing programs are the courses that individuals take to earn their nursing degree. Nursing schools are institutions that offer these programs and provide education and training for students.

Nursing schools typically require applicants to submit a personal statement as part of the application process.

Additionally, nursing schools often have a broader focus than just providing education in the field of nursing, such as offering classes in related subjects like biology or chemistry.

How do I find admission requirements for nursing school?

Research the different nursing schools you are interested in, and find their website. All the information you need about admissions should be on the university website

Once you have decided that nursing is for you, you can also schedule an appointment (in-person or online) with an admissions counsellor for each nursing school you are considering to get a better understanding of their personal statement requirements and other criteria they look for in applicants.

What are the different types of nursing careers?

There are many types of nursing careers, including:

  • Registered Nurse (RN): Registered nurses are licensed professionals who provide direct patient care, educate patients about their conditions, and administer medications.
  • Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN): Licensed practical nurses are also licensed professionals who provide direct patient care but do not have the same level of education as registered nurses.
  • Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA): Certified nursing assistants assist registered nurses and licensed practical nurses with basic patient care tasks such as feeding, bathing and dressing patients in addition to other duties related to the healthcare facility they work in such as cleaning rooms or providing transportation services for patients/family members visiting the facility/homecare settings etc.
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sample personal statement nursing

medRxiv

Coming out of the ashes we rise: Experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse international nursing students at two Australian universities during the Covid-19 pandemic

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Background and aim: Research on international students conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic has persistently highlighted the vulnerabilities and challenges that they experienced when staying in the host country to continue with their studies. The findings from such research can inevitably create a negative image of international students and their ability to respond to challenges during unprecedented times. Therefore, this paper took a different stance and reported on a qualitative study that explored culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) international nursing students who overcame the challenges brought about by the pandemic to continue with their studies in Australia. Method: A descriptive qualitative research design guided by the processes of constructivist grounded theory was selected to ascertain insights from participants' experiences of studying abroad in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: Three themes emerged from the collected data that described the participants' lived experiences, and they were: 1) Viewing international education as the pursuit of a better life, 2) Focusing on personal growth, and 3) Coming out of the ashes we rise. Discussion: The findings highlight the importance of recognising the investments and sacrifices that CaLD international students and their families make in pursuit of international tertiary education. The findings also underscore the importance of acknowledging the qualities that CaLD international students have to achieve self-growth and ultimately self-efficacy as they stay in the host country during a pandemic. Conclusion: Future research should focus on identifying strategies that are useful for CaLD international nursing students to experience personal growth and ultimately self-efficacy and continue with their studies in the host country during times of uncertainty such as a pandemic.

Competing Interest Statement

The authors have declared no competing interest.

Funding Statement

This study did not receive any funding

Author Declarations

I confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained.

The details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below:

Ethical approval was obtained from Curtin University Human Research Ethics Office (HRE2022-0238) and The University of Southern Queensland Ethical Review Committee (H22REA114).

I confirm that all necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived, and that any patient/participant/sample identifiers included were not known to anyone (e.g., hospital staff, patients or participants themselves) outside the research group so cannot be used to identify individuals.

I understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).

I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines, such as any relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material, if applicable.

Data Availability

All data produced in the present study are available upon reasonable request to the authors

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IMAGES

  1. Free nursing personal statement example in MS Word format

    sample personal statement nursing

  2. Nursing (Adult) personal statement example (2) (free Microsoft Word

    sample personal statement nursing

  3. Nurse Practitioner Personal Statement

    sample personal statement nursing

  4. Sample Personal Statements

    sample personal statement nursing

  5. 20+ SAMPLE Nursing Personal Statements in PDF

    sample personal statement nursing

  6. 12 Complete Templates Of Nursing Personal Statement For A Job And Tips

    sample personal statement nursing

COMMENTS

  1. Nursing Personal Statement Template and Example

    A nursing personal statement is a short essay that a candidate writes for a nursing program application. It complements their grades and other quantifiable factors, providing a more personal look at a candidate's dedication, passion and work ethic. Applicants can use this space to describe why they're interested in a specific nursing program ...

  2. Nursing Personal Statements

    Adult Nursing Personal Statement Example 10. Nursing is a profession I have always looked upon with respect. I believe that the role of a nurse can be very challenging and hectic at times, as well as rewarding and fulfilling. Adult Nursing Personal Statement Example 11. Nursing is a lifelong learning experience, a vocation and a profession that ...

  3. Personal Statement for Nursing School: Tips + Examples

    These examples are meant to serve as a guide when crafting your own original personal statement for nursing school. Example #1: Indeed 's Nursing School Personal Statement Sample. "I walked backward down the hill, my arms supporting the weight of the wheelchair as its wheels rolled slowly in reverse.

  4. Powerful Nursing School Personal Statement: w/Samples

    Step 1: Print or Write down the Prompt. You must adhere to the prompt. Period. Keep in mind how crucial it is to follow protocols in the field of nursing. If you cannot follow the guidelines for a nursing school personal statement, the admissions committee may doubt your abilities in the field.

  5. Tips for Writing a Great Nursing Personal Statement

    2. Create Your Draft. When it is time to start putting your thoughts on paper, try to avoid overthinking your work. Strive for a natural voice. Pretend you are talking to a friend and write without fear — you can edit and polish your piece to perfection in the next stage. Avoid cliches and nursing generalities.

  6. Nursing School Personal Statement Examples

    Nursing School Personal Statement Sample 5. Brainstorming for Your Nursing School Personal Statement. The process of creating a strong nursing personal statement starts even before you begin writing. There is a certain amount of preparation that should take place to identify the specific information you want to include in your essay. So, make ...

  7. Personal statement advice: nursing

    Nursing personal statement basics - what to include. To structure it, try to write clearly and reflectively about: how you arrived at your decision to go into nursing. why, specifically, you want to be an adult, child, mental health, or learning disabilities nurse. how your experience and research has contributed to your understanding of the ...

  8. Nursing Personal Statement Examples

    Nursing Personal Statement Examples | Uni Compare. Prepare for a digitally advanced workplace with cutting edge Finance Degrees. Transform lives with a Health and Social Care Degree from Bangor. Taken from 65,000+ data points from students attending university to help future generations. Find out more.

  9. 15 Amazing Personal Statement Examples That Stand Out

    These nursing personal statement examples and key takeaways provide valuable insights for anyone aspiring to enter the nursing freshman year. They demonstrate the importance of a well-crafted statement that blends personal motivation, relevant experiences, and a clear understanding of the nursing profession's demands and rewards. ...

  10. Smart'n

    Nursing personal statement examples. Here are 3 nursing school personal statement examples to help you write your own: 1-I descended the hill in reverse, guiding the wheelchair with my arms as it moved slowly backward. The sunlight filtered through the surrounding trees, casting a gentle glow on my grandmother, who sat in the wheelchair.

  11. Nursing Personal Statement Writing Guide (With Examples)

    So, the following format is suitable for writing your personal statement. Paragraph 1 - Explain in this section a reason or story as to why you want to be a nurse. This will help to create a connection. Paragraph 2 - At this point, you can explore your work experience as well as your education.

  12. How to Write a Nursing School Personal Statement: What to Include

    So, you have decided to go to nursing school, or advance your nursing career by furthering your education. Now is the time to become familiar with the application process, get your transcripts and letters of recommendation in order and compose the, in some cases dreaded personal statement. Writing a personal statement is a common part of the application process when working to advance your ...

  13. How To Write A Personal Statement For A Nursing Course Application

    Start with who you are. Your personal statement is your chance to talk directly to the course admissions officer about who you are, what motivates you, and why you should be chosen for a place in the branch of nursing you've applied for. You should demonstrate your knowledge of nursing and the healthcare industry in accordance with your level ...

  14. Adult Nursing Personal Statement 1

    Adult Nursing Personal Statement. Submitted by Maryam. I have always been eager to pursue a career where it's my job to care and fend for people that are unable to care for themselves efficiently. Nursing is very challenging and demanding, however, I believe that it is also very rewarding. I have also come to understand that a career in ...

  15. Nursing personal statements

    Nursing personal statements. On this page you'll find a collection of real personal statements written by students applying to study nursing and related courses at university. These personal statements are written by real students - don't expect them all to be perfect! But by reading through a few of these samples, you'll be able to get some ...

  16. Nursing Masters Personal Statement Sample

    Nursing Masters Personal Statement Sample. Written by Sarah Hastings-Woodhouse. This is an example personal statement for a Masters degree application in Nursing. See our guide for advice on writing your own postgraduate personal statement. As a qualified nurse with over three years' professional experience, I was immediately drawn to your ...

  17. How to write a nursing personal statement for your first nurse job

    How to begin your nursing personal statement. Draw attention to your personal achievements, but avoid repeating things like your grades, as these will likely be included elsewhere in your application. You would be much better off focusing on extra-curricular achievements at this point to show them you are good at much more than just academic ...

  18. Postgraduate Adult Nursing Studies Personal Statement Example

    MSc. Adult nursing. This personal statement is unrated. Nursing is a profession I have always looked upon with respect. I believe that the role of a nurse can be very challenging and hectic at times, as well as rewarding and fulfilling. In my opinion a person who is willing to become a nurse need to have very good interpersonal skills, be a ...

  19. Adult Nursing Personal Statement Example 5

    Adult Nursing Personal Statement Example 5. I am so very proud to be able to share aspects of my life that are not apparent from my academic record. After being encouraged to pursue my degree by both friends and family, I found that going back to school is a character-defining time in my life, causing me to face many challenges such as ...

  20. Nursing Personal Statement Examples in 2023

    Nursing Personal Statement Example #1. In 2023, an example of a successful nursing school personal statement might look something like this: "The week after I turned 16, I was walking backwards down a hill, my arms supporting the weight of the wheelchair as its wheels rolled slowly in reverse.

  21. Nursing personal statement example

    Office Hours: 9am - 6pm, Monday to Friday UK Address Personal Statement Service. The Old Dairy 12 Stephen Road Headington, Oxford, OX3 9AY United Kingdom. VAT Number 425 5446 95. 24/7 0800 334 5952 London 020 364 076 91 [email protected]

  22. Coming out of the ashes we rise: Experiences of culturally and

    Background and aim: Research on international students conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic has persistently highlighted the vulnerabilities and challenges that they experienced when staying in the host country to continue with their studies. The findings from such research can inevitably create a negative image of international students and their ability to respond to challenges during ...