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Why School Trips Are Beneficial for Students

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The pandemic has had many implications for students, teachers, and the educational system as a whole—the loss of many school trips among them. Now is the moment to make up for lost time ! Although some may consider school trips as more of a bonus element than an essential part of the school experience, we know just how valuable school trips are for students from first-hand experience .

From the notable academic benefits to the advantages for personal development, we believe passionately that school trips are a vital part of what makes CAS and IB experience so unique. Educational trips allow students to mobilize their learnings while socializing with peers and strangers in a completely different way than many of them have before. It is these experiences that many students remember most from their time at school. 

So, if you are looking for inspiration for the 2022/2023 academic year, here are just a few ways school trips can benefit students.

School trips bring subjects to life

Each young person learns a bit differently and ensuring that students receive a wide variety of learning experiences ensures that no one is left behind. Kinaesthetic learners, in particular, benefit immensely from the chance to take a hands-on approach to a topic. For example, a study of 10th-grade students from 2019 evaluated the attitude of students who had experienced learning outside of the classroom with those who had not. The findings showed that the experimental group had a more positive attitude towards science than their peers. It was also found that field trips promote a more vital interest in science. 

So, whether studying marine biodiversity in person or learning about different approaches to sustainability by seeing them implemented in a city, the quality of knowledge in virtually all subjects is enhanced when real-life experience is part of the program.

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School trips allow for the discovery of new interests

Exposure to new situations, topics, and teaching methods automatically stimulates interest and excites the brain. As such, school trips are a potent tool to cultivate new interests and boost motivation to continue exploring existing ones. School trips abroad and even shorter outings closer to home can provide invaluable inspiration for students. Many Service Learning experiences that students have while traveling, for example, prompt them to implement their own ideas once they have returned home. 

School trips benefit the classroom environment

In addition to how a school trip directly impacts a student’s academic education, such as strengthening their understanding of a subject or offering practical memories to be utlized in the exam hall, it will also improve the classroom environment once everyone has returned home. Carving out a block of time to share unique and exciting experiences necessarily improves relationships between students and between students and teachers. This generally translates to improved behavior and engagement at school. 

School trips instill confidence and independence

Another hugely important benefit of school trips is gaining the confidence to try new things. An essential step in broadening their horizons , a young person who feels empowered to do things and go places on their own will automatically open up many new and beneficial opportunities. For many students, a school trip might be their first time traveling without their families. This gives students a new level of responsibility for themselves and their belongings. 

In addition, travel also taps into the skills needed for public speaking, professional communication, and presentations—all things many students struggle with. Educational trips challenge students who may be timid or tend to avoid engaging with unfamiliar people. By stepping outside of their comfort zone when asking for directions, posing questions to the staff at visits, or even ordering food while traveling—these students’ confidence will enjoy a notable boost. 

School trips promote deeper cultural understanding

Trips abroad and even travel within their home country can help students appreciate the wonderful mixture of cultures, cuisines, and traditions that constitute the world around them. Travel is a fantastic opportunity for students to experience cultures outside their own and appreciate the shared characteristics that unite us. Students will also be gifted with first-hand knowledge of how their culture is informed by others and vice versa, leading to deeping understanding, empathy, and international mindedness .

At CAS Trips , we firmly believe that school trips help students gain real-world experience that cannot be taught in a classroom. These enriching and memorable journeys open their minds to different cultures and strengthen their knowledge of the world around them. 

Ready to start planning? Get in touch to speak with one of our educational travel experts today. 

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school trip benefits essay

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Why Are School Trips Important?

school trip benefits essay

Students recognise this benefit of school trips themselves – according to the Evaluation of Learning Away Final Report, 2015 , “the views of secondary students continued to be positive in the post residential context with two thirds or more thinking that…they: would make better progress in their subject (72%); had a better understanding of the subject (72%); were better at problem-solving (66%); and would do better in their exams/tests (66%)”.

Benefits of school trips

And Ofsted, in their History for All report, 2011 , said that “Wide-ranging out-of-classroom activities, including school trips, are cited as examples of outstanding teaching. Students are able to appreciate their studies from a different, and usually more active perspective. Trips to Berlin and the battlefields of Belgium are named as examples.”

Offering real-world experience of the subject

The academic benefits of school trips are pretty obvious – but important to remember.

But there’s so much more that school trips can offer students during these formative years.

For example, they give your students experience of the importance of your subject in the ‘real world’.

So? Well, pretty much every teacher has at some time or other faced resistance from kids who don’t understand why they have to learn about algebra, longshore drift or the difference between the French perfect, pluperfect and imperfect tenses. Your school trip is your golden opportunity to show them.

You may ignite a new passion. For some, you may even give them ideas for future careers they never would have considered before.

Improving the classroom environment

As you know, taking students out of the classroom can do wonders for the relationships between students and teachers, making the classroom a much nicer place for everyone to be.

Benefits of school trips

According to the Evaluation of Learning Away Final Report, 2015, “84% of staff felt that the Learning Away residential had begun to achieve its aims in relation to improving relationships” and “71% of secondary students felt that, as a result of the residential, their teachers had a better understanding of how they liked to learn best”.

Benefits of school trips

Your shared experiences and the opportunity to have fun together will improve your student-teacher relationship. And this improves behaviour and engagement back in the classroom.

It can also make it easier for students to talk to you if they need to.  

Of course, students will also have the opportunity to get to know their peers better, particularly those outside of their usual friendship circles. And this can help them all to feel more comfortable in class.

More comfortable students means higher engagement and better learning for everyone.

Building confidence and developing independence

This is another often ignored but hugely important benefit of school trips.

Benefits of school trips

According to the Learning Away – Brilliant residentials and their impact on young people and schools, 2015 study, 87% of secondary students felt more confident to try new things they would not have done before their trip.

Benefits of school trips

The study also found that “prior to the residential only 40% of secondary students felt that they could be role models to others; after the residential, this figure rose to 67%”.

What a gift to give your students! The confidence to try new things and broaden their horizons will open up so many incredible opportunities for them.

And for many of them, your school trip might well be their first time travelling abroad without their families.

Although they'll be fully supported by staff on the trip, they’ll still have to take responsibility for themselves.

They’ll have to make sure they’re up and ready on time every day. They’ll have to look after their own stuff and behave sensibly so that they (and everyone around them) are safe.

So, your school trip won’t just be of educational benefit from an academic point of view, it will also help your students grow up and help them on their way to becoming independent, confident young adults.

Inspiring young people

At the end of the day, aren’t school trips really so important because they’re powerful, life-changing experiences that inspire young people?

They’ll be inspired to do the best they can in their exams, by drawing on real, practical experiences and memories.

They’ll be inspired to see the value of your subject in the ‘real world’ - helping them to unlock new passions or even a future career.

They’ll be inspired to develop crucial life skills, such as independence, intercultural understanding and tolerance.

And they’ll become more confident in themselves and in their interactions with other people and the world around them.

And by running your school trip, you’ll be the teacher that provides them with all of this.

Download the FREE presentation

We’ve created this FREE, editable PowerPoint presentation with all of these points. We hope this saves you time and helps you to make the case for your next school trip.

What's next?

If you’re ready to start planning your school trip, then take a look at our ultimate guide to organising a school trip  – there are loads of tips, tricks and free downloads to help save you time.

Already booked your trip and ready to crack on with launching your trip? Then you’ll want to take a look at our Trip Launch Pack .

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My school trip essay

My school trip essay 6 models

Last updated Monday , 13-11-2023 on 09:55 am

My school trip essay ,School trips leave a great impact in the mind of the student where he goes without his family accompanied by friends and colleagues, which allows him to rely on himself and take responsibility to enjoy the activities of the trip.All this will be here in My school trip essay .

My school trip essay

School trips leave a great impact in the mind of the student, where he goes without his family, with his friends and colleagues, which allow him to rely on himself and take responsibility and enjoy the activities of the trip.

Each school planning for trips is as a recreational and educational way, supervised by social workers and school supervisors, who planning visits, ticketing, bus booking, etc.

I went on a school trip to (name of the city) of (Governorate name). of (city area in km) and (population number) approximately.

I prepared my small bag and put sandwiches, juice and water for the trip. I went to sleep early to wake up early to be full of energy on the journey.

We rode the bus in front of the school in the early morning and we left our parents and friends who did not come with us.

The bus driver displayed a documentary about the city we were going to visit and the tour supervisor told us about the directions and instructions we should follow and how to act in case of lost. He provided us emergency numbers and asked us to write them in a paper and keep in our pocket.

We arrived at our destination and started visiting the (museum name) which is a large museum featuring many important items that tell us the history of the city.

Then we went to visit the open museum which is an open area with many beautiful items.

Then we went to visit the important landmarks of the city.

The last stop of the trip was to visit the amusement park, a recreational city with lots of games.

The supervisor gave us two hours to enjoy our time, play the games we want and assemble before the door of the amusement park in preparation for riding the bus and back to our city.

We gathered two hours later in front of the amusement park door, the supervisor checked everyone’s presence and then we boarded the bus and returned to our city.

It was a beautiful day we enjoyed it a lot and we saw many of the city’s famous sights.

We learned a lot about its history and the history of its inhabitants.

Finally, we reached our city late at night. Our families were waiting for us.

We thanked the tour supervisor and went to our homes to sleep and prepare for school the next day.

a memorable school trip essay

It’s great to enjoy a little bit away from school and home for rejuvenation and energy, and this is exactly what happened. After working hard and excelling in school, I was able to go out on an unforgettable school trip. Through this trip, I was able to define my goals and benefit greatly from them.

This was an excursion to one of the seminars of the great Steve Jones. Just being in the midst of this huge crowd of scientists, inventors and businessmen made me know what I want to become in the future, and what are my upcoming priorities.

On this journey I was able to find answers to many of my questions and found the inspiration I wanted. Now I want to become in the future an inventor of something useful that benefits humanity and achieve great success for me, whether material or moral, through fame.

It is wonderful to know the importance of technology to society and how we inevitably go to it and the development of all means of services around us. And with just a little bit of clinging to the dream and fighting for it like Steve did, I can certainly succeed too.

simple essay on school trip

I feel very happy to go on a trip to the football stadium. This was a big surprise for us, to be able to watch an important match with friends.

Of course, I watched many matches with my family before, but this time the experience is different because it is with my friends and I was able to express and launch my enthusiasm, without feeling any pressure.

I enjoy this experience so much, and for sure I want to repeat this experience in other activities. Now I can’t wait to go home and tell my brother about this experience, and that in the future he should try going out with his friends on school trips and enjoying this holiday. It gives great psychological comfort and a boost of activity that helps to return to study with full vitality and activity.

essay on school trip to a park

Oh my gosh, I can’t describe the beauty of nature that I enjoyed during my last school trip. There is a very big difference between the constant presence between the big and fast industrial life and the relaxation in the vast gardens and parks that do not contain any noise.

It is great to go through this experience and go to one of the most beautiful parks that contain very beautiful gardening works and organized views of trees and roses.

The wonderful engineering work that I saw in the park is one of the best landscapes that my friends and I enjoyed watching.

And certainly immediately we felt the amount of interest and love from the people responsible for this place, and how they can preserve and show this place this beauty.

Of course I would love to go back on a school trip to the park and enjoy physical games with my friends like we did. This was one of the things I enjoyed in nature. It is great to find large green areas. This helped me relax a lot.

school tour experience essay

I would very much like to write an article about my experience in the last school tour, and point out the things I liked the most.

I find this tour very different from many of our previous tours. Previously, the tour was in only one place, and curiosity and enthusiasm ended before the tour ended.

But certainly this was different when we were able to visit many places in the same tour, such as the museum, the garden and the library. All of these places had a different effect.

We find when visiting the museum and meeting one of the guides working in the museum that he has that interesting and funny way of explaining the holdings. It makes you want to know more about its origin and the civilization it comes from.

But due to the lack of time, this made me even more excited, eager to listen. I am also eager to see another place and enjoy. This made it more beautiful and did not leave any way for boredom.

When visiting the library, I was able to sign one of the famous books and see some of the authors of these books. I always watched this event through movies only. It is great to try this experience and get some interesting and useful books.

But certainly nothing is so wonderful after a long day of listening and paying attention as visiting the park and walking around it to release all that energy.

I cannot describe the beauty of how I felt in the experience of the games and activities that we did inside the park. I can say this was the best school trip experience I’ve ever had.

a school field trip essay in English

One of the great school field trips I enjoyed was this trip, this weekend we were able to go on a school field trip to the zoo.

And there were a lot of interesting animals that wanted to feed and take pictures, many pictures with them. But of course, every field trip cannot pass without new experiences, some of which you will benefit from and others that delight you.

I can’t stop laughing whenever I remembered the monkeys, and how they used to behave, I can’t believe how smart this animal is, and how it can make you happy at any time. And also watching the peacock, what a beauty!, I did not feel the consistency and beauty of the colors, as I saw in this bird.

It was wonderful to learn some information about the habitat of many animals, which made me very eager to read about them, how they live and how important the group is to them, and how to unite among them, such as the blue whale and other collective animals that live in groups and like the wolf as well.

Certainly this field trip was very wonderful and contained a lot of information that I benefited from.

In this way we have given you  My school trip essay, and you can read more through the following section:

  •  English essay

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12 comments.

A school trip essay is very excellent and writing way is also perfect

A very good essay. Need more like this.

Yeah. A very good way of writing

Awesome Schools trips are always full of fun and interesting moment. Nice construction, fantastic essay. keep it up.

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Nice 👍👍👍👍👍👍🙂

This information is truly valuable. I appreciate the practical tips you’ve shared.

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Benefits of school trips, why are they important?

Educational tours and school trips abroad can help students develop both on an academic and personal level. Today we share our thoughts on the main benefits of school trips abroad for your students and children:

benefits of school trips travel newsletter JWT Sports

1-Reinforcing lessons and expanding knowledge

As Confucius said: “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

‘Doing’, or putting into action or practice lessons learnt in the classroom, helps students remember and understand them better.

Applying practice to the theory not only reinforces those lessons but expands their knowledge on the subject, giving it a different more tangible dimension.

This is applicable to all subjects, from history to art but it is particularly evident when studying languages. The excitement of using those language skills in the real world will help students see the real purpose of learning them in the first place.

2-Encouraging and discovering new interests

As humans and students our brain gets excited by different things, topics and teaching methods. School trips can be a powerful motivation tool, encouraging further learning on a particular subject or sparking their interest in new ones.

School trips abroad and indeed local school tours can inspire students. Kids who might not be particularly interested in team sports for instance, might discover they enjoy skiing, hiking or even find a new sporting passion.

3-Experiencing different cultures

Education is not only about growing intellectually or achieving results but also preparing youngsters to be responsible citizens. Experiencing different cultures teaches them valuable lessons they will carry with them into adulthood.

On school trips abroad, they get exposed to different cultures, traditions, food, languages and ways to see the world; encouraging understanding, appreciation for other nationalities and diversity. This is without a doubt one of the most important benefits of school trips abroad for all students.

4-Bonding with classmates and teachers

School trips also have an important social aspect, as they facilitate team building and bonding between classmates. Often new friendships are developed during school trips, as students from different groups might interact and mix.

They can also give teachers an opportunity to know their students better, their interests and personalities, in a more informal context and relaxed environment; and gain their trust.

5-Personal development and confidence building

Many students get their first taste of relative freedom or independence during school trips. This is an important rite of passage and has a positive impact on their personal development, building their confidence as they are taken out of their home environment and comfort zone.

For instance they will learn to manage their own time and find their way around a new city, if the trip includes free time to explore; they will be in charge of their personal budget for the duration of the trip and they can even be encouraged to organise a saving plan at home to take responsibility for their own school trip costs.

These valuable learning experiences can’t be recreated in a classroom environment or learned from textbooks.

6- Positive memories

Many of us remember our favourite school tour, whether it was a visit to a local museum or our first time saying a few words in a different language abroad. Many of our best school memories are created during school trips with peers.

As teachers and parents have told our travel team over the years, some of the benefits of school trips will last a lifetime.

Find some ideas for your school trips on our page: TOP 10 DESTINATIONS FOR SCHOOL TRIPS

We hope you enjoyed our article on the main benefits of school trips abroad, for destination ideas and travel advice for your school group, contact our knowledgeable travel experts at JWT Schools.

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GETTING STARTED

The value of school trips: a journey beyond the classroom

October 2023 • 3 mins read

School day trips have long been a cherished tradition in education, and for good reason. These excursions beyond the confines of the classroom offer a multitude of benefits for both students and teachers. In this blog post, we will explore the reasons why school field trips are so valuable and why they continue to play a vital role in the learning experience.

1. Real-World Learning: Field trips allow students to see, touch, and experience the subjects they are studying in real-world settings. Whether it's a visit to a science museum, a historical site, or an art gallery, students can apply what they've learned in class to tangible experiences, making the knowledge more concrete and memorable.

2. Cultural Enrichment: School field trips often include visits to museums, theatres, and cultural institutions. These experiences expose students to art, history, and cultural diversity that may be inaccessible to them. Such exposure can broaden their horizons and encourage a deeper appreciation for the world's richness.

3. Hands-On Experiences : Science centres, zoos, and nature reserves offer students the chance to engage in hands-on learning. Whether it's dissecting a frog, observing animal behaviour, or conducting experiments, students gain practical knowledge that textbooks alone cannot provide. This hands-on approach can ignite a passion for science and foster critical thinking skills.

4. Social Interaction: Field trips are a social experience, allowing students to interact with their peers and teachers in a different context. This interaction can help build relationships, improve communication skills, and enhance teamwork. Students often remember these shared experiences, which can create lasting bonds with their classmates.

Art Gallery of New South Wales

5. Historical Connection: Visiting historical sites and landmarks can make history come alive for students. Standing in the place where pivotal events occurred can create a deeper connection to the past, fostering a sense of historical empathy and understanding. It enables students to appreciate the significance of history in shaping the world they live in today.

6. Cognitive Development: School trips engage students' cognitive skills in a unique way. They encourage curiosity, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Students must process information, ask questions, and make connections between what they already know and what they are experiencing.

7. Inspiration: A well-organized school trip can inspire students. They may discover new interests, talents, or career aspirations. A visit to a science lab can spark a passion for research, while a trip to an art gallery might awaken an appreciation for creativity and artistic expression. Such experiences can lead to lifelong pursuits.

8. Teacher-Student Bond: School trips often provide teachers with opportunities to connect with their students more personally. Teachers can observe how their students respond to new environments and adapt their teaching methods accordingly. These experiences can help educators better understand their students and tailor their teaching to individual needs.

School trips often provide teachers with opportunities to connect with their students more personally

9. Memorable Learning: School trips are memorable, and this memorability enhances retention. When students look back on their educational journey, the moments from these outings often stand out as highlights. The vivid memories associated with field trips serve as anchors for the knowledge and lessons learned during the trip.

10. Inclusivity: Field trips can promote inclusivity by giving all students the opportunity to participate in educational activities regardless of their socioeconomic background. Many schools provide financial assistance to ensure every student can access these enriching experiences.

In conclusion, school day trips are invaluable for students and teachers because they offer real-world learning, cultural enrichment, hands-on experiences, social interaction, historical connection, cognitive development, inspiration, teacher-student bonding, memorable learning, and inclusivity. These outings are more than just a break from the routine; they are an integral part of the educational journey, shaping students into well-rounded individuals with a deep understanding of the world around them. Teachers and educators should continue to prioritize and plan these experiences, recognizing their lasting impact on the lives of their students.

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January 2024 • 30 mins read

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Education Next

  • The Journal
  • Vol. 14, No. 1

The Educational Value of Field Trips

school trip benefits essay

Jay P. Greene

school trip benefits essay

Brian Kisida

school trip benefits essay

Daniel H. Bowen

Jay P. Greene joined EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the benefits of field trips, including how seeing live theater is a more enriching experience to students, on the EdNext podcast .

SEI20130207_0243_2

Crystal Bridges; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art; School Tour © 2013 Stephen Ironside/Ironside Photography Bo Bartlett – “The Box” –  2002 • Oil on Linen • 82 x 100 – Photographer is Karen Mauch

The school field trip has a long history in American public education. For decades, students have piled into yellow buses to visit a variety of cultural institutions, including art, natural history, and science museums, as well as theaters, zoos, and historical sites. Schools gladly endured the expense and disruption of providing field trips because they saw these experiences as central to their educational mission: schools exist not only to provide economically useful skills in numeracy and literacy, but also to produce civilized young men and women who would appreciate the arts and culture. More-advantaged families may take their children to these cultural institutions outside of school hours, but less-advantaged students are less likely to have these experiences if schools do not provide them. With field trips, public schools viewed themselves as the great equalizer in terms of access to our cultural heritage.

Today, culturally enriching field trips are in decline. Museums across the country report a steep drop in school tours. For example, the Field Museum in Chicago at one time welcomed more than 300,000 students every year. Recently the number is below 200,000. Between 2002 and 2007, Cincinnati arts organizations saw a 30 percent decrease in student attendance. A survey by the American Association of School Administrators found that more than half of schools eliminated planned field trips in 2010–11.

The decision to reduce culturally enriching field trips reflects a variety of factors. Financial pressures force schools to make difficult decisions about how to allocate scarce resources, and field trips are increasingly seen as an unnecessary frill. Greater focus on raising student performance on math and reading standardized tests may also lead schools to cut field trips. Some schools believe that student time would be better spent in the classroom preparing for the exams. When schools do organize field trips, they are increasingly choosing to take students on trips to reward them for working hard to improve their test scores rather than to provide cultural enrichment. Schools take students to amusement parks, sporting events, and movie theaters instead of to museums and historical sites. This shift from “enrichment” to “reward” field trips is reflected in a generational change among teachers about the purposes of these outings. In a 2012‒13 survey we conducted of nearly 500 Arkansas teachers, those who had been teaching for at least 15 years were significantly more likely to believe that the primary purpose of a field trip is to provide a learning opportunity, while more junior teachers were more likely to see the primary purpose as “enjoyment.”

If schools are de-emphasizing culturally enriching field trips, has anything been lost as a result? Surprisingly, we have relatively little rigorous evidence about how field trips affect students. The research presented here is the first large-scale randomized-control trial designed to measure what students learn from school tours of an art museum.

We find that students learn quite a lot. In particular, enriching field trips contribute to the development of students into civilized young men and women who possess more knowledge about art, have stronger critical-thinking skills, exhibit increased historical empathy, display higher levels of tolerance, and have a greater taste for consuming art and culture.

Design of the Study and School Tours

The 2011 opening of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Northwest Arkansas created the opportunity for this study. Crystal Bridges is the first major art museum to be built in the United States in the last four decades, with more than 50,000 square feet of gallery space and an endowment in excess of $800 million. Portions of the museum’s endowment are devoted to covering all of the expenses associated with school tours. Crystal Bridges reimburses schools for the cost of buses, provides free admission and lunch, and even pays for the cost of substitute teachers to cover for teachers who accompany students on the tour.

Because the tour is completely free to schools, and because Crystal Bridges was built in an area that never previously had an art museum, there was high demand for school tours. Not all school groups could be accommodated right away. So our research team worked with the staff at Crystal Bridges to assign spots for school tours by lottery. During the first two semesters of the school tour program, the museum received 525 applications from school groups representing 38,347 students in kindergarten through grade 12. We created matched pairs among the applicant groups based on similarity in grade level and other demographic factors. An ideal and common matched pair would be adjacent grades in the same school. We then randomly ordered the matched pairs to determine scheduling prioritization. Within each pair, we randomly assigned which applicant would be in the treatment group and receive a tour that semester and which would be in the control group and have its tour deferred.

We administered surveys to 10,912 students and 489 teachers at 123 different schools three weeks, on average, after the treatment group received its tour. The student surveys included multiple items assessing knowledge about art as well as measures of critical thinking, historical empathy, tolerance, and sustained interest in visiting art museums. Some groups were surveyed as late as eight weeks after the tour, but it was not possible to collect data after longer periods because each control group was guaranteed a tour during the following semester as a reward for its cooperation. There is no indication that the results reported below faded for groups surveyed after longer periods.

We also assessed students’ critical-thinking skills by asking them to write a short essay in response to a painting that they had not previously seen. Finally, we collected a behavioral measure of interest in art consumption by providing all students with a coded coupon good for free family admission to a special exhibit at the museum to see whether the field trip increased the likelihood of students making future visits.

All results reported below are derived from regression models that control for student grade level and gender and make comparisons within each matched pair, while taking into account the fact that students in the matched pair of applicant groups are likely to be similar in ways that we are unable to observe. Standard validity tests confirmed that the survey items employed to generate the various scales used as outcomes measured the same underlying constructs.

The intervention we studied is a modest one. Students received a one-hour tour of the museum in which they typically viewed and discussed five paintings. Some students were free to roam the museum following their formal tour, but the entire experience usually involved less than half a day. Instructional materials were sent to teachers who went on a tour, but our survey of teachers suggests that these materials received relatively little attention, on average no more than an hour of total class time. The discussion of each painting during the tour was largely student-directed, with the museum educators facilitating the discourse and providing commentary beyond the names of the work and the artist and a brief description only when students requested it. This format is now the norm in school tours of art museums. The aversion to having museum educators provide information about works of art is motivated in part by progressive education theories and by a conviction among many in museum education that students retain very little factual information from their tours.

Recalling Tour Details. Our research suggests that students actually retain a great deal of factual information from their tours. Students who received a tour of the museum were able to recall details about the paintings they had seen at very high rates. For example, 88 percent of the students who saw the Eastman Johnson painting At the Camp—Spinning Yarns and Whittling knew when surveyed weeks later that the painting depicts abolitionists making maple syrup to undermine the sugar industry, which relied on slave labor. Similarly, 82 percent of those who saw Norman Rockwell’s Rosie the Riveter could recall that the painting emphasizes the importance of women entering the workforce during World War II. Among students who saw Thomas Hart Benton’s Ploughing It Under , 79 percent recollected that it is a depiction of a farmer destroying his crops as part of a Depression-era price support program. And 70 percent of the students who saw Romare Bearden’s Sacrifice could remember that it is part of the Harlem Renaissance art movement. Since there was no guarantee that these facts would be raised in student-directed discussions, and because students had no particular reason for remembering these details (there was no test or grade associated with the tours), it is impressive that they could recall historical and sociological information at such high rates.

These results suggest that art could be an important tool for effectively conveying traditional academic content, but this analysis cannot prove it. The control-group performance was hardly better than chance in identifying factual information about these paintings, but they never had the opportunity to learn the material. The high rate of recall of factual information by students who toured the museum demonstrates that the tours made an impression. The students could remember important details about what they saw and discussed.

Critical Thinking. Beyond recalling the details of their tour, did a visit to an art museum have a significant effect on students? Our study demonstrates that it did. For example, students randomly assigned to receive a school tour of Crystal Bridges later displayed demonstrably stronger ability to think critically about art than the control group.

During the first semester of the study, we showed all 3rd- through 12th-grade students a painting they had not previously seen, Bo Bartlett’s The Box . We then asked students to write short essays in response to two questions: What do you think is going on in this painting? And, what do you see that makes you think that? These are standard prompts used by museum educators to spark discussion during school tours.

We stripped the essays of all identifying information and had two coders rate the compositions using a seven-item rubric for measuring critical thinking that was developed by researchers at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The measure is based on the number of instances that students engaged in the following in their essays: observing, interpreting, evaluating, associating, problem finding, comparing, and flexible thinking. Our measure of critical thinking is the sum of the counts of these seven items. In total, our research team blindly scored 3,811 essays. For 750 of those essays, two researchers scored them independently. The scores they assigned to the same essay were very similar, demonstrating that we were able to measure critical thinking about art with a high degree of inter-coder reliability.

We express the impact of a school tour of Crystal Bridges on critical-thinking skills in terms of standard-deviation effect sizes. Overall, we find that students assigned by lottery to a tour of the museum improve their ability to think critically about art by 9 percent of a standard deviation relative to the control group. The benefit for disadvantaged groups is considerably larger (see Figure 1). Rural students, who live in towns with fewer than 10,000 people, experience an increase in critical-thinking skills of nearly one-third of a standard deviation. Students from high-poverty schools (those where more than 50 percent of students receive free or reduced-price lunches) experience an 18 percent effect-size improvement in critical thinking about art, as do minority students.

school trip benefits essay

A large amount of the gain in critical-thinking skills stems from an increase in the number of observations that students made in their essays. Students who went on a tour became more observant, noticing and describing more details in an image. Being observant and paying attention to detail is an important and highly useful skill that students learn when they study and discuss works of art. Additional research is required to determine if the gains in critical thinking when analyzing a work of art would transfer into improved critical thinking about other, non-art-related subjects.

Historical Empathy. Tours of art museums also affect students’ values. Visiting an art museum exposes students to a diversity of ideas, peoples, places, and time periods. That broadening experience imparts greater appreciation and understanding. We see the effects in significantly higher historical empathy and tolerance measures among students randomly assigned to a school tour of Crystal Bridges.

Historical empathy is the ability to understand and appreciate what life was like for people who lived in a different time and place. This is a central purpose of teaching history, as it provides students with a clearer perspective about their own time and place. To measure historical empathy, we included three statements on the survey with which students could express their level of agreement or disagreement: 1) I have a good understanding of how early Americans thought and felt; 2) I can imagine what life was like for people 100 years ago; and 3) When looking at a painting that shows people, I try to imagine what those people are thinking. We combined these items into a scale measuring historical empathy.

Students who went on a tour of Crystal Bridges experience a 6 percent of a standard deviation increase in historical empathy. Among rural students, the benefit is much larger, a 15 percent of a standard deviation gain. We can illustrate this benefit by focusing on one of the items in the historical empathy scale. When asked to agree or disagree with the statement, “I have a good understanding of how early Americans thought and felt,” 70 percent of the treatment-group students express agreement compared to 66 percent of the control group. Among rural participants, 69 percent of the treatment-group students agree with this statement compared to 62 percent of the control group. The fact that Crystal Bridges features art from different periods in American history may have helped produce these gains in historical empathy.

Tolerance. To measure tolerance we included four statements on the survey to which students could express their level of agreement or disagreement: 1) People who disagree with my point of view bother me; 2) Artists whose work is critical of America should not be allowed to have their work shown in art museums; 3) I appreciate hearing views different from my own; and 4) I think people can have different opinions about the same thing. We combined these items into a scale measuring the general effect of the tour on tolerance.

Overall, receiving a school tour of an art museum increases student tolerance by 7 percent of a standard deviation. As with critical thinking, the benefits are much larger for students in disadvantaged groups. Rural students who visited Crystal Bridges experience a 13 percent of a standard deviation improvement in tolerance. For students at high-poverty schools, the benefit is 9 percent of a standard deviation.

The improvement in tolerance for students who went on a tour of Crystal Bridges can be illustrated by the responses to one of the items within the tolerance scale. When asked about the statement, “Artists whose work is critical of America should not be allowed to have their work shown in art museums,” 35 percent of the control-group students express agreement. But for students randomly assigned to receive a school tour of the art museum, only 32 percent agree with censoring art critical of America. Among rural students, 34 percent of the control group would censor art compared to 30 percent for the treatment group. In high-poverty schools, 37 percent of the control-group students would censor compared to 32 percent of the treatment-group students. These differences are not huge, but neither is the intervention. These changes represent the realistic improvement in tolerance that results from a half-day experience at an art museum.

Interest in Art Museums. Perhaps the most important outcome of a school tour is whether it cultivates an interest among students in returning to cultural institutions in the future. If visiting a museum helps improve critical thinking, historical empathy, tolerance, and other outcomes not measured in this study, then those benefits would compound for students if they were more likely to frequent similar cultural institutions throughout their life. The direct effects of a single visit are necessarily modest and may not persist, but if school tours help students become regular museum visitors, they may enjoy a lifetime of enhanced critical thinking, tolerance, and historical empathy.

We measured how school tours of Crystal Bridges develop in students an interest in visiting art museums in two ways: with survey items and a behavioral measure. We included a series of items in the survey designed to gauge student interest:

• I plan to visit art museums when I am an adult.

• I would tell my friends they should visit an art museum.

• Trips to art museums are interesting.

• Trips to art museums are fun.

• Would your friend like to go to an art museum on a field trip?

• Would you like more museums in your community?

• How interested are you in visiting art museums?

• If your friends or family wanted to go to an art museum, how interested would you be in going?

Interest in visiting art museums among students who toured the museum is 8 percent of a standard deviation higher than that in the randomized control group. Among rural students, the increase is much larger: 22 percent of a standard deviation. Students at high-poverty schools score 11 percent of a standard deviation higher on the cultural consumer scale if they were randomly assigned to tour the museum. And minority students gain 10 percent of a standard deviation in their desire to be art consumers.

One of the eight items in the art consumer scale asked students to express the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with the statement, “I would tell my friends they should visit an art museum.” For all students who received a tour, 70 percent agree with this statement, compared to 66 percent in the control group. Among rural participants, 73 percent of the treatment-group students agree versus 63 percent of the control group. In high-poverty schools, 74 percent would recommend art museums to their friends compared to 68 percent of the control group. And among minority students, 72 percent of those who received a tour would tell their friends to visit an art museum, relative to 67 percent of the control group. Students, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds, are more likely to have positive feelings about visiting museums if they receive a school tour.

We also measured whether students are more likely to visit Crystal Bridges in the future if they received a school tour. All students who participated in the study during the first semester, including those who did not receive a tour, were provided with a coupon that gave them and their families free entry to a special exhibit at Crystal Bridges. The coupons were coded so that we could determine the applicant group to which students belonged. Students had as long as six months after receipt of the coupon to use it.

We collected all redeemed coupons and were able to calculate how many adults and youths were admitted. Though students in the treatment group received 49 percent of all coupons that were distributed, 58 percent of the people admitted to the special exhibit with those coupons came from the treatment group. In other words, the families of students who received a tour were 18 percent more likely to return to the museum than we would expect if their rate of coupon use was the same as their share of distributed coupons.

This is particularly impressive given that the treatment-group students had recently visited the museum. Their desire to visit a museum might have been satiated, while the control group might have been curious to visit Crystal Bridges for the first time. Despite having recently been to the museum, students who received a school tour came back at higher rates. Receiving a school tour cultivates a taste for visiting art museums, and perhaps for sharing the experience with others.

Disadvantaged Students

One consistent pattern in our results is that the benefits of a school tour are generally much larger for students from less-advantaged backgrounds. Students from rural areas and high-poverty schools, as well as minority students, typically show gains that are two to three times larger than those of the total sample. Disadvantaged students assigned by lottery to receive a school tour of an art museum make exceptionally large gains in critical thinking, historical empathy, tolerance, and becoming art consumers.

It appears that the less prior exposure to culturally enriching experiences students have, the larger the benefit of receiving a school tour of a museum. We have some direct measures to support this explanation. To isolate the effect of the first time visiting the museum, we truncated our sample to include only control-group students who had never visited Crystal Bridges and treatment-group students who had visited for the first time during their tour. The effect for this first visit is roughly twice as large as that for the overall sample, just as it is for disadvantaged students.

In addition, we administered a different version of our survey to students in kindergarten through 2nd grade. Very young students are less likely to have had previous exposure to culturally enriching experiences. Very young students make exceptionally large improvements in the observed outcomes, just like disadvantaged students and first-time visitors.

When we examine effects for subgroups of advantaged students, we typically find much smaller or null effects. Students from large towns and low-poverty schools experience few significant gains from their school tour of an art museum. If schools do not provide culturally enriching experiences for these students, their families are likely to have the inclination and ability to provide those experiences on their own. But the families of disadvantaged students are less likely to substitute their own efforts when schools do not offer culturally enriching experiences. Disadvantaged students need their schools to take them on enriching field trips if they are likely to have these experiences at all.

Policy Implications

School field trips to cultural institutions have notable benefits. Students randomly assigned to receive a school tour of an art museum experience improvements in their knowledge of and ability to think critically about art, display stronger historical empathy, develop higher tolerance, and are more likely to visit such cultural institutions as art museums in the future. If schools cut field trips or switch to “reward” trips that visit less-enriching destinations, then these important educational opportunities are lost. It is particularly important that schools serving disadvantaged students provide culturally enriching field trip experiences.

This first-ever, large-scale, random-assignment experiment of the effects of school tours of an art museum should help inform the thinking of school administrators, educators, policymakers, and philanthropists. Policymakers should consider these results when deciding whether schools have sufficient resources and appropriate policy guidance to take their students on tours of cultural institutions. School administrators should give thought to these results when deciding whether to use their resources and time for these tours. And philanthropists should weigh these results when deciding whether to build and maintain these cultural institutions with quality educational programs. We don’t just want our children to acquire work skills from their education; we also want them to develop into civilized people who appreciate the breadth of human accomplishments. The school field trip is an important tool for meeting this goal.

Jay P. Greene is professor of education reform at the University of Arkansas, where Brian Kisida is a senior research associate and Daniel H. Bowen is a doctoral student.

Additional materials, including a supplemental study and a methodological appendix , are available.

For more, please see “ The Top 20 Education Next Articles of 2023 .”

This article appeared in the Winter 2014 issue of Education Next . Suggested citation format:

Greene, J.P., Kisida, B., and Bowen, D.H. (2014). The Educational Value of Field Trips: Taking students to an art museum improves critical thinking skills, and more . Education Next , 14(1), 78-86.

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The top 9 educational benefits of embarking on a school trip

This article was updated on 16 november 2018. you can read the updated version of 9 common benefits of international school travel here ..

From our experience students and teachers alike have a great time on our school group tours. Not only is it a fun and a hugely memorable time, there are constant opportunities for students to expand their own individual tacit knowledge crucial to higher level learning and problem solving skills. Students take what they’ve learnt back into everyday life and this impacts them for months and years to come!

We know though that there are times when teachers such as yourself sigh at the idea of organising an opportunity like this. The primary focus becomes more about policy, paperwork and the potential cost rather than the educational benefits. We understand that there is a lot of time and effort spent picking the right program, hosting parent nights, getting the sign-off from your school, managing all your students in the airport, and making sure the trip itself is going to run smoothly. Believe us when we tell you though, it is 100% worth all the time and effort that goes in to a school group tour.

EA aim to make all this organising a breeze for you however, for those moments, when you need to remember why taking students out of the classroom is such a good idea, here are our top 9 benefits for taking your students on a school trip:

1. Improves critical thinking skills

Global citizenship is fast becoming a hot topic and society is looking to schools to prepare its students for the future, particularly in regards to teaching problem solving, soft-skills and preparing students for millennial jobs that currently don’t exist or didn’t 10 years ago. This is a big ask for teachers with limited resources and time. With this in mind, teachers are looking for dynamic ways to introduce this into their curriculum however the tried and tested school trip continues to prove itself an effective way to incorporate the soft-skills such as strong communication, problem solving and critical thinking into teaching.

2. Experiential learning takes place

The classroom is an effective simulation of the real world however experiential learning argues that when learning is shifted into to a real-life situation it becomes more powerful in individuals. This supports the idea that in order to prepare students effectively for life we need to give them memorable experiences such as an international school trip.

3. Student's worldview is expanded

Embarking on educational tours, and submerging students into cultural experiences have been found to be invaluable for development and understanding. It is a perspective that cannot be taught, only experienced for oneself. As I’m sure you’re aware, it is hard to impart a passion for learning languages, understanding another culture or teaching why current world affairs is important to your students in the classroom alone. Travelling, and visiting a country different from one’s own can trigger ideas and solutions that may not stem from familiar comforts and habits.  

4. Reinforces classroom material

Going to important historical landmarks and great museums gives students the opportunity to visualise, experience and discuss the topics they study in order to gain greater understanding. Not only will students recall the experience long after the trip, they may start to develop historical empathy, contextualising historical actions and understanding people of the past. This gives them a deeper understanding of people, places and situations which in turn can teach students critical thinking in their own life.

5. Greater bond between students and teachers

Getting to know your students more throughout the trip is a great way to build strong rapport with them. You will reap the benefits of this for the rest of the teaching year. Students who have a personal connection with their teachers are more motivated and connected to what they are being taught.

6. Learning local culture

I was amazed when I first heard that it was uncustomary in Japan to eat while walking along the street. I thought, surely it must not be closely adhered to. I needed to go there for myself to truly understand the local culture there and see how something as simple as don’t walk and eat played out in a place so unlike my own home. This is just one example of experiencing something first hand and how much it can enrich your perspective. Living in a different local culture even for a short time is a great way to enrich understanding. Not only that but it’s fun!

7. Students are encouraged to learn

Often educational tours use multimedia to visually grab attention and encourage students to partake in an enjoyable learning experience. However, in the classroom these exposed sensors may be limited. For example, students would retain more information from a NASA tour in Florida, where all sensors are exposed - over a powerpoint slide lesson in the classroom.

8. Helps those students who learn by doing

I’m sure you’ve all heard those age old qualms that not everyone was ‘made for school’ or ‘school just didn’t suit them’. Switching up the environment and bringing these types of students out of the classroom and into the real world can be a great way to spark their interest. Take advantage of the informal learning situation and ignite passion in those who learn by ‘doing’.

9. Lifelong memories are made

When in a new environment, the students will need to work as a team with other classmates outside of their normal group. Not only that, but they make lifelong memories among peers, which is no doubt a fun learning experience in itself.

All in all, we hope you can picture the exciting times to be had on your very own school group tour with your students. All the preparing is well worth the benefits gained during the trip and beyond. And don’t forget your own (mini) holiday in an amazing country along the way too…

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Why are School Trips Beneficial?

As the core of your child’s education, no one doubts the importance of classroom learning. The value of school trips however is a hot topic of discussion. Are school trips educational? Are school trips important?

April 25, 2022

school trip benefits essay

In our experience at Trent College and The Elms, the benefits that school trips bring to your child’s unique learning journey make them an essential part of any all-round education.

This blog focuses on the positive impact that trips have on our infant and junior pupils, but we strongly believe excursions can enhance the learning experience at every stage of education, from visits to the park in reception right through to expeditions and tours abroad in your child’s GCSE and A Level years.

Let’s take a look at how school trips help your child go further in school.

1. They increase independence and confidence

We introduce annual residential trips at The Elms in Year 3, with the time pupils spend away from home gradually increasing from 3 days to a week in Year 6. For some of our pupils, these overnight trips are their first real taste of independence. Experiencing this independence in a safe and positive environment will boost your child’s self-confidence. Residentials are essential for personal and social development, allowing new friendships to bloom and new challenges to be faced.

2. They take your child out of their comfort zone

Experiences that take your child out of their comfort zone are essential for personal growth and developing an appetite for trying new things. “Day trips and residential trips enable our pupils to enjoy experiences that cannot be replicated in the classroom environment,” Liz Barclay, Deputy Head at The Elms, explains. “A bustling, busy city, the ambience of the large open spaces of a cathedral or the excitement and power of a live London show.”

3. They contribute to a wider world perspective

With each school trip, your child ventures into undiscovered territory and as their life experience grows, so does their perspective on the world we live in.

Our pupils enjoy trips as far afield as the Isle of Wight, but trips nearer to home have just as much potential to teach valuable lessons. As part of our ‘superhero’ topic in reception last year, pupils travelled to Long Eaton Post Office so they could witness our postal service in action. Not only did they gain an understanding of Post Office logistics, the children came away with newfound appreciation for its workers and the important service they provide.

4. They are a great way to learn and remember information

School trips transport education to a new and exciting location. A change to the routine of a school timetable, trips are always memorable and therefore make effective learning tools. As your child thinks back on the fun they had at the Civil War Museum, they may also recall the differences between the Roundheads and the Cavaliers or remember that the English Civil War was actually three wars rather than one.

5. They make a classroom topic feel new and exciting

A well-chosen trip has the power to breathe new life into a classroom topic. Activities and interactive tasks add an element of excitement to learning, which are especially effective in engaging visual or hands-on learners. Trips support and enhance the curriculum, whilst providing new perspectives and wider context for your child to think about.

6. They teach your child new skills

Some lessons in life cannot be taught in class. Trips are an opportunity for your child to conquer challenges outside the classroom setting, where a different set of skills is required. The imagination to picture yourself in a different era, the map-reading skills to navigate an orienteering course or the courage to take on the high ropes!

Mrs Barclay says, “A school trip allows your child to take risks in a controlled environment, which adds to those vital life skills that will shape them into successful adults of the future.”

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How Do School Trips Benefit Your Primary Pupils?

Educational school trips benefit primary school pupils in many ways, and can be inspiring, positive experiences that not only enhance learning and understanding, but also pupils’ social and personal development.

School trips provide the opportunity for pupils to immerse themselves in new, different and exciting environments where learning is less formal – but sometimes more powerful – and a recreational element threads through their day.

Educational visits also benefit pupils who have a more kinaesthetic, sensory or visual way of learning, as well as SEND pupils who might struggle in a traditional classroom environment.

As the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom says , “Learning outside the classroom changes lives.”

The Educational Benefits of School Trips

Reinforcing classroom learning.

Pupils can obviously learn well in a classroom environment and a school trip can benefit and reinforce that learning, acting as a practical supplement and extension to the theory that pupils already know. It is easier to illustrate complex concepts in a real-world context, especially when there are experts on hand to give workshops or talks about particular subjects.

Increasing motivation and engagement

Taking learning outside of the classroom and into real life sparks excitement and curiosity, imagination and creativity. All of these things translate into a renewed interest in the subject learned, and increase motivation and engagement when you’re back in the classroom.

Improving understanding by getting hands-on

Using their hands as well as their minds helps pupils not only to better understand a subject, but also to retain what they learn for longer. Learning in this way is also most effective when it’s relevant to real life, as it is on a school trip, because it’s easier for pupils to relate to what they’re doing.

Developing 21 st century skills

There is much talk of 21 st century skills – and for good reason. Problem-solving, creativity, critical thinking, teamwork and communication are vital skills to have in our social, academic and professional lives. School trips benefit pupils by encouraging these types of skills and putting them into practice.

Engaging different types of learners

We don’t all learn in the same way, and taking pupils out of a classroom setting and into a practical, informal learning environment benefits those who may learn better kinaesthetically or visually. Many school trips use multimedia and physical interaction with machines, objects, artefacts, or nature, which encourages and engages different types of learners.

Supporting pupils with SEND

Educational school trips have definite benefits for pupils with SEND. Learning outside the classroom can support them in reaching their potential and provide them with real-life experiences. Children with SEND often learn best through doing, and through sensory learning that enables them to see, hear, smell, and touch.

Experiencing new environments

Pupils experience new environments and sights that they would not be able to at their desk, and for some pupils a school trip may be the only way they would see and experience new places. Educational visits in your local area can also foster a sense of community, especially for non-native speakers.

And finally…having fun!

There is of course a fun aspect to any educational visit, an element of recreation and a break from routine. And that’s fantastic! Children should be encouraged to enjoy learning, creating special childhood memories that last a lifetime.

How school trips benefit primary pupils

We believe that the benefits of a school trip far outweigh the organisation, planning and completion of risk assessments – indeed, they are a fundamental and integral part of learning at primary.

What do you think is the greatest benefit of a school trip? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below, on Facebook or on Twitter .

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Field Trips: Are They Really That Valuable?

These are the days of tight resources and tighter schedules, and field trips are sometimes seen as a distraction from education. Excited children pile into buses with teachers and volunteers, removing valuable resources from school budgets and infringing on important instructional time.

Field trips are increasingly cut from school calendars. A 2010 survey of the American Association of School Administrators found that 50 percent of schools did not plan field trips for the following year.

New research shows that eliminating field trips may be to students’ detriment. Field trips provide important instructional advantages that prove a significant payoff. Education Next, a journal on school reform that seeks to publish data-supported research on school change, recently published a  summary piece of research  by University of Arkansas professor Jay Greene, who heads the school’s Department of Education Reform.

The benefits of an art museum field trip

For the study, classes from kindergarten through high school took a half-day field trip to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Students received a one-hour guided tour through the museum focusing on specific paintings followed by an opportunity to freely explore the museum. Afterwards, a block of students were given a survey and a small essay assignment. This group included both a control group that had not attended a field trip and the field trip attendees. The findings of the study were important in outlining the usefulness of field trips overall.

The Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art’s healthy endowment allowed for complete funding of school field trips, creating a broad research base for Greene to examine. He looked for specific outcomes from field trips, related to tour detail recall, critical thinking, historical empathy, tolerance, and interest in museums. Greene also examined results from disadvantaged populations to see whether they enjoyed a unique benefit.

Interesting results found

Students who attended the tour had significant detail recall, which Greene notes could be an excellent means to teach them content if tours coincided with required student content knowledge. He concludes that this high rate of content recall is notable, though the control group comparison provides little insight because those students were not given access to the knowledge tested through the survey. Still, further study of the impressive rate at which students recalled content may prove the significant power of hands-on activity in cementing student content knowledge.

Three key measures of the study were critical thinking, historical empathy, and tolerance, and all three found positive correlations between the museum trip and increased gains in these categories. Greene noted that the critical thinking gains should inspire future study, as students illustrated positive gains in observational skills in art analysis, but future research should focus on the translatability of those skills to other key critical thinking behaviors. Historical empathy and tolerance both showed notable increases, with the field trip population more likely to both understand how early Americans felt during their varying time periods and to support an artist’s right to free expression.

Administrators: Consider before eliminating field trips

Two of the most notable findings of Greene’s research were the student likelihood to return to the museum experience and the gains made by disadvantaged students. Students were given a coded coupon to come to the museum. Those who attended a field trip were more likely to return to the museum, share their museum experience with their friends, and to view the experience positively.

Additionally, Greene notes that, “One consistent pattern in our results is that the benefits of a school tour are generally much larger for students from less-advantaged backgrounds.” He goes on to note that the younger the student populations are, the greater the gains as well.

Greene finishes his piece by covering the important policy takeaways from his research, namely that school enrichment field trips have “notable benefits,” and that policy makers, administrations, and philanthropists should all consider the implications of his study. Enrichment field trips should not be abandoned or replaced with reward trips. Most importantly, we should remember that the children who benefit most from enrichment field trips are often the least likely to get them.

Monica Fuglei is a graduate of the University of Nebraska in Omaha and a current adjunct faculty member of Arapahoe Community College in Colorado, where she teaches composition and creative writing.

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Essay on A Memorable School Trip

Students are often asked to write an essay on A Memorable School Trip in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on A Memorable School Trip

Introduction.

A memorable school trip I attended was to the local zoo. It was not just about fun but also a learning experience that left an indelible mark on me.

Exciting Journey

We boarded the bus, filled with excitement. The journey was filled with laughter, songs, and games.

The Zoo Visit

At the zoo, we saw various animals. The sight of colorful birds and playful monkeys was amazing. We learned about their habitats and lifestyles.

This trip was memorable because it was fun-filled and educational. It made me appreciate the beauty of nature and wildlife.

250 Words Essay on A Memorable School Trip

Every individual cherishes the memory of certain trips or excursions that leave an indelible mark on their minds. For me, it was a school trip to the historical city of Rome that stands out.

The Journey

The journey began with a wave of excitement among us, a group of history enthusiasts. The anticipation of exploring the city that was once the epicenter of the Roman Empire was palpable. The plane ride was filled with a mix of anxiety and exhilaration, a perfect blend that heightened our senses.

Exploring Rome

Upon arrival, the city’s grandeur and heritage were immediately evident. Our first stop, the Colosseum, was a testament to Rome’s architectural prowess. We marveled at its colossal structure, imagining the gladiatorial contests that once took place there. The visit to the Pantheon, a monument of Roman engineering, left us awestruck.

Immersive Learning

The trip was not just about sightseeing. It was an immersive learning experience. Visiting these historical sites, we could vividly imagine the lives of the Romans, their triumphs and tragedies, their culture, and their civilization. It was like living a history lesson, far more impactful than any textbook could provide.

The trip to Rome was more than just a school excursion; it was a journey through time, an exploration of a civilization that shaped the world. It was an experience that enriched our understanding of history and left us with memories that will last a lifetime. This memorable school trip was indeed a profound educational experience, and a testament to the fact that learning can extend far beyond the classroom walls.

500 Words Essay on A Memorable School Trip

School trips are an integral part of the educational journey, providing students with the opportunity to explore new environments and learn in an interactive manner. One such trip that remains etched in my memory was a visit to a local history museum during my sophomore year.

The Anticipation

The announcement of the trip was met with an infectious enthusiasm that permeated the entire school. The museum was renowned for its vast collection of artifacts and exhibitions, providing us with an opportunity to witness history firsthand. The anticipation was heightened by the fact that this was not just a trip, but an immersive educational experience. We were not merely going to observe, but to engage, question, and learn.

The journey to the museum was filled with an air of excitement and camaraderie. The bus ride was far from mundane, as friends shared stories, jokes, and anticipation about the day ahead. The journey, although a small part of the trip, was instrumental in setting the tone for the day. It was a testament to the fact that sometimes, it’s not just about the destination, but also about the journey.

The Museum Experience

Upon arrival, we were greeted by the grandeur of the museum, a magnificent structure housing centuries of history. The museum was a labyrinth of knowledge, each exhibit telling a story more intriguing than the last. From ancient civilizations to significant historical events, the museum was a treasure trove of learning.

One exhibit that particularly stood out was a detailed representation of the Industrial Revolution. It was not just the artifacts that were fascinating, but the way they were presented. The exhibit was interactive, allowing us to engage with the material in a way that textbooks never could.

The trip was not just about the museum and its exhibits. It was about experiencing history, understanding its relevance, and appreciating its impact on our present. The trip provided a platform for us to engage in meaningful discussions, fostering critical thinking and broadening our perspectives.

In conclusion, the memorable school trip to the museum was an enriching experience that transcended the boundaries of traditional classroom learning. It was a testament to the power of experiential learning, demonstrating that education is not confined to textbooks but extends to real-world experiences. The memories of this trip serve as a reminder that learning can be fun, interactive, and profoundly impactful.

That’s it! I hope the essay helped you.

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Essay on Summer Vacation: 100, 250, and 450 Words for School Students

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  • Feb 24, 2024

Essay on Summer Vacation

Summer Vacation is an annual period, organized by all the schools, colleges, and educational institutions in May and June. Everybody loves summer vacations, as they no longer have to worry about homework, regular school, and work. Summer vacation is an exciting period that can be spent with friends and family. However, once summer vacations are over, students are often asked to write an essay on summer vacation. 

Essay on summer vacation is an academic activity, where your teacher will be evaluating your writing skills and how well you can express your thoughts, ideas, and experience of your lovely summer vacation. Today, we will provide you with an essay on summer vacation in 100, 200, and 300 words. You can take ideas from these sample essays and use them to write your essay on summer vacation.

This Blog Includes:

Essay on summer vacation in 100 words, essay on summer vacation in 250 words, trips in summer vacation, new hobbies to learn, benefits of summer vacation.

Master the art of essay writing with our blog on How to Write an Essay in English .

‘This summer vacation, I visited my maternal grandmother’s house. In Hindi, I and my sister call her ‘nani’ . Every summer vacation we pay our visit to her and enjoy the natural beauty of the village. Everything about my grandmother’s home and village excites me. From the morning echoes to the evening breeze, entire days are filled with excitement and cherished memories. 

One of the best things I liked about hot summer vacations was eating large watermelons with the entire family. Our grandfather used to buy us watermelons, which my mother served to all of us. I plan to visit my grandmother’s house every summer vacation.’

Also Read: Essay on Euthanasia in 100, 200 and 300 Words

‘Summer vacation is that time of the year when we get time off work, study, school, and our daily routine. It is a time to enjoy, learn new hobbies, build interest, and focus on goals. This summer vacation I visited a hill station called Dharamshala in the state of Himachal Pradesh. This city is known for two things; the home of the Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama and its scenic beauty. 

Summer vacations are a break from our daily school and work routine. It allows us to cast aside the regular work schedule and spend some quality time with our loved ones. This break from routine is crucial for mental and emotional well-being, providing a chance to recharge and return with renewed energy.

Summer vacation is a great opportunity to explore new places and learn about new cultures. From scenic road trips to cold breezes on the beach, the summer season offers the ideal backdrop for exploration. 

We can indulge in recreational activities and hobbies that we are not able to focus on due to daily life hustle. Summer vacations can also encourage us to indulge in outdoor activities, as the warm weather and longer days are good for our physical and mental health. 

Summer vacation can be considered a season of joy, exploration, and rejuvenation. It offers a respite from the demands of daily life, allowing us to reconnect with ourselves, our families, and the world around us.

Also Read: Essay on Basant Panchami in English

Essay on Summer Vacation in 450 Words

‘Summer vacation holds an important place in our lives as it allows us to reconnect with ourselves and the people around us. In tropical and subtropical countries like India, summer vacation lasts for around 2 months, from May to June. This is the hottest time of the year as the sun is vertically overhead on the Tropic of Cancer, the imaginary line 23.5 degrees north. 

Summer vacation not only provides relief from daily school and work life but also serves as an opportunity to spend quality time with our friends and family. During these hot summer months, a lot of people visit hill stations, beaches, their relatives, and other popular tourist places.’

Everybody loves traveling. From the ice-capped Himalayas to the backwaters of Kerala, there are plenty of places to visit. Summer vacations are important for both children and adults. Children wait all year long for summer vacation, as they want to enjoy life, play outdoors, and eat ice creams and fruits. 

During summer vacation, schools also organize trips, where students travel to cold places and enjoy fun activities like mountain climbing, hiking, trekking, etc. Some of the popular summer vacation destinations are:

  • Mahabaleshwar

‘Learning new hobbies and indulging in creative activities is a great way to spend your summer vacation. A lot of parents encourage their children to learn new hobbies, like joining music lessons, art classes, football and cricket coaching, etc. Practicing new hobbies during the summer vacation can greatly improve our skills and we can stand out from the crowd. Here are some fun-loving hobbies to learn during the summer vacation.’

  • Yoga and meditation
  • Outdoor activities
  • Photography 
  • Music Lessons
  • Dance classes
  • Art Classes
  • Piano lessons

‘Summer vacation is not just about long trips and new hobbies. There are many benefits of summer vacation. Summer vacations provide a break from the routine and allow individuals to relax, unwind, and recharge. We can explore new places with our friends and family, allowing us to spend quality time with our loved ones. Traveling during summer vacation can expose us to different perspectives and broaden our horizons.

We can enhance our knowledge and creativity by visiting educational trips, workshops, or cultural experiences. The combination of relaxation, new experiences, and increased social interactions can positively impact mental health. Long summer vacations can result in increased productivity and prevent us from burnout.

Summer vacation is an important time of year for all the reasons mentioned above; relief from our daily schedule, quality time with family and friends, focus on our goals, learning new hobbies, etc.’

Also Read: Essay on Abortion in English for School Students

Ans: ‘Summer vacation is the time of the year when we get time off work, study, school, and our daily routine. It is a time to enjoy, learn new hobbies, build interest, and focus on goals. This summer vacation I visited a hill station called Dharamshala in the state of Himachal Pradesh. This city is known for two things; the home of the Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama and its scenic beauty. 

Ans: Writing an essay on summer vacation is a great way to express your thoughts, ideas, and experiences in creative and imaginative ways. It can also serve as a way to communicate your thoughts with the audience.

Ans: Understanding the topic and setting your tone accordingly is the first step when writing an essay. Your audience will better understand and connect with your essay if the tone in your writing is understandable to them. To support your arguments, provide appropriate evidence and reasons. Checking for grammatical errors is also important. Once the final draft is complete, go through the entire essay and read it aloud.

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With an experience of over a year, I've developed a passion for writing blogs on wide range of topics. I am mostly inspired from topics related to social and environmental fields, where you come up with a positive outcome.

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When I was a student, school choice benefited me and it will help Tennessee children too

Education freedom scholarships, with their decentralized approach, promotes a more nimble and responsive educational system than traditional public schools..

  • Walter Blanks Jr. is a spokesperson for American Federation for Children and is a member of the Beacon Center of Tennessee Impact Board.

Gov. Bill Lee's bold proposal for  Education Freedom Scholarships  in Tennessee is a beacon of hope for parents, families, and education reformers, ushering in what would be the next evolution in the state's approach to learning and educational attainment.

The scholarships offer a groundbreaking alternative, empowering parents with the ability to tailor their children's education, while demonstrating a level of accountability that outshines traditional public schools.

During the governor’s State of the State,  Lee doubled down on his plan  to give parents and students the opportunity and access to choose the best school that works for their own personal needs.

Lee stated, “The premise behind education freedom, and the one thing that most all of us agree upon, is that parents know what’s best for their child’s education.”

Lee then went on to say, “There are thousands of parents in the state who know their student would thrive in a different setting, but the financial barrier is simply too high. It’s time that we change that. It’s time that parents get to decide — and not the government — where their child goes to school and what they learn.”  

While the battle for school choice rages on, it’s extremely important not to forget the students who would actually benefit from such a program.

School choice benefited me and my family

Growing up in Ohio,  school choice became my lifeline , rescuing me from the clutches of a failing educational system.

The traditional public school I attended was struggling to provide quality education, leaving me disheartened and uninspired. The principal of the school told my mother, “If you give us five years, we will have the middle school and the high school turned around.”

My mother responded with, “In five years, Walter will either be in jail or in a body bag.” When my family discovered the school choice program, it opened a world of possibilities. School choice was more than an alternative; it was a catalyst for change, sparking a transformative journey that continues to shape my life positively.

Since moving to Tennessee, I have quickly realized  the education outcomes  in the state are not where they should be, and many families could benefit from similar programs that are being passed across the country.

Existing education choice programs across the nation have demonstrated impressive accountability mechanisms. By allowing parents to use allocated funds for various educational expenses, such as private school tuition, tutoring, or educational materials, choice programs like Education Freedom Scholarships promote a dynamic and tailored approach to learning. 

More: Gov. Bill Lee delivers State of the State to Tennessee General Assembly

Public schools, while essential, often face bureaucratic challenges that can hinder adaptability and responsiveness.

In 2023, the state of Tennessee spent roughly $10 billion dollars on public schools with very little (if any) accountability to parents and students. In Nashville,  roughly 30%  of third grade students are proficient (or considered “on track”). Within the public school system, families without the resources to change schools are left with empty promises, little improvements, and ultimately, no other option.

Education Freedom Scholarships, with their decentralized approach, promotes a more nimble and responsive educational system. This agility allows for quicker adjustments to address the evolving needs of students, ultimately better preparing the next generation for the challenges it will face.

Gov. Bill Lee's Education Freedom Scholarship proposal offers hope for Tennessee's education system, fostering innovation and unlocking its full potential. By prioritizing students' interests, the state can deliver quality education, ensuring a brighter future and a more adaptable model. It's time for Tennessee to embrace this opportunity, ushering in an era of empowerment and accountability in education.

Walter Blanks Jr. is a spokesperson for American Federation for Children and a beneficiary of a private school choice program, driven by a lifelong commitment to improving educational access. Blanks is a member of the Beacon Center of Tennessee Impact Board.

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  1. Essay on School Trip

    January 7, 2024 Students are often asked to write an essay on School Trip in their schools and colleges. And if you're also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic. Let's take a look… 100 Words Essay on School Trip The Excitement of a School Trip A school trip is an exciting event for students.

  2. Why School Trips Are Beneficial for Students

    Students Travel Why School Trips Are Beneficial for Students By CAS Trips Staff July 18, 2022 The pandemic has had many implications for students, teachers, and the educational system as a whole—the loss of many school trips among them. Now is the moment to make up for lost time!

  3. Why Are School Trips Important?

    Improving the classroom environment As you know, taking students out of the classroom can do wonders for the relationships between students and teachers, making the classroom a much nicer place for everyone to be. Benefits of school trips

  4. My school trip essay 6 models

    My school trip essay ,School trips leave a great impact in the mind of the student where he goes without his family accompanied by friends and colleagues, which allows him to rely on himself and take responsibility to enjoy the activities of the trip.All this will be here in My school trip essay . My school trip essay

  5. Essay on the Benefits of School Trips

    Place Order School trips could offer academically challenged pupils the opportunity to make connections between theory and experience aiding in developing a joy for learning and a better understanding. Pupils hone their perception and observation skills by using all their senses.

  6. Benefits of school trips, why are they important?

    5-Personal development and confidence building Many students get their first taste of relative freedom or independence during school trips. This is an important rite of passage and has a positive impact on their personal development, building their confidence as they are taken out of their home environment and comfort zone.

  7. The value of school trips: a journey beyond the classroom

    6. Cognitive Development: School trips engage students' cognitive skills in a unique way. They encourage curiosity, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Students must process information, ask questions, and make connections between what they already know and what they are experiencing. 7. Inspiration: A well-organized school trip can inspire ...

  8. The Educational Value of Field Trips

    Daniel H. Bowen. Jay P. Greene joined EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the benefits of field trips, including how seeing live theater is a more enriching experience to students, on the EdNext podcast. The school field trip has a long history in American public education. For decades, students have piled into yellow buses to visit a ...

  9. The top 9 educational benefits of embarking on a school trip

    EA aim to make all this organising a breeze for you however, for those moments, when you need to remember why taking students out of the classroom is such a good idea, here are our top 9 benefits for taking your students on a school trip: ‍. 1. Improves critical thinking skills. Global citizenship is fast becoming a hot topic and society is ...

  10. PDF A Review of Research on School Field Trips and Their Value in ...

    A field trip, which may also be termed as an instructional trip, school excursion, or school journey, is defined by Krepel and Duvall (1981) to be a school or class trip with an educational ... Teachers also gain many benefits. Students are interested and motivated, permitting the instruction to rise to new and higher levels. Students who

  11. Importance of Educational Trips, Benefits to Students ...

    1 2 3 4 5 WHY SCHOOL SHOULD HAVE EDUCATION TRIPS ? Memories of school Educational trips are among the most prominent of the formative years, largely because they are a welcome break in the routine for both students and teachers. While their purpose is essentially to educate, they can also be a fun bonding experience for everyone involved.

  12. Why are School Trips Beneficial?

    1. They increase independence and confidence We introduce annual residential trips at The Elms in Year 3, with the time pupils spend away from home gradually increasing from 3 days to a week in Year 6. For some of our pupils, these overnight trips are their first real taste of independence.

  13. Understanding Educational School Trip: A Review on Benefits and

    Understanding Educational School Trip: A Review on Benefits and Challenges in Tourism and Education is a paper that explores the role of school trips in enhancing students' learning and ...

  14. How Do School Trips Benefit Your Primary Pupils?

    The Educational Benefits of School Trips Reinforcing classroom learning. Pupils can obviously learn well in a classroom environment and a school trip can benefit and reinforce that learning, acting as a practical supplement and extension to the theory that pupils already know. It is easier to illustrate complex concepts in a real-world context ...

  15. Essay on Educational Trip

    Conclusion In conclusion, educational trips are a critical part of the learning process. They not only supplement classroom learning but also promote personal growth and cultural understanding. Therefore, educational institutions should prioritize these trips to enrich the overall educational experience of their students.

  16. Benefits of Educational Trip Free Essay Example

    Benefits of Educational Trip Categories: Classroom Education Learning Download Essay, Pages 13 (3191 words) Views 18420 Firstly, the educational trip increase the knowledge of student because there is a lot of knowledge that students cannot found it on textbook.

  17. Benefits Of School Trip Essay

    Benefits Of School Trip Essay Decent Essays 878 Words 4 Pages Open Document Essay Sample Check Writing Quality Show More 11 Ways to Make Your Educational School Trip More Successful Study trips with fellow students are often the pinnacles of our school lives.

  18. A report on a school trip abroad

    Worksheets and downloads. A report on a school trip abroad - exercises 741.34 KB. A report on a school trip abroad - answers 162.85 KB. A report on a school trip abroad - report 600.51 KB. A report on a school trip abroad - writing practice 155.32 KB.

  19. Essay on Field Trip

    Students are often asked to write an essay on Field Trip in their schools and colleges. And if you're also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic. Let's take a look… 100 Words Essay on Field Trip The Excitement of Field Trips. Field trips are an exciting part of school life.

  20. Benefits of School Field Trips

    A field trip to Lava Beds National Park would be a splendid opportunity. There are a plethora of advantages for the students and even teachers. The learning, social, and cultural benefits are a plenty. The eighth grade deserves this trip on behalf of the amazing grades, attendance, and behavior.

  21. Do Students Learn Anything on School Field Trips

    The benefits of an art museum field trip. For the study, classes from kindergarten through high school took a half-day field trip to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Students received a one-hour guided tour through the museum focusing on specific paintings followed by an opportunity to freely explore the museum.

  22. school trip benefits essay

    This is another often ignored but hugely important benefit of school trips. According to the Evaluation of... School trips allow for the discovery of new interests. Exposure to new situations, topics, and teaching methods automatically stimulates... 5 ways that school trips can benefit students · 1. Bring subjects to life. Everybody learns ...

  23. Essay on A Memorable School Trip

    Students are often asked to write an essay on A Memorable School Trip in their schools and colleges. And if you're also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic. Let's take a look… 100 Words Essay on A Memorable School Trip Introduction. A memorable school trip I attended was to the local zoo.

  24. Essay on Summer Vacation: 100, 250, and 450 Words for School Students

    Benefits of Summer Vacation 'Summer vacation is not just about long trips and new hobbies. There are many benefits of summer vacation. Summer vacations provide a break from the routine and allow individuals to relax, unwind, and recharge. We can explore new places with our friends and family, allowing us to spend quality time with our loved ones.

  25. School choice: My experience shows education freedom helps students

    School choice was more than an alternative; it was a catalyst for change, sparking a transformative journey that continues to shape my life positively. Since moving to Tennessee, ...