153 US History Topics [2024 US History Essay Ideas]

American history is not as long as the European one. However, it’s one of the richest histories in the world. It’s full of controversies, different opinions, and interesting facts. Those who study American history will find how many voices, perspectives, and points of view can coexist.

When writing an essay about America, you should try to stay as objective as possible. Think creatively and consider historical events from a new perspective.

This abundance of information and events can intimidate anyone. That’s why it can be very challenging to select one single US history topic to write about. There are so many!

To decide on it, students should answer several questions:

  • What time period interests me the most?
  • What specific event sounds the most appealing to me?
  • What historical figure impresses me?

It is indeed a daunting task to attempt to put the remarkable story of the US into an essay list. Fortunately, we’re not trying to do so.

Tired of researching historical encyclopedias? This is the perfect article for you – read through this collection of 153 US history essay topics prepared by our team .

🌎Top 10 American History Topics to Write about

  • 🏗️ Topics before 1877
  • 🌻 Topics: 1878-1899
  • 🏙️ US Topics: 1900s

🧊 Cool American History Topics

  • 🧐 US Regents Topics
  • ✊ Black History Topics

🎉 Fun US History Essay Topics

👌 easy american history essay topics, ❓ us history essay questions, 📋 how to cite an american history essay.

  • The 20th Century.
  • America’s Role in Normandy Landings.
  • Conquest of California.
  • The Great Depression.
  • USA: Colonial History.
  • The Oregon Trail.
  • African American Slave Trade.
  • Who was Harriet Tubman?
  • America in the Modern World.
  • Klondike Gold Rush.

☝️ Good US History Topics by Period

This is the IvyPanda list of American history topics that can help students get inspired!

We divided the history into epochs and organized the US history essay topics accordingly. Besides, this US history topics list structured thematically. It, hopefully, will make it easier to navigate and get started.

One of the best ways to look at history is to examine it from a chronological perspective. The topics in this section are structured based on the time period.

Every period is filled with key events and figures. American society is the product of those events—it’s vital to have a closer look at it.

🏗️ History Topics before 1877

  • America before Columbus . In this topic, you can talk about the first people in the Americas and what historians know about them. There are a lot of archeological findings and artifacts that survived thousands of years. Write about Christopher Columbus and how “the discovery” was not a discovery. The Americas have been inhabited and had developed civilizations long before Europeans put their foot there.
  • The first landing of Christopher Columbus and the New World

These ideas are for essays and research papers.

  • Christopher Columbus: Biography, Discoveries, Contributions . You can talk about Christopher Columbus and his biography. Track how his image has been changing throughout history. Modern historians see him as a person who contributed to the genocide of Native Americans. What is your opinion about him?
  • The British Rule in the Americas and the first British Settlements. Explore the first permanent colony in North America and what English wanted the colonies to be. There were a lot of obstacles, which first settlers had faced before Jamestown became a prosperous city. They suffered from a shortage of food, severe climate conditions, and disease. Plus, there were problems with the Indians. Research what “the middle ground” was and why this concept is relevant to this topic.
  • What is Puritanism?
  • Puritans in Great Britain
  • The Puritan Ethic in the United States . Who the Puritans were? Why were they sent to the New World? What were their religious beliefs? Explore the influence puritans had in the past. Is puritanism still relevant in the US today?
  • The Effects of the Spanish Rule and The Conquistadors in the Americas. Spanish Colonization of the Americas laid foundations for the Latin American identity. It is also considered the very first mass genocide in the world. It is indeed a matter of perspective. You can talk about how the contact between the Native Americans and the Spaniards affected both parties.
  • The Protestant Reformation and its influence on the US History. Religion was one of the main reasons why the first settlers decided to travel to the New World. Write about the connection between the freedom of religion in the US. What influence did it have on the nation as a whole in the future? Why is it crucial? How did it affect the lifestyle of people in the US?
  • Native Americans and “the Middle Ground” . Not everyone knows that the famous Disney cartoon Pocahontas is based on the true story. If this story was told by a Native American, it would be different. In this essay, you can comment on the role that Native Americans played in the European Colonization. Elaborate on the disappearance of “the Middle Ground.”
  • The beginning of slavery in British America and the Middle Passage. You can analyze the way this institution was established. Write about the factors that influenced it in the 17th century, try to include first-person accounts of slavery. Use the American Slave Narrative , for instance, Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa . This inclusion will demonstrate how inhumane slavery was and will open a good discussion.
  • Christianity, slavery, and colonialism in the US
  • The witchcraft trials . Elaborate on religious views of the New England public. How such views made it possible for more than 200 people to be accused of witchcraft. Discuss a Puritan code, the structure of the society, and what type of women were prosecuted.

Salem was an epicenter of the witchcraft trials in the US.

  • The Boston Tea Party as the key event of the American Revolution. The Boston Tea Party is a highly celebrated event in the history of the US. Discuss why is that? Why is it so important for the Americans? Talk about the birth of patriotism, resistance and the revolt against colonialism. What did the rebels mean by “taxation without representation?”
  • The American Revolutionary War and the Declaration of Independence. This topic is one of the most popular in the history of the United States. First, you could write about a military battle with Great Britain and the reasons for it. Second, talk about political battles within the US at that period. Examine the establishment of the new nation.
  • How the Revolutionary war changes American Society
  • Why was the Declaration of Independence written?
  • Was the American Revolution really revolutionary?
  • The meaning of the Constitution. This is one of the most fruitful and fascinating debates in US history. Some people argue that it is written in a very vague way to allow American society to evolve. Others say that its text allows minorities to be deprived of the very things it promises to establish. Elaborate if you find the Constitution to be a liberal, radical, or a conservative document.
  • Why the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution. Talk about the first 10 amendments to the Constitution and explore why these amendments are so important. What did the amendments guarantee? Why was The Bill of Rights added to the Constitution in the first place?

James Madison wrote the amendments in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties.

  • The Founding Fathers’ influence on the US. The Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence are sacred documents. The Founding Fathers are major figures for the Americans as well. Writing about the influence of the Founding Fathers, select one or two members to focus on. Consider the diversity among the members. How did it help the Founding Fathers in leading the war and framing a sustainable government?
  • What is the role of the Founding Fathers in American society and religion?
  • European Colonization influence on the Native American population
  • Removal of Indian tribes. American History is unjust at times. Explore how unconstitutional the treatment of Indian Americans was and why they find it this way. Look at the way the Founding Fathers addressed this issue. Examining the Indian Removal Act of 1830 will allow you to fully develop this topic. Analyze why the policy was accepted in the first place. Why is it called “ethnic cleansing” by the majority of historians nowadays?
  • Native Americans lost their freedom
  • The impact of railroads in America. The rapid expansion of America would be impossible without the railroad construction. The railroads triggered the development of the Midwest and the West. Despite that, the construction of the railroads was highly monopolistic and undemocratic. Comment on the richest men in the US – John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and Cornelius Vanderbilt.
  • The role of cotton in the American economy. The American Economy in the 19th century heavily depended on cotton production. There was even a saying “Cotton is King” that was very popular at that time. Besides cotton, it heavily depended on the slaves. This period in American History is called the Antebellum Era. Look at the role of cotton from several perspectives. How profitable was it? How did slaves contribute to the American economy? How financially unviable was the abolition of slavery?

he cotton plantation is “the Second Middle Passage.

  • History of American Transcendentalism.
  • Why was Transcendentalism important for American Culture? The essay can start with a broad explanation of what transcendentalism is. Explain where it started and how it evolved. Explore what views the group had on women’s rights, slavery, education, government, and religion. You could write about the most prominent transcendentalists – Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Thoreau.
  • Religions in the 19th Century America. Known as the Second Great Awakening or Christian Revivalism, religion in the 19th century America was altered. Look back at the beginning of the American Revolution. Anglicans, Methodists, and Quackers were the fastest-growing religious groups then. Discuss all of them.
  • The abolition of slavery and the Civil War . A lot of historians believe that slavery in itself did not cause the conflict. In this essay, you could elaborate on this idea and consider the other point of view. For a long essay, write about Abraham Lincoln’s thoughts on slavery. His ideas about slavery and racial inequality were one of the most discussed aspects of his entire life. Look at his letters and write about the complexity of his views.
  • The causes of the Civil War and the aftermath of war. This essay is one of the easiest American history essays to write. Talk about the causes and effects of the Civil War (1861-1865) in the US. Why did it happen? What was achieved?
  • The struggle over the goal and the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment . You can elaborate on the goal of the amendment. Was it able to protect the rights of black citizens? Why was it still possible for the states to deny them their right to vote?
  • How did Reconstruction change the United States after the Civil war?
  • The Reconstruction governments. What type of reforms did the reconstruction government implement? What positive reforms happened during the Reconstruction Era? You could discuss radical reconstruction and white supremacy that spawned during the Reconstruction period. Elaborate on the idea of manifest destiny. Why was it so popular in the 19th century in the US?
  • The Compromise of 1850 . Why was reaching the compromise necessary? You can describe the terms of the compromise. Explain what results were achieved: political, economic, and cultural.

🌻 American History 1878-1899

The United States was going through many changes during this period: from various social changes and changes in foreign and domestic policies to rapid economic and cultural changes. This time saw the country changing for the best in some aspects and for the worst in others.

  • Industrialization after the Civil war. Industrialization of the United States was going on for almost half a century. However, the most impressive growth happened in 1880-1900. The expansion of the steel, iron and oil industries drove the American economy. Comment on all the inventions, technological advancements that happened in the US at that time.
  • Immigrants and their ideas of the American Dream
  • Social reforms during the Progressive Era
  • American Foreign Policy in the 1890s

George Washington's quote from his Farewell Address to the American people.

  • The importance of the Progressive Era reforms
  • Race relations during the Progressive Era reforms
  • Japanese Americans Immigration in the 19th century

🏙️ 20th Century US History Topics

The 20th century for the United States and the world, in general, was highly eventful. Economic crises, two World Wars, the Cold War, and the fight over civil rights. Plus, a huge economic and technological upheaval, the space program.

This list of American History topics after 1900 can be great for those looking for inspiration for a paper.

Here you go:

  • The door to America— Ellis Island. What are America’s best features? Economic opportunities, political and religious freedom? An abundance of jobs and opportunities? Land and natural resources? All of these made the United States experience the migration flux from all over the world. Elaborate on how Ellis island is a symbol of American immigration and the American dream.

Many immigrants entered the US through Ellis Island

  • The rise of capitalism
  • Work environments during the Progressive Era
  • Women’s suffrage movement in America
  • The causes and effects of women’s suffrage movement in the US
  • Changes in American Government after WWI
  • Is prohibition to blame for the organized crime in The United States?
  • The economic impact of the Great Depression. The Great Depression is one of the longest economic downturns in the history of the United States. You can talk about several main causes of the crisis. Another good approach would be to analyze the way American presidents handled this crisis.
  • Japanese American discrimination during the Great Depression
  • How did Roosevelt plan to end the Great Depression?
  • The Great Depression and what is the new deal?
  • The Role of the United States during World War 2
  • Why did the United States fight and lose the Vietnam War?
  • The war in Vietnam and the Civil Rights Movement
  • A Comparison of the traditional and the revisionist arguments regarding the Origins of The Cold War
  • The Cold War and US diplomacy
  • The Cold War and how it influenced American society

History is tough, but some significant historical events take our breath away even centuries later. Here is our list of cool American history topics. Even if you don’t find any topic that works for you, it can inspire you to look for moments in history that appeal to you personally.

  • The true Story of Pocahontas: An untold story of a Native American girl. The true story of Pocahontas is covered with myths. Critically examine the story of her life and death. Try to understand it from a standpoint of a 12 years old Native American girl kidnapped by a white colonizer.
  • Native American tribes in the US History
  • What was discussed at the Constitutional Convention?
  • The history of the Statue of Liberty
  • Henry Ford and how his inventions changed America
  • Moon landing conspiracy
  • The war on drugs in US History
  • Illegal immigrants in the US
  • The American sense of humor
  • American pop culture in the 1920s . This time period is called “the roaring twenties.” It was filled with drastic political and cultural changes in the United States. Jazz, flapper culture, prohibition, and economic abundance are important elements of the 1920s.

The 20s were“roaring” due to the popular culture of the decade.

  • The history of gangs in the US
  • What did hippies believe in?
  • History of Hippie’s Culture
  • Presidential assassinations in the United States History. Abraham Lincoln, James Garfield, William McKinley, and JFK were the only US Presidents murdered while in office. You don’t have to retell the stories of their deaths! Instead, explore how these assassinations triggered some vital political reforms.
  • The history of the Fifth Amendment

🙌 Most Interesting American History Topics

Use the following list of most interesting US History topics for your next essay. Choose what US history interesting event or a historic figure captures your attention the most.

🧐 US History Regent Topics

  • The Relationships Between Federal and State Governments
  • Was there a need to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki?
  • The Cold War: Origins, Causes, Phases, and the Results
  • Why and How the Cold War Was Fought
  • The US Army in the Iraq War
  • The Iraq War: Background and Issues
  • Why did the Iraq War go against the plan?
  • Executive Orders and Presidential Power in the United States
  • History of the American Constitution
  • The Turning points of the American Revolution

The Battle of Saratoga was a key turning point of the Revolutionary War.

✊ Black History Essay Topics

Studying the history of the United States without studying slavery is impossible, mainly because the issue of race is ingrained into the DNA of America.

Black African American history allows students to get a different perspective on the same events. It lets them hear the voices that are so often erased from the history books. These African American history essays can help anyone looking for a good topic to write about.

  • Slave Resistance in the Eighteen Century. Continuously throughout history, African American slaves were portrayed as voiceless and victimized. Others presented them as almost indifferent and passive to their own destiny. You can examine a different perspective, an Afrocentric one. The history of slavery was not the history of passivity, it was a history of black resistance.
  • African American Music as a Form of Resistance
  • African American Religion and Spirituality in the United States
  • The 13th Amendment and the End of Slavery
  • The Jim Crow Laws in the United States History . Jim Crow Laws were the laws that enforced racial segregation in the country. Dedicate an introduction to discuss where the name “Jim Crow” comes from. Give a historical background to how the laws were used. This topic can make a strong essay because no one can stay indifferent.
  • Gender and Jim Crow
  • The Role of Martin Luther King, Jr in The Civil Right Movement
  • Martin Luther King’s speech “I have a dream”
  • Brown vs The Board of Education . The ruling in Brown vs. The Board of Education was one of the most fundamental changes in the US educational system. How did the general public receive the news about the desegregation of public schools? How did the American educational system change after this case?
  • The Significance of the Harlem Renaissance
  • Barack Obama: The First African American President
  • Barack Obama’s healthcare reforms
  • Has Obama’s Presidency changed America?

Obama prevented a few crises in the US.

  • The Cowboy Culture in the US
  • How Did Yellow Journalism Start?
  • Why is Superman the most American of all the heroes?
  • The History of American Flag
  • History of Sports in the United States
  • History of Thanksgiving Turkey in the United States
  • How Did Highways Change the United States of America?
  • American History through Hollywood Film

Sometimes you simply do not have enough time to write a profound essay. These American history topics are relatively easy, and you don’t have to research them a lot. Even if you do, there is a ton of information available.

  • British Colonization of the Americas
  • Slavery and racism in the United States
  • The Puritans Influence on the American Society
  • The pilgrims and the puritans
  • The Causes of the Vietnam War
  • Why Was Martin Luter King Assassinated?
  • American Moon Landing
  • What Are Major Events in the US History?
  • What Started the US History?
  • What Is the Most Important Piece of the US History?
  • What Is the US History Summary?
  • What City Was the First Capital in the US History?
  • What Was the First American State in the US History?
  • What Are Some Controversies in the US History?
  • How Far Was the New Deal a Turning Point in the US History up to 1941?
  • How the Airplane Industry Changed US History?
  • What Was President Reagan Known For in the US History?
  • How Reagan’s Ideology Shaped the US History?
  • Why Is the Reagan Revolution in the US History?
  • How Richard Nixon Influenced the US History?
  • What Vietnam War Showed About US History?
  • Did the Concept of Imperialism Exist in the US History?
  • Why Did the Wars in the Middle East Go Down in the US History as Unnecessary?
  • What Is the Most Popular Ideology in the US History?
  • How Does the US History Describe George W. Bush?
  • How Did the Use of Nuclear Weapons in Japan Affect the US History?
  • What Are Some Horrible and Forgotten Events in the US History?
  • Is Donald Trump the Second Worst President in the US History?
  • What Was the Biggest Political Miscalculation in the US History?
  • Who Is the Most Overrated First Lady in the US History?
  • How Well Do US History Teachers Really Know About the US History?
  • Who Was the Wimpiest President in the US History?
  • Who Are Some of the Great Asian Americans in the US History?
  • What Was the Most Corrupt Time in the US History?
  • What Was the Bloodiest Single Day Battle in the US History?
  • Who Is the Greatest Hero in the US History?
  • How Did King Philip’s War Change the US History?

Your citation will depend on the type of requirements your instructor will provide you with. You can ask your teacher which style of citation is preferable before the essay writing. The school itself may have specific guidelines for every typeof academic writing.

Chicago, MLA, APA are the main styles of citation in academic writing.

For history essays, there are two key methods of referencing both primary and secondary sources:

  • In-text citation. In this method, you mention the author and the year in the body of the essay. The list of references is placed at the end of the essay.
  • Footnote Referencing. In this method, you put a number in the body. It corresponds with the reference at the bottom of each page. At the end of the essay, a list of works read rather than cited should be included.

All the citation entries should be listed in alphabetical order. If you mention the same author multiple times with different works, use chronological order.

Keeping track of all the sources, both read and cited, is time-consuming. For that, students can try to use different online software systems. These systems can help arrange the list alphabetically and correctly organize all the citations.

Reference list

These digital tools are worth checking out:

Thank you for reading so far! Now you’re ready to start an amazing paper on US history. Share this article with those who may find it helpful, and leave a comment below.

🔗 References

  • U.S. History and Historical Documents: USAGov, the Official Guide to Government Information and Services.
  • All Topics: National Museum of American History.
  • TIMELINE, United States History: World Digital Library.
  • How Do I Cite Sources: Plagiarism.org.
  • Citing Primary Sources, Chicago: Teacher Resources, Library of Congress.
  • Black History, Topical: National Archives.
  • Black History Month: National Geographic Society.
  • College Writing: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • Writing Historical Essays, A Guide for Undergraduates: Department of History, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
  • Writing an Essay Introduction: Research & Learning Online.
  • Research and Citation Resources: Purdue Writing Lab, College of Liberal Art.
  • Citing Your Sources, Citing Basics: Research Guides at Williams College Libraries.
  • Citing Electronic Sources: Academic Integrity at MIT, a Handbok for Students.
  • Generate Topic Ideas Quickly and Easily: Online Research Library Questia.
  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

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Exploring 10 Historical Eras: 250 Captivating Essay Topics for a Journey Through Time

Exploring different historical eras provides us with valuable insights into the evolution of human civilization and the various forces that have shaped our societies. From the Prehistoric Era, when early humans roamed the Earth, to the Postmodern Era, characterized by cultural and intellectual shifts, each era presents a unique set of topics that can be examined and analyzed. In this blog article, we will delve into 10 different historical eras and present 25 intriguing essay topics for each era, encouraging readers to explore and gain a deeper understanding of these fascinating periods in history.

Prehistoric Era

The Prehistoric Era refers to the time before the invention of writing and the development of recorded history. It encompasses a vast span of time, from the emergence of the earliest human species to the advent of civilization. During this era, humans relied on stone tools, lived as hunter-gatherers, and gradually developed basic technologies and social structures.

Prehistoric Era Essay Topics

  • The Evolution of Homo sapiens: Tracing the origins and development of modern humans.
  • The Stone Age: Exploring the tools, technologies, and lifestyles of early human societies.
  • Paleolithic Art: Analyzing the cave paintings and rock art as a window into prehistoric culture.
  • The Neolithic Revolution: Examining the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture and settled communities.
  • Megalithic Monuments: Investigating the purpose and significance of Stonehenge, Avebury, and other ancient stone structures.
  • Early Human Migration: Tracing the routes and motivations behind the spread of early humans across the globe.
  • Ice Age and Human Adaptation: Understanding how early humans coped with harsh climatic conditions during the last Ice Age.
  • Prehistoric Rituals and Burial Practices: Exploring evidence of religious beliefs and ceremonial practices in ancient societies.
  • The Role of Women in Prehistoric Societies: Examining the archaeological record to understand the status and roles of women in early communities.
  • Prehistoric Artifacts and Their Significance: Analyzing tools, pottery, and other artifacts to gain insights into prehistoric lifestyles and technologies.
  • Megafauna Extinction: Investigating the causes and consequences of the extinction of large animals during the prehistoric era.
  • Prehistoric Architecture: Studying the construction techniques and purposes of ancient dwellings and structures.
  • Language Origins: Examining theories on the development of language and communication in prehistoric societies.
  • Prehistoric Trade and Exchange: Investigating the networks and systems of trade among early human groups.
  • Cave Dwellers: Exploring the daily lives and adaptations of early humans who lived in caves.
  • Prehistoric Medicine and Healing Practices: Analyzing evidence of ancient medical knowledge and healing techniques.
  • Cultural Diversity in Prehistoric Times: Examining the variation in cultural practices and traditions across different prehistoric societies.
  • Neanderthals and Homo sapiens Interaction: Investigating the encounters and potential interbreeding between Neanderthals and early modern humans.
  • Prehistoric Music and Sound: Exploring the use of musical instruments and sound in ancient rituals and expressions.
  • Prehistoric Agriculture Techniques: Studying the methods and innovations in early farming practices.
  • Prehistoric Coastal Settlements: Examining the impact of marine resources on the development of early coastal communities.
  • Prehistoric Clothing and Adornments: Analyzing evidence of early textile production and personal adornment in ancient cultures.
  • Shamanism and Spirituality in Prehistoric Societies: Investigating the role of spiritual leaders and their practices in ancient communities.
  • Prehistoric Hunting and Gathering Strategies: Understanding the techniques and approaches early humans used to secure food resources.
  • Environmental Impact of Prehistoric Humans: Examining the ecological consequences of human activities during the prehistoric era.

Ancient Era

The Ancient Era is a period of history characterized by the rise and fall of ancient civilizations. It includes the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and others. This era witnessed significant advancements in agriculture, architecture, governance, philosophy, and the arts, laying the foundation for many aspects of modern society.

Ancient Era Essay Topics

  • Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt: Exploring the political, cultural, and religious dynamics of one of the world's greatest civilizations.
  • Democracy in Ancient Athens: Analyzing the origins, functioning, and impact of the democratic system in ancient Greece.
  • The Roman Empire: Examining the expansion, governance, and cultural legacy of the Roman Empire.
  • Ancient Mesopotamia: Investigating the achievements and influence of the early civilizations in the land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers.
  • The Golden Age of Pericles: Exploring the cultural, artistic, and intellectual flourishing during the leadership of Pericles in Athens.
  • Alexander the Great: Analyzing the conquests, empire-building, and legacy of one of history's greatest military leaders.
  • Ancient Chinese Dynasties: Examining the major dynasties of ancient China, their contributions, and societal structures.
  • The Maurya Empire: Investigating the rise and impact of the Maurya Empire in ancient India, particularly under the reign of Ashoka.
  • Ancient Mesoamerica: Exploring the civilizations of the Maya, Aztec, and Olmec, and their advancements in agriculture, astronomy, and architecture.
  • The Hellenistic World: Analyzing the spread of Greek culture, philosophy, and science in the eastern Mediterranean and beyond after the death of Alexander the Great.
  • The Phoenicians: Investigating the maritime trade, city-states, and cultural contributions of the ancient Phoenician civilization.
  • Ancient African Kingdoms: Examining the powerful kingdoms of Kush, Axum, and Ghana, and their political and economic structures.
  • Ancient Indian Philosophy: Analyzing the philosophies of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism and their impact on ancient Indian society.
  • The Persian Empire: Investigating the rise, administration, and conflicts of the Persian Empire under Cyrus, Darius, and Xerxes.
  • Ancient Roman Law: Exploring the development, principles, and influence of Roman legal systems, including the Twelve Tables.
  • The Qin Dynasty: Analyzing the unification of China under the Qin Dynasty, the construction of the Great Wall, and the legacy of Emperor Qin Shi Huang.
  • Ancient Greek Philosophy: Investigating the philosophical ideas and contributions of thinkers such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
  • The Etruscans: Examining the culture, art, and influence of the ancient Etruscan civilization in Italy.
  • Ancient Indus Valley Civilization: Analyzing the urban planning, trade networks, and decline of the Indus Valley Civilization.
  • Ancient Hebrew Civilization: Exploring the religious, cultural, and historical aspects of ancient Hebrew society, including the development of monotheism.
  • The Kingdom of Kush: Investigating the trade routes, pyramids, and interactions with ancient Egypt in the Kingdom of Kush.
  • The Delphic Oracle: Examining the role and influence of the Oracle of Delphi in ancient Greek religion and politics.
  • Ancient Roman Engineering: Analyzing the architectural and engineering achievements of the Romans, including aqueducts, roads, and colosseums.
  • Ancient Olympic Games: Investigating the origins, traditions, and significance of the ancient Olympic Games in Greece.
  • Ancient Trade Routes: Exploring the Silk Road, Incense Route, and other ancient trade networks and their impact on cultural exchange and economic development.

Medieval Era

The Medieval Era, also known as the Middle Ages, is a period that followed the fall of the Western Roman Empire and lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It was marked by feudalism, the dominance of the Catholic Church, the emergence of nation-states, and the Crusades. This era saw the development of Gothic architecture, the growth of trade and towns, and significant social, cultural, and political transformations.

Medieval Era Essay Topics

  • Feudalism in Medieval Europe: Examining the political, social, and economic structure of feudal society.
  • The Crusades: Analyzing the motivations, impact, and legacy of the series of holy wars between Christians and Muslims.
  • The Black Death: Investigating the causes, consequences, and societal effects of the devastating plague that swept through Europe in the 14th century.
  • Medieval Castles: Exploring the purpose, architecture, and defensive features of castles during the medieval period.
  • The Magna Carta: Analyzing the significance and long-term influence of the Magna Carta as a document that limited the power of the English monarchy.
  • Medieval Chivalry and Knighthood: Investigating the code of conduct, training, and ideals of knights in medieval Europe.
  • Medieval Women: Examining the roles, rights, and societal expectations of women in medieval society.
  • The Hundred Years' War: Analyzing the causes, key events, and consequences of the long-lasting conflict between England and France.
  • Medieval Literature: Exploring the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, Dante Alighieri, and other prominent medieval authors and their contributions to literature.
  • The Inquisition: Investigating the establishment, methods, and impact of the medieval Inquisition, particularly in relation to religious heresy.
  • Medieval Universities: Examining the origins, curriculum, and influence of universities during the Middle Ages, such as the University of Bologna and the University of Paris.
  • Medieval Medicine and Healing: Analyzing the medical practices, beliefs, and advancements during the medieval period.
  • The Vikings: Investigating the Norse seafarers, their raids, exploration, and cultural impact during the medieval era.
  • Medieval Art and Architecture: Exploring the distinctive styles and techniques of medieval artistic expression, including Gothic cathedrals and illuminated manuscripts.
  • The Reconquista: Analyzing the Christian reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula from Islamic rule and its implications for religious and political dynamics.
  • Medieval Towns and Trade: Examining the growth of towns, guilds, and trade networks in medieval Europe and their economic significance.
  • Medieval Heresy and Witch Hunts: Investigating the persecution of religious dissidents and the witch-hunting phenomena during the medieval period.
  • The Hanseatic League: Analyzing the trading alliance of Northern European cities and its impact on commerce and politics during the Middle Ages.
  • Medieval Music: Exploring the development and characteristics of medieval music, including Gregorian chants and troubadour songs.
  • The Avignon Papacy: Investigating the period when the papal seat was moved from Rome to Avignon and its implications for the Catholic Church.
  • Medieval Islamic Golden Age: Examining the advancements in science, mathematics, philosophy, and art in the Islamic world during the medieval era.
  • The War of the Roses: Analyzing the dynastic conflict between the Houses of Lancaster and York for the English crown.
  • Medieval Monasticism: Exploring the roles, daily life, and contributions of monks and nuns in medieval monasteries.
  • The Hanseatic League: Investigating the trading alliance of Northern European cities and its impact on commerce and politics during the Middle Ages.
  • Medieval Witchcraft and Magic: Analyzing beliefs, practices, and the social response to witchcraft and magic in medieval society.

Renaissance Era

The Renaissance Era refers to a period of cultural and intellectual rebirth that took place in Europe from the 14th to the 17th century. It witnessed a revival of interest in classical knowledge, artistic innovation, scientific discoveries, and exploration. The Renaissance saw the works of renowned artists, thinkers, and scientists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Galileo Galilei, and William Shakespeare.

Renaissance Era Essay Topics

  • Humanism and the Renaissance: Examining the intellectual and cultural movement that emphasized human potential, classical learning, and individualism.
  • The Medici Family and the Renaissance: Analyzing the patronage and influence of the Medici family in Florence during the Renaissance.
  • Leonardo da Vinci: Exploring the life, artistic achievements, and scientific contributions of the renowned Renaissance polymath.
  • The Printing Press and the Spread of Ideas: Investigating the impact of Johannes Gutenberg's invention on the dissemination of knowledge during the Renaissance.
  • The Italian Renaissance vs. the Northern Renaissance: Comparing the artistic, cultural, and intellectual developments in Italy and Northern Europe during the Renaissance.
  • Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel: Analyzing the artistic techniques and symbolic significance of Michelangelo's masterpiece.
  • The Role of Women in the Renaissance: Examining the opportunities, limitations, and contributions of women in Renaissance society.
  • The Protestant Reformation: Investigating the religious, political, and social upheaval sparked by Martin Luther and other reformers during the Renaissance.
  • Renaissance Architecture: Exploring the innovative architectural styles and structures of the Renaissance, such as Brunelleschi's dome in Florence.
  • The Scientific Revolution: Analyzing the shift in scientific thinking and the contributions of figures like Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton during the Renaissance.
  • The Court of Henry VIII: Examining the political and cultural developments during the reign of Henry VIII in England, including his patronage of the arts.
  • Renaissance Music: Exploring the musical compositions, styles, and innovations of Renaissance composers like Palestrina and Josquin des Prez.
  • The School of Athens: Analyzing Raphael's famous fresco and its representation of the intellectual and artistic achievements of the Renaissance.
  • Elizabethan Theater: Investigating the flourishing of theater during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I and the works of playwrights like Shakespeare.
  • The Scientific Method and Empiricism: Examining the development of new scientific methodologies and the emphasis on observation and experimentation during the Renaissance.
  • Artistic Techniques of the Renaissance: Exploring the innovations in painting, sculpture, and perspective, including techniques like sfumato and chiaroscuro.
  • The Impact of Renaissance on European Exploration: Analyzing how the Renaissance spirit of curiosity and discovery influenced the Age of Exploration.
  • Renaissance Literature: Examining the works of Renaissance writers such as Dante, Petrarch, and Machiavelli and their contributions to literature and political thought.
  • Renaissance Gardens and Landscapes: Investigating the design principles and symbolism in Renaissance gardens, such as the Boboli Gardens in Florence.
  • Patronage and Artistic Identity: Analyzing the relationship between artists and their patrons and its influence on artistic expression during the Renaissance.
  • The Ottoman Empire and the Renaissance: Examining the cultural exchange and influence between the Ottoman Empire and Renaissance Europe.
  • Renaissance Medicine and Anatomy: Exploring the advancements in medical knowledge, anatomical studies, and medical illustrations during the Renaissance.
  • The Iconoclasm Controversy: Analyzing the debates and conflicts surrounding the destruction of religious images during the Reformation and Counter-Reformation.
  • Renaissance Fashion and Clothing: Investigating the evolution of fashion, textiles, and clothing styles during the Renaissance.
  • Renaissance Philosophy: Exploring the philosophical ideas and debates of Renaissance thinkers, including humanism, skepticism, and the concept of the "Renaissance Man."

Age of Enlightenment

The Age of Enlightenment, also known as the Age of Reason, was a philosophical and intellectual movement that flourished in Europe during the 18th century. It emphasized reason, science, and individualism, challenging traditional authority and advocating for political and social reforms. Thinkers such as John Locke, Voltaire, and Immanuel Kant shaped this era, promoting ideas of liberty, equality, and human rights.

Age of Enlightenment Essay Topics

  • The Enlightenment Thinkers: Analyzing the ideas and contributions of prominent Enlightenment philosophers such as Voltaire, Rousseau, and Locke.
  • The Age of Reason: Examining the shift towards rationality, skepticism, and empirical inquiry during the Enlightenment.
  • The Influence of the Scientific Revolution on the Enlightenment: Investigating how scientific advancements and methodologies shaped Enlightenment thinking.
  • Enlightenment and Religious Toleration: Analyzing the ideas of religious tolerance and freedom of thought promoted by Enlightenment thinkers.
  • The Social Contract Theory: Exploring the concept of the social contract and its impact on political thought during the Enlightenment.
  • Enlightenment and the American Revolution: Examining the Enlightenment ideals of liberty, equality, and democracy in the context of the American Revolution.
  • Enlightened Absolutism: Analyzing the attempts by monarchs such as Frederick the Great and Catherine the Great to implement Enlightenment ideas in their rule.
  • The Encyclopédie: Investigating the significance and impact of the Encyclopédie, a comprehensive compilation of knowledge during the Enlightenment.
  • Enlightenment and the French Revolution: Exploring the influence of Enlightenment ideas on the causes and outcomes of the French Revolution.
  • Salons and Enlightenment Culture: Analyzing the role of salons as intellectual and social hubs in fostering the spread of Enlightenment ideas.
  • Enlightenment and Women's Rights: Examining the contributions of Enlightenment thinkers to the development of feminist thought and women's rights.
  • Enlightenment and Education: Investigating the emphasis on education, reason, and critical thinking in Enlightenment philosophy.
  • The Enlightenment and Slavery: Exploring the Enlightenment's impact on the abolitionist movement and debates about human rights.
  • Enlightenment and the Scientific Method: Analyzing the influence of the scientific method and empirical observation on Enlightenment thought.
  • Enlightenment and the Arts: Examining the connections between Enlightenment ideals and artistic movements, such as neoclassicism.
  • Enlightenment and Human Rights: Investigating the development and influence of concepts like natural rights and the rights of man during the Enlightenment.
  • Enlightenment and Colonialism: Analyzing the contradictions between Enlightenment principles and the realities of European colonialism.
  • Enlightenment and Political Revolutions: Exploring the role of Enlightenment ideas in inspiring political revolutions beyond Europe, such as in Latin America.
  • Enlightenment and the Enlightenment Salons: Examining the role of salons as intellectual and social hubs in fostering the spread of Enlightenment ideas.
  • Enlightenment and Cosmopolitanism: Investigating the Enlightenment's promotion of global interconnectedness and cosmopolitan ideals.
  • Enlightenment and the Progress of Society: Analyzing the belief in human progress and the improvement of society through reason and knowledge during the Enlightenment.
  • Enlightenment and Economic Thought: Exploring the influence of Enlightenment thinkers on economic theories, such as Adam Smith's ideas on free markets.
  • Enlightenment and the Separation of Powers: Examining the Enlightenment's impact on the development of the concept of separation of powers in government.
  • Enlightenment and the Critique of Monarchy: Investigating Enlightenment criticisms of absolute monarchy and calls for political reform.
  • Enlightenment and the Critique of Superstition: Analyzing the Enlightenment's challenge to religious dogma, superstition, and the authority of the church.

Industrial Era

The Industrial Era, also referred to as the Industrial Revolution, marked a significant shift in economic and social structures, beginning in the late 18th century. It was characterized by the mechanization of production, the growth of factories, urbanization, and technological advancements. The Industrial Era transformed agriculture, transportation, communication, and labor, leading to profound societal changes.

Industrial Era Essay Topics

  • The Industrial Revolution: Examining the causes, advancements, and societal impact of the Industrial Revolution.
  • Urbanization and Industrialization: Analyzing the growth of cities and the transformation of rural societies during the Industrial Era.
  • Factory Labor and Working Conditions: Investigating the working conditions, labor movements, and the impact of industrialization on workers.
  • Technological Innovations of the Industrial Era: Exploring key inventions and advancements in transportation, communication, and manufacturing.
  • Industrialization and Environmental Impact: Examining the environmental consequences of industrialization, including pollution, deforestation, and resource depletion.
  • The Rise of Capitalism: Analyzing the economic system of capitalism and its role in driving industrialization and social change.
  • Child Labor in the Industrial Era: Investigating the exploitation of children in factories and the efforts to reform child labor laws.
  • Industrialization and Social Class: Examining the emergence of social classes, class struggles, and inequality during the Industrial Era.
  • Industrialization and Imperialism: Analyzing the connection between industrialization, technological advancements, and the expansion of colonial empires.
  • Industrialization and Global Trade: Exploring the impact of industrialization on global trade networks and the rise of economic globalization.
  • Industrial Revolution and Gender Roles: Investigating the changing roles and experiences of women during the Industrial Era.
  • Industrialization and the Formation of Labor Unions: Analyzing the rise of labor unions and collective bargaining in response to harsh working conditions.
  • Technological Advances in Transportation: Examining the impact of inventions like steam engines, railways, and steamships on transportation systems.
  • Industrialization and Urban Planning: Investigating the development of urban infrastructure, city planning, and public health initiatives during the Industrial Era.
  • Industrialization and the Rise of Consumer Culture: Exploring the emergence of mass production, advertising, and consumerism during the Industrial Era.
  • Industrialization and Colonialism in Africa: Analyzing the connection between industrialization in Europe and the scramble for Africa during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Industrialization and the Arts: Examining the artistic responses to industrialization, including movements such as realism and romanticism.
  • Industrialization and Social Reform Movements: Investigating the social and political reform movements that emerged in response to the negative impacts of industrialization.
  • Industrialization and Technological Disruption: Analyzing the effects of automation and mechanization on traditional industries and employment patterns.
  • Industrialization and the Rise of Scientific Management: Exploring the principles of scientific management and its impact on labor productivity.
  • Industrialization and Public Health: Investigating the challenges and advancements in public health during the Industrial Era, including sanitation and disease prevention.
  • Industrialization and the Rise of Mass Media: Examining the impact of industrialization on the development of mass media, including newspapers, radio, and cinema.
  • Industrialization and Social Mobility: Analyzing the opportunities and challenges for social mobility during the Industrial Era.
  • Industrialization and the Birth of Modern Warfare: Investigating the impact of industrialization on military technology, tactics, and the nature of warfare.
  • Industrialization and Demographic Shifts: Exploring the demographic changes, including population growth and migration, resulting from industrialization.

Colonial Era

The Colonial Era refers to the period during which European powers established colonies and expanded their influence across the globe, primarily from the 15th to the 20th century. It witnessed European exploration, colonization, and exploitation of regions in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. This era shaped the history, culture, and demographic composition of both colonized and colonizing nations.

Colonial Era Essay Topics

  • The Age of Exploration: Examining the motivations, key explorers, and initial contact between European powers and indigenous peoples during the Colonial Era.
  • The Columbian Exchange: Analyzing the exchange of goods, diseases, and ideas between the Old World and the New World following Christopher Columbus's voyages.
  • Colonialism and Imperialism: Exploring the political, economic, and cultural aspects of European colonization and empire-building during the Colonial Era.
  • Indigenous Peoples and European Colonization: Investigating the impact of European colonization on indigenous societies, including displacement, cultural assimilation, and resistance.
  • The Atlantic Slave Trade: Examining the transatlantic slave trade, its economic significance, and the experiences of enslaved Africans.
  • Religious Colonization: Analyzing the role of religion, including missions and conversions, in the process of colonization during the Colonial Era.
  • Colonial Economics and Mercantilism: Investigating the economic system of mercantilism and its impact on colonial economies and trade.
  • Colonial Governance and Administration: Exploring the various forms of colonial governance, including direct rule, indirect rule, and settler colonies.
  • The French and Indian War: Analyzing the causes, key events, and consequences of the conflict between France and Britain for control of North America.
  • Colonial Resistance and Revolutions: Examining the resistance movements and revolutions that emerged against colonial rule, such as the American Revolution and Latin American independence movements.
  • Impact of Colonialism on Native American Cultures: Investigating the cultural, social, and demographic changes experienced by Native American tribes as a result of European colonization.
  • Colonial Education and Cultural Assimilation: Analyzing the role of education in colonial societies and the impact of cultural assimilation on indigenous peoples.
  • Colonial Architecture and Urban Planning: Exploring the architectural styles and urban planning principles implemented by European colonizers in their colonies.
  • Colonial Trade Routes: Investigating the major trade routes and commodities traded during the Colonial Era, such as the Triangular Trade.
  • Gender Roles in Colonial Society: Examining the roles, expectations, and experiences of women in colonial societies, both European and indigenous.
  • Colonial Resistance in Africa: Analyzing the resistance movements and anti-colonial struggles in Africa, such as the Mau Mau uprising and the Algerian War of Independence.
  • The Spanish Conquest of the Americas: Investigating the conquest and colonization of the Americas by Spain, including the role of figures like Hernán Cortés and Francisco Pizarro.
  • Colonialism in Asia: Exploring European colonial expansion in Asia, including the Dutch East India Company, British India, and French Indochina.
  • Colonial Medicine and Health: Analyzing the medical practices, diseases, and healthcare systems introduced by European colonizers in colonial territories.
  • Colonial Borderlands and Frontiers: Investigating the social, cultural, and economic dynamics of colonial borderlands and frontier regions.
  • Colonial Legal Systems and Justice: Examining the establishment of colonial legal systems and their impact on indigenous communities and land rights.
  • Colonialism and Environmental Impact: Analyzing the ecological consequences of European colonization, including deforestation, resource extraction, and ecological changes.
  • Colonialism and Language: Investigating the linguistic impact of colonialism, including language shift, language policies, and the suppression of indigenous languages.
  • Colonial Art and Visual Culture: Exploring the artistic representations and cultural exchanges between colonizers and indigenous peoples during the Colonial Era.
  • Decolonization and Post-Colonial Legacy: Analyzing the process of decolonization, the formation of new nation-states, and the enduring effects of colonialism on political, social, and economic structures.

The Modern Era refers to the period from the 18th century to the present day. It encompasses various significant developments, including political revolutions, industrialization, globalization, and technological advancements. The Modern Era witnessed the rise of nation-states, the spread of democracy, the growth of capitalism, and the impact of scientific discoveries and innovations on society.

Modern Era Essay Topics

  • Industrialization and Modernization: Analyzing the transformation of societies through industrialization and the impact on technology, economy, and social structures.
  • World Wars and Global Conflicts: Investigating the causes, key events, and consequences of World War I, World War II, and other major conflicts in the modern era.
  • The Cold War: Examining the ideological, political, and military standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union and its global implications.
  • Decolonization and Postcolonialism: Analyzing the process of decolonization and the formation of new nation-states in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.
  • Globalization and its Effects: Investigating the economic, cultural, and political consequences of globalization in the modern era.
  • Civil Rights Movements: Examining the struggles for civil rights and social justice, including the African-American civil rights movement and other movements for equality.
  • Technological Revolution: Analyzing the rapid advancements in technology, such as the internet, telecommunications, and digital revolution, and their impact on society.
  • Environmentalism and Climate Change: Investigating the emergence of environmental movements and the challenges posed by climate change in the modern era.
  • Women's Liberation and Feminism: Examining the feminist movements and their impact on gender equality, women's rights, and social attitudes.
  • Human Rights and International Law: Analyzing the development of international human rights standards and institutions, and their challenges in the modern era.
  • Rise of Nationalism and Identity Politics: Investigating the resurgence of nationalism, ethnic conflicts, and the politics of identity in the modern era.
  • Economic Inequality and Poverty: Examining the issues of income inequality, poverty, and social disparities in the modern globalized world.
  • Terrorism and Global Security: Analyzing the rise of terrorism, its causes, and the international efforts to combat it in the modern era.
  • Technological Ethics and Privacy: Investigating the ethical implications of technological advancements, including surveillance, data privacy, and artificial intelligence.
  • Modern Art and Cultural Movements: Examining the various artistic movements and trends in the modern era, including surrealism, abstract expressionism, and pop art.
  • Media and Mass Communication: Analyzing the role of mass media, including television, radio, and social media, in shaping public opinion and disseminating information.
  • Health and Medicine in the Modern Era: Investigating advancements in medical science, public health challenges, and the impact of modern medicine on society.
  • Immigration and Global Migration: Examining the causes and consequences of global migration flows in the modern era and their impact on societies.
  • Humanitarian Interventions and Genocide: Analyzing the international response to humanitarian crises, genocides, and the concept of the responsibility to protect.
  • Space Exploration and the Space Age: Investigating the advancements in space exploration, the race to the moon, and the impact of space technologies on society.
  • LGBTQ+ Rights and Activism: Examining the LGBTQ+ rights movement, the fight for equality, and the changing attitudes towards sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • Populism and Political Movements: Analyzing the rise of populist movements and their impact on contemporary politics and governance.
  • Economic Globalization and Trade: Investigating the dynamics of global trade, multinational corporations, and economic interdependence in the modern era.
  • Human Migration and Refugee Crisis: Examining the causes and consequences of human migration, refugee crises, and the challenges faced by host countries.
  • Artificial Intelligence and Ethical Considerations: Analyzing the development of artificial intelligence, its potential benefits and risks, and the ethical dilemmas it poses in the modern era.

Information Age

The Information Age, also known as the Digital Age or the Computer Age, refers to the modern era characterized by the widespread use of digital technologies, computer networks, and the internet. It revolutionized communication, information access, and knowledge sharing, transforming various aspects of society, including education, business, entertainment, and governance.

Information Age Essay Topics

  • The Digital Revolution: Analyzing the transformative impact of the digital revolution on society, communication, and information dissemination.
  • The Internet and its Evolution: Investigating the origins, growth, and global implications of the internet in the information age.
  • Social Media and its Influence: Examining the rise of social media platforms and their impact on communication, activism, and social interactions.
  • Cybersecurity and Privacy: Analyzing the challenges and importance of cybersecurity, data privacy, and protecting personal information in the information age.
  • Big Data and Data Analytics: Investigating the role of big data, data mining, and data analytics in various fields, including business, healthcare, and governance.
  • Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning: Examining the advancements and applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning in the information age.
  • Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality: Analyzing the development, potential, and impact of virtual reality and augmented reality technologies.
  • Online Education and E-Learning: Investigating the rise of online education platforms and their impact on traditional education systems.
  • E-commerce and Online Retail: Examining the growth of e-commerce, online shopping, and the changing landscape of retail in the information age.
  • Digital Divide and Technological Inequality: Analyzing the disparities in access to technology and the internet, and the implications for socioeconomic inequality.
  • Online Activism and Social Movements: Investigating the role of online platforms in facilitating activism, mobilization, and social change.
  • Fake News and Misinformation: Examining the challenges posed by fake news, misinformation, and disinformation in the information age.
  • Digital Censorship and Freedom of Expression: Analyzing the tension between censorship, content moderation, and the protection of freedom of expression online.
  • Online Gaming and Virtual Communities: Investigating the social and psychological impact of online gaming and the formation of virtual communities.
  • Digital Health and Telemedicine: Examining the advancements in digital health technologies, telemedicine, and their potential to transform healthcare delivery.
  • Internet of Things (IoT): Analyzing the interconnectedness of devices and objects in the IoT, and its implications for everyday life.
  • Digital Literacy and Information Literacy: Investigating the importance of digital and information literacy skills in the information age.
  • Online Privacy and Surveillance: Examining the trade-offs between privacy and security in the era of widespread surveillance and data collection.
  • Digital Entertainment and Streaming Services: Analyzing the impact of digital entertainment platforms and streaming services on traditional media industries.
  • Digital Archives and Preservation: Investigating the challenges and opportunities of digital preservation, archiving, and access to historical and cultural artifacts.
  • Online Identity and Self-Presentation: Examining the construction of online identities, self-presentation, and the blurring of online and offline worlds.
  • Digital Citizenship and Online Ethics: Analyzing the responsibilities and ethical considerations associated with being a digital citizen in the information age.
  • Remote Work and Digital Nomadism: Investigating the rise of remote work, flexible work arrangements, and the impact on work-life balance.
  • Digital Transformation in Business: Examining the adoption of digital technologies and strategies by businesses and industries.
  • Ethical AI and Algorithmic Bias: Analyzing the ethical considerations and challenges associated with artificial intelligence algorithms, bias, and accountability in decision-making processes.

Postmodern Era

The Postmodern Era is a cultural and intellectual period that emerged in the mid-20th century, questioning and challenging the principles of modernism. It embraces a fragmented and diverse approach to art, literature, philosophy, and social critique. The Postmodern Era is characterized by skepticism towards grand narratives, a focus on individual experiences, intertext

Postmodern Era Essay Topics

  • The Postmodern Condition: Examining the characteristics and defining features of the postmodern era in philosophy, art, and literature.
  • Postmodern Architecture: Investigating the emergence of postmodern architecture, its defining features, and its influence on contemporary design.
  • Postmodern Literature: Analyzing the characteristics of postmodern literature, including intertextuality, fragmentation, and irony.
  • Postmodernism and Postcolonialism: Examining the intersections and differences between postmodernism and postcolonialism, and their impact on cultural and literary studies.
  • Postmodern Feminism: Investigating the contributions and critiques of postmodern feminism, and its impact on gender and sexuality studies.
  • Postmodernism and Consumer Culture: Analyzing the relationship between postmodernism and consumer culture, and its influence on contemporary society and identity.
  • Postmodernism and Globalization: Examining the impact of globalization on postmodernism, and the ways in which postmodernism has shaped the discourse on globalization.
  • Postmodernism and the Digital Age: Investigating the intersections between postmodernism and the digital age, including the impact of social media and digital technologies on identity and representation.
  • Postmodernism and Post-truth: Analyzing the role of postmodernism in the emergence of post-truth politics, and its impact on contemporary discourse and democracy.
  • Postmodern Ethics: Examining the challenges and opportunities of developing ethical frameworks in a postmodern world, and the role of postmodern philosophy in this process.
  • Postmodern Education: Investigating the impact of postmodernism on educational theory and practice, including the emphasis on critical thinking, cultural diversity, and creativity.
  • Postmodernism and the Environment: Analyzing the relationship between postmodernism and environmentalism, and the ways in which postmodernism has shaped the discourse on sustainability and climate change.
  • Postmodernism and Identity Politics: Examining the impact of postmodernism on the emergence of identity politics, and the tensions between individual and collective identities.
  • Postmodernism and Popular Culture: Investigating the influence of postmodernism on popular culture, including music, film, and television.
  • Postmodernism and the Body: Analyzing the ways in which postmodernism has shaped the discourse on the body, including issues of gender, sexuality, and disability.
  • Postmodernism and Psychoanalysis: Examining the relationship between postmodernism and psychoanalysis, and the ways in which postmodernism has contributed to the development of contemporary psychoanalytic theory.
  • Postmodernism and Religion: Investigating the impact of postmodernism on religious thought and practice, including the challenges of religious pluralism and the role of spirituality in contemporary society.
  • Postmodernism and Aesthetics: Analyzing the ways in which postmodernism has challenged traditional notions of aesthetics, including the relationship between form and content, and the role of the viewer in the creative process.
  • Postmodernism and the Body Politic: Examining the impact of postmodernism on political theory and practice, including the challenges of multiculturalism and the role of the state in the era of globalization.
  • Postmodernism and Intersectionality: Investigating the contributions and critiques of postmodernism to the development of intersectionality theory, and its impact on contemporary social justice movements.
  • Postmodernism and Post-humanism: Analyzing the implications of postmodernism for the relationship between humans and non-human entities, including animals, machines, and the environment.
  • Postmodernism and Popular Science: Examining the ways in which postmodernism has shaped the discourse on science, including issues of objectivity, subjectivity, and the ethics of scientific research.
  • Postmodernism and Historical Narratives: Investigating the challenges and revisions brought by postmodernism to the construction of historical narratives, including questioning dominant narratives and exploring multiple perspectives.
  • Postmodernism and Memory: Analyzing the impact of postmodernism on the understanding and representation of collective and individual memory, including the role of nostalgia, pastiche, and cultural memory.
  • Postmodernism and Resistance: Investigating the ways in which postmodernism has influenced forms of resistance and activism, including artistic expressions, subversive narratives, and counter-cultural movements.

The study of historical eras offers us a window into the past, shedding light on the foundations of our present-day societies. From the mysteries of the Prehistoric Era to the intellectual awakening of the Age of Enlightenment, and from the industrial advancements of the Industrial Era to the digital transformations of the Information Age, each era has left an indelible mark on our world. The 250 essay topics provided across the ten historical eras covered in this article offer a wealth of possibilities for further exploration and analysis. By delving into these topics, we can better comprehend the complexities of human history, appreciate the achievements and challenges of past civilizations, and gain valuable insights that can inform our understanding of the world today.

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Navigating Historical Debates: History Argumentative Essay Topics

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Dipping your toes into the vast ocean of history is an adventure. Each dive deep into its depths brings a new perspective, a fresh understanding, or a challenging contradiction. As a student of history, you don’t just learn about the past; you argue, debate, and discuss it. That’s where “history argumentative essay topics” come in, giving you the perfect platform to exhibit your persuasive skills while furthering your historical understanding.

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The Importance of Studying History

History isn’t just a record of ancient days; it’s a vibrant tapestry woven with countless threads, each representing a story, an era, a civilization, or an individual. Understanding history empowers us to make sense of our present, forecast future patterns, and appreciate humanity’s collective journey. Delving into argumentative essays adds depth to this exploration, honing your critical thinking, research understanding, and writing prowess.

The Art of Writing an Argumentative History Essay

In a history argumentative essay, your task goes beyond presenting facts. It would help to form an opinion, defend it with strong evidence, and persuade your reader to view history through your lens. Such essays often explore controversial issues, diverse interpretations, or underrepresented perspectives, making them thrilling.

Remember, an effective argumentative essay balances rigor with creativity. Your arguments should be based on solid research, but your writing style should maintain the reader’s interest. Short sentences, active voice, and transitional words will help ensure your essay is clear, concise, and captivating.

History Argumentative Essay Topics: Your Guide to an Engaging Argument

Picking the right history argumentative essay topics is crucial. Your topic should spark your curiosity, offer ample sources for research, and pose a challenge that motivates you to explore, argue, and persuade. The past is brimming with potential argumentative essay topics, from historical events and famous figures to social movements and cultural trends.

Here are a collection of history argumentative essay topics spanning different eras, regions, and themes to get you started. Use them as they are, or let them inspire you to develop your own.

  • The Crusades: Religious Devotion or Political Expediency?
  • Was the Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Justifiable?
  • The Impact of Colonialism: Development or Exploitation?
  • The Role of Women in World War II: Homefront or Battlefield?
  • The American Civil War: Slavery or States’ Rights?
  • The French Revolution: Fight for Liberty or Reign of Terror?
  • The Renaissance: A Cultural Rebirth or a Period of Conflict?
  • Martin Luther King Jr. vs. Malcolm X: Who Had a Greater Impact on the Civil Rights Movement?
  • The Age of Exploration: Discovery or Destruction?
  • The Industrial Revolution: Progress or Plight?
  • The Fall of the Roman Empire: Invaders or Internal Decay?
  • Was the Cold War Inevitable Post-World War II?
  • Christopher Columbus: Hero or Villain?
  • The Impact of the Protestant Reformation: Unity or Division?
  • The Age of Imperialism: Prosperity or Oppression?
  • The Vietnam War: A Necessary Stand or a Futile Endeavor?
  • The American Revolution: Liberty or Economic Motives?
  • The Russian Revolution: People’s Uprising or Bolshevik Coup?
  • The Enlightenment: Philosophical Breakthrough or Social Disruption?
  • The Emancipation Proclamation: Sincere or Strategic?
  • The Role of Propaganda in Nazi Germany
  • Was Alexander the Great Really Great?
  • The Partition of India: Religious Freedom or Colonial Divide-and-Rule?
  • Did the Suffragette Movement Achieve Its Goals?
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis: Near-Apocalypse or Diplomatic Triumph?
  • The Influence of the Printing Press: Information Revolution or Religious Turmoil?
  • The Crusades: A Pathway to Enlightenment or a Dark Age Misstep?
  • The Atomic Age: A New Era or a Dangerous Precedent?
  • The Impact of the Ming Dynasty on China’s Global Presence
  • The American Westward Expansion: Manifest Destiny or Brutal Displacement?
  • The British Raj in India: Beneficial or Destructive?
  • The War of 1812: Forgotten War or Critical Conflict?
  • The Cultural Revolution in China: Necessary Purge or Disastrous Policy?
  • Slavery: The True Cause of the American Civil War?
  • The Role of Espionage in the Cold War
  • The Contributions of Nikola Tesla: Overlooked or Overrated?
  • The Great Depression: Natural Economic Cycle or Result of Poor Policy?
  • Was the League of Nations Doomed to Fail?
  • The Impact of Napoleon’s Reign on Europe
  • The Salem Witch Trials: Mass Hysteria or Religious Extremism?
  • The Influence of the Ottoman Empire on Modern Middle East
  • Did the Treaty of Versailles Cause World War II?
  • The Role of the Catholic Church in Medieval Europe
  • Manifest Destiny: Expansionism or Cultural Imperialism?
  • The Impact of Genghis Khan and the Mongol Empire
  • The Spanish Inquisition: Religious Persecution or Political Power Play?
  • The Influence of the Harlem Renaissance on African American Culture
  • The Ethics of Using Atomic Bombs in WWII
  • The Role of Britain in the Creation of Israel
  • The Egyptian Revolution of 2011: A Springboard for Democracy?
  • The Effect of the Gold Rush on California’s Development
  • The Role of Social Media in the Arab Spring
  • The Implications of the Scramble for Africa
  • The Battle of Stalingrad: Turning Point in World War II?
  • The Meiji Restoration: Western Influence or Japanese Initiative?
  • The Role of Women in the French Revolution
  • The Impact of the Black Death on European Society
  • The Effect of the Viking Raids on European History
  • The Fall of the Berlin Wall: Inevitable or Surprising?
  • The Contributions of the Ancient Greeks to Modern Society
  • The Influence of the Catholic Church on the European Age of Discovery
  • The Impact of Gunpowder on Medieval Warfare
  • The Influence of the Spanish Civil War on WWII
  • The Causes and Consequences of the Thirty Years’ War
  • The Role of the Railroad in the Expansion of the United States
  • The Significance of the Magna Carta in the Modern Legal System
  • The Impact of the Silk Road on the Exchange of Cultures
  • The Role of the Mafia in Prohibition
  • The Effect of Charlemagne’s Reign on Europe
  • The Implications of the Columbian Exchange
  • The Influence of the Persian Empire on the Modern Middle East
  • The Impact of Marco Polo’s Travels on Europe
  • The Effect of the French Revolution on European Politics
  • The Influence of the Great Schism on Christianity
  • The Impact of the Space Race on the Cold War
  • The Legacy of the Aztec Empire
  • The Effect of the Transatlantic Slave Trade on Africa
  • The Role of the Knights Templar in the Crusades
  • The Influence of Gutenberg’s Printing Press on the Reformation
  • The Impact of the Han Dynasty on China
  • The Causes and Effects of the Boxer Rebellion
  • The Significance of the Pax Romana
  • The Influence of Confucianism on East Asian Cultures
  • The Impact of the Opium Wars on China
  • The Role of the French Foreign Legion in Colonial France
  • The Effect of the Suez Crisis on the Middle East
  • The Influence of the Renaissance on Modern Art
  • The Impact of the Zulu Nation on South Africa
  • The Causes and Consequences of the Irish Potato Famine
  • The Role of the Samurai in Feudal Japan
  • The Effect of the Hundred Years’ War on England and France
  • The Influence of the Roman Republic on Modern Democracies
  • The Impact of the US Constitution on the French Revolution
  • The Role of the Huns in the Fall of the Roman Empire
  • The Causes and Effects of the Haitian Revolution
  • The Influence of the Enlightenment on the US Constitution
  • The Impact of the Homestead Act on the American West
  • The Effect of the Plague of Justinian on the Byzantine Empire
  • The Role of the Medici Family in the Italian Renaissance

Remember, the goal is not just to recount history but to form an argument and defend it persuasively. Use reliable sources like scholarly articles, credible news outlets, and respected history websites for your research ( History.com , JSTOR , Fordham University’s Internet History Sourcebooks Project , etc.).

Conclusion: Your Historical Argument Awaits

Choosing from these argumentative history essay topics is just the beginning. You can turn your chosen topic into a compelling essay with thorough research, careful planning, and passionate writing. As you debate the past, you’re not just learning history but contributing to its discussion. Let these argumentative essay topics be your first step toward a thrilling historical discourse.

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135 US History Essay Topics

One of the most time-consuming essay writing assignments can be a US history essay. Assigned for a variety of reasons, including testing students’ knowledge, encouraging research skills, and determining how well students can comprehend different types of texts, a US history essay assignment provides many challenges to the student.

Another hardship of writing a US history essay is that there isn’t always an abundant or easily accessible source of new information on something that has already happened. This means that students need to work extra hard to craft a US History essay that is original, unique, and doesn’t sound like the many other essays that have already been written on the topic.

However, all of the hardships students face when attempting to write a US history essay can be eased with the help of this guide. We’ll cover the essential aspects of writing a US History essay and provide 135 US History essay topics that are ideal for any level of education.

How To Write a US History Essay?

When it comes to writing a US History essay, the first thing students will need to do is pick a topic. The topic should be relevant to the course and allow for enough credible research to back up any arguments or examples made in the essay’s body.

For example, a topic on the creation of the Declaration of Independence would offer much more opportunity for analysis and research than a topic on something less significant such as the color of George Washington’s horse.

Once students have selected their topic, they will need to start thinking about the essay’s thesis. The thesis is often referred to as the “point” of an essay and should be reflected in the introduction and conclusion. This means that students will need to think critically about their topic choice and determine what points they want to make.

Students can choose a thesis by listing the most important aspects of their topic and choosing one aspect as the main point of their essay. For example, if a student were assigned a paper on the Civil Rights movement, they might want to argue that violence was necessary or that nonviolence was more effective in the movement for equality.

Students will also need to consider what information they are expected to include in their essay. Common types of US History essays include:

  • argumentative
  • comparison/contrast
  • cause and effect
  • introspective
  • problem /solution

Each of these essay types requires a unique set of points, arguments, and examples to ensure they meet the criteria for the writing. For example, if you are writing a compare and contrast essay on US History, you’ll need to research several different aspects of your topic and compare them to each other.

If you are writing an argumentative US History essay, you’ll need to provide sufficient evidence to prove your point before explaining why the opposing side’s argument is incorrect.

Once the topic has been selected and enough information has been researched to create a thesis and provide supporting evidence, the next step of writing a US History essay is to outline your argument. An outline can help students organize their thoughts and ensure they include everything necessary to write a well-rounded paper.

Make sure your outline includes a thesis statement followed by a clear description of each point you plan to make in the body of your essay.

How To Structure a US History Essay?

Once you have completed the necessary steps to develop a thesis and outline your argument, you can move on to structuring your essay with the intro, body, and conclusion.

The introduction should start with a hook that captures the reader’s attention and provides enough information to encourage them to continue reading. After the hook, you can include your thesis statement, followed by explaining why it is important for readers to know about this topic.

For example, if you are writing an argumentative essay about the role of violence in the Civil Rights movement, you might start your introduction with a hook that asks readers to consider what they would do if they were faced with violence every day of their lives.

You then might include your thesis statement and explain that learning about civil rights activists who confronted police with violence is important to understand because it can help guide future generations about what they might need to do to achieve equality.

The body of your essay should include multiple points, each made with clear evidence and relevant examples. For example, if you were writing a thesis that argued that nonviolence was more effective than violence in the US Civil Rights movement, you might include a paragraph about how nonviolence was proven to be more effective when Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott were compared.

This may lead into a paragraph describing how Martin Luther King Jr. tried to reduce violence in the movement by promoting peaceful methods of protest such as sit-ins, boycotts, marches, etc.

The conclusion should contain a rephrase of the thesis statement and explain why it is vital for readers to understand. For example, if you wrote an argumentative essay about violence in the US Civil Rights movement, your conclusion might include your thesis statement along with the reasons why understanding whether violence is effective or not helps us understand how future generations should respond to injustice.

If you are struggling to begin writing your US History-themed essay, why not choose from any of these 135 US History essay topics to help start your writing process.

US History Essay Topics About the Civil War

  • Why were slaves treated poorly during the Civil War era?
  • Should Confederate generals have been tried for treason after the US Civil War?
  • What was daily life like for formerly enslaved Black people following the US Civil War?
  • How has Lincoln’s influence on Presidential power impacted American society today?
  • Did Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation have a negative impact on Reconstruction?
  • Why is it important to understand the social, political, and economic impacts of slavery during America’s history?
  • Describe how trade was impacted with foreign nations during the Civil War?
  • What forms of civil disobedience became commonplace during the Civil War?
  • Compare and contrast the roles of women during the Civil War and WW2.
  • What were the causes of the US Civil War?
  • Why did people support both sides of the US Civil War?
  • Why was it hard for formerly enslaved people to find employment following the Civil War?
  • Explain how racial violence increased following Reconstruction.
  • Discuss what you believe caused Confederate Generals to order their men to wear gray uniforms at the Battle of Bull Run.
  • How did the Emancipation Proclamation impact foreign relations in the 1860s?
  • What were some causes for fighting during the Reconstruction Era?
  • How was President Lincoln able to pass legislation that helped win the US Civil War?
  • Discuss the most significant battle during the Civil War.
  • Compare and contrast modern-day war strategies to those used during the Civil War.
  • Explain how technological advancements were made during the Civil War.
  • What was the role of Native Americans during the Civil War?
  • How has history made a lot of the same mistakes as it did during the Civil War?

US History Essay Topics About the Native Americans

  • What was life like for Native Americans following their defeat in the US-Indian War?
  • What factors led to violence between whites and indigenous peoples after the Indian Removal Act of 1830?
  • What were some effects of Manifest Destiny on Native Americans?
  • How has the Dawes Act impacted modern-day Native American communities?
  • Why is it important to learn about the Trail of Tears during US history?
  • What were some causes for violence between Indians and settlers in the 1800s?
  • How does modern-day Native American culture resemble indigenous communities during the 1800s?
  • How were treaties formed and broken between whites and Native Americans in North America?
  • What was life like for Natives after they were forced onto reservations?
  • How did President Jackson impact relations between Indigenous peoples and white settlers in the 1800s?
  • Discuss what occurred when European immigrants settled on Native American land.
  • What were some causes for Native American uprisings during the 1800s?
  • Why are there not more Native Americans today compared to during the early years of North America?
  • Discuss the ideologies of Native Americans and how they may have impacted Indian-European relationships.
  • Why was the Battle of Wounded Knee significant?
  • What factors led to corruption within tribal governments following US-Indian wars?
  • What historical stereotypes are still represented in modern day depictions of Native Americans?
  • How can Native Americans use history to correct the ideologies of those who harbor America First sentiments?

US History Essay Topics About the Great Depression

  • Explain how life changed for African Americans during the Great Depression.
  • What factors led to the Great Depression?
  • How was President Roosevelt able to influence Congress to act in favor of his New Deal programs?
  • How did WWII impact Americans following the Great Depression?
  • What were significant turning points that allowed the US to improve its economy during the Great Depression?
  • What were some effects of the Great Depression on race relations in the US?
  • What attitudes about free trade capitalism led to the Great Depression?
  • How did the Great Depression influence art, music, and culture?
  • What other economic solutions could have been implemented to end the Great Depression sooner?
  • How did the Great Depression influence the size and scope of the federal government in the US?
  • How did African Americans help lessen America’s dependency on foreign goods during the Great Depression?
  • What were some causes for poverty during the Great Depression?
  • Discuss things that became illegal during the Great Depression.
  • Explain how the Great Depression led to increased or reduced population growth.
  • Why do historians consider the Great Depression a critical moment in US history?

US History Essay Topics About WW1 & WW2

  • What caused the eruption of violence during WW1?
  • How did President Wilson’s Fourteen Points impact WW2?
  • What was life like for African Americans and Native Americans during WWII?
  • How have civil liberties changed since WWII?
  • What are some parallels between WWII propaganda posters and modern-day media advertisements?
  • What were some positive and negative factors during US involvement in WWII?
  • How did the US economy change as a result of WWII?
  • What events led to the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki?
  • In what ways has European history been heavily impacted by WW1 and WW2?
  • What were some causes for the US entering WW2?
  • How has US foreign policy changed as a result of WWII?
  • In what ways has WWII impacted modern-day conflicts?
  • Who was President Truman, and why is he important to remember during US history?
  • Why is it important to study both World Wars in detail?
  • Who was Joseph Stalin, and what was his role during WW2?
  • How have wars led to the formation of the UN and NATO?
  • How did military alliances impact WWII?
  • What was President Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms, and how did it influence US soldiers’ morale overseas?
  • What economic impacts of WW2 still be seen in today’s modern economy?
  • How did technological advancements made during WW1 assist with battle strategies during WW2?
  • What is the significance of D-Day?
  • How did the US become involved in WW1 after the sinking of the Lusitania?
  • Why were women viewed as socially disadvantaged during WW1?
  • What are some positive outcomes of WW1 and WWII on American society today?

US History Essay Topics About Women’s Rights

  • What significant roles have women played in US history and not received credit for?
  • What were some causes of the first and second waves for women’s rights?
  • How did each wave of feminism impact US history differently?
  • How have women influenced US history through their actions in non-traditional fields?
  • What are some positive impacts of women becoming involved with social reform efforts such as abolition, temperance, and labor movements?
  • What were some negative impacts of women gaining more legal rights?
  • Who was Susan B. Anthony, and why is she important to remember during US history?
  • How has popular culture influenced how society views feminism today compared to the past?
  • How did government restrictions such as coverture laws impact women’s daily lives in America?
  • What were some positive and negative impacts of the Lowell Mill Girls?
  • Who was Sojourner Truth, and what did she accomplish for women’s rights?
  • How did Susan B. Anthony influence how society treats women today?
  • How has Western Expansion impacted the lives of American women?
  • Who was Victoria Woodhull, and what were some of her goals in the early feminist movement?
  • What historical issues still affect women’s rights in society today?
  • Why does it matter to study US history and women’s rights?
  • Would the USA have been as successful during WW2 without contributions made by women?
  • Is life for women easier or harder now than it was at other points in US history?
  • How can women obtain better equality by examining the past?

US History Essay Topics About Immigration

  • What is the history of immigration in America?
  • Who were some influential immigrants who have changed society through their actions and contributions?
  • How have immigrants influenced art, architecture, government policy, and popular culture in America?
  • How did nativism influence how Americans viewed immigration during different time periods throughout US history?
  • How have immigrants been treated by US law and society during different time periods throughout American history?
  • Why was the Chinese Exclusion Act significant for immigration policy in America?
  • In what ways have recent immigration movements changed the nation’s identity, economy, and workforce today compared to the past?
  • What causes of the Great Depression led to more immigrants moving to America?
  • What are some positive impacts of immigration on American society today?
  • Who was Giovanni da Verrazano and why is he important to remember during US history?
  • What role did African Americans play in immigration during slavery?
  • What were some differences in the immigrant experiences of different races?
  • How has immigration changed American society today compared to the past?
  • What are some adverse effects of immigration on American society today?
  • What are some positive impacts of immigration on US history and national identity today?
  • How is the process for immigration in modern times different from previous periods in US history?
  • How can the USA learn from their past immigration reform mistakes to correct current issues surrounding immigration reform?

US History Essay Topics About Labor and Strikes

  • What were some causes of the early labor movement in America?
  • In what ways have unions been influential for Americans today?
  • Who was Eugene V. Debs, and how has he influenced the labor movement?
  • What impact did strikes have during different time periods throughout US history?
  • What were some negative consequences of child labor in America, and how did reform movements attempt to change it?
  • How has technology impacted the American workforce today compared to the past?
  • Who was Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and what impact did she have on the labor movement?
  • What were some differences between strikes in the past and today?
  • What were some positive effects of the labor movement on American society today?
  • Why is it essential to study US history about labor unions and strikes?
  • Who was Mother Jones, and how has she influenced the labor movement in America?
  • How did the Great Depression and New Deal change labor in America?
  • What were some causes of the Haymarket Affair, and how did it influence labor policy?
  • How has technology shaped labor unions today compared to when they first began?
  • Why is it essential to understand labor unions in America?
  • What are some differences between strikes today compared to the past?
  • Who was John L. Lewis, and what is his legacy on unionization in America?
  • How did Franklin D. Roosevelt’s policies impact labor unions in America during the Great Depression?
  • What were some causes of the 1934 West Coast waterfront strike?
  • What are some causes of the Grand Bargain, and how has it influenced unions today?

With these 135 US History essay topics, students of all grade levels can find an interesting topic to write about that will have plenty of research to back it up.

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Group 6

How to Write a History Essay?

04 August, 2020

10 minutes read

Author:  Tomas White

There are so many types of essays. It can be hard to know where to start. History papers aren’t just limited to history classes. These tasks can be assigned to examine any important historical event or a person. While they’re more common in history classes, you can find this type of assignment in sociology or political science course syllabus, or just get a history essay task for your scholarship. This is Handmadewriting History Essay Guide - let's start!

History Essay

Purpose  of a History Essay

Wondering how to write a history essay? First of all, it helps to understand its purpose. Secondly, this essay aims to examine the influences that lead to a historical event. Thirdly, it can explore the importance of an individual’s impact on history.

However, the goal isn’t to stay in the past. Specifically, a well-written history essay should discuss the relevance of the event or person to the “now”. After finishing this essay, a reader should have a fuller understanding of the lasting impact of an event or individual.

Need basic essay guidance? Find out what is an essay with this 101 essay guide: What is an Essay?

Elements for Success

Indeed, understanding how to write a history essay is crucial in creating a successful paper. Notably, these essays should never only outline successful historic events or list an individual’s achievements. Instead, they should focus on examining questions beginning with what , how , and why . Here’s a pro tip in how to write a history essay: brainstorm questions. Once you’ve got questions, you have an excellent starting point.

Preparing to Write

What? Who? Why?

Evidently, a typical history essay format requires the writer to provide background on the event or person, examine major influences, and discuss the importance of the forces both then and now. In addition, when preparing to write, it’s helpful to organize the information you need to research into questions. For example:

  • Who were the major contributors to this event?
  • Who opposed or fought against this event?
  • Who gained or lost from this event?
  • Who benefits from this event today?
  • What factors led up to this event?
  • What changes occurred because of this event?
  • What lasting impacts occurred locally, nationally, globally due to this event?
  • What lessons (if any) were learned?
  • Why did this event occur?
  • Why did certain populations support it?
  • Why did certain populations oppose it?

These questions exist as samples. Therefore, generate questions specific to your topic. Once you have a list of questions, it’s time to evaluate them.

Evaluating the Question

Assess the impact

Seasoned writers approach writing history by examining the historic event or individual. Specifically, the goal is to assess the impact then and now. Accordingly, the writer needs to evaluate the importance of the main essay guiding the paper. For example, if the essay’s topic is the rise of American prohibition, a proper question may be “How did societal factors influence the rise of American prohibition during the 1920s? ”

This question is open-ended since it allows for insightful analysis, and limits the research to societal factors. Additionally, work to identify key terms in the question. In the example, key terms would be “societal factors” and “prohibition”.

Summarizing the Argument

The argument should answer the question. Use the thesis statement to clarify the argument and outline how you plan to make your case. In other words. the thesis should be sharp, clear, and multi-faceted. Consider the following tips when summarizing the case:

  • The thesis should be a single sentence
  • It should include a concise argument and a roadmap
  • It’s always okay to revise the thesis as the paper develops
  • Conduct a bit of research to ensure you have enough support for the ideas within the paper

Outlining a History Essay Plan

Outlining a Plan

Once you’ve refined your argument, it’s time to outline. Notably, many skip this step to regret it then. Nonetheless, the outline is a map that shows where you need to arrive historically and when. Specifically, taking the time to plan, placing the strongest argument last, and identifying your sources of research is a good use of time. When you’re ready to outline, do the following:

  • Consider the necessary background the reader should know in the introduction paragraph
  • Define any important terms and vocabulary
  • Determine which ideas will need the cited support
  • Identify how each idea supports the main argument
  • Brainstorm key points to review in the conclusion

Gathering Sources

As a rule, history essays require both primary and secondary sources . Primary resources are those that were created during the historical period being analyzed. Secondary resources are those created by historians and scholars about the topic. It’s a good idea to know if the professor requires a specific number of sources, and what kind he or she prefers. Specifically, most tutors prefer primary over secondary sources.

Where to find sources? Great question! Check out bibliographies included in required class readings. In addition, ask a campus Librarian. Peruse online journal databases; In addition, most colleges provide students with free access. When in doubt, make an appointment and ask the professor for guidance.

Writing the Essay

Writing the Essay

Now that you have prepared your questions, ideas, and arguments; composed the outline ; and gathered sources – it’s time to write your first draft. In particular, each section of your history essay must serve its purpose. Here is what you should include in essay paragraphs.

Introduction Paragraph

Unsure of how to start a history essay? Well, like most essays, the introduction should include an attention-getter (or hook):

  • Relevant fact or statistic
  • Rhetorical Question
  • Interesting quotation
  • Application anecdote if appropriate

Once you’ve captured the reader’s interest, introduce the topic. Similarly, present critical historic context. Namely, it is necessary to introduce any key individuals or events that will be discussed later in the essay. At last, end with a strong thesis which acts as a transition to the first argument.

Body Paragraphs

Indeed, each body paragraph should offer a single idea to support the argument. Then, after writing a strong topic sentence, the topic should be supported with correctly cited research. Consequently, a typical body paragraph is arranged as follows:

  • Topic sentence linking to the thesis
  • Background of the topic
  • Research quotation or paraphrase #1
  • Explanation and analysis of research
  • Research quotation or paraphrase #2
  • Transition to the next paragraph

Equally, the point of body paragraphs is to build the argument. Hence, present the weakest support first and end with the strongest. Admittedly, doing so leaves the reader with the best possible evidence.

Conclusion Paragraph

You’re almost there! Eventually, conclusion paragraphs should review the most important points in the paper. In them, you should prove that you’ve supported the argument proposed in the thesis. When writing a conclusion paragraph keep these tips in mind:

  • Keep it simple
  • Avoid introducing new information
  • Review major points
  • Discuss the relevance to today
Problems with writing Your History essay ? Try our Essay Writer Service!

history essay

Proofreading Your Essay

Once the draft is ready and polished, it’s time to proceed to final editing. What does this process imply? Specifically, it’s about removing impurities and making the essay look just perfect. Here’s what you need to do to improve the quality of your paper:

  • Double check the content. In the first place, it’s recommended to get rid of long sentences, correct vague words. Also, make sure that all your paragrahps contain accurate sentences with transparent meaning. 
  • Pay attention to style. To make the process of digesting your essay easier, focus on crafting a paper with readable style, the one that is known to readers. Above all, the main mission here is to facilitate the perception of your essay. So, don’t forget about style accuracy.
  • Practice reading the essay. Of course, the best practice before passing the paper is to read it out loud. Hence, this exercise will help you notice fragments that require rewriting or a complete removal.  

History Essay Example

Did you want a history essay example? Take a look at one of our history essay papers. 

Make it Shine

An A-level essay takes planning and revision, but it’s achievable. Firstly, avoid procrastination and start early. Secondly, leave yourself plenty of time to brainstorm, outline, research and write. Finally, follow these five tips to make your history essay shine:

  • Write a substantial introduction. Particularly, it’s the first impression the professor will have of the paper.
  • State a clear thesis. A strong thesis is easier to support.
  • Incorporate evidence critically. If while researching you find opposing arguments, include them and discuss their flaws.
  • Cite all the research. Whether direct quotations or paraphrases, citing evidence is crucial to avoiding plagiarism, which can have serious academic consequences.
  • Include primary and secondary resources. While primary resources may be harder to find, the professor will expect them—this is, after all, a history essay.

History Essay Sample

Ready to tackle the history essay format? Great! Check out this history essay sample from an upper-level history class. While the essay isn’t perfect, the professor points out its many strengths.

Remember: start early and revise, revise, revise . We can’t revise history, but you can revise your ideas until they’re perfect.

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30 Most Popular World History Essay Topics in 2020-2021

Essay topics may surprise everyone. Some are assigned by professors, while some are figments of the students’ imagination. However, when it comes to World History, one doesn’t have a very broad pool for choosing something non-trite. That’s where students feel bored and aren’t interested in writing.

Students who don’t like writing about World History tend to buy essays online written from scratch to minimize the burden of studying. Yet, if you still believe in mastering the essay DIY, this article covers the 30 most popular World History essay topics of 2020-2021 as well as tips on how to choose one for your preferences.

How to Choose the Essay Topic in World History

Even though this article may hint you at the topic, you should start by researching which one goes over well with your mood.

  • Brainstorm the World History areas or fields that you find the most interesting ones . It means a topic that will get you hooked on the research. You won’t be bored but eager to learn something new and deliver it to the audience or your professor. Note, if you choose a topic that seems a burden to yourself, success is unlikely to happen, especially with your potential grade;
  • Research the chosen topic . Learn how much evidence and facts you may find to make your essay interesting. Ask a professor for advice since they may tell you about the fields not covered by other students previously;
  • Prepare sources . Once done with the choice, ensure to collect as many reliable sources as possible to show your dedication to writing.

By following these three steps, you are half of the way until submitting an interesting World History essay.

Note, some students may also play smart and find an essay sample online. They rewrite it and submit it as the original one. Such intentions are better to avoid since 1) you don’t practice and work out your brain but get a ready paper; 2) a professor may still find it plagiarized with designated tools. Moreover, feel free to check the standard evaluation of World History essays.

Now, the topics. Off we go!

Top 30 World History Topics for Essays

  • Comparison of slavery in ancient times with modern times in African regions;
  • Plaques that managed to destroy populations in Europe and Asia;
  • Egyptians have hidden goals while building pyramids;
  • Chinese Great Wall - convict-built protection;
  • Indigenous tribes of America;
  • How did World War 2 change the world?
  • What could have been done to prevent World War 2?
  • Japanese Yakuza - ancient and modern traditions;
  • The best inventions of history that don’t have alternatives;
  • Cuban history - Revolutions and Freedom;
  • Cold War - positive and negative outcomes;
  • The bloody history of the British Empire;
  • Roman military forces - What made them be one of the greatest warriors?
  • Islam beliefs in the modern world;
  • Post-war in Vietnam outcomes for the population;
  • Fashion history:  Women clothes in the 18th century;
  • Roman vs British Empires comparison;
  • Pol Pot’s cruelty in Cambodia;
  • The Nazi mission to change the world;
  • Top 3 historical figures that changed the world;
  • Bizzare medicine in ancient times;
  • Hippie culture - Do we need one now?
  • Iran and Iraq war - What are the positive outcomes if there are any?
  • Gender roles in American government in the 19th century;
  • Pirates in Somali - Why and at What Cost?
  • Colonization of Africa - Why African people struggle with basics until now?
  • Soviet countries technology in 2021;
  • Russia - Why is everyone scared of the country?
  • Conquering space - American and Russian outcomes;
  • Covid-19 - Is there any hope for a total cure?

These are examples. Based on any above-mentioned topic, you may find alternative topics. For instance, “Bizzare medicine in ancient times” - you may take Asian medicine or European medicine to write about. Otherwise, you may generally speak of the diseases of ancient times, and how people managed to survive them with holistic treatments.

How to Make World History Writing Interesting?

To help you discover as many inspirational moods as possible, think about turning to the following platforms:

Another method to make your essay flawless if you have enough time is to use social media. Don’t be surprised. For instance, you write about Hippie Culture in America, and you want more facts or interesting stories. Find the designated groups online where people share their love for this culture. These groups might be followed by senior representatives of the hippie movement, and you may directly ask them for some interesting stories. Such an approach to writing will be much appreciated by your professor. Beyond that, it is a non-trite way of writing that other students might not even think of.

Note, every fact that you add to your history essay should have a solid backup. If you cannot double-check the veracity of the fact, don’t add it. It concerns the dates, names, and outcomes. If you are not sure about one even specific date, round it or use the century just. However, it is always better to fill your paper with traceable facts that your professor may check anytime.

Finally, prior to submitting your essay in World History, ensure to check it with plagiarism tools. Even though you could write it on your own, some statements may look like the borrowed ones. Especially, it concerns the quotes. If so, you cannot prove after the professor that it is your creation written from scratch.

Feel free to choose any topic and master it until it is tasty to read. World History is not always a happy or interesting matter, however, you may change your audience’s opinion once and forever.

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How to Write a History Essay

Last Updated: December 27, 2022 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Emily Listmann, MA . Emily Listmann is a private tutor in San Carlos, California. She has worked as a Social Studies Teacher, Curriculum Coordinator, and an SAT Prep Teacher. She received her MA in Education from the Stanford Graduate School of Education in 2014. There are 8 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 243,746 times.

Writing a history essay requires you to include a lot of details and historical information within a given number of words or required pages. It's important to provide all the needed information, but also to present it in a cohesive, intelligent way. Know how to write a history essay that demonstrates your writing skills and your understanding of the material.

Preparing to Write Your Essay

Step 1 Evaluate the essay question.

  • The key words will often need to be defined at the start of your essay, and will serve as its boundaries. [2] X Research source
  • For example, if the question was "To what extent was the First World War a Total War?", the key terms are "First World War", and "Total War".
  • Do this before you begin conducting your research to ensure that your reading is closely focussed to the question and you don't waste time.

Step 2 Consider what the question is asking you.

  • Explain: provide an explanation of why something happened or didn't happen.
  • Interpret: analyse information within a larger framework to contextualise it.
  • Evaluate: present and support a value-judgement.
  • Argue: take a clear position on a debate and justify it. [3] X Research source

Step 3 Try to summarise your key argument.

  • Your thesis statement should clearly address the essay prompt and provide supporting arguments. These supporting arguments will become body paragraphs in your essay, where you’ll elaborate and provide concrete evidence. [4] X Trustworthy Source Purdue Online Writing Lab Trusted resource for writing and citation guidelines Go to source
  • Your argument may change or become more nuanced as your write your essay, but having a clear thesis statement which you can refer back to is very helpful.
  • For example, your summary could be something like "The First World War was a 'total war' because civilian populations were mobilized both in the battlefield and on the home front".

Step 4 Make an essay...

  • Pick out some key quotes that make your argument precisely and persuasively. [5] X Research source
  • When writing your plan, you should already be thinking about how your essay will flow, and how each point will connect together.

Doing Your Research

Step 1 Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.

  • Primary source material refers to any texts, films, pictures, or any other kind of evidence that was produced in the historical period, or by someone who participated in the events of the period, that you are writing about.
  • Secondary material is the work by historians or other writers analysing events in the past. The body of historical work on a period or event is known as the historiography.
  • It is not unusual to write a literature review or historiographical essay which does not directly draw on primary material.
  • Typically a research essay would need significant primary material.

Step 2 Find your sources.

  • Start with the core texts in your reading list or course bibliography. Your teacher will have carefully selected these so you should start there.
  • Look in footnotes and bibliographies. When you are reading be sure to pay attention to the footnotes and bibliographies which can guide you to further sources a give you a clear picture of the important texts.
  • Use the library. If you have access to a library at your school or college, be sure to make the most of it. Search online catalogues and speak to librarians.
  • Access online journal databases. If you are in college it is likely that you will have access to academic journals online. These are an excellent and easy to navigate resources.
  • Use online sources with discretion. Try using free scholarly databases, like Google Scholar, which offer quality academic sources, but avoid using the non-trustworthy websites that come up when you simply search your topic online.
  • Avoid using crowd-sourced sites like Wikipedia as sources. However, you can look at the sources cited on a Wikipedia page and use them instead, if they seem credible.

Step 3 Evaluate your secondary sources.

  • Who is the author? Is it written by an academic with a position at a University? Search for the author online.
  • Who is the publisher? Is the book published by an established academic press? Look in the cover to check the publisher, if it is published by a University Press that is a good sign.
  • If it's an article, where is published? If you are using an article check that it has been published in an academic journal. [8] X Research source
  • If the article is online, what is the URL? Government sources with .gov addresses are good sources, as are .edu sites.

Step 4 Read critically.

  • Ask yourself why the author is making this argument. Evaluate the text by placing it into a broader intellectual context. Is it part of a certain tradition in historiography? Is it a response to a particular idea?
  • Consider where there are weaknesses and limitations to the argument. Always keep a critical mindset and try to identify areas where you think the argument is overly stretched or the evidence doesn't match the author's claims. [9] X Research source

Step 5 Take thorough notes.

  • Label all your notes with the page numbers and precise bibliographic information on the source.
  • If you have a quote but can't remember where you found it, imagine trying to skip back through everything you have read to find that one line.
  • If you use something and don't reference it fully you risk plagiarism. [10] X Research source

Writing the Introduction

Step 1 Start with a strong first sentence.

  • For example you could start by saying "In the First World War new technologies and the mass mobilization of populations meant that the war was not fought solely by standing armies".
  • This first sentences introduces the topic of your essay in a broad way which you can start focus to in on more.

Step 2 Outline what you are going to argue.

  • This will lead to an outline of the structure of your essay and your argument.
  • Here you will explain the particular approach you have taken to the essay.
  • For example, if you are using case studies you should explain this and give a brief overview of which case studies you will be using and why.

Step 3 Provide some brief context for your work.

Writing the Essay

Step 1 Have a clear structure.

  • Try to include a sentence that concludes each paragraph and links it to the next paragraph.
  • When you are organising your essay think of each paragraph as addressing one element of the essay question.
  • Keeping a close focus like this will also help you avoid drifting away from the topic of the essay and will encourage you to write in precise and concise prose.
  • Don't forget to write in the past tense when referring to something that has already happened.

Step 3 Use source material as evidence to back up your thesis.

  • Don't drop a quote from a primary source into your prose without introducing it and discussing it, and try to avoid long quotations. Use only the quotes that best illustrate your point.
  • If you are referring to a secondary source, you can usually summarise in your own words rather than quoting directly.
  • Be sure to fully cite anything you refer to, including if you do not quote it directly.

Step 4 Make your essay flow.

  • Think about the first and last sentence in every paragraph and how they connect to the previous and next paragraph.
  • Try to avoid beginning paragraphs with simple phrases that make your essay appear more like a list. For example, limit your use of words like: "Additionally", "Moreover", "Furthermore".
  • Give an indication of where your essay is going and how you are building on what you have already said. [15] X Research source

Step 5 Conclude succinctly.

  • Briefly outline the implications of your argument and it's significance in relation to the historiography, but avoid grand sweeping statements. [16] X Research source
  • A conclusion also provides the opportunity to point to areas beyond the scope of your essay where the research could be developed in the future.

Proofreading and Evaluating Your Essay

Step 1 Proofread your essay.

  • Try to cut down any overly long sentences or run-on sentences. Instead, try to write clear and accurate prose and avoid unnecessary words.
  • Concentrate on developing a clear, simple and highly readable prose style first before you think about developing your writing further. [17] X Research source
  • Reading your essay out load can help you get a clearer picture of awkward phrasing and overly long sentences. [18] X Research source

Step 2 Analyse don't describe.

  • When you read through your essay look at each paragraph and ask yourself, "what point this paragraph is making".
  • You might have produced a nice piece of narrative writing, but if you are not directly answering the question it is not going to help your grade.

Step 3 Check your references and bibliography.

  • A bibliography will typically have primary sources first, followed by secondary sources. [19] X Research source
  • Double and triple check that you have included all the necessary references in the text. If you forgot to include a reference you risk being reported for plagiarism.

Sample Essay

topics to write a history essay on

Community Q&A

Community Answer

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Write a Reflection Paper

  • ↑ http://www.historytoday.com/robert-pearce/how-write-good-history-essay
  • ↑ https://www.hamilton.edu/academics/centers/writing/writing-resources/writing-a-good-history-paper
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/thesis_statement_tips.html
  • ↑ http://history.rutgers.edu/component/content/article?id=106:writing-historical-essays-a-guide-for-undergraduates
  • ↑ https://guides.lib.uw.edu/c.php?g=344285&p=2580599
  • ↑ http://www.hamilton.edu/documents/writing-center/WritingGoodHistoryPaper.pdf
  • ↑ http://www.bowdoin.edu/writing-guides/
  • ↑ https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/hppi/publications/Writing-History-Essays.pdf

About This Article

Emily Listmann, MA

To write a history essay, read the essay question carefully and use source materials to research the topic, taking thorough notes as you go. Next, formulate a thesis statement that summarizes your key argument in 1-2 concise sentences and create a structured outline to help you stay on topic. Open with a strong introduction that introduces your thesis, present your argument, and back it up with sourced material. Then, end with a succinct conclusion that restates and summarizes your position! For more tips on creating a thesis statement, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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439 History Argumentative Essay Topics to Get an A [Writing Tips Included]

Who hasn’t been puzzled when it comes to choosing historical argument topics?

It is hard to memorize all the information given in a class. Undoubtedly, all historical issues can be developed into excellent history essay topics. The question to resolve is how to discover your case.

You can find 300+ unique world history argumentative essay topics in our article, as well as some essay writing tips. If our topics are not enough for you, use our instant and completely free research title generator .

  • 🚧 History Essay Challenges
  • 📜 Top 15 Topics
  • ✊ Revolution Topics
  • 🗺️ Regional Topics
  • 🤴 Key Figures Topics
  • 🏳️‍🌈 Key Movements
  • 📿 Topics on Traditions
  • 👁️‍ Topics on Mysteries
  • 📝 Historical Topics – 2024

📢 History Persuasive Essay Topics

  • 👉 Choosing a Topic
  • ♟️ Writing Strategies

🚧 History Essay Topics Main Challenges

History shapes our present. To study the rules of our modern world and society, we need to research historical argument topics. They can show us which conflicts led to a better future and which destroyed our civilization.

History assignments for high school students contain many pitfalls. The five most critical of them are listed below.

  • Avoid thinking that any event was inevitable. First, we rarely dispose of a complete picture of a historical period. Second, some events are Force-Majeure and unpredictable. However, human choices matter. Focus on what could have been changed and which lessons we could learn from the alternative result.
  • Listing events is pointless. It can be read in any chronicle. Instead, your purpose is to analyze them. An untrivial perspective is what makes your essay a good one.
  • People often change their opinions. Historical figures also did. Try not to perceive their beliefs as a consistent and invariable set of ideas. Explore how they reached their wisdom or why they made errors.
  • Not all events are relevant to your history essay question . Make a list of the significant events and personalities that refer to your topic. Cross out all that can be omitted. Then add minor events related to those that left. It is what you should write about.
  • Avoid vague words. Great, prominent, positive, or negative are obscure words that make your writing limited and unilateral. Most personalities and events were multifaceted. Work in this direction.

List of do's and don'ts of history essay.

📜 Top 15 History Argumentative Essay Topics

History is full of mystery, riddles, and conflicting points. Writing a history paper will undoubtedly be fun if you choose an exciting history essay topic. Meet our list of the most provocative history questions.

  • How could The 1896 Anglo-Zanzibar last only 38 minutes?
  • Did Arab people invent the Arab numerals or Hindus?
  • Hitler as the man of the year in 1938, according to Time magazine.
  • The average life expectancy of peasants In the Middle Ages was about 25 years.
  • Why were Roman soldiers using baths as rehabilitation centers?
  • What was the importance of the Battle of Stalingrad?
  • The wars with the most considerable losses took place in China.
  • In 400 BC, Sparta had only 25,000 inhabitants but over 500,000 slaves.
  • Out of the last 3500 years, how many years were peaceful?
  • How important is tea time for British people?
  • In the middle of the 20th century, the whole British royal court got sick because of improperly cooked potatoes.
  • Compare the number of Soviet soldiers who died in World War II and the number of American ones.
  • Has any part of the Roman Empire existed 1000 years after the Fall of Rome?
  • Were the Egyptian pyramids actually constructed using slaves’ labor?
  • Did Leonardo Da Vinci have dyslexia?

⚔️ History Essay Topics on War

“There never was a good war or a bad peace,” — wrote Benjamin Franklin in one of his letters. Did we learn what peace is, after all? Discussion and analysis of armed conflicts that humanity has faced throughout its existence are still massive jobs researchers do. Below, you can find excellent topics on war and peace.

Detailed categorization to help you write a good essay about war!

  • How did the Second World War change family traditions? It lasted for six years, and families learned how to survive without a father. What were the psychological implications for mothers, children, and returning soldiers?
  • Food packages for long-term storage quickly developed during both World Wars . Explore which products changed the most. How did their modified form affect the cuisine and rations?
  • WWII spurred the creation of new professions . Find out which jobs appeared during this period. How were they linked to warfare? Did they change after the termination of the war?
  • Many scientific advances came to our understanding through dubious ways. The research and experiments of Nazi Germany on humans led to a breakthrough in medicine, anthropology, genetics, psychology, etc. Is it moral to use their findings for peaceful purposes?
  • Soldiers spread the Spanish Flu during WWI. It killed more people than died in military actions. Did it influence the outcome of the war? Analyze how the pandemic might have unfolded if it had happened in a time of peace.

1918 influenza pandemic killed 3% to 6% of the global population.

  • Explain how trench warfare slowed the military actions in WWI. What were the common diseases in trenches, and how did they affect the conflict? The Germans dug trenches not to lose any more ground.
  • American Women in History of World War II .
  • To which extent was Hitler not responsible for the Second World War? He was obviously the one to blame for the many atrocities of the Nazis. Still, which circumstances were out of his control and led to the war?
  • Japanese American Life During and after the World War II.
  • Compare the economic conditions in which Britain entered WWI and WWII.
  • The Treaty of Versailles in World War II History .
  • What was the military potential of Russia in WWI?
  • World War II People in “Hitler’s Army.”
  • Is it correct to say that the results of WWI caused WWII?
  • Minority Civil Rights in the US after the WWII .
  • Was Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria so influential that his death caused the outbreak of WWI?
  • What Was the Second World War Impact on the USSR?
  • The Russian population scarcely supported the Bolsheviks. What helped them to seize power during the October Revolution? The provisional government was occupied by the war. The Red Army followed the same interests, and Vladimir Lenin led the entire group.
  • Francisco Franco was the dictator of Spain from 1939 till 1975, when he died. How did the Spanish Civil War bring him to power? Why did Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy help him?
  • The monarchy in Uganda was abolished in 1967. Several years later, from 1971 to 1986, the country was torn apart by the Civil War . What were the causes of this dark period, and how did it end? Is Uganda peaceful now?
  • Describe the role of climate in the collision between the North and South in the US . Did long agricultural seasons make the South depend on fieldwork? Was the traditional use of slavery a way to get rich?
  • The polarized opinions of the left and right political forces caused the Greek Civil War. Based on the history of this conflict and the thematic in-country clashes of other countries, analyze the eternal and unending struggle between the left and right ideologies.
  • The American Civil War Outbreak and the Role of the Federal Government.
  • The English Civil War (1642 – 1651) was about ruling England, Scotland, and Ireland. What were the variants, and which one do you support?
  • Short- and Long-term Causes of the Civil War .
  • Describe the differences between the free Northern States and the slave Southern states during the American Civil War.
  • The Economics of the Civil War .
  • How did the Second Civil War in Sudan entail the creation of South Sudan through the referendum of 2011 ?
  • The Motives of Individual Soldiers Who Fought in the Civil War .
  • Why was Pugachev’s Rebellion (1773 – 1775) in Russia defeated?
  • Post-Civil War Political, Economic, Social Changes .
  • Austrian Civil War: The shortest possible conflict (12-16 February 1934).
  • Petersburg in the Civil War: History Issues .

Intercountry Wars

The image depicts the main reasons of international conflicts.

  • Analyze the possible reasons for an international conflict and how they can be regulated through warfare. List the ideas that motivated people to get into a war. This essay will illustrate the debatable history of wars.
  • Describe the relationship between the emergence of nuclear weapons and the Cold War. Why was America afraid of the Soviet Union and communism?
  • Why was the Spanish-American War one of the cheapest conflicts in history? It lasted for only several months and did not take many lives, as other military actions did. What secured its swift completion?
  • What Were the Major Diplomacy Steps of J.F. Kennedy in Cuba During the Cold War?
  • Why did Canada play a peacekeeper role at the beginning of the Cold War?
  • The Seven Years War and its Impact on the First British Empire .
  • How did the history of the Palestinians impact the Arab-Israeli conflict ?
  • Outline the reasons for the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979.
  • The Vietnam War’s Impact on the United States .
  • Describe the collaboration between the American and Australian troops in the Vietnam War.
  • United States Role in the Korean War: History Analysis .
  • How did the Soviet Union and US intervention cause Afghanistan’s War on Terror ?

Religious Wars

  • Why did the Huguenots fail in the French Religious Wars (1562 – 1598)? They could not rely on settlements that supported them. Thus, they were less autonomous than the Catholics.
  • How did the Thirty Years’ War change the geopolitical image of Europe? Why was it transformed into a group of independent states with equal rights? The most important consequence of the war was the creation of the modern notion of national borders.
  • Describe the relationship between the Second Great Awakening and the abolishment of slavery in the US. It also entailed several philanthropic reforms and women’s emancipation. Why did the movement inspire a new vision on slavery and encourage questioning the British monarchy control?
  • Quackers: The religion of pacifism and non-violence . Did their peaceful worldview prevent their faith from popularization? Which controversy with other confessions did they face?
  • How did the English Civil War (1642 – 1651) lay the modern parliamentary monarchy’s foundation in the UK?
  • Islam and War: True Meaning of Jihad .
  • How did the Second Great Awakening participants expect to bring America to a Golden Age through religion?
  • Comparison of Jewish and Muslim Experiences .
  • Which role did religion play in the American Revolutionary War (1775 – 1783)?
  • Christian Europeans vs. Islamic Arabs: Why did the fight for Jerusalem affect the Jews who lived in Europe?
  • Judaism, Christianity, and Islam .
  • Why did the Catholics fight with Protestants during the Thirty Years’ War?
  • Religious Beliefs and Political Decisions .
  • How did the Protestant Reformation lead to the European Wars of Religion?

✊ History Essay Topics on Revolution

Pick a revolution, any famous and well-documented one, and be sure to find a bunch of yet unresolved questions. Numerous mysteries held by revolutionary events give us a lot of topics to debate. Now, here are themes to study about the world and local revolutions.

Political Revolutions

  • The European Revolutions (1848) affected almost 50 countries. Battles and executions took tens of thousands of lives. How did nationalism incentivize the political and economic struggle?
  • How did the French invasion of Spain (1807) entail the Spanish-American Wars? The Spanish side aimed for political independence from America. What was their motivation?
  • Fulgencio Batista, the Cuban President, was an elected president. He gradually seized power and became a dictator. Why did the US politically support him before Fidel Castro ousted and replaced him?
  • The Shah’s regime brought economic shortages and inflation. Some people thought he was the puppet of the non-Muslim West (i.e., the US). How did Shah’s oil policy lead to the Iranian Revolution ?
  • During the Storming of the Bastille , there were only seven political prisoners. Why did the revolutionaries attack this building and not the Versailles or some other royal building? Why was Bastille the symbol of monarchy and its abuse of power?
  • Various Propaganda Tools Shaped People’s Vision of the State and Themselves during the Cultural Revolution in China .

"When dictatorship is a fact, revolutions becomes a right" - Victor Hugo

  • The Events That Led to the American Revolution .
  • Describe and analyze the conflict between the Three Estates that led to the French Revolution .
  • Who won in the Spanish American War of Independence and why?
  • The Proclamation and the Stamp Act: Discriminatory laws that led to the American Revolution.
  • Economic Factors Contributing to the Cause of the American Revolution.
  • A political revolution does not change the property relations inside the country. Give examples of such events.
  • Cold War Role in the Iranian Revolution .
  • Haitian Revolution (1791–1804): The only successful revolt of self-liberated slaves.
  • The Effects of Social Media on Egyptian Revolution of 2011 .

Social Revolutions

  • Boston Tea Party (1773) was a protest of merchants against the British tax on tea. Why is it considered as the precursor of the American Revolution? How does it symbolize the birth of American patriotism?
  • The French nobility was not concerned with the problems of ordinary people. They dedicated themselves to leisure and intrigues. Do you agree with this statement? How does it fit with the idea that France had authoritarianism ?
  • What is the difference between a political and a socio-economic revolution? Which event takes more time and has more dramatic consequences? Give several examples of the experience in different countries.
  • The Neolithic Revolution was the first social revolution in the history of humanity. Describe the shift from nomadic life to permanent settlements. How did the transformation change people’s lives and their sources of food?
  • Could we consider the Enlightenment as a social revolution? Was this transformation a peaceful one? What were its causes, and what did people strive for?
  • Syrian Arab Spring: Why Was it Late? Conflict Evolution and Solutions.
  • How did the burning of Cinema Rex theatre trigger the Iranian Revolution?
  • The American Revolution as a Social Revolution .
  • How did hope and idealism fuel the French Revolution?
  • The Revolution of Women in Society .
  • What was achieved by the Civil War in the USA (1861-1865)?
  • Child Labor During Industrial Revolution .
  • Analyze the existing theories of what does and does not constitute a revolution.
  • Karl Marx’s Ideas on Society Alienation and Conflict Theory.
  • What were the precursors of the Age of Revolution in Europe and America?
  • The Revolution of Transportation Systems .

🗺️ World History Argumentative Essay Topics

Time to examine history from a local perspective! Below you can find multiple excellent topics on regional history. The US history, Latin America, Asia, Europe, and more. Make sure to look at all of them precisely – this will require some effort.

US History Essay Topics

  • American history before 1877: The New World before Christopher Columbus. Which sources of knowledge about the first settlements do historians draw from? Which civilizations existed there before the invasion of the Europeans?
  • Explore the role of women in Colonial America . What rights did they have? What was their standard daily routine? Why was their work sometimes more complicated than that of their male relatives?
  • How did slavery appear in British America? What were the circumstances that led to forced labor? Why was the trans-Atlantic slave trade so prosperous?
  • How did the Founding Fathers treat Indian history and tribes? Were their actions legitimate? Did these deeds favor the establishment of the New World? Can such or any other “ethnic cleansing” ever be justified?

8 Founding Fathers of the United States.

  • Were Jim Craw Laws necessary for a smooth transition from slavery to democracy? Or were they a big mistake that provided freedom to African-Americans without giving them any rights?
  • The Roles Played by Different Presidents on American Civil Rights Movement.
  • Comment on the inflow of immigrants pursuing the American Dream after the Civil war.
  • The Enslaved Blacks and Free Blacks During the American Civil War .
  • How did Prohibition in the US cause the proliferation of the Italian-American Mafia?
  • American Revolution: The “History” and “Memory”.
  • Franklin Roosevelt led the US into the Second World War as the biggest debtor but exited it as the most significant creditor.
  • In Search of the American Dream throughout the History.
  • Describe the main problems the first British settlements faced in America.
  • The Right to Vote in the USA Throughout the History .
  • What were the psychological consequences of the Great Depression on ordinary American citizens?

Latin America History Essay Topics

  • How did smallpox influence the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire ? How did the disease contribute to other advantages of the Spanish forces? Why did Cortez wish to defeat the Aztecs?
  • The Panama Canal made Panama the second-fastest growing economy in Latin America after Chile. It brings about $2 billion in yearly revenue. However, more than five thousand people died during its construction. Was it possible to avoid the deaths by postponing the construction?
  • How the history of Peru would be different if Francisco Pizarro did not initiate the homicide of the Aztecs. Would modern Peru benefit from its pre-colonial natives? Which historical monuments would have been preserved?
  • Gold or silver was never found in Uruguay. How did this fact influence the present-day prosperity and stability in the country? Why did it present almost no interest for the colonial conquest?
  • In 1848, General Santa Anna sold a big part of Mexico to the United States. Why did he do so? What would Latin America look like now had he not sold the land to feed the army?
  • Nationalism and Development in the Countries of Latin America .
  • Why did Latin America wish to declare independence from Spain (1810)?
  • Haitian Migration History, and the Role of Jamaica in This Process .
  • Explore the benefits of the Chilean victory in the War of the Pacific (1879 – 1883).
  • Brazil and the European Union: The Relations .
  • Why did America win the Mexican-American War?
  • Criminal Justice Systems of the US and Colombia .
  • Describe how the borders of modern Brazil were decided back in 1494 .
  • Which consequences of Gen Alfredo Stroessner’s dictatorship in Paraguay can you name?
  • Mexico’s Globalization and Democratization .

European History Essay Topics

  • Why did ordinary people believe in Fascist propaganda ? Analyze the psychological factors and the cultural precursors that made people susceptible to Nazism. Did the fear of being killed influence their willingness to obey the ruling party?
  • Find out the difference between the perception of gods in Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. Did both nations truly believe in gods? Was the Pantheon a cultural phenomenon? Why did they use the same gods with different names ?
  • Would Roman Empire have become so influential if it had never used slavery? Why was slavery an essential part of the economy of many countries? What changed then? Was the abolishment of slavery dictated only by humanism?
  • How did the relationships between lords and their vassals transform into modern government standards? Which positive and negative features were preserved throughout the ages? Compare the ancient tradition and the present-day government using historical and contemporary figures.
  • What is the difference between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment ?
  • Why Capitalism Started in Europe and Dominated the World ?
  • Analyze the evolution of peace-maintaining methods inside the country and around its borders throughout European history.
  • Building a Communist Society in East Germany .
  • What does the classical and vulgar language distinction in Ancient Rome tell us about the structure of its society?
  • Austria and France: Impacts and Causes of World War I and World War II .
  • Compare and contrast the role of Russia in WWI and the Napoleonic Wars .
  • Trace the development of European liberalism .
  • Germany at the End of the World War I .
  • List the six ancient civilizations and compare the causes that led to their fall .

Asian History Essay topics

  • What made the Mongol Empire the second-largest kingdom in human history? How did the empire use technology and production to ensure its prosperity? What helped Genghis Khan unite the nomadic tribes?
  • The Black Death is traditionally associated with Europe since it killed one-third of its population. Still, the bubonic plague started in Asia. Explore its outburst in 1330 – 1340 and its origins (presumably, in China).
  • Explore the consequences of numerous conflicts between nomads and settled people in Asia. How did this rivalry shape the history of the continent? Analyze the contribution of trading between nomads and towns.
  • A crossbow was invented in Asia. It revolutionized warfare. How did the weapon make archery a more democratic art? Which benefits did crossbow offer the army? Describe the history of the arm.

A crossbow was invented in Asia.

  • The word Aryan comes from Iran and India. It meant “a noble person.” How did it turn into the most abused words of anti-Semitism?
  • The Causes and Effects of Cultural Revolution in China (1966-1976).
  • What are the social effects of female infanticide in China, India, South Korea, and Nepal?
  • China’s New Silk Road for Trade and IGo to demoessays.commplications .
  • Compare and contrast the Indian castes and Feudal Japanese classes.
  • The Development of Tension Between South and North Korea.
  • How did the Battle of Gaugamela (331 BC) open Asia to be invaded by Alexander the Great?
  • Japan’s Withdrawing From the International Whaling Commission .
  • Describe the weapons of Ancient Asian civilizations as the mirror of their culture.
  • How did some Asian countries (Japan, China, and Siam) escape European colonization ?
  • Nationalism in East Asia, Japan and China .

Russian History Essay Topics

  • Which tribes created modern Russia? Were they Slavic or Finno-Ugric? Why does this history argumentative essay topic cause debates among historians? What are the implications of either variant for the Russian national identity?
  • How did the Tsardom of Moscow transform into the Russian Empire in 1721? What did Peter I do for this reformation? How did it change Russian society’s standard of living?
  • Why did Boris Godunov come to power breaking the Rurik family dynasty? Before his ascension to the throne, he was a Tatar nobleman and served as an advisor to Tsar Fyodor I. Why did his rule start at the Time of Troubles (1598 – 1613)?
  • Is it appropriate to call Moscow the “Third Rome” ? Sophia Palaiologina, the daughter of the last emperor of Constantinople, married Ivan III. Analyze the reasons for the statement that Moscow is the successor of the Roman Empire
  • What were the causes and consequences of the existence of the four “False Dmitrys”? Explore the under-the-carpet battle that led to the killing of the dynasty’s successors. How did the four imposters entail the decay of the institution of Tsardom?
  • Long-Term Strategies to Address Threats to the US’ Interest From Russia .
  • Which personal traits helped Ivan the Terrible establish the Tsardom of Russia and make it a powerful state?
  • Why Is There a Strong Russian Influence in Syrian Crisis?
  • Debate the phenomenon of Peter the Great : Was he the result of the epoch or the random person who changed Russian history?
  • Crisis on European Borders and Russia’s Threats .
  • What were the merits and drawbacks of Catherine the Great ?
  • Communist Nations Divisions During the Cold War .
  • How did other countries react to the Russian version of communism?
  • The Cold War Between the U.S. and the Soviet Union .
  • Did the communist regime make Russia stronger, or did it throw it back in time?
  • The Collapse of the Soviet Union .

African History Essay Topics

  • Why did the imperial historiography propagate that Africa had no history? They wanted to create the image of Africa as the “dark continent.” How did the historians justify these statements and relate them to the absence of writing?
  • The Kingdom of Kush : The most powerful African kingdom. Describe the period of its existence and outline the possible reasons for its decay. Which historical monuments have been found of that era?
  • Do you support the idea that humanity originated in Africa? Why does this statement insult the Western World? Is there enough evidence that proves the idea?
  • We know about African history from the perspective of Western scholars. Even the locally educated people who study history have adopted the Western way of looking at the past. What can be done about that?
  • Before European colonization , there were about 10,000 states in Africa. Describe their ethnic similarities and shared customs that we know nowadays.
  • What do we know about prehistoric Africa, i.e., the one that existed before the Ancient Egypt civilization?
  • China in Africa: Aspects of Sino-African Relations.
  • Why is slavery often mentioned as the initial reference point in African history?
  • African Americans Fight for the Rights.
  • Which problems arose in some African societies as a result of decolonization ?
  • The History of African American Women’s Fights for Suffrage.
  • Describe how decolonized Africa tried to decolonize its history.
  • Colonialism, Ideology, Ethnicity, Religion, Social Class, and Legitimacy in Africa’s Politics .

Australian History Essay Topics

  • James Cook was not the first one to discover Australia. Who were his predecessors? Why didn’t they gain as much fame as Cook did?

Who came to Australia before Captain James Cook?

  • King O’Malley : The founder of the Australian capital. How did he favor the creation of the Commonwealth Bank? How did Prime Minister Fisher ensure trust in the bank among the population?
  • Why did the Ballarat Rebellion finish just in 30 minutes? What did the rebels struggle for? How did the event lead to the signing of the Electoral Act of 1856?
  • The first colonizers of Australia were prisoners. How does this fact impact the contemporary image of the country? What were the historical implications of such a demographical situation?
  • Why do Australians consider the battle of 25 April 1915 (during WWI) as “the birth of the nation?” Describe the reasons that made Australian Imperial Forces participate in the war and attack the Turkish coast?
  • Why were Afghan cameleers important in Australia, and what caused their disappearance?
  • Aboriginal and Chinese Australians: Cultural Diversity.
  • What were the causes of the Rum rebellion of 1808, and which role did William Bligh play in it?
  • How Have Australian Attitudes Towards ‘Asia’ Changed Since the 1890 ?
  • Describe the role of Merino sheep in the Australian economy since they were first brought there by Captain John Macarthur in 1797.
  • Is Australian Foreign Policy Now Independent?
  • Ned Kelly : A ruthless killer or a symbol of resistance to the colonial power?
  • Multiculturalism in Australian Society .
  • Describe the Brisbane Line and its role in the Japanese invasion.
  • China’s and Australia’s Management of International Disputes .

🤴 History Essay Topics on Key Figures

The significance of historical figures is something challenging to measure and compare. And there is indeed no need to do that; everyone has their place, time, and role. With these topics below, we offer you to dive into biographies of some fascinating people. Take a deep breath; we are almost there!

Central Figures of Ancient History

  • Plato vs. Aristotle : The abstract vs. the empirical. Both of them are the most influential figures in Western philosophy. Aristotle was Plato’s disciple. What made their ideas so different?
  • Why was Diogenes a controversial personality? How did he manage to criticize social conventions through his simple lifestyle? Is poverty a virtue, as Diogenes claimed?
  • Aeschylus: The father of Tragedy . What were his contributions to the image of Ancient Greek theater? Explore his influence beyond his own time.
  • Homer created the ancient Greek identity. Did he formulate the qualities already present in his compatriots ? Alternatively, did he idealize the past to make the Greeks aspire for more?
  • Cleisthenes : The father of the Athenian democracy. Explore his contribution to the governance of Athens. How different was it from the modern idea of democracy?
  • The Ancient City of Tikal: Mayan Cultural, Social, Astronomy and Political Influence .
  • Why did Mark Antony and Cleopatra trust one another so much?
  • Plutarch : Our window to the ancient times.
  • Cleopatra’s Life and Political Impact .
  • How did Alexander the Great and his conquest change the ancient world?
  • Ethical Life Issues in Works by Cicero and C.S. Lewis .
  • Why do we consider Hippocrates as the father of medicine ?
  • Aristotle and Relationships at Work .
  • Describe the difference between the historical and fictional accounts of the assassination of Julius Caesar.
  • Alaric I the Visigoth: The person responsible for the Sack of Rome in 410.
  • Jesus & Mohammed: Comparison and Contrast .
  • Why was Leonidas I encircled by a hero cult?
  • Moses in Christianity, Judaism and Islam .

Central Figures of Medieval Ages

  • Tomás de Torquemada was the first Grand Inquisitor of Spain. Why did his name become the synonym of religious fanaticism and cruelty? What made him the most notorious Inquisitor?
  • Charlemagne was the creator of modern Europe. He divided the Carolingian Empire between his sons. He also added more parts to Europe that had never been under Roman or Frankish control before. Explore his activity.
  • Avicenna (980 – 1037) was the most important polymath of the Islamic Golden Age. Analyze his contributions to modern science.
  • Constantine was the last Byzantine emperor . He was killed when protecting Constantinople from the Ottoman Turks. What makes him a legendary figure in Greek culture?
  • Thomas Aquinas was the first theologian that linked religion and science. He connected Christian principles with Aristotelian ideas. How did he influence our perception of God and faith?
  • Did Marco Polo travel to China, or was he a big liar?
  • Joan of Arc as a Military Heroine .
  • Why was Sir William Marshal called “the greatest knight” in human history?
  • St. Thomas Aquinas’ Cosmological Argument Analysis .
  • Describe the leadership qualities of Richard the Lionheart in his battle for Jerusalem with sultan Saladin.
  • Was Genghis Khan a great ruler? Analyze his leadership style.
  • British Culture – Tudors, Henry VIII and Anglican Church .
  • William the Conqueror and his Domesday Book : The most critical statistical document in European history.
  • Why was Peter the Hermit the critical figure in the First Crusade ?
  • Elizabeth I’s Leadership. English History .
  • What was the role of Joan of Arc in the Hundred Years’ War?
  • Pope Innocent III: The person who invented the Crusades.

Central Figures of Modern Period

  • How did Otto von Bismarck change the European map and reinforce Germany? He was the first chancellor of Germany for 20 years. This fact made him the mastermind of European affairs for two decades.
  • Alexander II and Nicolas II: The grandfather and the grandson. Fifty years separated prosperity from decay. The first abolished slavery, and the latter caused the collapse of the Russian Empire.
  • Stalin: From a collective leadership to dictatorship . He was the man that defined the epoch. Why was he the longest ruler of the USSR? How did his activity shape the international image of the Soviet Union?
  • Mahatma Gandhi liberated India from Britain . Yet, he invariably insisted on non-violent methods. Could the liberation have happened in more favorable conditions for India if he had used more aggressive measures?

Gandhi wrote a letter to Hitler, addressing him as "Dear Friend," and beseeched him to stop the war. Hitler never wrote back.

  • Churchill: The ideologist of the anti-Hitler coalition and the creator of the Entente. Why do we consider him the inspirer of the British movement against Nazi Germany? What were the main postulates of his ideology?
  • The Civil Rights Movement by Martin Luther King .
  • From the modern point of view, did Lenin fulfill his intentions by introducing communism?
  • Einstein and his Contribution to Science .
  • If we abstract from the issues of morality, was Hitler a positive figure for his country?
  • Hitler’s Interests: Nazi Germany and the Jews .
  • What was the role of Margaret Thatcher’s activity in the process of entailing deep divisions in British society?
  • Leadership Management: The Case of Mahatma Gandhi .
  • Analyze the life story of Sigmund Freud that brought him to become the father of psychoanalysis.
  • How did Anne Boleyn help to create the Church of England?
  • US Foreign Policies from Eisenhower to Kennedy .
  • How did Jane Austen’s stories about unremarkable situations turn into social satire?
  • George Washington: Life, Presidency, Challenges as a Commander .
  • How did El Greco transform icon painting by using ordinary people as models?

Central Figures of Contemporary History

  • Mao Zedong drew inspiration from the Soviet Communistic ideology. How did his principles differ from the USSR scenario? Analyze the policy of Mao Zedong from the modern Chinese point of view.
  • Albert Einstein changed our perception of reality through his theory of relativity . It explained how objects behave in space and time. The approach gave us a chance to predict the future.
  • Analyze the personality of Usama bin Ladin as the founder of Al-Qaeda and the most famous terroristic leader. Explore his ideology and motivation for killing civil citizens. Can we change this ideology through education?
  • Stanley N. Cohen was the first person who managed to cut DNA into pieces. But Paul Berg is considered the father of genetic engineering. Which personality did more for genetics?
  • Harry Truman was a Vice President only for several weeks. Truman, the 33rd US President, ordered the dropping of the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Why did he do so?
  • Queen Elizabeth’s II contributions to the UK we know now.
  • Truman Doctrine in the United States History .
  • Anne Frank: The girl whose diary united millions of human tragedies.
  • Barack Obama’s Political Doctrine and Its Elements .
  • Describe the role of Douglas MacArthur in Japan’s restoration after WWII .
  • Maria Curie : The woman who taught us to use X-rays.
  • Merkel’s Germany and Trump’s Us Stances on Migration Policies .

Both Pierre and Marie Curie had no idea of the dangers of radioactivity.

  • How did Grace Kelly contribute to the image of Monaco as a touristic paradise?
  • Why did Gorbachev win the Nobel Peace Prize?

🏳️‍🌈 Argumentative History Topics on Significant Movements

Each epoch has had some movements that perform the leading ideas and soul of the corresponding time. Political, social, religious, and other movements have left multiple traces in different spheres of life. The necessity to explore these traces is pretty obvious, right? Let’s do it together.

Political Movements

  • Why does extreme libertarianism reject the authority of the state?
  • Anarchy and Sovereignty in International Relations .
  • Is it correct to regard feminism as a political movement ?
  • Analyze the incorrect interpretation of Nietzsche’s philosophy by the German Nazi.
  • “Manifesto of the Communist Party” by Karl Marx .
  • How do eugenic policies entail the loss of genetic diversity?
  • Discussion of Capitalism and Socialism .
  • Why are there two major parties in US politics?
  • Explore the development of the Women’s Suffrage movement in your local area.
  • Why does any political movement require access to state power to be successful?
  • Islamism: Political Movement & Range of Ideologies .
  • Does lobbying influence the development of various political movements in power?
  • Democratic Regime and Liberation Movements .
  • Describe communism as a secular religion.
  • Is anti-capitalism a viable ideology?

Social Movements

  • What are the achievements of the animal rights movement?
  • White Society’s Reaction to Civil Rights Movement .
  • Which women’s rights movements do you know, and what are their goals?
  • Civil Rights and #BlackLivesMatter Social Movements .
  • Do you believe that some psychological problems make people participate in social movements?

Picture showing examples of different social movements.

  • What did the Black Power Movement (1960 – 1980s) achieve?
  • Women’s Rights Movement Impact on Education.
  • What are the psychological effects of volunteering in hospices?
  • The Strategy of the National Popular Vote Movement .
  • Analyze the success of the Black Lives Matter movement.
  • Greta Thunberg : The inspirer of the international movement against climate change.
  • Free Movement of Workers in the EU Single Market.
  • Why does the majority of the population negatively look at all sorts of social movements?
  • #MeToo movement and its results: The cancellation culture.

Art Movements

  • How did the return of the African culture to the natives after WWII give birth to a new art movement?
  • Why are modern art movements so numerous, and what does this fact characterize?
  • Futurism. Artistic and Social Movement.
  • Which art movement do you consider the most recognizable?
  • Do you think Cubism is an art or a protest against artistic tradition?
  • An artistic movement: Copying geniuses or drawing inspiration from them?
  • Andy Warhol’s Paintings .
  • How did the Hudson River School of Art shape American painting?
  • Why did art in late Medieval Europe face decay?
  • Art Movements in History: Baroque .
  • What is the difference between the Baroque and Rococo styles?
  • Which artistic movement initiated the use of perspective in painting, and why did it happen?

Religious and Spiritual Movements

  • Explore the influence of fundamentalism on evangelicalism in America.
  • Look for similar features between new religious movements and radical Islamic groups .
  • Describe the distinctive traits of new religious movements that differentiate them from older religions.
  • Which methods does the Religious Right movement use against the LGBT community?
  • Do religious movements favor or impede globalization ?
  • Which psychological reasons drive young people to Satanism?
  • Why do people create new cults , and are they detrimental to society?
  • Explore the difference between a spiritual and religious movement.
  • Relation Between God, Jesus Christ, and Holy Spirit .
  • Is it correct to consider atheism as a religious movement?
  • Modern spiritual movements: business or altruism?

📿 Interesting History Essay Topics on Traditions

No matter the military history of a state or region, cultural heritage and traditions are something every society has. Now, the most exciting part is to explore these traditions and rituals. It can be a long journey!

  • Trace the difference between Vlad the Impaler as a historical and mythical figure.

Prince Charles of Wales, the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II, is the descendant of Vlad Dracula in the sixteenth generation.

  • Which events and traditions shaped the way we imagine a witch?
  • False and Folk Etymologies of Words .
  • Analyze Baba Yaga as the symbol of mother nature in Russian folklore.
  • How does German folklore reflect in the tales of the Brothers Grimm ?
  • The Thousand & One Nights: Folk Collection Overview .
  • Is there any scientific explanation for weather prediction by natural signs is present in many cultures’ folklore?
  • Witch-Hunt in Europe During the Middle Ages .
  • Half-human creatures of ancient times: Who were they, and which archetype did they represent?
  • Explore the folklore origins of the Swastika , which became the Nazi symbol.
  • The mythology of Achilles’ heel: What does it symbolize?
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh – A Classic Tale .
  • Describe the meaning of fireflies in Japanese culture.
  • “The Tale of Kieu” by Nguyen Du .
  • What is the link between zombies and voodoo?
  • Discover the origins of putting a pickle ornament on Christmas trees in Germany.
  • Why Saturnalia, Mithras, and Hanukkah were the precursors of modern-day Christmas?
  • What is the link between the Festival of Lanterns and Chinese New Year?
  • What are the origins of Imbolc in Celtic tradition?
  • Chinese Spring Festival .
  • Which African-American harvest celebrations were unified under the name of Kwanzaa?
  • What does Jewish Hannukah commemorate, and why does it last eight days?
  • Why does the US celebrate Veterans Day at the 11th hour on the 11th day and 11th month?
  • Why did the US presidents start racing Easter Eggs?
  • What is the relation between Daylight Savings time and WWI?
  • Analyze the geography and calendar of Christmas in different parts of the world.
  • Why are most rituals practiced in modern world religions?
  • Buddhism: History, Origins, and Rituals .
  • Describe human sacrifice rituals in Ancient Rome .
  • Why do civilized countries use rituals in politics, for example, during the presidential inauguration?
  • Crusades from a Christian Viewpoint .
  • Compare male and female initiation rituals in African countries.
  • How do funeral rituals help humans overcome the pain of loss?
  • Marriage rituals in Japan: History that is preserved to nowadays.
  • Explore pagan rituals that remained in the Christian culture.
  • Is Baptism a ritual of initiation?
  • What do the burial rituals of native Americans tell us about their culture?

👁️‍ Essay Topics on Historical Mysteries

Have you ever thought about how many things around us are still covered with layers of questions? Humanity has still not resolved some events, places, and people that took place throughout history. Let’s have a look at some breathtaking historical mysteries.

  • Think of the reasons for the Great Leap Forward . Why did people start painting caves and making jewelry?
  • During the Middle Ages, English speakers changed the way they pronounced vowels. What are the theories of the Great Vowel Shift ?
  • The Green Children of Woolpit: A scary folk tale or a historical event?
  • The Inca civilization: Highway and postal system, skull surgeries, and other signs of culture.
  • The Sea Peoples caused the Bronze Age Collapse. Who were they? Where did they come from?
  • What are the available explanations of the Phoenix Lights?
  • The Salem Witch Trials and Their Impact on Massachusetts .
  • Analyze the theories explaining the Baghdad batteries and select the most true-to-life version.
  • What do we know about the “ Nazi Bell. ” Why is there so little information about the secret weapon?
  • What do we know about the Philadelphia Experiment ? Discuss the major theories and opinions on that case.
  • The Tunguska event: Military experiments or a meteoroid impact?
  • The mystery of Yonaguni Island and its underwater structures: Who were their creators?
  • The Bermuda Triangle: Human error camouflaged as a mystery.
  • Was the uncanny nature of The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park created by Stephen King?
  • Delano Roosevelt’s bomb shelter : Why did the President order to construct the chamber in 1941?
  • What is known about the secret passageways and hiding rooms of the British Queen?
  • The chief designer of the “hall of records” in Mount Rushmore died before completing his work. Was it a conspiracy?
  • Why do the scientists believe that the secret of Stonehenge will be revealed in some decades?
  • Find out the facts that point to the existence of Atlantis.
  • The Lock Ness Lake and the monster: A non-extinct dinosaur?
  • Money Pit on the Oak Island : A geologic formation or a place to hide treasures?
  • What traits make Jack the Ripper so attractive to historians and fiction writers?
  • Italian Americans Portrayed as Mafia Members in Films .
  • Keth Arnold saw some “flying saucers” that traveled faster than jet airplanes. Was it a UFO or a flock of birds?
  • David Blair: The person who was guilty in the Titanic catastrophe.
  • Was Joan of Arc executed for heresy or for dressing in male clothes?
  • The mystery of Amelia Earhart: Dead or alive?
  • Was Grigori Rasputin really capable of predicting the future?
  • Did the lost Grand Duchess Anastasia die when the rest of the Romanov family was killed?
  • Explore the mystery of the Babushka Lady , who recorded the assassination of John F. Kennedy. What is known about her and the purposes of her filming?
  • The Man in the Iron Mask and his sentence in the Bastille: Who could he be?
  • Perseus in the Manhattan Project: How did he manage to hide from the US for so long?

📝 Historical Topics to Write About – 2024

  • Geopolitical consequences of the USSR collapse for the world.
  • The influence of Confucianism on modern society in China.
  • How did the formation of NATO impact the Cold War?
  • The significance of Napoleon Bonaparte in European history.
  • The development of democracy in ancient Athens.
  • Reagan’s tax reform and its impact on the modern economy.
  • What were the key consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings?
  • The September 11th events and their impact on global security.
  • The Manhattan Project and the development of nuclear weapons.
  • The influence of slavery on African American families.
  • Mahatma Gandhi and his influence on the ideology of modern India.
  • What was the role of the first moon landing in astronomy?
  • The ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and its value.
  • The true history of the Confederate flag.
  • How much regulation is necessary for capitalism to function?
  • The main causes of the Vietnam War.
  • Historical events should be reexamined through a contemporary ethical lens.
  • The debate over the role of the United States in the Middle East.
  • The controversy behind the Israel-Palestine conflict.
  • Operation “Barbarossa”: aggression or attack prevention?
  • The reasons for Martin Luther King’s assassination.
  • The efficiency of the United Nations.
  • Christopher Columbus: heroic explorer or the harbinger of genocide?
  • The disputes about the origins of Shakespeare.
  • Was Donald Trump an effective president?
  • The benefits of communism in Eastern Europe.
  • Is the world doing enough to prevent the destruction of historical sites?
  • The real motive behind the Watergate scandal.
  • South Korean provocations of the Korean War.
  • Should the United States have entered World War I?
  • Princess Diana’s death as the subject of a conspiracy theory.
  • The effect of the Cuban Missile Crisis on the Cold War.
  • Is the international community doing enough to commemorate the Holocaust?
  • The debate over the use of internment camps during WWII.
  • The factors contributing to the Nazi Party’s rise in Germany
  • Did the attack on Pearl Harbor push the USA into WWII?
  • The leading causes of the Roman Empire’s fall.
  • Mysteries of the disappearance of the Mayan civilization.
  • Disputes about the role of women in medieval society.
  • The corruption of the Catholic Church: myth or truth?
  • Capitalism is the best economic system.
  • The injustices experienced by Muslims after 9/11.
  • What would have happened without Hitler?

👉 History Essay Topics: How to Choose

Selecting the proper essay topic can sometimes be rather tricky. Especially after reading all these fascinating questions above😏

Jokes aside, perfect topic choice is crucial if you want to write a good essay or a research paper and get a high grade. Here are some useful tips that will help you make the right choice and write a great history essay.

♟️ Strategies for Historical Argument Topics

When it comes right to writing a historical essay, you should consider several scenarios of how to build your text. Depending on your topic and the point of view, you might need different strategies.

Now, let’s see the differences between descriptive and research argumentative essays on historical topics.

  • Historians debate my topic. I agree with some of them, and I’m going to prove that. I will use their arguments to show their correctness.
  • Historians disagree on my topic. I think they shall start their debate all over again, as they have reached a dead end.
  • Historians relatively agree on my topic. I have developed a better interpretation of the events in question.
  • Historians disregarded my topic. I will explain its topicality and list what should be researched.
  • Several historians have examined my topic, but their findings are inconsistent. I will present more constructive evidence to clarify things.
  • Many historians have studied my topic. However, I will take a fresh look at the subject matter from the perspective of new research or methodologies.

And we are done here.

Now, have a break if you’ve read all 396 topics. Though, wait, did you find something fitting you? In that case, you are free for a break 👼

In case if you are still not sure what to write about, we recommend you to read these topic compilations:

  • The Best Argumentative Essay Topics for 2024
  • Hot Problem-Solution Essay Topics
  • 250+ Interesting Topics to Research
  • Cause & Effect Essay Topics for Students
  • Top 138 Awesome Sociology Essay Topics & Questions for 2024

We are pretty sure there’s no hopeless situation. It’s just a matter of time and effort. And everyone needs a different amount of each. So, keep calm, and let’s rock this history essay!

Good luck, friends 🍀

Research Paper Analysis: How to Analyze a Research Article + Example

Film analysis: example, format, and outline + topics & prompts.

520 Excellent American History Topics & Tips for an A+ Paper

How can you define America? If you’ve ever asked yourself this question, studying US history will help you find the answer.

Our specialists will write a custom essay specially for you!

This article will help you dive deeper into this versatile subject. Here, you will find:

  • Early and modern US history topics to write about. We’ve also got topics for DBQ essays for students taking an AP US history class.
  • Tips on how to create a great history paper.

Have you checked out our custom writing service yet? Our experts are always ready to help you with your assignments.

🔝 Top 10 American History Topics

✅ how to write a history paper, ⭐ top 10 us history topics to research.

  • 🦅 Topics Before 1865
  • ⚔️ Civil War Topics
  • 🛠️ Reconstruction & Industrialization
  • 🗽 20th Century Topics
  • 🔫 Topics on WWI & II
  • ☮️ Civil Rights Movement Topics
  • 💬 Debatable Topics
  • ✊🏿 Black History Topics
  • 🏞️ Native American Topics
  • ⭐ Topics on Famous People

🔍 References

  • The ideology of the Black Panthers
  • How did tenements affect America?
  • Why was Wilmot Proviso so controversial?
  • What characterizes the Roaring Twenties?
  • Cause and effect of the Missouri Compromise
  • The role of women during the Great Depression
  • Did anyone profit from the 1929 Stock Market Crash?
  • Michael Collins’ contribution to the space exploration
  • How did the US benefit from the Bracero Program?
  • Brigham Young’s contribution to the development of the West

History writing is controversial by nature. Selecting questions and topics is already a subjective process. On top of that, you need to interpret the sources. So, there is much to think about when it comes to history papers.

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  • Don’t be afraid to disagree . People explain many issues by conventional wisdom. Be skeptical and examine your own bias.
  • Explore new terrains . Not all historical events get the attention they deserve. Writing about generally neglected topics can yield fascinating results.
  • Consider how situations change over time . Frame your subject with a start- and endpoint.
  • Wonder . History is not just descriptions of what happened—it also questions how and why specific events took place.
  • Avoid relating everything to the present . Examine the past on its own terms. In doing so, keep the chronological order straight.
  • Don’t judge your subject . Your goal is to understand the past. Remember: moral norms might have been different in the period you’re studying.
  • Give context . It’s crucial to engage with and interpret your sources. Pinpoint their place in the grand scheme of events.

Finally, you might want to write in the present tense. While this works for other social sciences, it’s not advisable for history. It’s best to keep the past in the past! Also, if you need to construct a MLA title page , there’s nothing wrong in using a specialized tool to do that, as long as it allows you to concentrate on the more important part—writing.

  • What caused the Red Scare?
  • What did the Loyalists fight for?
  • Literacy rates during Puritan times
  • The effects of the Great Awakening
  • Why was the Boston Tea Party justified?
  • The aftermath of the Battle of Bunker Hill
  • Why was presidential Reconstruction a failure?
  • The causes of the economic recession of the 1780s
  • Railroads development role in the Industrial Revolution
  • Frederick Douglass’s contribution to the abolition of slavery

🦅 Essay Topics on US History before 1865

The period of colonial America is packed with turmoil. Think of the Boston Tea Party or the American Revolution. And these are only two of that era’s most notable events. In this rubric, you’ll find colonial American history essay topics. The period in question starts with the British arrival in the New World and ends with the Civil War.

  • The origins of Thanksgiving. One idea is to find out why the Pilgrims started celebrating it in the first place. Alternatively, you could examine how it became a national holiday.
  • Why did the British begin settling in the New World? This topic allows you to explore the rivalry with Spain. Or you could investigate England’s problem with poverty.
  • Discuss the emergence of joint-stock companies. Who profited from them? What is their legacy? You might also want to study their role in early settling attempts.
  • Compare and contrast the Jamestown and Plymouth settlements. You can concentrate on areas such as religion and government.

Barack Obama quote.

  • Why did Americans start revolting? An excellent place to begin might be America’s position in global power struggles. The impact of the European Enlightenment movement is also something to consider.
  • The history of African American culture . Ask yourself these questions: How does it differ from the way it is now? What factors influenced its development?
  • What problems arose during the drafting of the Constitution? You might want to write about the economic crisis. Other important factors include different interest groups and their expectations.
  • How did the American Revolution influence society? Your essay can be concerned with its immediate or long-term impact. Find out how women, slaves, and other groups reacted to the revolutionary spirit.
  • Consequences of the Royal Proclamation of 1783. American settlers didn’t obey the proclamation, but it still proved to be influential. Your paper could discuss why. Perhaps you’d also like to ponder if it was a good idea.
  • The role of nationalism in the westward expansion. Explore how Americans justified their belief in Manifest Destiny .

Don’t forget to check out these essay topics on early American history:

  • Why did the settlers start importing slaves?
  • How did Texas become a sovereign republic?
  • Why was the American Revolution successful?
  • Discuss the significance of the Louisiana Purchase.
  • What events led to the war of 1812 ?
  • How did the French Revolution impact America?
  • Describe the changes the American Revolution brought to the states.
  • What did “American” mean in the 18 th century?
  • The role of the Sons and Daughters of Liberty in achieving unity.
  • Why was the right to bear arms included in the Bill of Rights?
  • The first President of the United States.
  • Investigate the origins of the two-party system.
  • Alexander Hamilton’s financial policies: opposition and political consequences .
  • How did Washington, DC become the national capital?
  • Trace the Lewis and Clark expedition.
  • Analyze the importance of cotton for the South’s economy in the 1800s.
  • How did the relations between the settlers and Native Americans develop over time?
  • Who formed the abolitionist movement, and why?
  • How did Kansas become a battleground for proponents and opponents of slavery?
  • Who were the Border Ruffians?
  • What was the Compromise of 1850 ?
  • Consequences of the Mexican-American war.
  • Long-term influences of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin .
  • Compare the real Underground Railroad with the Underground Femaleroad in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale .
  • The Declaration of Independence and its legacy.
  • What did the philosophy of transcendentalism entail?
  • Abigail Adams and the fight for women’s rights in the new republic.
  • Who was Daniel Shays?
  • Trace the ratification process of the United States’ Constitution.
  • What problems arose with the Missouri Compromise ?
  • The revival of religion in the US after achieving independence.
  • How did the mass immigration of Germans and Irish people impact the US?
  • Nativism in the US: riots and the politics of the Know-Nothings.
  • How did the South and the North respectively argue for and against slavery?
  • Investigate the emergence of the “Old American West.”
  • Study the connection of the blue jeans’ invention with the California gold rush .
  • Describe a day in a life of a slave.
  • Why was the Dred Scott Decision significant?
  • How does the 1860 election relate to the southern states seceding from the Union?
  • Explain the term “popular sovereignty.”

⚔️ Civil War Topics for Your Paper

In the pre-war period, tensions in the US over state rights and slavery were high. The differences seemed impossible to overcome. Eventually, this led to several southern states seceding from the Union. What followed was the bloodiest war ever to take place on American ground. In writing about the Civil War, you can explore military, political, and social issues.

  • Did the South ever have a chance to win? The conflict seemed to be heavily in favor of the more industrialized North. Still, it took four years of fighting to get the South to surrender. Your essay could examine the South’s underestimated strengths.
  • Compare and contrast the South’s and North’s economic situation on the eve of the Civil War . You might want to investigate the following questions: What did they produce? How did this influence the decision to wage war?
  • How did the Emancipation Proclamation affect the war? You could focus on the contributions of African American soldiers.
  • Discuss the fatal mistakes made on the battlefields of the Civil War. What decisive moments impacted its results the most? Your paper might explore what the generals could have done differently.
  • Was the Civil War inevitable ? It may be interesting to contemplate a possible compromise. In doing so, think about whether this would have merely delayed the war.
  • The general public’s position on the Civil War. It might be compelling to analyze who supported the effort and why. One focal point could be on differences between social classes.
  • The role of beliefs during the Civil War. You could investigate what the South and the North respectively held sacred. Were religious beliefs a crucial motivator for one or both sides?
  • The “Angel of the Battlefield”: Clara Barton. An essay could analyze how she contributed to the recognition of women’s war participation. It could also examine how it forwarded the struggle for women’s rights.

Clara Barton.

  • What were the political reasons to fight the Civil War? Investigating this question might yield surprising insights.
  • Contrasting Stonewall Jackson and Ulysses Grant might be engaging for those who are interested in military strategies.

Do you want more? Have a look at the following topic samples for high and middle school students:

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  • Analyze why Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address became a critical moment in American history.
  • Was the Civil War justified?
  • Why was Fort Sumter relevant?
  • How did the Civil War battles impact the American social sphere?
  • What does the notion of the “Lost Cause” mean?
  • Would the election of a different man other than Abraham Lincoln as president have prevented the Civil War?
  • Why did many former slaves enlist in the Union army after the Emancipation Proclamation?
  • Describe the consequences of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination .
  • Why was slavery essential for the South?
  • Foreign US policy during the 1860s.
  • European reactions on the American Civil War.
  • How did Jefferson Davis’ government differ from Abraham Lincoln’s ?
  • Analyze the notion “A rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight.” Why was this especially true in the South?
  • Why did the Union rely heavily on blockades to weaken the Confederation?
  • Examine how Mary Boykin Chesnut’s A Diary from Dixie reflects on the war.
  • How did the war affect life in the South vs. the North ?
  • Investigate the events that led to the Union victory in 1864-65.
  • Was the abolitionist movement the catalyst for the war?
  • The impact of industrialization on the battlefield.
  • What technologies emerged during the Civil War?
  • Discuss the societal effects of war photography .
  • How did the Civil War affect the many immigrants who recently entered the United States?
  • Did the American Civil War impact the rest of the globe? If so, how?
  • Can one consider Abraham Lincoln one of the best presidents in American history? If so, why?
  • Compare and contrast the most important generals and their tactics.
  • Debate the influence of Manifest Destiny on exacerbating tensions.
  • What states were devastated the most after the war, and why?
  • Describe the South’s and North’s goals during the Civil War.
  • What does the term “Bleeding Kansas” mean?
  • Newspaper coverage of the Civil War in the South vs. the North.
  • Analyze various letters to understand how people from different backgrounds perceived the Civil War .
  • Art and theater in 1860s America.
  • Debate how sectionalism and protectionism contributed to pre-war tensions in the US.
  • Why did the Crittenden Compromise fail?
  • How did the border states perceive the battles of the Civil War?
  • Explore the war contributions and legacy of Mary Edwards Walker.
  • The importance of the US navy in leading the Union to victory.
  • What happened on the West Coast during the Civil War?
  • Trace a timeline of the Civil War’s key battles.
  • Nation-building and national identity: how did the Civil War shape the idea of “Americanness”?

🛠️ Essay Topics on Reconstruction & Industrialization

After the war, industrialization was rapidly changing the American landscape. Additionally, restoring the order after years of fighting proved a challenge. In abolishing slavery, Republicans took the first step to ensure constitutional rights for African Americans. But not everyone shared the same viewpoints. Dive deeper into these confusing times with one of our topics on American history before 1877:

  • Why did scholars initially view the Reconstruction Era in a bad light ? When answering this question, you can focus on the idea of “Black Supremacism.” You also might want to analyze what compelled them to shift their perspective.
  • Another option is investigating what caused Reconstruction to fail . You can further argue where it succeeded and perhaps offer a new interpretation.
  • Maybe you’d prefer an essay on why the Reconstruction Era mattered . This topic allows you to highlight crucial contemporary debates still relevant today.
  • Tracing the origins of the Ku-Klux-Klan has much to offer. You can link this topic to today and question if handling them has changed.
  • Why did President Johnson veto the enactment of the Civil Rights Act in 1866? It might be interesting to contrast his political reasoning and his personal beliefs.
  • Compare the phases of Reconstruction. How did the concept change from Lincoln’s initial plans to President Johnson’s execution?
  • How did urbanization affect American life? Your paper could contrast life in the city and the countryside. You can take economic, social, and health factors into account.
  • How did the American landscape change during industrialization? You might want to examine city growth and architecture.
  • The invention of electricity was one of the most important events in human history. It might be compelling to wonder what side effects its implementation had.
  • Why not investigate the symbolism of skyscrapers? Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead is a fascinating source for this subject.

But wait, that’s not all of it. We’ve got more, including topics on American history since 1877:

  • Did the situation for freedmen improve after Reconstruction?
  • How did industrialization affect African Americans?
  • Discuss what consequences the Compromise of 1877 had.
  • The role of transportation during industrialization .
  • How does an assembly line work?

The first ever assembly line was installed by Henry Ford.

  • The invention of the automobile.
  • Describe in what ways mass production affected American society.
  • What was the Panic of 1873?
  • Long-term effects of Plessy v. Ferguson.
  • How did the Freedmen’s Bureau help former slaves?
  • Why did rebuilding the South prove so difficult?
  • Debate the effects of the print revolution on American society.
  • What was the primary goal of Reconstruction?
  • How did the Reconstruction Act affect politics in the South?
  • What caused the formation of Radical Republicans?
  • The transformation of leisure in late 19 th century America.
  • Analyze why landownership was a crucial issue in establishing African American equality.
  • Was President Johnson’s attempted impeachment in 1868 justified?
  • How did the US government help exacerbate the wealth gap in the late 19 th century?
  • What changes did transcontinental railroad transportation bring?
  • How did John D. Rockefeller influence the American economy?
  • The role of oil in industrializing America.
  • Discuss the relevance of the Great Upheaval.
  • Changing gender roles in times of urbanization.
  • Industrialization and Education: obstacles and opportunities for women and African Americans.
  • Analyze how industrialization and urbanization in the USA challenged old values.
  • How did the American newspaper business change in the 19 th century?
  • The impact of sensationalism on the American public.
  • Why did steel become such a crucial material during the late 1800s?
  • What caused the Reconstruction Era to come to an end?
  • How did contemporary cartoons attempt to depict the mood during Reconstruction?
  • What problems did Ulysses S. Grant have to face with his administration?
  • Compare and contrast reconstruction measures in various states.
  • Why did cities become increasingly attractive for America’s rural population in the 19 th century?
  • Examine the significance of the Slaughterhouse Cases.
  • Determine the difference between Presidential Reconstruction and Radical Reconstruction?
  • From the black code to Jim Crow: institutionalized racism in the southern states.
  • The combined rise of populism and imperialism in the 1800s.
  • Discuss the significance of regional differences during industrialization .
  • The impact of labor unions on the American work environment.

🗽 20th Century US History Topics to Write About

By the turn of the century, the US was a significant global player. Events such as the Great Depression affected the whole world. In addition, American contributions to the arts changed the cultural sphere forever. If you’re looking for modern US history thematic essay topics, this section is for you.

  • Why did the “final frontier” gain such importance in the 20 th century? Your essay could examine if the space race was an extension of Manifest Destiny.
  • How did the Titanic’s sinking influence innovation and safety regulations ? The ship was the biggest and most technologically advanced ocean liner at the time. Carrying over 2000 passengers, it sank on its maiden voyage. Investigating its legacy might yield fascinating results.
  • How did progressivism shape the political landscape in America at the turn of the century? In the early 1900s, the USA was almost a different country than it was 50 years prior. How did this happen? And who were the leading figures of this process?
  • Are you curious about the development of American workplace laws? Write about the consequences of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire .
  • If you’re into corporate history, look into the rise and fall of America’s formerly largest retailer, Sears.
  • The real William Randolph Hearst vs. his portrayal in David Fincher’s Mank . This topic allows you to combine film theory and the history of American journalism.
  • The impact of Citizen Kane on movies around the globe. To this day, Citizen Kane is considered one of the most influential films ever made. In a paper on the 1941 masterpiece, you can focus on what made it special. Which features are still prominent in cinema today?
  • How did the eugenics movement affect American society? You might want to investigate marriage laws or forced sterilizations.
  • Consequences of the Spanish-American War . The brief battle didn’t last long, but its impact was immense. Your essay could highlight the war as a stepping stone to making the US a global power.
  • Escalating racial violence: The Rosewood Massacre. In 1923, the entire town of Rosewood, Florida, was wiped out by white aggressors. How did racial tensions get so far?

Haven’t found anything yet? Here are some other American history thesis topics for you to explore:

  • The impact of the Cold War on the American economy.
  • What caused the Great Depression ?
  • Ellis Island as a beacon of hope for immigrants and refugees.
  • The transformation of the American school system in the 1920s.
  • What were pop art’s main concepts?
  • Moral vs. political considerations during the annexation of Hawaii.
  • Who were the Social Gospel preachers?
  • John Dewey’s role in advancing education.
  • What sources fueled American progressivism ?
  • Trace the timeline of Theodore Roosevelt’s presidency.
  • What was laissez-faire capitalism?
  • How did President Woodrow Wilson reform businesses?
  • A dive into the speakeasy culture.
  • How did the widespread availability of cars impact American dating life?
  • Prohibition : reasons and consequences.
  • Connecting arts and civil rights: The Harlem Renaissance .
  • Al Capone and the rise of organized crime in the 1920s.
  • What was the New Deal, and why was it necessary?
  • How did FDR’s “Alphabet Agencies” help the economy after the Great Depression?
  • Explore the funding of the UN.
  • Discuss the significance of the Berlin Airlift.
  • Screen rebels: how James Dean and Marlon Brando changed American cinema forever.
  • Find a connection between McCarthyism and the Salem Witch Trials.
  • How did affordable television perpetuate the idea of the ideal American family?
  • Analyze the political consequences of the Watergate scandal.
  • A new American culture: variety shows in the 1950s.
  • The origins of Rock’n’roll .
  • What caused the US to slide into inflation in the 1970s?
  • Counterculture literature in the middle of the century: The Beat Generation.
  • The aftermath of the Vietnam War .
  • What made John F. Kennedy a popular president ?
  • The development of Hippie culture in the 1960s.
  • Reproductive rights and the rise of American feminism in the late 20 th century.
  • Intertwining show-business and government: Ronald Reagan’s presidency .
  • Outline the tactical maneuvers of Operation Desert Storm.
  • How did MTV revolutionize the music industry ?
  • Why did drug use become an existential problem in America during the 1970s and 80s?
  • American environmental reform policies from 1960 to 1980.
  • ’70s fashion as a social and political statement in the US.
  • How did the sexual revolution redefine American social life?

🔫 Topics about America in World Wars I & II

America during the World Wars is an engaging writing prompt. But it may be too broad for an essay. That’s why it makes sense to narrow your focus. Which area do you find most interesting about the subject? For example, you can choose between culture, economy, technology, and, of course, the military.

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  • Repressions and progress went hand in hand in the postwar US. Writing about the impact of WWI on domestic American politics would give you various directions to research.
  • President Woodrow Wilson was against entering the war until 1917. What events led the US to break its neutrality?
  • Many Germans of the time called the Treaty of Versailles a “dictate of shame.” It is often considered a significant reason for World War II. What was the US’ position on the Treaty of Versailles?
  • After WWI, America followed isolationist politics. Until 1941, when they declared war on Japan after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Could the USA have stayed out of WWII?
  • How did WWII affect the American economy? Think about military needs and rationing.
  • President Woodrow Wilson was a fierce supporter of the League of Nations. But congress coerced him not to have the USA join. Should America have become a member of this organization?

Woodrow Wilson quote.

  • How did American civilians contribute to the war effort? Your essay can focus specifically on women. Be sure to examine new arrangements in daily life.
  • If you’re more into art, why not analyze how the world wars influenced American art?
  • WWII changed all aspects of American life, including their diet. What new methods of food preservation emerged during that time?
  • Another fascinating topic to engage in is propaganda and advertisement in the US during WWII. Your focus might lie on how they targeted different members of society.

Don’t forget to read the rest of our topics on this issue:

  • Evaluate Woodrow Wilson’s 14 points program.
  • How did the American army recruitment work in WWII?
  • “Kilroy was here”: examine where the mysterious slogan comes from.
  • Outline the history of Japanese Americans in Japanese internment camps.
  • US spies: where and how did they operate?
  • The Manhattan Project: trace the making of the atomic bomb.
  • How did migration shape American society in the 1930s and ‘40s?
  • The notion of freedom in America before, during, and after the wars.
  • What role did communication play for the military in WWI vs. WWII?
  • Canadian-American relations during WWII.
  • How did the wars spur transportation developments in the US?
  • Discuss the significance of D-Day .
  • Could the allies have won WWII without the USA?
  • Why did America emerge as a “Global Policeman” after the world wars?
  • The effects of National Socialism in America.
  • In what ways does the outcome of WWII still influence American society today?
  • Compare and contrast military strategies in Europe vs. the Pacific.
  • Was the dropping of the atomic bomb necessary?
  • After the Little Boy’s devastating results, why did the American government decide to drop Fat Man?
  • What made the Zimmerman telegram such a central document for American war participation?
  • What happened to prisoner-of-war camps in the US after the fighting was over?
  • Compare the leadership styles of Franklin D. Roosevelt in WWII and Woodrow Wilson in WWI.
  • Why did the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor ?
  • What methods did the American government use to conceal their operations?
  • Growing up in the ‘40s: how did the war impact the manufacture of toys?
  • Which medical advancements were helpful to American soldiers in WWII that didn’t yet exist in WWI?
  • How did the 1940s fashion in the USA reflect the global situation?
  • Did the two world wars change the civil rights situation for African Americans? If so, how?
  • How did the war affect employment in the US?
  • What was unique about the Higgins boats?
  • The role of submarines in WWI.
  • How did America cooperate with the allied forces in Europe in WWI?
  • Discuss how the American citizens reacted to being drawn into WWI vs. WWII.
  • Did anyone in the US profit from the wars? If so, who?
  • Describe how American families changed during WWII.
  • What stories do letters that soldiers sent to their families back home tell?
  • Joseph Heller’s depiction of World War II in the novel Catch-22 .
  • Compare and contrast memory culture concerning WWII in Russia vs. the USA.
  • How did the perception of America on the global stage change after World War I?
  • The role of women in the US military.

☮️ Essay Topics About the Civil Rights Movement

The struggle for African American equality finally intensified in the 1950s and 60s. Influential figures such as Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks emerged. Their resilience inspired countless others. Seventy years later, the fight is far from over. The rights of minorities and people of color are still a crucial topic in American society today.

  • Nine months before the Montgomery Bus Boycott , Claudette Colvin refused to give up her seat to a white woman. Yet, Rosa Parks is the one commonly associated with sparking the event. Why is Claudette Colvin often ignored in history?
  • Everybody knows Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr , but who were the Civil Rights Movement’s lesser-known figures? Start your research with Aurelia Browder and Susie McDonald.
  • Which concepts and themes can you find in Martin Luther King Jr. ’s I Have A Dream speech ? One idea is to focus on how he expresses hope and freedom for black Americans.

Martin Luther King Jr Quote.

  • Which committees and organizations were central to the Civil Rights Movement’s success ? Discuss the roles of the SNCC, CORE, and NAACP.
  • What makes Malcolm X a controversial figure? Be sure to mention his nationalist ideas and membership in the Nation of Islam.
  • The Little Rock Nine: what made their integration into Little Rock Central High School difficult? In your research paper, you can write about harassment issues and military intervention.
  • What did the Civil Rights Act of 1957 change? On the one hand, you can talk about the history of voter rights. On the other, you might want to investigate how the public reacted to the new law.
  • If you prefer personal stories, you can trace Ruby Bridges’ experiences. She became famous as the first black person to go to an all-white school. She’s still alive today.
  • History can be ugly. If you’re not afraid to encounter violence during your research, check out the Freedom Rides. How did they help attract international attention to the Civil Rights Movement?
  • Consequences of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. Did the movement die with him? How did the government respond?

Are you curious for more? Have a look at these prompts:

  • Compare the modern Black Lives Matter movement with the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.
  • What did the Black Panthers party achieve?
  • The best way to teach about the Civil Rights Movement in 8 th grade.
  • What happened at the Greensboro sit-ins?
  • Why did the civil rights activists encounter so much violence, even though they mostly protested peacefully ?
  • Compare and contrast Gandhi’s methods and those of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Why was Bloody Sunday a crucial moment for the Civil Rights Movement
  • What was the “long, hot summer”?
  • Examine the creation of the Kerner Commission.
  • The role of students in advancing civil rights for African Americans.
  • What rights did black Americans gain through the Civil Rights Movement
  • Describe the Nation of Islam’s goals.
  • Who were the members of the Black Panther Party ?
  • What distinguishes the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s from previous movements to establish more rights for African Americans?
  • Give a brief overview of the most important Supreme Court decisions concerning the struggle for equality.
  • The importance of the church for the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Compare the effects of various marches for freedom.
  • What made Martin Luther King Jr. a great leader for the movement?
  • How did the murder of Emmett Till affect the public’s view on segregation and racism?
  • How did the press support or hinder the Civil Rights Movement ?
  • Loving v. Virginia: legacy and contemporary significance.
  • What did the notion of “miscegenation” entail?
  • What were the Jim Crow laws ?
  • Describe the goals and achievements of Operation Breadbasket.
  • Who was Stokely Carmichael?
  • Analyze Ralph Abernathy’s autobiography And the Walls Came Tumbling Down . Why do some people consider it controversial?
  • Debate the criticism brought up against the Congress of Racial Equality.
  • Why did some civil rights activists in the 1960s radicalize?
  • Did the election of Barack Obama mark the end of the struggle for equal rights?
  • Discuss the success of the Baton Rouge bus boycott.
  • What events led to Lyndon B. Johnson’s signing of the Voting Rights Act?
  • Examine Coretta Scott King’s career after her husband’s passing.
  • Investigate conspiracy theories concerning James Earl Ray’s role in the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • The publishing and writing process of Malcolm X’s autobiography.
  • How and why did the 2020 election undermine parts of the Voting Rights Act?
  • Is studying the Civil Rights Movement still relevant today? If so, why?
  • How did CORE help desegregate schools in Chicago?
  • Who is Jesse Jackson?
  • Contemporary commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement.
  • How did John F. Kennedy’s death impact the Civil Rights Movement?

💬 Debatable US History Topics to Research

Controversy has been a constant companion of American history. And it’s not only questionable segregation practices that are up for debate. Women’s and LGBT rights, as well as welfare programs, are issues still unresolved today. If you want argumentative or persuasive essay topics about American history, check out this section.

  • Memories are always socially constructed. “How do various communities around the US perceive monuments of slaveholders?” is an engaging question to explore in your essay.
  • In 1995, an exhibition at the Smithsonian centered around the Enola Gay sparked a nationwide controversy. Critics said the exhibit focused too much on the Japanese suffering the nuclear bomb dropped from the aircraft caused. Was that criticism justified?
  • In the past, Colonial Williamsburg’s issues with slavery were often overlooked. Instead, when creating and developing the historical site, the focus lay on its democratic values. Is Colonial Williamsburg still a good place to learn about American history?
  • What does the Liberty Bell stand for today? You can include recent and older controversies surrounding the location and custody of the bell.
  • Tracing the history of LGBT rights will yield many debatable insights. Which court decisions would you consider especially controversial, and why?
  • The legacy of the Centralia massacre in 1919: are the events linked to the Red Scare? How did the town try to obscure the truth?
  • In 1887, President Eisenhower supported a campaign to promote patriotism. Part of this was the addition of “under God” to the American Pledge of Allegiance. Analyze the debates surrounding the issue.
  • The history of prostitution laws in the US. Your thesis could suggest a connection between decriminalizing sex work and the workers’ wellbeing.
  • In the 2020 election, several states voted to legalize not only marijuana but also other drugs. History shows many movements to legalize recreational drug use. What was different now?
  • Many older Disney cartoons depict racist stereotypes. The question of adjusting them to modern values sparked much debate. Using this discussion to explore how America should deal with problematic media from the past might be promising.

Keep reading and discover more controversial United States history topics.

  • Did President Barack Obama deserve his Nobel Peace Prize?
  • What did the US gain from the Iraq War ?
  • Would Germany have won WWII without America’s intervention?
  • Should the presidents of the previous century have done more to promote animal rights ?
  • Given its historical context, should we keep celebrating Thanksgiving?
  • Why did it take so long for American women to achieve legally equal rights ?
  • Find historical reasons why the US never instituted universal healthcare.
  • The necessity of cow’s milk in America: past vs. present.
  • Was the annexation of Puerto Rico justified?
  • Did the Chicano Movement achieve positive changes for Mexican Americans?
  • John F. Kennedy’s most controversial presidential actions.
  • The ratification of the 8 th amendment.
  • Was the government’s response to 9/11 justified?
  • The role of faith in American history before 1877 and after.
  • Who or what caused the US’ drug overdose epidemic?
  • HIV/AIDS denialism in America in the 1990s.
  • What should Locust Grove do to restore its deteriorating African American cemetery? Can the place be considered a historical site?
  • Why did some states introduce felon disenfranchisement in 1792? Did the new law spark any outrage?
  • Trace the historical timeline of the same-sex marriage debate.
  • The USA has always been a country of immigrants. How did this lead to immigration being a fiercely discussed topic nowadays?
  • How did the US contribute to the current instability in the Middle East?
  • Was the “Lost Generation” reckless?
  • How do US historians influence public opinion?
  • Does the Red Scare reflect on Russian-American relations today?
  • Should Bill Clinton have stayed in office ?
  • Discuss the benefits of being a hippie in the 60s.
  • Can the members of the Beat Generation serve as role models for travel enthusiasts today?
  • Roe v. Wade : what made the court case a turning point in the fight for women’s reproductive rights?
  • Did American feminism become too radical by the late 19 th century?
  • The rise and fall of DDT: Why was it allowed in the first place?
  • What should US history education for high school students look like?
  • From a historical perspective, does the reality in Watchmen seem like a likely scenario for the future?
  • Psychiatric methods in early 1900s America.
  • The role of performance-enhancing drugs in the history of American sports achievements.
  • Why do some people believe that the moon landing was staged?
  • Criticism against Ayn Rand’s objectivism and its influence.
  • Before opening America’s first women’s hospital, gynecologist J. Marion Sims experimented on slaves. Should he still be celebrated as the ‘father’ of modern gynecology?
  • Is the notion of “American Century” accurate?
  • American exceptionalism in the 20 th century vs. now.
  • Has technological innovation always been beneficial for the American public?

✊🏿 Black History Topics for an Essay

African American experiences are still very different than those of their white compatriots. That’s why it’s crucial to analyze people of color’s perspectives of and contributions to history. Black history includes thematic topics on education, society, and culture.

  • Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave adapts the 1853 memoirs of Solomon Northup. Though the film doesn’t shy away from brutal images, critics argued it was too soft. Should film writers surrender accurate historical representation to make their content more accessible?
  • After the Civil War, slavery was officially banned in the US. Still, the South continued to find ways to exploit black labor. Examine the consequences of new methods such as convict leasing and sharecropping .
  • Many of those who opposed slavery complied with the system by staying silent or inactive. What did this mean for the reality of African Americans? Why didn’t these people stand up?
  • A paper on what caused the Red Summer of 1919 can focus on the South to North migration of African Americans during WWI.
  • In the 20 th century, the Great Migration relocated many African Americans. How did this event impact the development of black culture? Your paper could concentrate on art movements or political activism.
  • The GI Bill promised financial benefits to veterans. But former black soldiers didn’t profit as much as their white compatriots. To analyze a concrete example of racist inequality, you can write about how the GI Bill affected African American veterans.
  • For decades, American universities did their best to keep African Americans from receiving higher education . How is education inequality still impacting black students today?
  • After WWI, Tulsa was a prosperous city home to the so-called “ Black Wall Street .” Then the Tulsa Race Massacre happened, and the area was left in shambles. Explore the moving history of Tulsa’s Greenwood District.
  • Do you want to investigate the powerful interplay between cinema and reality? Dedicate your essay to the connection between D.W. Griffith’s 1915 picture The Birth of a Nation and the Ku Klux Klan’s revival. What did this mean for black lives in the early 20 th century?
  • Pan-Africanism in the United States: Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association. Writing about this topic, you might want to highlight African American nationalism in the 20 th century.

Are none of these prompts for you? Don’t worry; we’ve got more African American history paper topics for college students:

  • Booker T. Washington vs. W. E. B. Du Bois: similarities and disagreements.
  • African American innovators who never received credit for their inventions.

The most important African American inventors.

  • From Hiram Rhodes Revels and Shirley Chisholm to Barack Obama: African Americans who paved the way for modern American democracy .
  • Should the US government pay reparations to descendants of former slaves?
  • Sojourner Truth : how did the former slave fight to end injustice?
  • How did job competition in the North intensify racial tensions in the 20 th century?
  • The accomplishments of Dorothy Johnson Vaughan.
  • Ida B. Wells’ legacy and the history of lynching in America.
  • Why do we celebrate Black History Month, and why is it important?
  • What does Juneteenth commemorate?
  • Histories of the most famous black scientists in the United States.
  • How did the geographic distribution of black people in America transform over time?
  • Key activists of the abolitionist movement .
  • How did African Americans contribute to NASA’s success?
  • African Americans in the age of Prohibition: views and effects.
  • Juxtapose the development of black rights and felon rights.
  • Analyze the significance of Marian Anderson’s show on the National Mall for the Civil Rights Movement.
  • African American women in the beauty business: the story of Madame C. J. Walker.
  • What motivated many black Americans to fight in WWI voluntarily?
  • How did enslaved people manage to escape to the Northern states ?
  • Compare the origins and outcomes of the Civil Rights Movement’s various marches.
  • The New Deal’s effect on African Americans.
  • Explore the connection between black history in the US and cotton .
  • What does the term “black flight” mean, and why might the phenomenon be a problem?
  • How did white capping inhibit the development of black communities?
  • What were the goals of the Che Lumumba Club?
  • Analyze the Regents of the University of California v. Bakke case. What did its outcome mean for equality?
  • What makes Angela Davis a crucial figure in the black history discourse?
  • Analyze how Jackie Robinson broke the “color line” to pave the way for African American participation in professional sports.
  • Discuss the long-term consequences of the Tuskegee experiment.
  • How did the Watts Riots affect African American communities in California?
  • Explore the origins of Kwanzaa.
  • African American poetry before 1877: Lucy Terry’s Bars Fight .
  • Not so free after all: enactment of the Fugitive Slave Law.
  • Did the situation for American people of color improve after the implementation of Affirmative Action laws? If so, how?
  • Trailblazing black Americans in education.
  • How did sports help promote equality for African Americans in the 1900s?
  • Who were the Scottsboro boys?
  • Journalism’s fight for social justice: The Crisis magazine then and now.
  • How did Prohibition help dissolve segregation?

🏞️ Native American Topics to Write About

Much effort has gone into improving the relations between Americans and the indigenous peoples. Unfortunately, this hasn’t always been the case. The history of native Americans is tainted with cruel battles. Taking a closer look reveals the interplay of various cultures and customs.

  • Pocahontas is one of the most renowned figures in Native American history. Compare Pocahontas’ real life vs. how she is depicted in the media. Why was she often romanticized?
  • How did Andrew Jackson’s government justify the Indian Removal Act ? Moral standards during that time and economic reasoning might be a compelling area to focus on.
  • Native American participation in American wars. The colonists fought many battles with each other. France, Spain, and England all competed for the new territory. Did Native Americans participate in these fights? If so, whose side were they on?
  • African peoples were not the only ones who suffered serfdom. Your research paper could cover the colonial enslavement of Native Americans .
  • In the 18 th century, settlers and natives negotiated a variety of treaties. What did they say? Were these treaties ever beneficial for the natives?
  • The Indian Appropriations Act of 1851 organized Native American lives into reservations. What did life look like for natives in these reservations? Additionally, you could examine how reservations affect their lives today.
  • Attempts to deal with Native Americans included assimilation and “civilization.” How did these methods work out? For a concrete example, investigate Henry Pratt’s Carlisle Indian Industrial school.
  • If you want to know more about Indian belief systems, research the emergence of the Ghost Dance. Originating in the late 19 th century, many native communities adapted the new tradition.
  • Geronimo escaped captivity countless times before turning himself in. How did he do that? Your essay can look at his beliefs and this geographical knowledge.
  • The Narragansett was the first tribe to encounter European settlers. What were their relations? How did they develop? Consider territorial struggles and the role of Roger Williams.

Are you looking for something else? Check out these US history essay questions and prompts:

  • Compare and contrast American and Australian historical relations to their native population.
  • What events led to the breakout of King Philip’s War?
  • Ancient Indian burial rituals and modern myths.
  • How did the Cherokees rebuild their lives after the Trail of Tears?
  • Sacagawea’s contribution to the success of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
  • Great Native American leaders: Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull.
  • What happened at the Battle of the Little Bighorn?
  • Consequences for Native American lives after the proclamation of 1763.
  • The crucial role of Navajo Code Talkers in WWII.
  • How did integration into American culture transform tribal life for different tribes?
  • Explore naming customs of various Native American tribes.
  • Is Black Elk Speaks an accurate representation of Lakota culture?
  • What did the American Indian Movement achieve?
  • What makes the Massacre of Wounded Knee significant?
  • Trace Leonard Peltier’s career in politics and activism.
  • Chief Tecumseh and the Indian confederacy.
  • Compare and contrast the cultures of native tribes from various regions in America before colonization.
  • How did American policies regarding the indigenous population change from the Mayflower’s arrival until now?
  • What happened to California’s extensive Native American population after it became a state?
  • The development of Native American music.
  • Traditional Cherokee farming tools and techniques.
  • Native Americans and religion : what compelled some chiefs to convert to Christianity?
  • How did N. Scott Momaday’s House Made of Dawn shape indigenous cultures’ image for the general public?
  • How did native spiritualism relate to the environment?
  • Gender roles of the Sioux tribe before 1900.
  • The greatest battles between First Nations and Americans.
  • Why were the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole, and Cherokee considered the “ Five Civilized Tribes ”?
  • America’s first native newspaper: The Cherokee Phoenix and its modern equivalent.
  • How did many of today’s Native Americans become entangled with alcohol and gambling ?
  • Myths and speculations on the ancient origins of indigenous Americans.
  • Economic development of Native American tribes in the 20 th century.
  • Why did Cochise and his Apache warriors raid American settlements?
  • Trace the history of indigenous feminism.
  • What were the blood quantum laws, and why were they introduced?
  • Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill: forging an unlikely friendship.
  • The accomplishments of Oglala Lakota chief Red Cloud.
  • How did the Louisiana Purchase impact First Nations in the region ?
  • The history of Native Americans in law and politics.
  • The political aftermath of the Sand Creek Massacre
  • Cheyenne warrior societies: the emergence of Dog Soldiers as a separate band.

⭐ Topics on Famous People in American History

People shape history. Many of America’s leading historical figures made it to global importance. This section provides you with history essay topics on American artists, presidents, innovators, and more.

  • The “King of Pop” Michael Jackson died a decade ago. Why is he still one of the most debated American celebrities? Your essay could focus on the controversial allegations of child abuse towards him.
  • The social influence of Benjamin Franklin’s journalism is an enticing topic. It allows you to look at the founding father from a different angle. Make sure to include in your essay his desire to educate Americans in morality.
  • John Harvey Kellogg was a progressive healthcare leader. He was also a fierce follower of Adventism. If you endorse obscure things, write about Kellogg’s “warfare with passion.”
  • Mural made Jackson Pollock famous. Reflect on his career before and after the painting. How did the artist find his passion for drip painting?
  • As a First Lady, Betty Ford was a strong advocate for women’s rights. But her political influence didn’t end with her husband’s career. Discuss Betty Ford’s accomplishments after her time in the White House. Mention her addiction and the subsequent establishment of the Betty Ford Center.
  • In 1935, J. Edgar Hoover founded the FBI. In his later years, he became a controversial figure due to his abuses of power . Examine Hoover’s investigations of subversion. What do you find surprising about them?
  • Before his brother’s assassination, Bobby Kennedy wasn’t particularly popular in the US. Analyze his speeches during his political career after the event. What made him a compassionate orator?
  • The Kennedy-Nixon debates provide a rich foundation for those interested in political campaigning. How did the public react to them? What did the polls say? Keep in mind that it was America’s first televised presidential debate.
  • If you seek to combine environmentalism and politics, Al Gore is your man. How did Al Gore shape America’s political discourse in the 2000s? Consider his loss against George Bush in the controversial 2000 election.
  • Literature enthusiasts know Allen Ginsberg for his explicit poem Howl . How did he express his political and social activism in his works? You could focus on his fight for free speech and the Howl trial.

We’ve got more topics on regents and other famous Americans for you to check out:

  • Just Say No: Nancy Reagan and the failure of her anti-drug campaign.
  • Why was Abraham Lincoln such a controversial figure?
  • Kurt Cobain and Nirvana: the voice of the ‘90s youth.
  • Ronald Reagan was an actor before he became president. What drove him into politics?
  • What circumstances made Donald Trump’s presidency possible?
  • Why was Jimmy Carter such an unpopular president?
  • Discuss what Eleanor Roosevelt achieved for women.
  • Stanley Kubrick: was he the greatest filmmaker of the 20 th century?
  • The role of First Ladies before the Civil War.
  • Judith Butler’s influence on American feminism.
  • Margaret Sanger: the initiator of the birth control movement.
  • How did Oprah Winfrey get to where she is now?
  • Steve Jobs and the revolution of computer technology.
  • Research the mysterious Zodiac Killer and his ciphers. Why were many people obsessed with him?
  • How did the Wright Brothers shape the history of aviation?
  • Amelia Earhart’s disappearance: myths and facts.
  • J. Robert Oppenheimer’s contributions to physics.
  • Bruce Lee and the transformation of martial arts.
  • How did O.J. Simpson end up in the US’ most famous car chase?
  • Charles Goodyear and the road to vulcanized rubber.
  • Creating nanotechnology : the legacy of Eric Drexler.
  • Muhammad Ali’s influence on raising awareness for Parkinson’s research.
  • Describe how Bobby Fischer impacted the world of chess.
  • What made Chuck Norris so famous?
  • How did Marilyn Monroe change the American attitude towards sexuality?
  • Truman Capote’s role in advancing LGBT rights.
  • Harper Lee’s biography after the publishing of To Kill A Mockingbird .
  • Transforming science fiction: the legacy of Philip K. Dick .
  • Andy Warhol as a global anti-capitalist icon.
  • Bringing quantum physics forward: the brilliance of Richard Feynman.
  • Samuel Colt and the consequences of inventing the revolver.
  • Analyze the significance of Helen Keller’s work for women’s and disabled persons’ rights.
  • How did Sam Walton become the wealthiest American in 1985?
  • Discuss the importance of Thurgood Marshall for the Civil Rights Movement.
  • What inspired Bill W. to found Alcoholics Anonymous ?
  • Paving the way for gay politicians: the activism of Harvey Milk .
  • What was Louis B. Mayer’s management style with MGM?
  • Walt Disney : who was the person behind the chipper cartoons?
  • Trace Estée Lauder’s success story.
  • How did Olympia Brown contribute to advance gender equality in the religious sphere?

We hope you found your ideal essay or project topic on US history. Good luck with your assignment!

Further reading:

  • Americanism Essay: Examples, Tips & Topics [2024 Update]
  • 497 Interesting History Topics to Research
  • 460 Excellent Political Topics to Write about in 2024
  • 149 Interesting History Essay Topics and Events to Write about
  • A List of 450 Powerful Social Issues Essay Topics
  • 210 Immigration Essay Topics
  • A List of 175 Interesting Cultural Topics to Write About
  • 512 Research Topics on HumSS (Humanities & Social Sciences)
  • Pre-Columbian to the New Millenium: US History
  • A Brief Guide to Writing the History Paper: Harvard
  • American Civil War: History.com
  • Reconstruction: Encyclopedia Britannica
  • Industrialization and Urbanization in the United States: Oxford Research Encyclopedias
  • The United States in WWI: Khan Academy
  • America Goes to War: The National WWII Museum
  • Controversies: National Council on Public History
  • The 100 Most Significant Americans of All Time: Smithsonian Magazine
  • American History: History Central
  • The 25 Moments From American History That Matter Right Now: Time
  • All Topics: American Historical Association
  • Native American: Library of Congress
  • African American History: National Archives
  • Civil Rights Movement: ADL
  • US 20th Century: Princeton University
  • The Progressive Era: Lumen Learning
  • Timeline: United States History: World Digital Library
  • Explore by Timeline: The New Nation (1783-1860): US General Services Administration
  • The Emergence of Modern America: Smithsonian Institution
  • What Was the Cold War?: National Geographic
  • The Story of the Atomic Bomb: The Ohio State University
  • Continental Feminism: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
  • The Constitution: The White House
  • The US During World War I: Delaware.gov
  • America in the First World War: The British Library
  • Key Events and Figures of Reconstruction: The City University of New York
  • Reconstruction and Its Impact: IDCA
  • 400 Years since Slavery: a Timeline of American History: The Guardian
  • American Revolution Facts: American Battlefield Trust
  • The Presidents of the United States: Constitution Facts
  • What Caused the American Industrial Revolution: Investopedia
  • Reasons Behind the Revolutionary War: NCpedia
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topics to write a history essay on

How to Write a History Essay with Outline, Tips, Examples and More

History Essay

Before we get into how to write a history essay, let's first understand what makes one good. Different people might have different ideas, but there are some basic rules that can help you do well in your studies. In this guide, we won't get into any fancy theories. Instead, we'll give you straightforward tips to help you with historical writing. So, if you're ready to sharpen your writing skills, let our history essay writing service explore how to craft an exceptional paper.

What is a History Essay?

A history essay is an academic assignment where we explore and analyze historical events from the past. We dig into historical stories, figures, and ideas to understand their importance and how they've shaped our world today. History essay writing involves researching, thinking critically, and presenting arguments based on evidence.

Moreover, history papers foster the development of writing proficiency and the ability to communicate complex ideas effectively. They also encourage students to engage with primary and secondary sources, enhancing their research skills and deepening their understanding of historical methodology. Students can benefit from utilizing essay writers services when faced with challenging assignments. These services provide expert assistance and guidance, ensuring that your history papers meet academic standards and accurately reflect your understanding of the subject matter.

History Essay Outline

History Essay Outline

The outline is there to guide you in organizing your thoughts and arguments in your essay about history. With a clear outline, you can explore and explain historical events better. Here's how to make one:

Introduction

  • Hook: Start with an attention-grabbing opening sentence or anecdote related to your topic.
  • Background Information: Provide context on the historical period, event, or theme you'll be discussing.
  • Thesis Statement: Present your main argument or viewpoint, outlining the scope and purpose of your history essay.

Body paragraph 1: Introduction to the Historical Context

  • Provide background information on the historical context of your topic.
  • Highlight key events, figures, or developments leading up to the main focus of your history essay.

Body paragraphs 2-4 (or more): Main Arguments and Supporting Evidence

  • Each paragraph should focus on a specific argument or aspect of your thesis.
  • Present evidence from primary and secondary sources to support each argument.
  • Analyze the significance of the evidence and its relevance to your history paper thesis.

Counterarguments (optional)

  • Address potential counterarguments or alternative perspectives on your topic.
  • Refute opposing viewpoints with evidence and logical reasoning.
  • Summary of Main Points: Recap the main arguments presented in the body paragraphs.
  • Restate Thesis: Reinforce your thesis statement, emphasizing its significance in light of the evidence presented.
  • Reflection: Reflect on the broader implications of your arguments for understanding history.
  • Closing Thought: End your history paper with a thought-provoking statement that leaves a lasting impression on the reader.

References/bibliography

  • List all sources used in your research, formatted according to the citation style required by your instructor (e.g., MLA, APA, Chicago).
  • Include both primary and secondary sources, arranged alphabetically by the author's last name.

Notes (if applicable)

  • Include footnotes or endnotes to provide additional explanations, citations, or commentary on specific points within your history essay.

History Essay Format

Adhering to a specific format is crucial for clarity, coherence, and academic integrity. Here are the key components of a typical history essay format:

Font and Size

  • Use a legible font such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Calibri.
  • The recommended font size is usually 12 points. However, check your instructor's guidelines, as they may specify a different size.
  • Set 1-inch margins on all sides of the page.
  • Double-space the entire essay, including the title, headings, body paragraphs, and references.
  • Avoid extra spacing between paragraphs unless specified otherwise.
  • Align text to the left margin; avoid justifying the text or using a centered alignment.

Title Page (if required):

  • If your instructor requires a title page, include the essay title, your name, the course title, the instructor's name, and the date.
  • Center-align this information vertically and horizontally on the page.
  • Include a header on each page (excluding the title page if applicable) with your last name and the page number, flush right.
  • Some instructors may require a shortened title in the header, usually in all capital letters.
  • Center-align the essay title at the top of the first page (if a title page is not required).
  • Use standard capitalization (capitalize the first letter of each major word).
  • Avoid underlining, italicizing, or bolding the title unless necessary for emphasis.

Paragraph Indentation:

  • Indent the first line of each paragraph by 0.5 inches or use the tab key.
  • Do not insert extra spaces between paragraphs unless instructed otherwise.

Citations and References:

  • Follow the citation style specified by your instructor (e.g., MLA, APA, Chicago).
  • Include in-text citations whenever you use information or ideas from external sources.
  • Provide a bibliography or list of references at the end of your history essay, formatted according to the citation style guidelines.
  • Typically, history essays range from 1000 to 2500 words, but this can vary depending on the assignment.

topics to write a history essay on

How to Write a History Essay?

Historical writing can be an exciting journey through time, but it requires careful planning and organization. In this section, we'll break down the process into simple steps to help you craft a compelling and well-structured history paper.

Analyze the Question

Before diving headfirst into writing, take a moment to dissect the essay question. Read it carefully, and then read it again. You want to get to the core of what it's asking. Look out for keywords that indicate what aspects of the topic you need to focus on. If you're unsure about anything, don't hesitate to ask your instructor for clarification. Remember, understanding how to start a history essay is half the battle won!

Now, let's break this step down:

  • Read the question carefully and identify keywords or phrases.
  • Consider what the question is asking you to do – are you being asked to analyze, compare, contrast, or evaluate?
  • Pay attention to any specific instructions or requirements provided in the question.
  • Take note of the time period or historical events mentioned in the question – this will give you a clue about the scope of your history essay.

Develop a Strategy

With a clear understanding of the essay question, it's time to map out your approach. Here's how to develop your historical writing strategy:

  • Brainstorm ideas : Take a moment to jot down any initial thoughts or ideas that come to mind in response to the history paper question. This can help you generate a list of potential arguments, themes, or points you want to explore in your history essay.
  • Create an outline : Once you have a list of ideas, organize them into a logical structure. Start with a clear introduction that introduces your topic and presents your thesis statement – the main argument or point you'll be making in your history essay. Then, outline the key points or arguments you'll be discussing in each paragraph of the body, making sure they relate back to your thesis. Finally, plan a conclusion that summarizes your main points and reinforces your history paper thesis.
  • Research : Before diving into writing, gather evidence to support your arguments. Use reputable sources such as books, academic journals, and primary documents to gather historical evidence and examples. Take notes as you research, making sure to record the source of each piece of information for proper citation later on.
  • Consider counterarguments : Anticipate potential counterarguments to your history paper thesis and think about how you'll address them in your essay. Acknowledging opposing viewpoints and refuting them strengthens your argument and demonstrates critical thinking.
  • Set realistic goals : Be realistic about the scope of your history essay and the time you have available to complete it. Break down your writing process into manageable tasks, such as researching, drafting, and revising, and set deadlines for each stage to stay on track.

How to Write a History Essay

Start Your Research

Now that you've grasped the history essay topic and outlined your approach, it's time to dive into research. Here's how to start:

  • Ask questions : What do you need to know? What are the key points to explore further? Write down your inquiries to guide your research.
  • Explore diverse sources : Look beyond textbooks. Check academic journals, reliable websites, and primary sources like documents or artifacts.
  • Consider perspectives : Think about different viewpoints on your topic. How have historians analyzed it? Are there controversies or differing interpretations?
  • Take organized notes : Summarize key points, jot down quotes, and record your thoughts and questions. Stay organized using spreadsheets or note-taking apps.
  • Evaluate sources : Consider the credibility and bias of each source. Are they peer-reviewed? Do they represent a particular viewpoint?

Establish a Viewpoint

By establishing a clear viewpoint and supporting arguments, you'll lay the foundation for your compelling historical writing:

  • Review your research : Reflect on the information gathered. What patterns or themes emerge? Which perspectives resonate with you?
  • Formulate a thesis statement : Based on your research, develop a clear and concise thesis that states your argument or interpretation of the topic.
  • Consider counterarguments : Anticipate objections to your history paper thesis. Are there alternative viewpoints or evidence that you need to address?
  • Craft supporting arguments : Outline the main points that support your thesis. Use evidence from your research to strengthen your arguments.
  • Stay flexible : Be open to adjusting your viewpoint as you continue writing and researching. New information may challenge or refine your initial ideas.

Structure Your Essay

Now that you've delved into the depths of researching historical events and established your viewpoint, it's time to craft the skeleton of your essay: its structure. Think of your history essay outline as constructing a sturdy bridge between your ideas and your reader's understanding. How will you lead them from point A to point Z? Will you follow a chronological path through history or perhaps dissect themes that span across time periods?

And don't forget about the importance of your introduction and conclusion—are they framing your narrative effectively, enticing your audience to read your paper, and leaving them with lingering thoughts long after they've turned the final page? So, as you lay the bricks of your history essay's architecture, ask yourself: How can I best lead my audience through the maze of time and thought, leaving them enlightened and enriched on the other side?

Create an Engaging Introduction

Creating an engaging introduction is crucial for capturing your reader's interest right from the start. But how do you do it? Think about what makes your topic fascinating. Is there a surprising fact or a compelling story you can share? Maybe you could ask a thought-provoking question that gets people thinking. Consider why your topic matters—what lessons can we learn from history?

Also, remember to explain what your history essay will be about and why it's worth reading. What will grab your reader's attention and make them want to learn more? How can you make your essay relevant and intriguing right from the beginning?

Develop Coherent Paragraphs

Once you've established your introduction, the next step is to develop coherent paragraphs that effectively communicate your ideas. Each paragraph should focus on one main point or argument, supported by evidence or examples from your research. Start by introducing the main idea in a topic sentence, then provide supporting details or evidence to reinforce your point.

Make sure to use transition words and phrases to guide your reader smoothly from one idea to the next, creating a logical flow throughout your history essay. Additionally, consider the organization of your paragraphs—is there a clear progression of ideas that builds upon each other? Are your paragraphs unified around a central theme or argument?

Conclude Effectively

Concluding your history essay effectively is just as important as starting it off strong. In your conclusion, you want to wrap up your main points while leaving a lasting impression on your reader. Begin by summarizing the key points you've made throughout your history essay, reminding your reader of the main arguments and insights you've presented.

Then, consider the broader significance of your topic—what implications does it have for our understanding of history or for the world today? You might also want to reflect on any unanswered questions or areas for further exploration. Finally, end with a thought-provoking statement or a call to action that encourages your reader to continue thinking about the topic long after they've finished reading.

Reference Your Sources

Referencing your sources is essential for maintaining the integrity of your history essay and giving credit to the scholars and researchers who have contributed to your understanding of the topic. Depending on the citation style required (such as MLA, APA, or Chicago), you'll need to format your references accordingly. Start by compiling a list of all the sources you've consulted, including books, articles, websites, and any other materials used in your research.

Then, as you write your history essay, make sure to properly cite each source whenever you use information or ideas that are not your own. This includes direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. Remember to include all necessary information for each source, such as author names, publication dates, and page numbers, as required by your chosen citation style.

Review and Ask for Advice

As you near the completion of your history essay writing, it's crucial to take a step back and review your work with a critical eye. Reflect on the clarity and coherence of your arguments—are they logically organized and effectively supported by evidence? Consider the strength of your introduction and conclusion—do they effectively capture the reader's attention and leave a lasting impression? Take the time to carefully proofread your history essay for any grammatical errors or typos that may detract from your overall message.

Furthermore, seeking advice from peers, mentors, or instructors can provide valuable insights and help identify areas for improvement. Consider sharing your essay with someone whose feedback you trust and respect, and be open to constructive criticism. Ask specific questions about areas you're unsure about or where you feel your history essay may be lacking. If you need further assistance, don't hesitate to reach out and ask for help. You can even consider utilizing services that offer to write a discussion post for me , where you can engage in meaningful conversations with others about your essay topic and receive additional guidance and support.

History Essay Example

In this section, we offer an example of a history essay examining the impact of the Industrial Revolution on society. This essay demonstrates how historical analysis and critical thinking are applied in academic writing. By exploring this specific event, you can observe how historical evidence is used to build a cohesive argument and draw meaningful conclusions.

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FAQs about History Essay Writing

How to write a history essay introduction, how to write a conclusion for a history essay, how to write a good history essay.

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How to write an introduction for a history essay

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Every essay needs to begin with an introductory paragraph. It needs to be the first paragraph the marker reads.

While your introduction paragraph might be the first of the paragraphs you write, this is not the only way to do it.

You can choose to write your introduction after you have written the rest of your essay.

This way, you will know what you have argued, and this might make writing the introduction easier.

Either approach is fine. If you do write your introduction first, ensure that you go back and refine it once you have completed your essay. 

What is an ‘introduction paragraph’?

An introductory paragraph is a single paragraph at the start of your essay that prepares your reader for the argument you are going to make in your body paragraphs .

It should provide all of the necessary historical information about your topic and clearly state your argument so that by the end of the paragraph, the marker knows how you are going to structure the rest of your essay.

In general, you should never use quotes from sources in your introduction.

Introduction paragraph structure

While your introduction paragraph does not have to be as long as your body paragraphs , it does have a specific purpose, which you must fulfil.

A well-written introduction paragraph has the following four-part structure (summarised by the acronym BHES).

B – Background sentences

H – Hypothesis

E – Elaboration sentences

S - Signpost sentence

Each of these elements are explained in further detail, with examples, below:

1. Background sentences

The first two or three sentences of your introduction should provide a general introduction to the historical topic which your essay is about. This is done so that when you state your hypothesis , your reader understands the specific point you are arguing about.

Background sentences explain the important historical period, dates, people, places, events and concepts that will be mentioned later in your essay. This information should be drawn from your background research . 

Example background sentences:

Middle Ages (Year 8 Level)

Castles were an important component of Medieval Britain from the time of the Norman conquest in 1066 until they were phased out in the 15 th and 16 th centuries. Initially introduced as wooden motte and bailey structures on geographical strongpoints, they were rapidly replaced by stone fortresses which incorporated sophisticated defensive designs to improve the defenders’ chances of surviving prolonged sieges.

WWI (Year 9 Level)

The First World War began in 1914 following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The subsequent declarations of war from most of Europe drew other countries into the conflict, including Australia. The Australian Imperial Force joined the war as part of Britain’s armed forces and were dispatched to locations in the Middle East and Western Europe.

Civil Rights (Year 10 Level)

The 1967 Referendum sought to amend the Australian Constitution in order to change the legal standing of the indigenous people in Australia. The fact that 90% of Australians voted in favour of the proposed amendments has been attributed to a series of significant events and people who were dedicated to the referendum’s success.

Ancient Rome (Year 11/12 Level)  

In the late second century BC, the Roman novus homo Gaius Marius became one of the most influential men in the Roman Republic. Marius gained this authority through his victory in the Jugurthine War, with his defeat of Jugurtha in 106 BC, and his triumph over the invading Germanic tribes in 101 BC, when he crushed the Teutones at the Battle of Aquae Sextiae (102 BC) and the Cimbri at the Battle of Vercellae (101 BC). Marius also gained great fame through his election to the consulship seven times.

2. Hypothesis

Once you have provided historical context for your essay in your background sentences, you need to state your hypothesis .

A hypothesis is a single sentence that clearly states the argument that your essay will be proving in your body paragraphs .

A good hypothesis contains both the argument and the reasons in support of your argument. 

Example hypotheses:

Medieval castles were designed with features that nullified the superior numbers of besieging armies but were ultimately made obsolete by the development of gunpowder artillery.

Australian soldiers’ opinion of the First World War changed from naïve enthusiasm to pessimistic realism as a result of the harsh realities of modern industrial warfare.

The success of the 1967 Referendum was a direct result of the efforts of First Nations leaders such as Charles Perkins, Faith Bandler and the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

Gaius Marius was the most one of the most significant personalities in the 1 st century BC due to his effect on the political, military and social structures of the Roman state.

3. Elaboration sentences

Once you have stated your argument in your hypothesis , you need to provide particular information about how you’re going to prove your argument.

Your elaboration sentences should be one or two sentences that provide specific details about how you’re going to cover the argument in your three body paragraphs.

You might also briefly summarise two or three of your main points.

Finally, explain any important key words, phrases or concepts that you’ve used in your hypothesis, you’ll need to do this in your elaboration sentences.

Example elaboration sentences:

By the height of the Middle Ages, feudal lords were investing significant sums of money by incorporating concentric walls and guard towers to maximise their defensive potential. These developments were so successful that many medieval armies avoided sieges in the late period.

Following Britain's official declaration of war on Germany, young Australian men voluntarily enlisted into the army, which was further encouraged by government propaganda about the moral justifications for the conflict. However, following the initial engagements on the Gallipoli peninsula, enthusiasm declined.

The political activity of key indigenous figures and the formation of activism organisations focused on indigenous resulted in a wider spread of messages to the general Australian public. The generation of powerful images and speeches has been frequently cited by modern historians as crucial to the referendum results.

While Marius is best known for his military reforms, it is the subsequent impacts of this reform on the way other Romans approached the attainment of magistracies and how public expectations of military leaders changed that had the longest impacts on the late republican period.

4. Signpost sentence

The final sentence of your introduction should prepare the reader for the topic of your first body paragraph. The main purpose of this sentence is to provide cohesion between your introductory paragraph and you first body paragraph .

Therefore, a signpost sentence indicates where you will begin proving the argument that you set out in your hypothesis and usually states the importance of the first point that you’re about to make. 

Example signpost sentences:

The early development of castles is best understood when examining their military purpose.

The naïve attitudes of those who volunteered in 1914 can be clearly seen in the personal letters and diaries that they themselves wrote.

The significance of these people is evident when examining the lack of political representation the indigenous people experience in the early half of the 20 th century.

The origin of Marius’ later achievements was his military reform in 107 BC, which occurred when he was first elected as consul.

Putting it all together

Once you have written all four parts of the BHES structure, you should have a completed introduction paragraph. In the examples above, we have shown each part separately. Below you will see the completed paragraphs so that you can appreciate what an introduction should look like.

Example introduction paragraphs: 

Castles were an important component of Medieval Britain from the time of the Norman conquest in 1066 until they were phased out in the 15th and 16th centuries. Initially introduced as wooden motte and bailey structures on geographical strongpoints, they were rapidly replaced by stone fortresses which incorporated sophisticated defensive designs to improve the defenders’ chances of surviving prolonged sieges. Medieval castles were designed with features that nullified the superior numbers of besieging armies, but were ultimately made obsolete by the development of gunpowder artillery. By the height of the Middle Ages, feudal lords were investing significant sums of money by incorporating concentric walls and guard towers to maximise their defensive potential. These developments were so successful that many medieval armies avoided sieges in the late period. The early development of castles is best understood when examining their military purpose.

The First World War began in 1914 following the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The subsequent declarations of war from most of Europe drew other countries into the conflict, including Australia. The Australian Imperial Force joined the war as part of Britain’s armed forces and were dispatched to locations in the Middle East and Western Europe. Australian soldiers’ opinion of the First World War changed from naïve enthusiasm to pessimistic realism as a result of the harsh realities of modern industrial warfare. Following Britain's official declaration of war on Germany, young Australian men voluntarily enlisted into the army, which was further encouraged by government propaganda about the moral justifications for the conflict. However, following the initial engagements on the Gallipoli peninsula, enthusiasm declined. The naïve attitudes of those who volunteered in 1914 can be clearly seen in the personal letters and diaries that they themselves wrote.

The 1967 Referendum sought to amend the Australian Constitution in order to change the legal standing of the indigenous people in Australia. The fact that 90% of Australians voted in favour of the proposed amendments has been attributed to a series of significant events and people who were dedicated to the referendum’s success. The success of the 1967 Referendum was a direct result of the efforts of First Nations leaders such as Charles Perkins, Faith Bandler and the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders. The political activity of key indigenous figures and the formation of activism organisations focused on indigenous resulted in a wider spread of messages to the general Australian public. The generation of powerful images and speeches has been frequently cited by modern historians as crucial to the referendum results. The significance of these people is evident when examining the lack of political representation the indigenous people experience in the early half of the 20th century.

In the late second century BC, the Roman novus homo Gaius Marius became one of the most influential men in the Roman Republic. Marius gained this authority through his victory in the Jugurthine War, with his defeat of Jugurtha in 106 BC, and his triumph over the invading Germanic tribes in 101 BC, when he crushed the Teutones at the Battle of Aquae Sextiae (102 BC) and the Cimbri at the Battle of Vercellae (101 BC). Marius also gained great fame through his election to the consulship seven times. Gaius Marius was the most one of the most significant personalities in the 1st century BC due to his effect on the political, military and social structures of the Roman state. While Marius is best known for his military reforms, it is the subsequent impacts of this reform on the way other Romans approached the attainment of magistracies and how public expectations of military leaders changed that had the longest impacts on the late republican period. The origin of Marius’ later achievements was his military reform in 107 BC, which occurred when he was first elected as consul.

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 113 perfect persuasive essay topics for any assignment.

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Do you need to write a persuasive essay but aren’t sure what topic to focus on? Were you thrilled when your teacher said you could write about whatever you wanted but are now overwhelmed by the possibilities? We’re here to help!

Read on for a list of 113 top-notch persuasive essay topics, organized into ten categories. To help get you started, we also discuss what a persuasive essay is, how to choose a great topic, and what tips to keep in mind as you write your persuasive essay.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

In a persuasive essay, you attempt to convince readers to agree with your point of view on an argument. For example, an essay analyzing changes in Italian art during the Renaissance wouldn’t be a persuasive essay, because there’s no argument, but an essay where you argue that Italian art reached its peak during the Renaissance would be a persuasive essay because you’re trying to get your audience to agree with your viewpoint.

Persuasive and argumentative essays both try to convince readers to agree with the author, but the two essay types have key differences. Argumentative essays show a more balanced view of the issue and discuss both sides. Persuasive essays focus more heavily on the side the author agrees with. They also often include more of the author’s opinion than argumentative essays, which tend to use only facts and data to support their argument.

All persuasive essays have the following:

  • Introduction: Introduces the topic, explains why it’s important, and ends with the thesis.
  • Thesis: A sentence that sums up what the essay be discussing and what your stance on the issue is.
  • Reasons you believe your side of the argument: Why do you support the side you do? Typically each main point will have its own body paragraph.
  • Evidence supporting your argument: Facts or examples to back up your main points. Even though your opinion is allowed in persuasive essays more than most other essays, having concrete examples will make a stronger argument than relying on your opinion alone.
  • Conclusion: Restatement of thesis, summary of main points, and a recap of why the issue is important.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Essay Topic?

Theoretically, you could write a persuasive essay about any subject under the sun, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you should. Certain topics are easier to write a strong persuasive essay on, and below are tips to follow when deciding what you should write about.

It’s a Topic You Care About

Obviously, it’s possible to write an essay about a topic you find completely boring. You’ve probably done it! However, if possible, it’s always better to choose a topic that you care about and are interested in. When this is the case, you’ll find doing the research more enjoyable, writing the essay easier, and your writing will likely be better because you’ll be more passionate about and informed on the topic.

You Have Enough Evidence to Support Your Argument

Just being passionate about a subject isn’t enough to make it a good persuasive essay topic, though. You need to make sure your argument is complex enough to have at least two potential sides to root for, and you need to be able to back up your side with evidence and examples. Even though persuasive essays allow your opinion to feature more than many other essays, you still need concrete evidence to back up your claims, or you’ll end up with a weak essay.

For example, you may passionately believe that mint chocolate chip ice cream is the best ice cream flavor (I agree!), but could you really write an entire essay on this? What would be your reasons for believing mint chocolate chip is the best (besides the fact that it’s delicious)? How would you support your belief? Have enough studies been done on preferred ice cream flavors to support an entire essay? When choosing a persuasive essay idea, you want to find the right balance between something you care about (so you can write well on it) and something the rest of the world cares about (so you can reference evidence to strengthen your position).

It’s a Manageable Topic

Bigger isn’t always better, especially with essay topics. While it may seem like a great idea to choose a huge, complex topic to write about, you’ll likely struggle to sift through all the information and different sides of the issue and winnow them down to one streamlined essay. For example, choosing to write an essay about how WWII impacted American life more than WWI wouldn’t be a great idea because you’d need to analyze all the impacts of both the wars in numerous areas of American life. It’d be a huge undertaking. A better idea would be to choose one impact on American life the wars had (such as changes in female employment) and focus on that. Doing so will make researching and writing your persuasive essay much more feasible.

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List of 113 Good Persuasive Essay Topics

Below are over 100 persuasive essay ideas, organized into ten categories. When you find an idea that piques your interest, you’ll choose one side of it to argue for in your essay. For example, if you choose the topic, “should fracking be legal?” you’d decide whether you believe fracking should be legal or illegal, then you’d write an essay arguing all the reasons why your audience should agree with you.

Arts/Culture

  • Should students be required to learn an instrument in school?
  • Did the end of Game of Thrones fit with the rest of the series?
  • Can music be an effective way to treat mental illness?
  • With e-readers so popular, have libraries become obsolete?
  • Are the Harry Potter books more popular than they deserve to be?
  • Should music with offensive language come with a warning label?
  • What’s the best way for museums to get more people to visit?
  • Should students be able to substitute an art or music class for a PE class in school?
  • Are the Kardashians good or bad role models for young people?
  • Should people in higher income brackets pay more taxes?
  • Should all high school students be required to take a class on financial literacy?
  • Is it possible to achieve the American dream, or is it only a myth?
  • Is it better to spend a summer as an unpaid intern at a prestigious company or as a paid worker at a local store/restaurant?
  • Should the United States impose more or fewer tariffs?
  • Should college graduates have their student loans forgiven?
  • Should restaurants eliminate tipping and raise staff wages instead?
  • Should students learn cursive writing in school?
  • Which is more important: PE class or music class?
  • Is it better to have year-round school with shorter breaks throughout the year?
  • Should class rank be abolished in schools?
  • Should students be taught sex education in school?
  • Should students be able to attend public universities for free?
  • What’s the most effective way to change the behavior of school bullies?
  • Are the SAT and ACT accurate ways to measure intelligence?
  • Should students be able to learn sign language instead of a foreign language?
  • Do the benefits of Greek life at colleges outweigh the negatives?
  • Does doing homework actually help students learn more?
  • Why do students in many other countries score higher than American students on math exams?
  • Should parents/teachers be able to ban certain books from schools?
  • What’s the best way to reduce cheating in school?
  • Should colleges take a student’s race into account when making admissions decisions?
  • Should there be limits to free speech?
  • Should students be required to perform community service to graduate high school?
  • Should convicted felons who have completed their sentence be allowed to vote?
  • Should gun ownership be more tightly regulated?
  • Should recycling be made mandatory?
  • Should employers be required to offer paid leave to new parents?
  • Are there any circumstances where torture should be allowed?
  • Should children under the age of 18 be able to get plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons?
  • Should white supremacy groups be allowed to hold rallies in public places?
  • Does making abortion illegal make women more or less safe?
  • Does foreign aid actually help developing countries?
  • Are there times a person’s freedom of speech should be curtailed?
  • Should people over a certain age not be allowed to adopt children?

Government/Politics

  • Should the minimum voting age be raised/lowered/kept the same?
  • Should Puerto Rico be granted statehood?
  • Should the United States build a border wall with Mexico?
  • Who should be the next person printed on American banknotes?
  • Should the United States’ military budget be reduced?
  • Did China’s one child policy have overall positive or negative impacts on the country?
  • Should DREAMers be granted US citizenship?
  • Is national security more important than individual privacy?
  • What responsibility does the government have to help homeless people?
  • Should the electoral college be abolished?
  • Should the US increase or decrease the number of refugees it allows in each year?
  • Should privately-run prisons be abolished?
  • Who was the most/least effective US president?
  • Will Brexit end up helping or harming the UK?

body-sparkler-us-flag

  • What’s the best way to reduce the spread of Ebola?
  • Is the Keto diet a safe and effective way to lose weight?
  • Should the FDA regulate vitamins and supplements more strictly?
  • Should public schools require all students who attend to be vaccinated?
  • Is eating genetically modified food safe?
  • What’s the best way to make health insurance more affordable?
  • What’s the best way to lower the teen pregnancy rate?
  • Should recreational marijuana be legalized nationwide?
  • Should birth control pills be available without a prescription?
  • Should pregnant women be forbidden from buying cigarettes and alcohol?
  • Why has anxiety increased in adolescents?
  • Are low-carb or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • What caused the destruction of the USS Maine?
  • Was King Arthur a mythical legend or actual Dark Ages king?
  • Was the US justified in dropping atomic bombs during WWII?
  • What was the primary cause of the Rwandan genocide?
  • What happened to the settlers of the Roanoke colony?
  • Was disagreement over slavery the primary cause of the US Civil War?
  • What has caused the numerous disappearances in the Bermuda triangle?
  • Should nuclear power be banned?
  • Is scientific testing on animals necessary?
  • Do zoos help or harm animals?
  • Should scientists be allowed to clone humans?
  • Should animals in circuses be banned?
  • Should fracking be legal?
  • Should people be allowed to keep exotic animals as pets?
  • What’s the best way to reduce illegal poaching in Africa?
  • What is the best way to reduce the impact of global warming?
  • Should euthanasia be legalized?
  • Is there legitimate evidence of extraterrestrial life?
  • Should people be banned from owning aggressive dog breeds?
  • Should the United States devote more money towards space exploration?
  • Should the government subsidize renewable forms of energy?
  • Is solar energy worth the cost?
  • Should stem cells be used in medicine?
  • Is it right for the US to leave the Paris Climate Agreement?
  • Should athletes who fail a drug test receive a lifetime ban from the sport?
  • Should college athletes receive a salary?
  • Should the NFL do more to prevent concussions in players?
  • Do PE classes help students stay in shape?
  • Should horse racing be banned?
  • Should cheerleading be considered a sport?
  • Should children younger than 18 be allowed to play tackle football?
  • Are the costs of hosting an Olympic Games worth it?
  • Can online schools be as effective as traditional schools?
  • Do violent video games encourage players to be violent in real life?
  • Should facial recognition technology be banned?
  • Does excessive social media use lead to depression/anxiety?
  • Has the rise of translation technology made knowing multiple languages obsolete?
  • Was Steve Jobs a visionary or just a great marketer?
  • Should social media be banned for children younger than a certain age?
  • Which 21st-century invention has had the largest impact on society?
  • Are ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft good or bad for society?
  • Should Facebook have done more to protect the privacy of its users?
  • Will technology end up increasing or decreasing inequality worldwide?

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Tips for Writing a Strong Persuasive Essay

After you’ve chosen the perfect topic for your persuasive essay, your work isn’t over. Follow the three tips below to create a top-notch essay.

Do Your Research

Your argument will fall apart if you don’t fully understand the issue you’re discussing or you overlook an important piece of it. Readers won’t be convinced by someone who doesn’t know the subject, and you likely won’t persuade any of them to begin supporting your viewpoint. Before you begin writing a single word of your essay, research your topic thoroughly. Study different sources, learn about the different sides of the argument, ask anyone who’s an expert on the topic what their opinion is, etc. You might be tempted to start writing right away, but by doing your research, you’ll make the writing process much easier when the time comes.

Make Your Thesis Perfect

Your thesis is the most important sentence in your persuasive essay. Just by reading that single sentence, your audience should know exactly what topic you’ll be discussing and where you stand on the issue. You want your thesis to be crystal clear and to accurately set up the rest of your essay. Asking classmates or your teacher to look it over before you begin writing the rest of your essay can be a big help if you’re not entirely confident in your thesis.

Consider the Other Side

You’ll spend most of your essay focusing on your side of the argument since that’s what you want readers to come away believing. However, don’t think that means you can ignore other sides of the issue. In your essay, be sure to discuss the other side’s argument, as well as why you believe this view is weak or untrue. Researching all the different viewpoints and including them in your essay will increase the quality of your writing by making your essay more complete and nuanced.

Summary: Persuasive Essay Ideas

Good persuasive essay topics can be difficult to come up with, but in this guide we’ve created a list of 113 excellent essay topics for you to browse. The best persuasive essay ideas will be those that you are interested in, have enough evidence to support your argument, and aren’t too complicated to be summarized in an essay.

After you’ve chosen your essay topic, keep these three tips in mind when you begin writing:

  • Do your research
  • Make your thesis perfect
  • Consider the other side

What's Next?

Need ideas for a research paper topic as well? Our guide to research paper topics has over 100 topics in ten categories so you can be sure to find the perfect topic for you.

Thinking about taking an AP English class? Read our guide on AP English classes to learn whether you should take AP English Language or AP English Literature (or both!)

Deciding between the SAT or ACT? Find out for sure which you will do the best on . Also read a detailed comparison between the two tests .

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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The Impact and Mechanics of Propaganda: Case Studies Across History and Media

This essay about the pervasive role of propaganda throughout history examines how it shapes societies, politics, and media. It discusses historical instances, such as Nazi Germany and the Cold War, highlighting propaganda’s role in shaping ideologies and manipulating public perception. The text also explores propaganda’s evolution in the digital age and its potential for both harmful manipulation and beneficial advocacy. Finally, it advocates for ethical propaganda use to ensure it supports truth and democratic values.

How it works

Propaganda, both subtle and potent, has intricately woven itself into the fabric of human history, profoundly influencing societies, shaping political arenas, and altering media narratives worldwide. Its pervasive impact reverberates through time and space, molding beliefs, directing ideologies, and steering historical events. A deeper examination into the complex machinery and diverse instances of propaganda reveals a compelling narrative of human persuasion, where facts and distortions often engage in a nuanced and elusive dance.

At its core, propaganda functions as a sophisticated ensemble, expertly directing emotions, beliefs, and prejudices to create a powerful symphony of influence that deeply resonates with its target audience.

It employs the selective disclosure of facts, the crafting of compelling narratives, and the strategic vilification of opponents, enabling propagandists to shape perceptions as deftly as sculptors mold their creations.

Historically, one of the most chilling examples of propaganda is seen in Nazi Germany during Adolf Hitler’s reign. Spearheaded by Joseph Goebbels, the Reich Minister of Propaganda, the regime skillfully used media tools such as radio, film, and print, along with massive public gatherings, to propagate a terrifying narrative of hate and deception. This propaganda championed Aryan supremacy, demonized Jews and other marginalized communities, and exalted the Nazi ideology, ultimately facilitating horrific acts of violence and marking one of humanity’s darkest periods.

Meanwhile, the Cold War era saw the American and Soviet governments engage in intense propaganda efforts. The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) covertly supported cultural endeavors, media, and political movements to promote capitalism and democracy and counteract communism. Conversely, the Soviet Union employed its vast media network to promote Marxist-Leninist ideals and depict the West as corrupt and greedy.

However, the reach of propaganda extends beyond political spheres, infiltrating commercial and social domains. In advertising, it transforms into a tool of consumer persuasion, drawing individuals towards brands through emotionally charged narratives and compelling visuals. Likewise, social media has become a modern arena for ideological conflicts, with algorithms often prioritizing sensational content that may lack factual accuracy.

In today’s digital realm, the dynamics of propaganda have evolved dramatically. The spread of misinformation and disinformation risks overwhelming genuine discourse, with advanced technologies like deepfakes further obscuring the line between reality and fabrication, fostering doubt and discord.

Nevertheless, there remains a beacon of hope. Propaganda is not inherently malevolent and can be used to promote beneficial causes such as public health, social justice, and humanitarian efforts. The ethical application of propaganda, however, requires a commitment to transparency, integrity, and truth, ensuring it serves to enlighten rather than deceive.

Ultimately, the fight against manipulative propaganda is a crusade for humanity’s soul, aiming to wrest control of the narrative from the hands of deceit and reestablish truth’s dominance in public discourse. By remaining vigilant, embracing education, and adhering to democratic values and personal freedoms, society can navigate towards a future lit by reason and understanding.

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PapersOwl.com. (2024). The Impact and Mechanics of Propaganda: Case Studies Across History and Media . [Online]. Available at: https://papersowl.com/examples/the-impact-and-mechanics-of-propaganda-case-studies-across-history-and-media/ [Accessed: 14-May-2024]

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