ELA Brave and True by Marilyn Yung

DAR Patriots of the American Revolution Essay Contest

dar essay contest 2022 topic

High school essay contest

Looking for a high school writing contest this fall? Look no further than the Daughters of the American Revolution’s (DAR) Patriots of the American Revolution Essay Contest. In my previous teaching position, a few of my high school students participated in this contest as part of our Writer’s Workshop routine. Entering the contest was one of the options they could choose for their portfolios.

If you’re not familiar with the DAR, here’s a brief intro from the organization’s website: “The DAR, founded in 1890 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a non-profit, non-political volunteer women’s service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America’s future through better education for children.”

dar essay contest 2022 topic

My students have had great success with the  DAR Patriots of the American Revolution Essay Contest.  Within the last three years, two of my students have written essays that won at both the local and state level, where monetary prizes were awarded. Needless to say, I’m very proud of those students!

This year’s 2022-2023 contest guidelines sheet details the topic, length (800-1,200 for 6-8 grades), format, and bibliography details. (Note: Each DAR chapter designates their own individual due dates. Check with your local chapter by locating it here on the  national DAR website’s chapter locater. )

Here’s the high school essay prompt:

“Select a figure from the era of the American Revolution (1773-1783). Discuss how he or she influenced the course of the American Revolution, who he or she was and his/her contribution to the founding of a new nation. Your figure may be any person, whether a well-known figure or an everyday man, woman or child who supported the American Revolution in ways large or small.”

With that prompt in mind, here’s my advice to your students:

Choose a lesser known patriot. Go beyond the founding fathers to find and write about a patriot whom the judges won’t be as familiar with. My student who won at state last year, for example, wrote about the patriot Nancy Hart.

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Download the contest guidelines by clicking the button below:

And here’s my last tip:.

Tell your students to get creative and go beyond the traditional informative essay. Blend genres, combining, for example, a journal entry with a biographical piece.

I encourage you to try the DAR Patriots of the American Revolution High School Contest with your high school students. It was a mainstay in my classes.

Marilyn Yung

Thanks for reading!

Have you ever tried a DAR contest? Leave a comment below or send me a message via my  Contact Page.  If you need more info, please ask. I’ll be glad to help you however I can.

I thoroughly believe that  writing contests  can infuse ELA with relevance and a dash of project-based learning. Whenever students know their words will enter “the real world” and be reviewed by real people, it makes them take the work more seriously.

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Need a new poetry idea?

Enter your email below and I’ll send you this PDF file that will teach your students to write Treasured Object Poems , one of my favorite poem activities. I know your students will enjoy it!

Image shows readers the paper I'll send for signing up for my email list. The handout gives instructions for a Treasured Object poem.

By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with me (the site owner) and Mailchimp to receive occasional emails. Obviously, you can use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt out at any time.

Looking for something specific?

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Book Bentos: My First Attempt

girl standing in shower of balloons

Enthusiasm in the High School Classroom

Walter Mitty Movie Guide product image

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty: A Movie Guide

dar essay contest 2022 topic

ELA Brave and True

Featured Photo by  Josh Willink  from  Pexels

Share this:

  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)
  • Click to print (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)
  • Click to email a link to a friend (Opens in new window)

Published by Marilyn Yung

Writes | Teaches | Not sure where one ends and the other begins. View more posts

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Discover more from ela brave and true by marilyn yung.

Subscribe now to keep reading and get access to the full archive.

Type your email…

Continue reading

  • Middlefield
  • Strawberry Park
  • Desert Hills
  • Avery Ranch
  • Independence
  • Pond Springs
  • Salt Lake City
  • Traverse Mountain
  • West Jordan

Challenger School 2021 National Blue Ribbon School Awardee

Wyoming Daughters Of The American Revolution

Essay Contests

The Davey Jackson Chapter NSDAR participates in the annual American History Essay Contest for students in grades 5 through 8.   In 2021, in preparation for the 250th anniversary of the nation’s founding, the Davey Jackson Chapter NSDAR will also participate in a new essay contest for high school students focused on figures of the American Revolution.   Details for each of these contests follows.  

*   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *

Celebrate America’s History!

Are you in grades 5 through 8? You are invited to participate in the American History Essay Contest

Topic for 2021-2022

November 11, 2021, marks the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Imagine that you had a brother who lost his life on the battlefields of France during World War I. You and your family attended the November 11, 1921, dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Washington, D.C. Describe what this meant to you and your family. Why is it important to remember those who gave their lives to serve our nation?

Title of Essay:

“the tomb of the unknown soldier””.

Open to Grades 5 through 8 Length: 300-600 words (grade 5); 600-1,000 words (grades 6, 7, and 8)

One winner will be selected by the Davey Jackson Chapter for each grade level .   All entrants to this year’s contest will receive a certificate and grade-level winners will also receive a medal and monetary award.  All winning essays selected by our chapter will advance to the Wyoming state level competition.  The Wyoming state winner from each grade will advance to the divisional level. The divisional winners will advance to the national level where the winners are announced. All National winners will receive a certificate, medal and a monetary award.    Deadline for submission to the Davey Jackson Chapter is December 10, 2021. You can download official contest rules by clicking: ( 2021-22-AHEC_info )  

Patriots of the American Revolution

Dar high school essay contest.

Open to Grades 9 through 12 Length: 800 to 1,200 words

Topic: Select a figure from the era of the American Revolution (1773 – 1783). Discuss how he or she influenced the course of the American Revolution, who he or she was and his/her contribution to the founding of a new nation. Figures may be any person, whether a well-known figure or an everyday man, woman or child who supported the American Revolution in ways large or small.

Students are encouraged to use primary sources (i.e., immediate, first-hand accounts such as letters, diaries, speeches or newspaper reports) for their research, lesser well-known figures are acceptable, but subjects must have been actual participants, i.e. not fictionalized.

All entrants to this year’s contest will receive a certificate.  A single winner will be selected by the Davey Jackson Chapter and will receive a medal and monetary award.  The chapter winner will advance to the Wyoming state level competition.  The Wyoming state winner will advance to the divisional level. The divisional winner will advance to the national level. The National winner will receive a certificate, pin and monetary award.   

Deadline for submission to Davey Jackson Chapter is December 10, 2021. You can download official contest rules by clicking: ( Patriot_Contest_Info )

Have questions?  

Please contact the Davey Jackson Historian. [email protected]

We look forward to seeing your entries!

dar essay contest 2022 topic

DAR  Library

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Patriot Database

dar essay contest 2022 topic

America 250 Celebration

dar essay contest 2022 topic

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Santa Monica Chapter, NSDAR

Santa Monica, California

  • Chapter Activities and Projects
  • Contests and Awards
  • Our Patriot Ancestors
  • Chapter History
  • Member Login

Scholarships, Contests and Awards

For further details and deadlines, please contact our chapter regent .  , dar scholarships.

dar essay contest 2022 topic

For details on some of the National scholarships offered, go to the NSDAR Scholarship page .  To access the DAR Scholarship Committee's online scholarship application portal,  click here .  DAR members should notify their chapter of their participation.  Entrants who are non-DAR members must be sponsored by a DAR Chapter. Please contact the regent for more information. 

The California State Society DAR (CSSDAR) scholarship for Native Americans is awarded annually. Contact the Chapter Regent to notify her of your application and follow the detailed directions on each form below. 1.  American Indians Committee California Indian Scholarship Information 2. American Indians Committee California Indian Scholarship Application 3. American Indians Committee California Indian Scholarship Financial Need Form

Constitution Week Poster Contest

DAR and non-DAR members are invited to participate in the Constitution Week Poster Contest. So, grab your favorite art tools and plan your project!  All entries must be received by the chapter regent by January 1.  Please inform the regent before beginning.

  • The winning poster will be printed in the spring of 2024 and offered for sale at the DAR store.
  • For this year's theme, the poster should illustrate/celebrate the spirit or meaning of the U.S. Constitution. .
  • For the most recent Constitution Week Poster Contest Guidelines and form, please contact the Regent.

DAR American History Essay Contest

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Chapters may reach out to students in the community and do not need to go through just the schools; libraries, church and youth organizations can also participate, but please stay within the state of your chapter.

One essay at each grade level can be selected as the chapter winner and forwarded to the state competition .  DAR chapters will then send the winner's essay, title sheet found in forms, and three judges sheets also found in forms, by email to the State Chairman American History for state competition.  For more information, please visit the NSDAR's  Essay Contests  webpage.  This contest is conducted without regard to race, religion, sex, or national origin.  

The TOPIC for 2023-2024

“The Stars and Stripes Forever" --- On May 14, 1897, John Philip Sousa played his new march, “The Stars and Stripes Forever.”  This song would become the national march of the United States on December 11, 1987. Imagine it is 1897 and you are a newspaper reporter for The Philadelphia Times. Your newspaper editor has asked you to write an article about the new song performed that day. Your article needs to tell about Sousa’s life and the story behind the song. It is the first performance of the song, so make sure your article includes thoughts about the music and how the audience reacts to what was seen and heard that day.

Title of Essay:  Stars & Stripes Forever Length 300-1,000 words (depending on grade level, please check forms) Please note that the entire essay must be the student’s original work. This includes all research, writing, and editing, which must be done by the student only and not by a parent, teacher, tutor, or other helper. Essays not following these guidelines will be disqualified.

AMERICAN HISTORY CONTEST FLYER (AHC1004)  AMERICAN HISTORY CONTEST INFORMATION  (AHC1000) AHC Study Guide - Contact your local DAR Chapter AHC JUDGE'S SCORING SHEET (AHC1001) AHC Electronic Contest Submission Form (AHC1008) - DAR USE ONLY (available at State level) American History Committee Essay Contests Cover Sheet and Signature Form (AHC1009) - DAR USE ONLY (available at State level)

-----------------------------------------

Deadlines for Essay Contests: Schools to Chapters: November 6 Chapters to District: December 4 Districts to State: January 2 States to Divisions: February 15 Divisions to National: March 15

------------------------------------------

Patriots of the American Revolution DAR High School Essay Contest

In 2021, NSDAR established a new high school-level essay contest focused on figures of the American Revolution, in preparation for the 250th anniversary of the nation’s founding. 

The contest is open to students in grades 9th -12th in public, private, or parochial schools, or those who are in registered home school programs. All grades will be judged together, with one chapter winner chosen to move on to the next stage of judging .  This contest is conducted without regard to race, religion, sex, or national origin.   For more information, please visit the NSDAR's  Essay Contests  webpage.  Please contact your local DAR Chapter for more resources and to let them know you'd like to participate.

The TOPIC for 2023-2024: 

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Students are encouraged to use primary sources (i.e., immediate, first-hand accounts such as letters, diaries, speeches, or newspaper reports) for their research. Lesser well-known figures are acceptable, but subjects must have been actual participants, i.e. not fictionalized.

Patriots of the American Revolution DAR Essay Contest Suggested Reading Resources (these are a few suggestions of the many resources available):       Liberty’s Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 by Mary Beth Norton       The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution: Forgotten Black Heroes by William Cooper Nell       Founding Mothers by Cokie Roberts       Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution by Nathaniel Philbrick       Bernardo de Galvez: Spanish Hero of the American Revolution by Gonzalo M. Quintero Saravia       John Adams by David McCullough       Patriot Hero of the Hudson Valley: The Life and Ride of Sybil Ludington by Vincent T. Dacquino

PATRIOTS ESSAY CONTEST FLYER PATRIOTS ESSAY INFORMATION  (AHC1002) PATRIOTS JUDGE'S SCORING SHEET  (AHC1003) American History Committee Essay Contests Cover Sheet and Signature Form (AHC1009) - DAR USE ONLY (available at State level)

DAR Good Citizens

Each year the Santa Monica Chapter, NSDAR, honors a local high school senior with the DAR Good Citizens award recognizing an individual who exemplifies by demonstration, the qualities of a good citizen: dependability, service, leadership and patriotism! 

This program is open to senior-class students enrolled in accredited public or private secondary schools that are in good standing with their state boards of education. Along with the honor of the award, the recipient receives a DAR Good Citizens pin and certificate. This student is then eligible to enter the DAR Good Citizens Scholarship Contest. 

Have your school's counselor contact our chapter for instructions and deadlines.  For more information, please visit the DAR Good Citizens  webpage.

GOOD CITIZENS FLYER

Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) and Junior ROTC (JROTC) Awards

Every Spring, our chapter presents  ROTC medals to outstanding high school and college cadets in the local area.  For more information, please visit the NSDAR Medals webpage.

Outstanding DAR Service for Veterans Award

This award is presented to a DAR member in recognition of her outstanding care given to veterans in any of the following areas: Department of Veterans Affairs facilities, state veterans facilities, nursing homes, shelters, and outpatient clinics. The Outstanding Veterans Volunteer has given more than her time. She has made meaningful contributions to veterans through creative and resourceful outreach.

Outstanding Teacher of American History

The Outstanding Teacher of American History contest honors full-time teachers of American history, government, or civics for grades five through twelve.  Our chapter's nominee won the national competition to become the NSDAR 2021 Outstanding Teacher of American History.  See more in our NEWS webpage.

Photos courtesy of NSDAR

National society daughters of the american revolution, california state society daughters of the american revolution.

The content contained herein does not necessarily represent the position of the NSDAR. Hyperlinks to other sites are not the responsibility of the NSDAR, the state organizations, or individual DAR chapters. For questions or comments, please contact the webmaster .

Content Updated: March 25, 2024, 8:04 pm

to submit an obituary

To place an obituary Monday through Friday, 8:30am to 4:00pm, please email [email protected] or call us at 610-235-2690 for further information.

Saturday & Sunday, please contact [email protected]

Daily Local

West Chester, Downingtown students win DAR…

Share this:.

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on X (Opens in new window)
  • Things to Do
  • Classifieds
  • Special Sections

Latest Headlines

West chester, downingtown students win dar essay contest.

Senator Kane, Melissa Griswold, Graham Drummond and Michael Hartman. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

DOWNINGTOWN—A Downingtown student and a West Chester student were winners in the 2021 American History Essay contest sponsored by The Chester County Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Each year students in grades fifth through eighth are given the opportunity to compose an essay and have it presented to the CCDAR for evaluation.  In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on Nov. 11, 2021, the essay topic was “Imagine that you had a brother who lost his life on the battlefields of France during World War I. You and your family attended the Nov. 11, 1921, dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Washington, D.C. Describe what this meant to you and your family. Why is it important to remember those who gave their lives to serve our nation?” Judging guidelines included historical accuracy, adherence to topic, organization of material, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation, neatness, and that the essay is the student’s own work.

The winners were Graham Drummond, 6th grade, Marsh Creek Sixth Grade Center, Downingtown, and Claire Bushnell, 8th grade, E.N. Peirce Middle School, West Chester.

All winners have their essays submitted to the state level where Claire Bushnell was selected as the Pennsylvania State DAR 8th grade winner. Christopher Beatty, Gifted Resource teacher at E.N. Peirce Middle School of West Chester, said about Claire “I’ve known Claire for three years now and she gets more impressive with each passing year.  She has a wide array of interests and abilities.  I wouldn’t be surprised to see her in a political office in the future, but I also wouldn’t be surprised if she becomes a roller coaster engineer.  Claire will succeed in whatever field and in whatever program that is lucky enough to gain her interest.”

In 2021, The National Society of the DAR established a new high school-level essay contest focused on figures of the American Revolution, in preparation for the 250th anniversary of the nation’s founding. The contest is open to students in grades 9 through 12.The topic was “Select a figure from the era of the American Revolution (1773-1783). Discuss how he or she influenced the course of the American Revolution, who he or she was and his/her contribution to the founding of a new nation. Your figure may be any person, whether a well-known figure or an everyday man, woman or child who supported the American Revolution in ways large or small.”  The evaluation criteria were the same as the American History Essays contest. Congratulations to CCDAR winner Melissa Griswold, a 10th grader at Unionville High School.

During the March 7 CCDAR meeting winners were given a certificate, medal and monetary award by Dawn Coughlan, CCDAR Regent, and Elberta Clinton, Chair, American History Essay Awards. Senator John Kane and Michael Hartman, representing Senator Carolyn Comitta, presented the students with a citation on behalf of the Pennsylvania state senate.

Visit www.dar.org to learn more about the Daughters of the American Revolution.

More in News

A $1,000 donation was presented on behalf of Grocery Outlet to both Parkesburg Library, a free library for the Parkesburg community, and a $500 donation to Parkesburg Churches Community Outreach.

Parkesburg embraces newly opened Grocery Outlet Bargain Market

It amazes me how much healthcare has changed in the last four years since the pandemic. However, there is one constant: physicians still shoulder the ultimate responsibility for a patient’s care whether it be in an outpatient practice, in the Emergency Room, on the Med Surg floors, in Labor and Delivery, or on the operating […]

Guest column: A day to honor our doctors

Wrestlemania 40 is in Philadelphia. Here's everything you need to know.

Sports | Wrestlemania 40 in Philadelphia: What to know, how to watch, what time does it start and more

Director Dave Patten and a crew of 15 recently filmed a portion of a new feature film on Scottish Stream Farm.

Small Talk: Chester County llamas to be in feature film

  • DAR Essay Contests

DAR ESSAY CONTESTS

dar essay contest 2022 topic

The American History Essay Contest was established to encourage young people to think creatively about our nation’s great history and learn about history in a new light.

The Christopher Columbus Essay Contest is an annual national essay contest in honor of Christopher Columbus.

To learn more about NSDAR Essay Contests , visit the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution Website .

Last updated August 6, 2022

dar essay contest 2022 topic

The content contained herein does not necessarily represent the position of  the NSDAR. Hyperlinks to other sites are not the responsibility of the NSDAR, the state organizations, or individual DAR chapters.

dar essay contest 2022 topic

2021 Maine State Organization Daughters of the American Revolution 

  • Account Profile
  • Newsletters

Today's Daily Herald ePaper

  • Today’s Stories
  • Entertainment
  • Classifieds

Libertyville DAR Announces American History Essay Contest Topic

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Are you in grades 5th through 8th? You are invited to participate in the NSDAR's American History Essay Contest

The 2022-2023 American History Essay contest sponsored by the Ansel Brainerd Cook Chapter; National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) is now open to students enrolled in 5th through 8th grade. They must attend a public, private, or parochial school, and those who are homeschooled are also eligible. This contest is conducted without regard to race, religion, sex, or national origin.

The American History Essay Contest was established to encourage young people to think creatively about our nation's great history and learn about history in a new light.

This year's essay topic is about the Second Continental Congress. They met from May 10,1775 - March 1,1781 and included delegates from all thirteen colonies. This Congress was instrumental in shaping what was to become the United States of America.

Students' 5th through 8th grade, imagine that you are a delegate during 1775-1776. Which colony are you from and what will be important for you to accomplish for your colony?

Essays are judged for historical accuracy, adherence to the topic, organization of materials, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation, and neatness. Depending on the student's grade, the essays may be from 300-1000 words.

Essays must be submitted by Monday, November 21, 2022.

One winner will be selected by the Ansel Brainerd Cook Chapter from each grade level. All winning essays selected by our chapter will advance to the Illinois State level competition. The state will send one winning essay from each of the four grades to be judged on a divisional level. The winning essay from each of the four grades will then be judged on the national level and the winners are announced.

All winners will be honored at Ansel Brainerd Cook Chapters Student Awards program in February 2023.

For more information about the essay contest, please contact the American History Chairperson via email at: [email protected]

The Ansel Brainerd Chapter, NSDAR, is celebrating its 45th year. The chapter was organized in September 1977 in Libertyville by 17 members. The chapter has now grown to include more than 175 members. In 2021, the ABC chapter members logged in 7,705 volunteer hours in the communities in which we work and live.

The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution was founded in 1890 to promote historic preservation, education and patriotism. Its 190,000 plus members in approximately 3000 chapters worldwide all have proven their lineage from patriots who won American independence during the Revolutionary War. The DAR is one of the most active service organizations. DAR members have committed to volunteer service having served more than 12.5 million hours in communities throughout the world.

For more information about the Ansel Brainerd Cook Chapter, please visit:

https:// ildar.org/chapters/anselbrainerdcook or e-mail us at: [email protected]

  • Daily Herald Events
  • Daily Herald Media Group News
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Service
  • Advertising/Marketing
  • Jobs at Paddock Publications
  • Share Article or Event
  • About our Ads
  • Place a Classified Ad
  • Business Directory
  • Email Newsletters

Coeur d'Alene Press Home

DAR honors American history essay contest winner

From left: American History Committee Chair Stephanie Keaty, Reese Alexander, Chapter Regent Susan Snodderley and Chapter Vice Regent Michelle Fansler. Photo courtesy of BARB NELSON

Back row from left: Michelle Fansler, Susan Snodderley, Stephanie Keaty and Kim Brown. Front row: Londyn Steckman, Mrs. Hicks, Reese Alexander and Sharon King.

Londyn Steckman (left) and Reese Alexander.

COEUR d’ALENE — The Lt. George Farragut Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution is proud to recognize Reese Alexander as the winner of the American History Essay Contest.

Reese is an eighth-grade student at River City Middle School in Post Falls. She was awarded a bronze medal, a certificate and a monetary award during her English class on March 14. Her essay has advanced to the state level.

This year’s topic was the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Nov. 11, 2021, marked the 100th anniversary of its dedication. Students were to imagine having a brother who lost his life in the battlefields of France during World War I and that they and their family attended the Nov. 11, 1921, dedication in Washington, D.C.

Reese concluded her essay with, “After a while I went upstairs and laid in my cozy bed. I soon found it hard to keep my eyes open, and I fell into a cobweb of dreams. When mother shook me, I jolted out of bed. I dashed to the closet and picked out a formal black button up; it was Williams, and some denim jeans and the same aged oxfords. I barreled outside and I hopped in the 1920 Nash Touring. The car ride was long and sorrow filled the air. When we made it to Arlington to honor the most hallowed grave. A somber moment. My emotions were taking over me. I saw a little girl hugging her older brother. I should have felt happy at the sight of the young girl's smile, but instead I felt resentful. Why did my brother die? Why did considerate Willam innocently die? He was the only person who could make me smile. When I went to place a red rose on the tomb, a tear fell from my cheek. It was hard to see the cause behind the deaths, but now I see they died for me, for Mother, and for America. Thank you Soldiers; thank you Willam."

Londyn Steckman, also an eighth-grade student at River City Middle School, was awarded a certificate for her participation in the contest.

Nancy Hicks, the English teacher of both Reese and Londyn, has promoted the contest to her students for several years.

All students in grades 5 to 8 are eligible to participate in the annual contest whether they are enrolled in a public, private, or parochial school or are homeschooled.

“The contest provides a wonderful opportunity for young writers to learn about patriotism, one of the missions of the DAR,” said Stephanie Keaty, American History committee chair. The topic for next year’s contest will be announced in the summer.

photo

Photo courtesy of BARB NELSON

photo

Share This Story

dar essay contest 2022 topic

The Gila Herald

Your trusted source for news of the Gila Valley and more.

DAR 2022 Patriotic Essay contest winners announced

dar essay contest 2022 topic

DAR Gila Valley Chapter has announced its scholarship winners of the 2022 DAR Patriotic Essay Contest. They are, pictured from left, Brooklynn Dorr (first place), Laethan Nelson, and Carson Richins, all from Thatcher High School.  

Contributed Article/Courtesy DAR Gila Valley Chapter

GRAHAM COUNTY – This fall, the local Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Gila Valley Chapter offered scholarships, one valued at $500 and two at $250, to local high school students dual enrolled at Eastern Arizona College. These students needed to be currently taking general education classes without financial assistance from the GIFT program or the school district.

In order to apply for the scholarships, the students had to submit a patriotic essay based on the required topic: In your opinion, what are the primary principles of the U.S. Constitution, and are those principles still relevant in today’s world? Of the eight essays submitted at the end of August, shortly after the start of school, three were judged as the first, second, and third-place winners. All three students are from Thatcher High School: Brooklyn Dorr, Laethan Nelson, and Carson Richins. 

During the DAR Constitution Week program in September, the first-place winner, Brooklyn Dorr, read her essay, and highlights of the other two essays were shared with those attending the event. Below are highlights from all three essays.

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Brooklynn Dorr

School: Thatcher High School Junior 

Parents: Julee and Danny Dorr of Central 

Excerpt from essay:

Brooklynn begins her essay by stating, “The U.S. Constitution is the longest surviving written charter of any modern national government and serves as a model and a beacon for countess countries across the world.” She goes on to mention that “it is revered by many as a timeless work, written by some of our nation’s greatest leaders. While these observations alone make the US Constitution relevant today; its greatest relevance is rooted in something much deeper!  The Constitution is relevant because of its absolute, time-tested values and its uniting spirit that inspires and brings together the great people of the United State of America.” 

She indicates that “while people’s interpretation of the powerful principles found within the Constitution constantly waiver, this document carries steady and universal truths and values that will never fade.” As an example, she writes that “the Constitution affirms that all have inalienable rights and through its framework, it promises no one will ‘be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process of law.’ If a group of people chooses to believe that another group of people within the Nation shouldn’t be granted freedom, the truth of freedom’s promise steadily continues.”

Throughout her essay, she writes about other primary principles and then in conclusion states “the Constitution is a fundamental part of the United States, its principles of protecting freedom, human rights, division of powers and popular sovereignty extend well beyond the U.S. These principles are critical, freeing, relevant, essential and uniting throughout all of today’s world. The eternal truths and values outlined and protected in the Constitution are the primary reason for its extreme relevancy in this country and throughout the globe. It will forever stand as a model and conviction for freedom to all patriots who dare to unite in its promises.”

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Laethan Nelson

School: Thatcher High School Junior

Parents: Camilee and Jason Nelson of Thatcher

Excerpt from essay:  

Laethan starts his essay with questions about freedom. “Have you ever felt like you had no freedom; had no choice or say in what you did or were doing? Many people felt this when our country was founded and some still feel it now. Our constitution was set up to solve these important problems, provide the citizens with a way to choose, and allow them to decide for themselves. Our constitution gives us these liberties through the principles of popular sovereignty and basic individual rights. 

Popular sovereignty is the principle that the government is created by the people and ruled by the people. Essentially, the people have the power to choose who will represent them. Many times this principle ensures that the government has checks put upon its power and that the people ultimately have the final say.”

For his second principle, basic human rights, he writes,  “Our country was created because human rights were not being upheld. The founding fathers wanted to build this country from the ground up and started the foundation with the building blocks of basic human rights. Without these basic rights protected, our country, our lives, and our freedoms would be in utter chaos.”

In his conclusion, he writes, “In our lives today, these principles are just as important, if not more important. With all the commotion around our world and country, these principles affect us each and every day by protecting and empowering us throughout these difficult times of uncertainty and fear that is prevalent in our world today.”

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Carson Richins

School: Thatcher High School Sophomore

Parents: Mary and Tyson Richins of Thatcher

Excerpt from essay: 

Carson begins with the early colonists who “had been under the rule of the British government with little or no rights, power and opportunities of individuality. When the Constitution was written, the colonists made the new government in a way that seemed most beneficial and helpful for the people by implementing individual rights, equal responsibilities to all citizens, and a government with limited power.”

In his emphasis on equal responsibilities to all citizens, he writes, “All Citizens, including government leaders, have the same basic responsibilities.  Everyone must obey the law and deal with the consequences of breaking the law. Without the people following these rules, the nation would be less organized and more chaotic.” Carson used paying taxes as an example. “Taxes are necessary.” He referred to the Kansas Secretary of State Office for the purpose of taxes. Those taxes provide ‘services and programs for schools, roads, police and fire protection, Medicare and national defense that would be impossible to maintain without the support of tax payments.’ “This quote explains that the government runs on the income of tax payments, from all United States citizens, including government leaders such as the president.”

He concludes his remarks about those principles being relevant today by expressing “that many things that happen in this day and age can still be applied to the original framework the founding fathers established. Despite the many challenges and situations the country has been through, the Constitution provides a guideline that our nation can use today. Things that were not considered over two hundred years ago when the Constitution was written still apply to the world today. The United States has only one constitution, and that shows that the Constitution is still applicable to this day and age.”

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Online Casino Bonuses: Demystified for You

March 29, 2024 March 29, 2024

dar essay contest 2022 topic

Ethereal Realms: Embark on Epic Quests in this Thriving Online Game Universe

March 28, 2024 March 28, 2024

dar essay contest 2022 topic

From Practice to Policy: Exploring Non-Clinical Career Opportunities for Physicians

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Open Letters: Our New Opinion-Writing Contest

We invite students to write public-facing letters to people or groups about issues that matter to them. Contest dates: March 13 to May 1.

By The Learning Network

What’s bothering you? Who could do something about it? What could you say to them that would persuade them to care, or to make change?

And … what if we all read your letter? How could you make us care too?

These are some of the questions we’re asking you to ponder for our new Open Letter Contest. An open letter is a published letter of protest or appeal usually addressed to an individual, group or institution but intended for the general public. Think of the many “Dear Taylor Swift” open letters you can find online and on social media: Sure, they’re addressed to Ms. Swift, but they’re really a way for the writer to share opinions and feelings on feminism, or ticket sales, or the music industry, or … the list goes on.

As you might already know if you’ve read Martin Luther King’s famous Letter From Birmingham Jail , an open letter is a literary device. Though it seems on the surface to be intended for just one individual or group, and therefore usually reads like a personal letter (and can make readers feel they are somehow “listening in” on private thoughts), it is really a persuasive essay addressed to the public. This recent letter signed by over 1,000 tech leaders about the dangers of A.I. , this funny 2020 letter addressed to Harry and Meghan , and this video letter from young Asian Americans to their families about Black Lives Matter are all examples of the tradition.

Now we’re inviting you to try it yourself. Write your own open letter, to anyone you like on any issue you care about, as long as it is also appropriate and meaningful for a general Times audience.

Whom should you write to? What should you say? How do open letters work?

The rules and FAQ below, along with our Student Opinion forum and related how-to guide , can walk you through ways to get started.

This is a new contest and we expect questions. Please ask any you have in the comments and we’ll answer you there, or write to us at [email protected]. And, consider hanging this PDF one-page announcement on your class bulletin board.

Here’s what you need to know:

The challenge, a few rules, resources for students and teachers, frequently asked questions, submission form.

Write an open letter to a specific audience that calls attention to an issue or problem and prompts reflection or action on it.

Whether you choose to write to your parents, teachers, school board members or mayor; a member of Congress; the head of a corporation; an artist or entertainer; or a metonym like “Silicon Valley” or “The Kremlin,” ask yourself, What do I care about? Who can make changes, big or small, local or global, to address my issue or problem? What specifically do I want my audience to understand or do? And how can I write this as an “open letter,” compelling not just to me and the recipient, but to the general audience who will be reading my words?

The Times has published numerous open letters over the years, to both famous and ordinary people. You can find a long list of free examples in our related guide .

This contest invites students to express themselves and imagine that their words can lead to real change.

Your open letter MUST:

Focus on an issue you care about and with which you have some experience. You can write about almost anything you like, whether it’s a serious issue like bullying , or something more lighthearted like why bugs deserve respect , but we have found over the years that the most interesting student writing grows out of personal experience. Our related Student Opinion forum and how-to guide can help you come up with ideas.

Address a specific audience relevant to the issue. Choose an individual, group, organization or institution who is in a position to make change or promote understanding about your topic.

Call for action, whether the change you seek is something tangible , like asking Congress to enact a law or demanding a company stop a harmful practice, or something more abstract, like inviting your audience to reflect on something they may have never considered.

Be suitable and compelling for a wide general audience . An open letter simultaneously addresses an explicit recipient — whether Joe Biden or your gym teacher — as well as us, the general public, your implicit audience. Though your letter might seem to be meant just for one person, it is really trying to persuade all readers. Make sure you write it in such a way that it is relevant, understandable, appropriate and meaningful for anyone who might come across it in The New York Times. (Again, our related guide can help.)

Be written as a letter, in a voice and tone that is appropriate for both your audience and purpose. Are you simply taking an argumentative essay you’ve written for school already and slapping a “Dear X” on top of it and a “Sincerely, Y” on the bottom? No. A letter — even an open letter — is different from a formal essay, and your writing should reflect that. Can you be informal? Funny? If that makes sense for your purpose and audience, then yes, please.

Our related guide, and the many examples we link to, can help you think about this, but we hope the format of a letter will let you loosen up a bit and express yourself in your natural voice. (For example, you’ll be writing as “I” or “we,” and addressing your letter’s recipient as “you.”)

Also attempt to persuade a general audience. Though it is written in the form of a letter, it is an opinion piece, and you are trying to make a case and support it with evidence, as you would any argument. Remember that you are trying to change hearts and minds, so you’ll be drawing on the same rhetorical strategies as you might have for our long-running editorial contest . (Again, more on this in the related guide .)

Make your case in 460 words or fewer. Your title and sources are not part of the word count.

Inform with evidence from at least two sources, including one from The Times and one from outside The Times. We hope this contest encourages you to deepen your understanding of your topic by using multiple sources, ideally ones that offer a range of perspectives. Just make sure those sources are trustworthy .

Because this is a letter, not a formal essay, we are not asking you to provide in-text citations, but we will be asking you to list the sources you used — as many as you like — in a separate field that does not contribute to your word count. Keep in mind, however, that if you include evidence from those sources, our readers (and judges) should always be able to tell where it came from. Be careful to put quotations around any direct quotes you use, and cite the source of anything you paraphrase.

In addition to the guidelines above, here are a few more details:

You must be a student ages 13 to 19 in middle school or high school to participate , and all students must have parent or guardian permission to enter. Please see the F.A.Q. section for additional eligibility details.

The writing you submit should be fundamentally your own — it should not be plagiarized, created by someone else or generated by artificial intelligence.

Your open letter should be original for this contest. That means it should not already have been published at the time of submission, whether in a school newspaper, for another contest or anywhere else.

Keep in mind that the work you send in should be appropriate for a Times audience — that is, something that could be published in a family newspaper (so, please, no curse words).

You may work alone or in groups , but students should submit only one entry each.

You must also submit a short, informal “artist’s statement” as part of your submission, that describes your writing and research process. These statements, which will not be used to choose finalists, help us to design and refine our contests. See the F.A.Q. to learn more.

All entries must be submitted by May 1, at 11:59 p.m. Pacific time using the electronic form at the bottom of this page.

Use these resources to help you write your open letter:

Our step-by-step guide : To be used by students or teachers, this guide walks you through the process of writing an open letter.

A list of free examples of open letters published both in and outside The New York Times, which you can find in our step-by-step guide .

A writing prompt: To Whom Would You Write an Open Letter? This prompt offers students a “rehearsal space” for thinking about to whom they’d like to write, the reason they’re writing and why they think that issue is important — not only for the recipient but also for a wider audience.

Argumentative writing prompts: We publish new argumentative writing prompts for students each week in our Student Opinion and Picture Prompt columns. You can find them all, as they publish, here , or many of them, organized by topic, in our new collection of over 300 prompts .

Argumentative writing unit: This unit includes writing prompts, lesson plans, webinars and mentor texts. While it was originally written to support our Student Editorial Contest , the resources can help students make compelling arguments, cite reliable evidence and use rhetorical strategies for their open letters as well.

Our contest rubric : This is the rubric judges will use as they read submissions to this contest.

Below are answers to your questions about writing, judging, the rules and teaching with this contest. Please read these thoroughly and, if you still can’t find what you’re looking for, post your query in the comments or write to us at [email protected].

Questions About Writing

How is this contest different from your long-running Editorial Contest? Can we still use those materials?

For a decade we ran an editorial contest , and the students who participated wrote passionately about all kinds of things — A.I. , fast fashion , race , trans rights , college admissions , parental incarceration , fan fiction , snow days , memes , being messy and so much more . You can still write about the issues and ideas that fire you up — it’s just that this time around you’ll be framing your work as a letter to a person who has the power to make change on or bring understanding to that issue.

Our related guide has more about the differences between a traditional opinion essay and an open letter, but the many materials we developed for that earlier contest are also woven into the guide, as concepts like ethos, logos and pathos are still very much relevant to this challenge.

I have no idea what to write about. Where should I start?

Our Student Opinion forum can help via its many questions that encourage you to brainstorm both the audience you might write to and the topics you’d like to address.

Can I actually send my open letter?

You can! Just wait until after you have submitted your work to us to do so. (As always for our contests, you retain the copyright to the piece you submit, and can do whatever you like with it.)

Questions About Judging

How will my open letter be judged?

Your work will be read by New York Times journalists, as well as by Learning Network staff members and educators from around the United States. We will use this rubric to judge entries.

What’s the “prize”?

Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to have your work published in the print New York Times.

When will the winners be announced?

About 8-10 weeks after the contest has closed.

My piece wasn’t selected as a winner. Can you tell me why?

We typically receive thousands of entries for our contests, so unfortunately, our team does not have the capacity to provide individual feedback on each student’s work.

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE RULES

Who is eligible to participate in this contest?

This contest is open to students ages 13 to 19 who are in middle school or high school around the world. College students cannot submit an entry. However, high school students (including high school postgraduate students) who are taking one or more college classes can participate. Students attending their first year of a two-year CEGEP in Quebec Province can also participate. In addition, students age 19 or under who have completed high school but are taking a gap year or are otherwise not enrolled in college can participate.

The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees are not eligible to enter this contest. Nor are students who live in the same household as those employees.

Can I have someone else check my work?

We understand that students will often revise their work based on feedback from teachers and peers. That is allowed for this contest. However, be sure that the final submission reflects the ideas, voice and writing ability of the student, not someone else.

Do I need a Works Cited page?

Yes. We provide you with a separate field to list the sources you used to inform or write your open letter. You’re allowed to format your list however you want; we will not judge your entry based on formatting in this section. Internal citations in your letter are not necessary.

Why are you asking for an Artist’s Statement about our process? What will you do with it?

All of us who work on The Learning Network are former teachers. One of the many things we miss, now that we work in a newsroom rather than a classroom, is being able to see how students are reacting to our “assignments” in real time — and to offer help, or tweaks, to make those assignments better. We’re asking you to reflect on what you did and why, and what was hard or easy about it, in large part so that we can improve our contests and the curriculum we create to support them. This is especially important for new contests, like this one.

Another reason? We have heard from many teachers that writing these statements is immensely helpful to students. Stepping back from a piece and trying to put into words what you wanted to express, and why and how you made artistic choices to do that, can help you see your piece anew and figure out how to make it stronger. For our staff, they offer important context that help us understand individual students and submissions, and learn more about the conditions under which students around the world create.

Whom can I contact if I have questions about this contest or am having issues submitting my entry?

Leave a comment on this post or write to us at [email protected].

QUESTIONS ABOUT TEACHING WITH THIS CONTEST

Do my students need a New York Times subscription to access these resources?

No. All of the resources on The Learning Network are free.

If your students don’t have a subscription to The New York Times, they can also get access to Times pieces through The Learning Network . All the activities for students on our site, including mentor texts and writing prompts, plus the Times articles they link to, are free. Students can search for articles using the search tool on our home page.

How do my students prove to me that they entered this contest?

After they press “Submit” on the form below, they will see a “Thank you for your submission.” line appear. They can take a screenshot of this message. Please note: Our system does not currently send confirmation emails.

Please read the following carefully before you submit:

Students who are 13 and older in the United States or the United Kingdom, or 16 and older elsewhere in the world, can submit their own entries. Those who are 13 to 15 and live outside the United States or the United Kingdom must have an adult submit on their behalf.

All students who are under 18 must provide a parent or guardian’s permission to enter.

You will not receive email confirmation of your submission. After you submit, you will see the message “Thank you for your submission.” That means we received your entry. If you need proof of entry for your teacher, please screenshot that message.

If you have questions about your submission, please write to us at [email protected] and provide the email address you used for submission.

COMMENTS

  1. Essay Contests

    This contest is open to students in public, private, and parochial schools, and registered home-study programs, in grades 9 through 12. Essays from students from all grades will be judged together, with one winning essay chosen at each level. Participating DAR Chapters will select one essay as the chapter winner, to be sent on to the State ...

  2. DAR Patriots of the American Revolution Essay Contest

    This year's 2022-2023 contest guidelines sheet details the topic, length (800-1,200 for 6-8 grades), format, and bibliography details. (Note: Each DAR chapter designates their own individual due dates. Check with your local chapter by locating it here on the national DAR website's chapter locater.) Here's the high school essay prompt:

  3. Contests & Awards

    California DAR Awards American History Essay Contest. ... Essays are judged for historical accuracy, adherence to the topic, organization of materials, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation, and neatness. ... 2022-2025 Commemorative Events · 50th Anniversary Vietnam War

  4. Meet this Year's American History Essay Winners

    The American History Essay Contest welcomes essays from students in grades 5 through 8, all centered on a theme that changes annually, often to commemorate the anniversary of an important event. The 2021-2022 American History Essay Contest commemorates the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Arlington National Cemetery.

  5. PDF DAR Announces The American History Essay Contest

    You're invited to participate in an. Essay Contest. Topic for 2022-2023. The Second Continental Congress met from May 10, 1775 - March 1, 1781 and included delegates from all thirteen colonies. This Congress was instrumental in shaping what was to become the United States of America. Imagine that you are a delegate during the 1775-1776.

  6. National DAR Essay Contest Winner 2022

    National DAR Essay Contest Winner 2022. Every year, Challenger fifth-through eighth-graders participate in the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) American History Essay Contest, where students are able to refine their writing technique and embrace their creative ability. Essays are judged for historical accuracy, adherence to topic ...

  7. PDF Microsoft Word

    Patriots of the American Revolution DAR High School Essay Contest. Topic for 2022-2023. Select a figure from the era of the American Revolution (1773-1783). Discuss how he or she influenced the course of the American Revolution, who he or she was and his/her contribution to the founding of a new nation. Your figure may be any person, whether ...

  8. Essay Contests

    You are invited to participate in the American History Essay Contest. Topic for 2021-2022. November 11, 2021, marks the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Imagine that you had a brother who lost his life on the battlefields of France during World War I. You and your family attended the November 11, 1921 ...

  9. American History

    American History Essay Contest Information! The deadline for chapter winning essays to be delivered to the State American History chairperson is January 15, 2023. Chapters are responsible to set their deadlines for essays to be presented to them, but please be realistic, knowing it will take time and reflection to choose the best essays for ...

  10. Contests and Awards

    In 2021, NSDAR established a new high school-level essay contest focused on figures of the American Revolution, in preparation for the 250th anniversary of the nation's founding. The contest is open to students in grades 9th -12th in public, private, or parochial schools, or those who are in registered home school programs.

  11. West Chester, Downingtown students win DAR essay contest

    PUBLISHED: March 9, 2022 at 10:27 a.m. | UPDATED: March 9, 2022 at 4:33 p.m. DOWNINGTOWN—A Downingtown student and a West Chester student were winners in the 2021 American History Essay contest ...

  12. DAR Essay Contests

    DAR ESSAY CONTESTS. Since its founding in 1890, the Daughters of the American Revolution has promoted historic preservation, education and patriotism in communities across the nation. From essay contests to educational materials to youth programs, scholarships, and awards, DAR has something to offer to every community.

  13. Libertyville DAR announces essay contest topic

    The 2022-23 American History Essay contest sponsored by the Ansel Brainerd Cook Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, is now open to students enrolled in grades 5-8.

  14. Winning DAR essay shared

    Winning DAR essay shared. Editor's note: This is the winning essay from the 2022 Fort Atkinson/Eli Pierce Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution's annual "Good Citizen" essay contest ...

  15. Libertyville DAR Announces American History Essay Contest Topic

    The 2022-2023 American History Essay contest sponsored by the Ansel Brainerd Cook Chapter; National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) is now open to students enrolled in 5th ...

  16. DAR honors American history essay contest winner

    COEUR d'ALENE — The Lt. George Farragut Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution is proud to recognize Reese Alexander as the winner of the American History Essay Contest. Reese is an ...

  17. DAR group names American History essay contest winners

    Anna Kate, an 8th grade student at Freedom Middle School, is the middle school winner of the 2022-23 DAR American History Essay Contest. Her essay was about George Wythe, a delegate to the Second Continental Congress. During morning announcements Anna Kate was presented with a DAR certificate and medal and a $100 check from the Old Glory chapter.

  18. DAR 2022 Patriotic Essay contest winners announced

    October 24, 2022 - by News Director. DAR Gila Valley Chapter has announced its scholarship winners of the 2022 DAR Patriotic Essay Contest. They are, pictured from left, Brooklynn Dorr (first place), Laethan Nelson, and Carson Richins, all from Thatcher High School.

  19. Two sixth-graders win DAR essay contest

    Representatives of the regional chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution were on hand Wednesday, March 30, 2022, to present awards in the DAR's annual essay contest to members of Donna Yost's sixth-grade class at Enterprise Elementary School.

  20. 2024 Theological Librarianship Student Essay Contest, Theological

    The author of the winning essay will receive a $500 U.S. cash prize and a complimentary registration and travel grant, if applicable, to attend the 2025 Atla Annual Conference. Proof of current graduate or undergraduate enrollment will be required upon notification of selection as the winner of the contest.

  21. California is gripped by economic problems, with no easy fix

    When the Federal Reserve jacked up interest rates in 2022 in order to tame inflation, many analysts and investors fretted that this monetary tightening would lead to a recession.

  22. Open Letters: Our New Opinion-Writing Contest

    We hope this contest encourages you to deepen your understanding of your topic by using multiple sources, ideally ones that offer a range of perspectives. Just make sure those sources are trustworthy.