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How To Write Dialogue Between Doctor And Patient [13 Templates]

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Writing realistic doctor-patient dialogues is essential for fiction writers who write scenes related to hospital interactions or doctor-patient scenarios. Dialogue writing specific to two characters in a story contains critical information for the reader and reveals key aspects of both characters’ personalities.

In this article, we’ll explore how to write dialogue between doctor and patient with templates that focus on various medical topics and situations. We’ll also provide tips on crafting engaging dialogue that resonates with your readers.

👉 See our overview guide to dialogue writing for authors

How to write dialogue between doctor and patient

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dialogue writing about doctor and patient

How To Write Dialogue Between Doctor And Patient

  • Research medical terminology and conditions: To make your dialogue sound authentic, familiarize yourself with common medical terms and conditions related to the topic of conversation. However, remember not to overwhelm your readers with jargon.
  • Understand the characters: Clearly understand your characters’ backgrounds, motivations, and personalities. This will help you create a believable conversation that reflects their individuality.
  • Use body language and non-verbal cues : Incorporate body language and non-verbal cues into your dialogue to add depth and emotion to the conversation. Describe how the characters behave during the interaction to give readers a better understanding of their feelings and reactions.
  • Keep the dialogue natural and realistic : Ensure the conversation flows naturally and mimics how people speak. This is a rule of dialogue writing that should not be overlooked.
  • Create a balance between dialogue and narrative : Strike a balance between dialogue and narrative by describing the setting , characters’ emotions, and other relevant information to enhance the conversation and keep the reader engaged.
  • Use dialogue to advance the plot or reveal character : Ensure that the conversation between the doctor and patient contributes to the overall story, whether it’s advancing the plot, revealing character traits, or providing information.

👉 To learn more, read our guide to the rules of dialogue writing

Below are 13 templates on how to write dialogue between doctor and patient:

1. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient Discussing Fever

Dr. Lee: Hello, Tom. How are you today? Tom: Not great, Dr. Lee. I have a fever. Dr. Lee: How high is your temperature? Tom: 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Lee: Any other symptoms? Tom: Headache and sore throat. Dr. Lee: Sounds like the flu.

[The conversation continues, with Dr. Lee recommending over-the-counter medications, rest, and fluids to help Tom recover from his fever and flu symptoms.]

Dr. Lee: Rest is crucial, Tom. Tom: How long should I rest? Dr. Lee: At least until the fever breaks. Tom: And medication? Dr. Lee: Ibuprofen for fever and pain.

[ The conversation continues, with Dr. Lee providing advice on hydration when to seek further medical help, and tips for avoiding the spread of illness to others. ]

2. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Quitting Smoking

Dr. Green: Hi, Susan. What brings you in today? Susan: I want to quit smoking, Dr. Green. Dr. Green: That’s great, Susan! Are you ready for help? Susan: Yes, I’m tired of being a smoker. Dr. Green: There are many options. Let’s find the right one.

[Dr. Green explains various smoking cessation methods, such as nicotine replacement therapy, medications, and support groups, and Susan shares her concerns and goals for quitting smoking.]

Dr. Green: Nicotine patches might help. Susan: How do they work? Dr. Green: They release nicotine gradually. Susan: Any other options? Dr. Green: Prescription medications like Chantix.

[The dialogue continues, with Dr. Green and Susan discussing the pros and cons of various quitting methods and Susan deciding which option she feels most comfortable pursuing.]

3. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Allergy

Dr. Anderson: Good morning, Alex. How can I help you? Alex: I’ve been sneezing a lot, Dr. Anderson. Dr. Anderson: Allergies, maybe? Any other issues? Alex: Itchy eyes and a runny nose. Dr. Anderson: Sounds like seasonal allergies. Let’s discuss treatment options.

[ Dr. Anderson suggests antihistamines, nasal corticosteroids, and allergy shots to help manage Alex’s allergy symptoms and provide relief. ]

Dr. Anderson: Antihistamines can help. Alex: Which one should I take? Dr. Anderson: Claritin or Zyrtec are good options. Alex: Will they make me drowsy? Dr. Anderson: Usually not, but individual reactions vary.

[ The conversation continues, with Dr. Anderson providing further information about allergy medications and suggesting additional strategies for managing symptoms, such as using a saline nasal spray or avoiding known allergens. ]

4. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Heart Health

Dr. Kim: Welcome back, Lisa. How’s your blood pressure? Lisa: It’s still high, Dr. Kim. Dr. Kim: Any lifestyle changes since last time? Lisa: I’ve been exercising more, but still struggling. Dr. Kim: Let’s review your diet and consider medication.

[ The dialogue continues, with Dr. Kim offering guidance on dietary changes and discussing possibly adding medication to Lisa’s treatment plan to help manage her hypertension. ]

Dr. Kim: Reduce salt intake, Lisa. Lisa: What about exercise? Dr. Kim: 30 minutes daily, moderate intensity. Lisa: And if that doesn’t work? Dr. Kim: We’ll consider medication.

[ Dr. Kim and Lisa discuss other lifestyle changes, such as stress management and weight loss, that can help improve hypertension and overall heart health. ]

👉 For deeper insight, see our article on dialogue writing between two characters

5. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Insomnia and Sleep

Dr. Johnson: Hello, Mark. How have you been sleeping? Mark: Not well, Dr. Johnson. I can’t fall asleep. Dr. Johnson: How long has this been happening? Mark: About two weeks now. Dr. Johnson: Let’s explore possible causes and solutions.

[ Dr. Johnson asks Mark about his sleep habits, stress levels, and daily routine and suggests potential strategies and treatments to help Mark overcome his insomnia. ]

Dr. Johnson: Create a bedtime routine, Mark. Mark: What should it include? Dr. Johnson: Relaxing activities, like reading. Mark: Should I avoid screens? Dr. Johnson: Yes, they can disrupt sleep.

[ Dr. Johnson provides more tips for establishing healthy sleep habits and discussing potential treatments, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia or sleep aids, if necessary. ]

6. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Medication Side Effects

Dr. Baker: Hi, Sarah. How’s the new medication? Sarah: It’s helping, Dr. Baker, but I have side effects. Dr. Baker: What side effects are you experiencing? Sarah: Nausea and dizziness. Dr. Baker: Let’s discuss how to manage them or consider alternatives.

[ The conversation continues. Dr. Baker provides tips on managing the side effects and the possibility of switching to another medication to minimize discomfort and ensure Sarah’s treatment remains effective. ]

Dr. Baker: Nausea can be managed with ginger. Sarah: What if that doesn’t work? Dr. Baker: We can try anti-nausea medication. Sarah: And the dizziness? Dr. Baker: Drink water and stand up slowly.

[ Dr. Baker and Sarah discuss other ways to manage side effects or consider alternative medications that may have fewer or less severe side effects. ]

7. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Exercise and Diet

Dr. Martin: Hi, Emily. How’s your health journey going? Emily: Slow, Dr. Martin. I’m having trouble staying motivated. Dr. Martin: What’s been the most challenging? Emily: Sticking to a healthy diet and exercise. Dr. Martin: Let’s talk about setting achievable goals.

[ The dialogue continues. Dr. Martin offers suggestions for creating a balanced diet, finding enjoyable exercises, and setting realistic goals to help Emily stay on track with her health journey. ]

Dr. Martin: Start with small changes, Emily. Emily: Like what? Dr. Martin: Swap soda for water or add veggies to meals. Emily: How about exercise? Dr. Martin: Try walking for 30 minutes a day.

[ Dr. Martin provides additional suggestions for healthy food swaps, finding enjoyable physical activities, and staying accountable with a support system or tracking app. ]

8. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient about Weight Loss

Dr. Smith: Hi, Jane. How can I help you today? Jane: I need to lose weight, Dr. Smith. Dr. Smith: What’s your goal weight? Jane: I want to lose 30 pounds. Dr. Smith: Let’s make a plan together.

[Dr. Smith and Jane discuss dietary changes, exercise routines, and setting realistic goals to achieve healthy weight loss.]

9. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Mental Health

Dr. Brown: Hello, Peter. What brings you in? Peter: I’ve been feeling down, Dr. Brown. Dr. Brown: How long has this been happening? Peter: A few months now. Dr. Brown: Let’s explore some treatment options.

[The conversation continues as Dr. Brown asks Peter about his symptoms and daily routines and suggests potential strategies and treatments to improve his mental health, such as therapy or medication.]

10. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Diabetes Management

Dr. Patel: Hi, Mark. How’s your diabetes management? Mark: It’s tough, Dr. Patel. Dr. Patel: Are you taking your medication? Mark: Yes, but I need help with my diet. Dr. Patel: Let’s discuss some dietary changes.

[Dr. Patel provides guidance on creating a balanced diet to manage diabetes, the role of exercise, and the importance of regular blood sugar monitoring.]

11. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Prenatal Care

Dr. Thompson: Welcome, Lisa. How’s your pregnancy? Lisa: It’s been rough, Dr. Thompson. Dr. Thompson: What issues are you experiencing? Lisa: Morning sickness and fatigue. Dr. Thompson: Let’s discuss how to manage these symptoms.

[The conversation continues. Dr. Thompson offers advice on coping with morning sickness and fatigue and discusses the importance of regular prenatal appointments, screenings, and tests.]

11. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Injury

Dr. Williams: Hi, Sam. What happened to your arm? Sam: I fell off my bike, Dr. Williams. Dr. Williams: Does it hurt a lot? Sam: Yes, and I can’t move it well. Dr. Williams: Let’s examine it and discuss treatment.

[Dr. Williams evaluates Sam’s injury, discussing potential treatments such as immobilization, pain management, and physical therapy and providing guidance on preventing future injuries.]

12. Dialogue Template: Doctor and Patient About Cancer

Dr. Miller: Hello, Karen. I have your test results. Karen: Is it cancer, Dr. Miller? Dr. Miller: Yes, it’s breast cancer. Karen: What are my treatment options? Dr. Miller: Let’s discuss surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

[The dialogue continues. Dr. Miller explain s the benefits and risks of various treatment options, and Karen shares her concerns and preferences to create a personalized treatment plan.]

13. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Skincare

Dr. Taylor: Hi, Mike. What’s your skin concern? Mike: I have acne, Dr. Taylor. Dr. Taylor: How long have you had it? Mike: For a few years now. Dr. Taylor: Let’s discuss treatment and skincare.

[Dr. Taylor recommends different acne treatments, such as topical medications or oral antibiotics, and provides advice on proper skincare routines to help manage and prevent breakouts.]

Final Notes: How To Write Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient In A Story

Writing engaging doctor-patient dialogues can be a powerful tool in your fiction writing. By using these dialogue templates as a starting point and incorporating the provided tips, you can craft authentic conversations that resonate with your readers and help bring your story to life. Remember to keep it simple, vary sentence length, and convey emotion so you can create relatable interactions between two characters .

👉See our article on dialogue writing between two characters

Chioma Ezeh is an author, digital marketer, business coach, and the founder of chiomaezeh.com, a blog that teaches how to build successful online businesses. Get in touch.

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Conversation Between Doctor and Patient [Five Scenarios]

  • Updated on Nov 12, 2023

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This post contains conversation between a doctor and a patient/ attendant on five different medical issues:

  • Fever and sore throat,
  • Stomach ache,
  • Cancer, and
  • Glaucoma (an ailment of eye)

Whereas the first three conversations take place in a clinic, the last two take place in a hospital.

The three main characters – doctor, patient/ attendant, and support (reception, billing etc.) – in these conversations have been color-coded for ease of browsing. Furthermore, explanations and activities outside the conversation have been put in brackets so that you can easily follow what’s happening.

1. Conversation about fever and sore throat

Conversation about fever and sore throat

Patient : Good evening doctor.

Doctor : Good evening. You look pale and your voice is out of tune.

Patient : Yes doctor. I’m running a temperature and have a sore throat.

Doctor : Lemme see.

(He touches the forehead to feel the temperature.)

Doctor : You’ve moderate fever.

(He then whips out a thermometer.)

Patient : This thermometer is very different from the one you used the last time. (Unlike the earlier one which was placed below the tongue, this one snapped around one of the fingers.)

Doctor : Yes, this is a new introduction by medical equipment companies. It’s much more convenient, as it doesn’t require cleaning after every use.

Patient : That’s awesome.

Doctor : Yes it is.

(He removes the thermometer and looks at the reading.)

Doctor : Not too high – 99.8.

(He then proceeds with measuring blood pressure.)

Doctor : Your blood pressure is fine.

(He then checks the throat.)

Doctor : It looks bit scruffy. Not good.

Patient : Yes, it has been quite bad.

Doctor : Do you get sweating and shivering?

Patient : Not sweating, but I feel somewhat cold when I sit under a fan.

Doctor : OK. You’ve few symptoms of malaria. I would suggest you undergo blood test. Nothing to worry about. In most cases, the test come out to be negative. It’s just precautionary, as there have been spurt in malaria cases in the last month or so.

(He then proceeds to write the prescription.)

Doctor : I’m prescribing three medicines and a syrup. The number of dots in front of each tells you how many times in the day you’ve to take them. For example, the two dots here mean you’ve to take the medicine twice in the day, once in the morning and once after dinner.

Doctor : Do you’ve any other questions?

Patient : No, doctor. Thank you.

Check out other conversations:

  • Conversation between nurse and patient in a hospital
  • Conversation between two friends on issues such as pollution, job change, and picnic
  • Conversation between waiter and guests in a restaurant
  • Conversation between customer and a shopkeeper in a grocery shop

2. Conversation about headache

Conversation about headache

Image by Nik Shuliahin on Unsplash

Patient : Doctor, I’ve headache since yesterday evening.

Doctor : Have you taken any medicine so far?

Patient : Saridon, but the headache hasn’t disappeared.

Doctor : You’ve a running nose. Looks like your headache is a result of sinus infection, and not the regular one that results from anxiety and fatigue. Lemme check.

(The doctor checks the patient thoroughly.)

Doctor : It’s quite clear that the infection in your sinus is the reason for your headache. I’ll prescribe an antibiotic to clear the infection and a pain reliever to relieve the pain.

Patient : Thank you, doctor.

3. Conversation about stomach ache

Conversation about stomach ache

Image by Unsplash

Patient : I’ve stomachache and loose motions since last night. I also vomited few times in the night.

Doctor : What did you eat yesterday?

Patient : I ate some snacks on the roadside eatery. It’s likely a result of that.

Doctor : Likely you ate contaminated food. Because of diarrhea, you’ve lost plenty of body fluids. You need to be hydrated. Drink water regularly. Mix some Glucon-D powder or Electral in it. Fruit juice is fine too. Avoid caffeine, dairy products, and solid foods at least till evening. And get plenty of rest.

Patient : Any medicines, doctor.

Doctor : Yes, I’m prescribing few to control diarrhea.

4. Conversation with an oncologist on cancer

Conversation with an oncologist on cancer

Image by Ken Treloar on Unsplash

In this conversation, the patient’s family member (attendant) talks to the doctor.

Doctor : So, what brings you here?

Attendant : Doctor, my father has been diagnosed with abnormal growth of cells in colon, which doctors so far have confirmed as a case of cancer.

Doctor : What tests have you conducted?

Attendant : On the advice of doctors in Lucknow, we conducted blood tests, CT scan, and biopsy. We’ve taken three opinions on the reports and all have opined colorectal cancer. Here are the reports.

(The doctor goes through the reports.)

Doctor : Yes, this looks cancerous. What we’ll do is admit him today itself and get few tests done. And let’s meet tomorrow morning when you’ve the reports of these tests.

Attendant : OK. Thank you.

(The doctor writes his observations on his letterhead and hands it over to the attendant. The attendant then gets the patient admitted and visits the doctor again the next morning with new reports in hand.)

Doctor : The cancer is just one stage before it’ll spread to other parts. In this case, the best course of action is immediate surgery to remove the affected part followed by radiation therapy.

Attendant : How many days of hospitalization will be required?

Doctor : We can perform the surgery day after tomorrow. Thereafter, we’ll keep the patient under observation for 4-5 days. Radiation therapy has become pretty standardized and therefore you can get it done in any tier-2 city, which will not only be convenient to you but also reduce your expense.

Attendant : And for how long the patient will have to undergo radiation therapy?

Doctor : One dose every two weeks for three months. You need to visit the hospital only on days you receive therapy. Once radiation therapy is done, you should consult an oncologist every three months in the beginning and every year later on to check for remission of cancerous cells.

Attendant : OK. I’ve heard radiation therapy has side effects.

Doctor : Yes, radiation therapy has side effects. It can lead to hair loss, nausea, and loss of appetite.

Attendant : Thank you doctor. We’ll get him admitted today.

5. Conversation with an eye specialist in a hospital

Conversation with an eye specialist in a hospital

Image by Jordan Whitfield on Unsplash

This conversation involves not just the doctor, but also people conducting different tests and those at reception and billing desks in the hospital.

Support : Good morning sir. How may I help you?

Patient : Good morning. I had an appointment with the doctor at 9 AM.

Support : Have you registered with us earlier?

Patient : Yes.

Support : Please show me your registration card. Or I can search for your details through your mobile number.

Patient : That would be better. My mobile number is 989930xxx.

(She searches for the patient’s past records on her computer.)

Support : OK, I’ve found your details. You last visited us in August 2016.

Patient : That’s right.

Support : You can pay the doctor consultation fee here.

Patient : Sure. Here is my card.

(She swipes the card and hands over the invoice to the patient.)

Support : Pl take a seat, and feel free to help yourself with water, newspapers etc.

Patient : Thank you.

(After 15-odd minutes, the attendant calls the patient’s name, following which the patient proceeds to the doctor’s cabin.)

Patient : Good morning doctor.

Doctor : Good morning. How’re you doing today?

Patient : I’m fine. Thank you. How about you?

Doctor : I’m good. So what brings you here?

Patient : I’ve come for a regular checkup for a suspected case of glaucoma. I don’t have it, but few years back a doctor after examining my eye and knowing my family eye history advised me to undergo precautionary checkup once a year.

(He puts the past reports on the table. The doctor peruses them.)

Doctor : I see that your optic nerve is thicker than the normal. That’s probably the reason why you were asked to undergo precautionary tests every year. You can have the same two tests – visual field analysis and OCT – today and once you’ve the two reports, we can meet again in the afternoon.

Patient : Alright.

(The doctor scribbles the names of the two tests on his letterhead and pushes it across the table.)

(The patient leaves the doctor’s cabin and again approaches the reception desk.)

Patient : I saw the doctor. He has asked for these two tests.

(He pushes the prescription towards the billing lady.)

Support : OK. The two tests will cost you xxx and you’ll get the reports in around two hours. Is that fine?

Patient : That’s fine.

(He slips his card toward her. She swipes it again and hands over the invoice a second time.)

Support : Please be seated there. Someone will call you for the first test in few minutes.

(Over the next two hours, he undergoes the two tests and receives the reports. Thereafter, he meets the doctor again, this time with reports.)

Doctor : I hope you had a smooth experience going through those tests.

Patient : Yes, it was. And because I’ve taken these tests in the past too, I knew what was coming.

(The patient pushes the reports toward the doctor. The doctor pores through the pages, looking at the colored images of the eye minutely.)

Doctor : Your reports are absolutely fine. Since these reports haven’t shown anything suspect in so many years, I think you can now take these tests once in two years, and not once a year.

Patient : OK.

Doctor : Well, that puts glaucoma thing to rest. Does your work involve working on laptop for long hours?

Doctor : In case your eyes get tired quickly, I would recommend xxx. It’s an eye drop, which you can use 2-3 times in the day. Our eyes get dry when we look at the computer screen without blinking for long, a common reason for tiredness in eyes. This eye drop will lubricate your eyes.

Patient : Yes. I see few thin, black, wavy structures floating in front of my eyes and they don’t disappear even when I close my eyes. What are they? Are they harmful?

Doctor : They’re called floaters, and most persons develop them to different extent as they age. They’re not harmful.

Patient : Thank you doctor. Thanks for your time.

Doctor : You’re welcome.

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Anil is the person behind content on this website, which is visited by 3,000,000+ learners every year. He writes on most aspects of English Language Skills. More about him here:

11 Comments

I want conversation between cardiologist and patient.

I want dialogue between doctor and patient who is having weight problem.

I want dialogue between a doctor and a patient about surgery.

Hey! Please, can I get a dialogue between doctor and myself about the issue of stress and how can we overcome it.

I want a dialogue between doctor and patient who is suffering from sleepless nights and not any other disease.

I want a conversation between doctor and patient about covid 19.

Can I get a conversation between doctor and patient wherein they are friends and talk about their life and not about illness and medical stuff? Pl.

Conversation between doctor and patient about diabetes, pl.

Can you provide dialogue between doctor and patient on liver infection?

I want dialogue between doctor and patient about fever and cold.

I want a conversation between me as a patient and the doctor is explaining about the result of my laboratory using medical terms

Comments are closed.

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A Dialogue between a Doctor and a Patient

We have written a few dialogues between a doctor and a patient for school students and kids. I hope you will find this useful to you.

In This Blog We Will Discuss

A Dialogue between a Doctor and a Patient: 1

Patient : Hello, may I come in?

Doctor : Yes, of course. How are you feeling today?  

Patient : Nothing change sir, the headache is pretty much the same as before.

Doctor : Oh sorry to know, are you taking the medicine that I prescribed you?  

Patient : Yes, I am taking the medicines properly, but I am not getting any change.

Doctor : Keep patience, it’s only a week. You need to wait more and check the improvement because your problem is so tough and uncommon.  

Patient : What should I do now? Doctor: Have you finished the medicines that I prescribed?  

Patient : Yes.

Doctor : Then, I am giving some tests here, go to the test room and do these, and I will prescribe a few more medicines after seeing the test result. Now take this paper and go for tests.  

Patient : Thank you, Doctor.

Doctor : You are welcome.

A Dialogue between a Doctor and a Patient: 2

Sania : Doctor, I am feeling very weak and fever.

Doctor : Oh, I see, sit down and how many days are you suffering?  

Sania : It has been for two days.

Doctor: Okay, open your mouth, and let me see your tongue.   (After showing her tongue)

Sania : What should I do doctor?

Doctor : Don’t worry, there is nothing serious. Tell me something more, do you feel a headache?  

Sania : Yes, I feel lots of headaches when I watch TV or sit in front of the computer.

Doctor : You better stop doing these for a few days.  

Sania : Okay, I will.

Doctor : Here I’m prescribing a few medicines, take them properly I hope you will be okay within a couple of days.  

Sania : Should I do anything else?

Doctor : Yeah, stay in bed for the next two days. Don’t bath or go to under the sun, that could increase your fever. Try to eat properly.  

Sania : Thanks, Doctor.

Doctor : You’re welcome.  

Here are two examples of dialogue between a doctor and a patient, I hope you will enjoy these.  

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English Aspirants

Write a Conversation Between Doctor and Patient [5 Examples]

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient: In this article, you are going to read 5 dialogues between doctor and patient on different topics. These conversations/dialogues will be helpful for the students of all classes. So, let’s start.

1. Conversation Between Doctor and Patient about Fever

Doctor: Hello! What can I do for you?

Patient: I am suffering from Fever and sore throat since yesterday.

Doctor: Do you have cough problem also?

Patient: Yes I have

Doctor: Do you have any other symptoms?

Patient: I also feel headache and shivering.

Doctor: Have you taken any medicine so far?

Patient: No Doctor.

Doctor: Let me check your temperature. Now the fever is 101 degrees.

Patient: Is there something serious Doctor?

Doctor: Don’t worry. Take the prescribed medicines two times a day for 3 days and get some rest.

Patient: Thank you very much Doctor.

Doctor: Welcome. Get well soon.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient about Fever

2. Conversation Between Patient and Doctor about Stomach Pain

Patient: Hello Doctor.

Doctor: Hello, How can I help You?

Patient: Actually Doctor, Since morning I am having severe stomach pain.

Doctor: Tell me where exactly the pain is?

Patient: It is somewhat near the lower abdomen.

Patient: No doctor.

Doctor: What did you eat last night?

Patient: I had a dinner party with friends in a Restaurant.

Doctor: That’s the reason. Don’t worry I am prescribing you some medicines, take them regularly and avoid eating outside food.

Patient: Thank you so much Doctor.

Doctor: Take care

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient about Stomach Pain

3. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient about Headache

Patient: Good evening Doctor!

Doctor: Good Evening. How can I help you?

Patient: I am suffering from headache since morning.

Doctor: Have you taken any medicine?

Patient: Yes doctor but still not getting better.

Doctor: You have a running nose. Your headache could be a result of sinus infection. Let me check it.

Patient: Is it something serious doctor?

Doctor: I think sinus infection is the cause of your headache. It’s not a regular headache. Don’t worry I am prescribing some medicines. Take the medicines regularly. You’ll get better soon.

Patient: Thank you Doctor.

Doctor: Visit me after one week for a checkup.

Patient: Okay doctor.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient about Headache

4. Dialogue between doctor and patient about Fever, Cough and Headache

Patient: May I come in, doctor?

Doctor: Yes, come in, please.

Patient: Thank you, doctor.

Doctor: Please, be seated. What ails you?

Patient: I had high temperature last night. It was 103°C. Moreover, I have a chest pain. I also cough.

Doctor: I see. Now lie down on the bed. I’ll check your chest. It’s cold weather now. You should be careful.

Patient: Last week I had gone to a village to do some field work on the potable water. I’d to work even at late evening under the open sky. I felt sick there, I returned with pain in chest.

Doctor: Any headache?

Patient: It is slight. Not severe. Is it serious anything?

Doctor: Nothing serious. You’ve caught cold. Take these medicines. You’ll be ok. Have your bath only in tepid water for some days.

5. Conversation Between Patient and Doctor about Indigestion

Patient: Good Morning Doctor.

Doctor: Morning. What is wrong with you?

Patient: I am suffering from indigestion since last few days.

Doctor: Have you noticed any other symptoms?

Patient: I have also headache. I couldn’t sleep at night.

Doctor: I think this is happening because of anxiety and bad eating habit.

Patient: Yes, Doctor. I have a lot of work pressure and due to my field work, I eat a lot of junk food.

Doctor: I will suggest you to take a break from your work and eat healthy foods like fruits, vegetables etc. Besides, I am also prescribing some medicines, take them 2 times a day.

Doctor: Welcome. Take care.

Read Also: Conversation Between Teacher and Student [3 Examples] 

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  • Conversation Between Doctor And Patient

Conversation between Doctor and Patient

Conversations between doctors and their patients are most often serious discussions about the symptoms of a sickness or the improvement in health after a particular surgery or course of medication. For this same reason, it is important to maintain the tone and seriousness of the discussion when you are writing a conversation between a doctor and a patient. Language, here, is more formal and there might be a lot of medical terms used. So, make sure you carefully mention them in the conversation.

Check out the following conversation samples to have a better understanding of how you have to write a conversation between a doctor and a patient.

Sample Conversation 1 – Conversation between Doctor and Patient about Fever

Sample conversation 2 – conversation between doctor and patient about covid – 19, sample conversation 3 – conversation between doctor and patient about joint pain.

Patient – Good Morning, doctor. May I come in?

Doctor – Good Morning. How are you? You do look quite pale this morning.

Patient – Yes, doctor. I’ve not been feeling well for the past few days. I’ve been having a stomach ache for a few days and feeling a bit dizzy since yesterday.

Doctor – Okay, let me check. (applies pressure on the stomach and checks for pain) Does it hurt here?

Patient – Yes, doctor, the pain there is the sharpest.

Doctor – Well, you are suffering from a stomach infection, that’s the reason you are having a stomach ache and also getting dizzy. Did you change your diet recently or have something unhealthy?

Patient – Actually, I went to a fair last week and ate food from the stalls there.

Doctor – Okay, so you are probably suffering from food poisoning. Since the food stalls in fairs are quite unhygienic, there’s a high chance those uncovered food might have caused food poisoning.

Patient – I think I will never eat from any unhygienic place in the future.

Doctor – That’s good. I’m prescribing some medicines, have them for one week and come back for a checkup next week. And please try to avoid spicy and fried foods for now.

Patient – Okay, doctor, thank you.

Doctor – Welcome.

Patient – Good afternoon, Doctor.

Doctor – Good afternoon, Mr. Bose. How are you?

Patient – I’m doing good, doctor, but my daughter isn’t doing well. Everywhere, people are getting affected with COVID and I am really worried about her.

Doctor – Please have a seat and tell me what happened.

Patient – Last week, my daughter came back from Pune as her college was closed on account of COVID. From the second day, she has had high fever and has been coughing badly. I think that she has contracted the virus on her way home.

Doctor – Okay, I understand your concern. Having a fever and cough doesn’t necessarily mean that someone has contracted the virus. These are symptoms of common cold too. The change in the temperature of the atmosphere could have triggered these symptoms. Still, to put your worries to rest, I am prescribing some medicines and an RT PCR test. Do the test by tomorrow, and if the test results are positive, make sure she is isolated. On the other hand, if the result is negative, just give her the medicine and ask her to drink a lot of water. Also, bring her in so I could examine her.

Patient – Okay, doctor. I will bring her in the evening. Thank you.

Doctor – You are welcome.

Doctor – (to the nurse) Please send in the next patient.

Patient – Hello doctor, good morning.

Doctor – Good morning, have a seat. Please tell me what happened.

Patient – (showing the knee) For the past few months, I have been experiencing a severe pain in my left knee whenever I stand up or walk long distances.

Doctor – (checking the knee) Yes, it is slightly swollen, but probably nothing is broken. Can you please stand up for me?

Patient – (stands up) It really hurts when I try to stand after being seated for a while.

Doctor – Did you fall down or hit your knee somewhere?

Patient – No doctor, as far as I remember, I didn’t hurt my knees.

Doctor – Okay, so I’m giving you Ibuprofen; it will help bring down the swelling and pain. Once the swelling goes down, you can take some tests which will help me judge why you have this constant pain. If you don’t find Ibuprofen in the medical store, you can ask them to give you Paracetamol 600. It will also help ease the pain. Have the medicines for two days and come back for another check-up once the swelling is gone.

Patient – Sure doctor. Thank you.

Frequently Asked Question (FAQ)

What should be included in conversations between a doctor and a patient.

Conversations between a doctor and a patient include whatever the patient and doctor discuss regarding the ailments of the patient. The conversation also includes the course of treatment prescribed by the doctor.

dialogue writing about doctor and patient

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Dialogue Examples 2 - Doctor & Patient

GrammarBank YouTube Video Exercises

English Compositions

Dialogue or Conversation Writing Between Doctor and Patient about Stomach Pain

Today, I’m going to share a couple of sample conversations between a Doctor, and Patient about stomach pain. So let’s get started.

feature image of Dialogue or Conversation Writing Between Doctor and Patient about Stomach Pain

Sample Conversation 1

Doctor: Hello, Good morning. What can I do for you today?

Patient: Hello Doctor. I am not very well today.

Doctor: Come, sit and please tell me.

Patient: Doctor, I have a really bad stomach ache.

Doctor : Did you have motions yesterday?

Patient: No Doctor.

Doctor: Okay what else?

Patient: I vomited two-three times today and also had a very bad headache because of that.

Doctor : Did you take any medicine?

Patient : Yes doctor took a crocin.

Doctor: Any prescription of it?

Patient : No Doctor. I took it myself because of the headache.

Doctor: Okay. There is not much to worry about. I will give you a prescription of three days, and if still you don’t feel okay, please come get rechecked in after that.

Patient: Okay Thank you doctor.

Sample Conversation 2

Doctor: Come in come in.

(The patient enters.)

Doctor: Yes, tell me. What problems are you facing?

Patient : Doctor I am suffering from a stomach ache and I have been having motions since last night. I also feel like vomiting.

Doctor: Okay. Did you have something unusual yesterday?

Patient: I had a little bit of roadside food.

Doctor: Then it could be because of that.

Patient: Yes doctor.

Doctor: It is possible that the food was contaminated or it did not suit you. You also look very dehydrated because of the loss of fluids. Drink enough water up to 10-12 glasses a day and take some energy drinks also. Fruit Juice is must and does not consume dairy products or caffeine.

Patient: Okay doctor. Anything else?

Doctor: Yes, please consume simple food and I am prescribing you a cou5rse of medicines for 3 days. Please come see me after that.

Patient: Okay. Thank you Doctor.

Sample Conversation 3

Doctor – Hello. How are you?

Patient – Hello doctor. I’ve been suffering from a little bit of stomach ache for the past couple of days. 

Doctor : Did you consume any street food or spicy foods recently?

Patient : I’ve only eaten homemade food.

Doctor : Come, lie down. I’ll examine your abdominal region. Point out the areas where you’ve been experiencing pain.

Okay. Have you had any difficulties in your bowel movements? Any changes you’ve observed?

Patient : Yes, passing stool has been slightly painful.  And the stool has been dry and lumpy.

Doctor : And the frequency of stools? How often have you been going to the toilet?

Patient : Once every day.

Doctor : Okay. It’s nothing to worry about. It’s a mild case of constipation. I’ll be prescribing you some laxatives and painkillers for your stomach ache. You’ll have to consume a fiber rich diet from now on, eat salad with your meals and drink lots of water. Exercise more and you’ll be just fine.

Patient : Thank you doctor.

Sample Conversation 4

Doctor: Hello. How are you today?

Patient: Hello Doctor. My stomach has been hurting for the past few days. I also feel nauseous and my head hurts.

Doctor: Does it hurt throughout your abdomen, or is it just in one particular area?

Patient : No, just here (patient points to region of pain)

Doctor: Is the pain constant or does it come and goes?

Patient: It comes and goes. It is sharp initially and then it dies down after a while.

Doctor: It is a severe stabbing pain or a dull one?

Patient: It’s dull mostly.

Doctor: Okay. I think it’s a mild infection and the discomfort you’re experiencing is mostly gastric, so no need to worry. I’m giving you a course of antibiotics and some pain killers. If the pain persists after 5 days then please come back for another consult. And eat light food like moong dal, khichdi and avoid oily and fried foods. Also, add exercise to your routine and drink lots of water.

Patient: Thank you.

That’s It:

So there you have it: Dialogue Writing Between Doctor and Patient about Stomach Pain.

I hope you these examples help you.

If you have any more topic ideas that you want me to cover, do let me know by leaving a quick comment just below the article.

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Go Natural English

How to talk to your doctor in English

Doctor-talk-in-English

Do you feel overwhelmed when going to a doctor?

Do you have kids who translate for you when you go to the doctor’s or you use a translator? It may feel overwhelming when you can’t speak for your kids or for yourself. I can relate to this situation with my own family. I used to translate for my mom when going to places where we needed to speak to someone. It was very difficult for my mom, but I remember telling her she should try to practice to get over the fear. After a few years and several times practicing, her English showed great improvement.

In the following dialogue, I will demonstrate a conversation between a doctor and a patient. It also includes the dialogue you would have with the appointment setter on the phone. Please be aware that I am not qualified to provide medical advice. This is just an example.

Dialogue between a doctor and patient

Making a doctor’s appointment on the phone before arriving to the clinic:.

  • Patient: Hello, I would like to make an appointment, please? 
  • Receptionist : sure, what is going on?
  • Patient : my son is not feeling well, has a headache, diarrhea, and vomiting. He also has a fever.
  • Receptionist :  OK, do you have your insurance information?
  • Patient : yes, I have the insurance information
  • Receptionist :  OK, what’s the insurance provider number
  • Patient : yes, it is…..
  • Receptionist : What is your son’s name and date of birth ?
  • Patient :   his name is David Ramos and his date of birth is 3/27/2005
  • Receptionist : great, do you prefer mornings or afternoons?
  • Patient : I prefer mornings
  • Receptionist :  OK, I have Wednesday at 9 am, is that OK? 
  • Patient : yes, thank you so much!
  • Receptionist : we will see you then!

Arriving at the doctor office:

  • Receptionist : Hello, how can I help you?
  • Patient : I have an appointment for my son at 9 am
  • these forms include basic information including medical history
  • Patient : I have finished thank you
  • Receptionist : thank you, we will call you when the doctor is ready for you
  • Patient : great, thank you

The nurse or doctor calls you in:

  • Doctor/nurse :  David?
  • Patient :  Yes, right here.
  • Doctor/nurse :  hello David, what’s going on?
  • Patient :  Hi, David has been experiencing some headaches, vomiting, diarrhea, and a little bit of a fever . 
  • Doctor/nurse :  we will take a look at his vitals and see what’s going on
  • Doctor/nurse : alright David, please take your shoes off and step on the scale
  • vitals include blood pressure, ears/nose/mouth/eyes, breathing, and heart rate
  • Doctor/nurse: mom, is there something different in his diet? 
  • Patient: we had some salmon and he has been feeling bad ever since 
  • Doctor/nurse: was this his first time eating salmon?
  • Patient :  yes, that was his first time and he didn’t take it very well
  • Doctor/nurse: it sounds like David has food poisoning or a stomach bug
  • food poisoning/stomach bug : maybe allergic to a certain food or the salmon wasn’t cooked right

The doctor will now give instructions

  • Doctor/nurse: Do you have any more questions about your son?
  • Patient: is there something I can give him to make him better? he has been throwing up a lot 
  • Doctor/nurse: He should stay hydrated and he has a fever give him some Tylenol and he should be fine in a few days

As you can see, it is a lengthy conversation but it is a great way to practice reading and understanding a conversation between a doctor and a patient. Remember to do your best to fend for yourself but if it is too advanced for you, always ask for help translated as needed. I hope you were able to get more practice and your vocabulary has expanded.

Check out this similar post for more medical phrases and vocabulary HERE .

For more content like this, don’t miss our free Go Natural English tips. Let us send them to you by email! Sign up for free at  https://www.gonaturalenglish.com/email/

Gabby Wallace, M.Ed TESOL

Gabby Wallace, M.Ed TESOL

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English for Medical Purposes - Making a Doctor's Appointment

Blend Images - Jose Luis Pelaez Inc / Brand X Pictures / Getty Images

  • TESOL Diploma, Trinity College London
  • M.A., Music Performance, Cologne University of Music
  • B.A., Vocal Performance, Eastman School of Music

Read the following dialogue with a partner to learn important vocabulary used for making doctor's appointments . Practice this dialogue with a friend to help you feel confident when you next make an appointment in English. Check your understanding with the quiz and review vocabulary. 

Role Play: Making a Doctor's Appointment

Doctor's Assistant: Good morning, Doctor Jensen's office. How may I help you? Patient : Hello, I'd like to make an appointment to see Doctor Jensen, please.

Doctor's Assistant:  Have you been in to see Doctor Jensen before? Patient : Yes, I have. I had a physical last year.

Doctor's Assistant:  Fine, what is your name? Patient : Maria Sanchez.

Doctor's Assistant:  Thank you, Ms. Sanchez, let me pull up your file... Okay, I've located your information. What's the reason for your making an appointment? Patient : I haven't been feeling very well lately.

Doctor's Assistant:  Do you need urgent care? Patient : No, not necessarily, but I'd like to see the doctor soon.

Doctor's Assistant:  Of course, how about next Monday? There's a slot available at 10 in the morning. Patient : I'm afraid I'm working at 10. Is there anything available after three?

Doctor's Assistant:  Let me see. Not on Monday, but we have a three o'clock opening next Wednesday. Would you like to come in then? Patient : Yes, next Wednesday at three would be great.

Doctor's Assistant:  All right, I'll pencil you in for three o'clock next Wednesday. Patient : Thank you for your help.

Doctor's Assistant: You're welcome. We'll see you next week. Goodbye. Patient : Goodbye.

Key Making an Appointment Phrases

  • Make an appointment : schedule a time to see the doctor
  • Have you been in before? : used to ask if the patient has seen the doctor before
  • Physical (examination:  yearly check-up to see if everything is okay.
  • Pull up a file : find a patient's information
  • Not feeling very well : feel ill or sick
  • Urgent care : similar to an emergency room, but for everyday problems
  • A slot:  an available time to make an appointment
  • Is there anything open?:  used to check if there is an available time for an appointment
  • Pencil someone in : to schedule an appointment

True or False?

Decide whether the following statements are true or false: 

  • Ms. Sanchez has never seen Doctor Jensen.
  • Ms. Sanchez had a physical examination with Doctor Jensen last year.
  • The doctor's assistant already has the file open.
  • Ms. Sanchez is feeling fine these days.
  • Ms. Sanchez needs urgent care.
  • She can't come in for a morning appointment. 
  • Ms. Sanchez schedules an appointment for next week.

Preparing for your Appointment

Once you've made an appointment you'll need to make sure you're prepared for your doctor's visit. Here is a short overview of what you'll need in the United States.

Insurance / Medicaid / Medicare Card

In the US doctor's have medical billing specialists whose job it is to bill the correct insurance provider. There are many insurance providers in the US, so it's essential to bring your insurance card. If you are over 65, you probably will need your Medicare card.

Cash, Check or Credit/Debit Card to Pay for Co-payment

Many insurance companies require a co-payment which represents a small portion of the total bill. Co-payments can be as little as $5 for some medicines, and as much as 20 percent or more of larger bills. Make sure to check with your insurance provider for much information on co-payments in your individual insurance plan as these vary widely. Bring some form of payment to your appointment to take care of your co-pay.

Medication List

It's important for your doctor to know which medications you take. Bring a list of all medications that you currently take.

Key Vocabulary

  • Medical billing specialist:  (noun) a person who processes charges to insurance companies
  • Insurance provider:  (noun) company that insurances people for their health care needs
  • Medicare:  (noun) a form of insurance in the US for people over 65
  • Co-payment / co-pay:  (noun) partial payment of your medical bill
  • Medication:  (noun) medicine
  • Co-payments are payments made by the insurance company to the doctor to pay for your medical appointments.
  • Medical billing specialists will help you deal with insurance companies.
  • Everyone in the US can take advantage of Medicare.
  • It's a good idea to bring a list of your medications to a doctor's appointment.
  • False - patients are responsible for co-payments.
  • True - medical billing specialists specialize in working with insurance companies.
  • False - Medicare is national insurance for those over 65.
  • True - it's important for your doctor to know which medications you are taking. 

If you need English for medical purposes you should know about troubling symptoms  and  joint pain,  as well as  pain that comes and goes.  If you work in a pharmacy, it's a good idea to practice talking about  prescriptions . All medical staff might be faced with a patient who is  feeling queasy  and how to  help a patient.

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Conversation Between Doctor and Patient

A conversation between doctor and patient is an important part of your overall health care experience, so it’s important to be well prepared. When you have a medical problem, there’s a good chance that you will be asked a series of questions by a doctor or other health care provider. A friend or family member may even ask you questions. These questions can be intimidating, but they don’t have to be. With the right answers, you can build trust and create a more comfortable environment for your doctor.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Stomach Ache

Conversation 1:

Doctor: How can I help you?

Patient: I’m having some stomach aches lately.

Doctor: What kind of stomach aches?

Patient: They come and go. Sometimes they feel like I ate something that disagreed with me. Other times I just feel nauseous.

Doctor: Do you have any other symptoms?

Patient: Yes, I feel really tired. I’m always exhausted.

Doctor: It sounds like you might be experiencing some gastritis. I’d like to prescribe you some pain medication to help with the discomfort.

Patient: Thank you, Doctor.

Doctor: You’re welcome.

Conversation 2:

Doctor: Hello, how can I help you?

Patient: I’m feeling terrible. My stomach is hurting all over.

Doctor: I see. Can you tell me exactly where it hurts?

Patient: Everywhere.

Doctor: Is it sharp or dull pain?

Patient: Sharp.

Doctor: Could you describe it to me in more detail?

Patient: It hurts when I move my stomach around.

Doctor: That’s because it’s a spasm. I’ll give you some medicine to relax you.

Conversation 3:

Doctor: How are you feeling today?

Patient: Fine, thanks.

Doctor: Are you sure you’re okay?

Patient: Yeah, I feel fine.

Doctor: So, what’s bothering you?

Patient: I’m not really sure. It started a couple of days ago, but it feels like it’s gotten worse since then.

Doctor: Let’s take a look.

Patient: All right.

Doctor: Can you tell me if you had any food or beverages that might have caused your stomach pain?

Patient: No, I haven’t had anything unusual.

Doctor: Any changes in your diet or exercise routine?

Patient: No, nothing like that.

Doctor: Well, it’s probably nothing to worry about. But I’d like to do some tests.

Patient: Okay.

Doctor: It’s going to be a little uncomfortable, but it won’t hurt.

Patient: Okay, I guess.

Doctor: First, I’m going to put a small tube into your stomach.

Doctor: It’s going to feel a little bit like a pinprick.

Patient: I’m ready.

Doctor: Okay.

Doctor: Here it goes.

Patient: Oh, that’s weird.

Doctor: What’s wrong?

Patient: My stomach feels really tight.

Doctor: That’s normal. It’s a natural response to the test.

Doctor: Is there anything else you need to tell me?

Patient: No, I’m fine.

Doctor: All right. I’m just going to do some other tests. I’ll be right back.

Conversation 4:

Doctor: Hello, I’m Dr Smith. Can I ask you a few questions?

Patient: Sure, Doctor.

Doctor: How long have you had your stomach pain?

Patient: It’s been going on for a while, but I just thought it was indigestion or something.

Doctor: How often do you have these symptoms?

Patient: They happen pretty frequently. Sometimes they last a day, sometimes they last a week.

Doctor: Does anything make them better or worse?

Patient: No, not really.

Doctor: Do you ever have them while you’re asleep?

Patient: I’ve never really noticed it before, but I sometimes do.

Doctor: You probably have sleep -related gastroenteritis. We’ll need to start you on some medicine to help reduce the inflammation in your stomach.

Patient: That sounds good, Doctor.

Doctor: I’m glad you feel better.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Fever

Patient: Hi Doctor, I’m sick.

Doctor: Okay, what seems to be the problem?

Patient: My fever is really high.

Doctor: It’s probably because of a virus. Do you have a cough?

Patient: Yes, I do.

Doctor: That’s nothing unusual. Viruses cause a lot of colds and flu symptoms. We all need to practice good hygiene to help prevent them.

Patient: I know, but it’s really bad.

Doctor: Okay, what’s your temperature?

Patient: It’s 102 degrees.

Doctor: That’s a bit high, but not really surprising. Your body is working overtime to fight off a viral infection.

Patient: I know. It’s just so uncomfortable.

Doctor: I can give you some medicine to make you feel better.

Patient: That’s not necessary. I just need to get through the day without feeling miserable.

Doctor: I understand, but you’re probably going to feel better soon. You’ll get your energy back in no time.

Patient: I hope so.

Doctor: I’m sure you will. I’m going to give you some medicine to make you feel a little better.

Patient: Thank you.

Doctor: What brings you in today?

Patient: I have a fever.

Doctor: Okay, that’s a pretty common complaint. Tell me, how long have you had this fever?

Patient: I don’t know exactly. I think it started yesterday.

Doctor: Okay, have you taken any medications to try to bring it down?

Patient: No, I haven’t.

Doctor: Well, I’d like to give you something to help you feel better. But I’m concerned that you might experience side effects if I do.

Patient: I understand.

Doctor: So, let’s talk about this a little bit. I’d like to make sure that you’re comfortable with my recommendations.

Patient: That sounds good.

Doctor: I think I should mention first that there’s a very good chance that you’re suffering from a virus. And if you have a fever, it’s likely that you’ve caught a cold or flu. I don’t think you’ve had a fever this high before, so I’d like to rule out infection first.

Doctor: Let’s talk about your options. I’m going to give you a prescription for some over-the-counter medication. It’s called acetaminophen. It’s very effective at bringing fevers down. I think it’s safe to take for at least three days.

Patient: I’m sure I can take it for three days.

Doctor: You might have some minor side effects from taking it, but it’s a small price to pay to feel better.

Patient: Okay, sounds good.

Doctor: Okay. I’m going to write you a prescription for a couple of days worth of medicine. It’s just to make sure that you get well.

Doctor: I’m going to have you come back in one week to make sure you’re feeling better. If you’re still sick, then I’ll give you a different prescription.

Doctor: I’ll see you next week.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Headache

Doctor: Hello, Mr Jones. How can I help you?

Patient: I’ve been having a headache for a few days now.

Doctor: Are you sure it isn’t just a normal headache?

Patient: Yes, I’m pretty sure.

Doctor: Well, let me take a look.

Doctor: Hmm. Your forehead looks a little red. Do you have any allergies?

Patient: I don’t think so.

Doctor: What about sinus problems?

Patient: No, I don’t think so.

Doctor: Have you been sleeping well?

Patient: Yeah, I’ve been getting about six hours of sleep every night.

Doctor: That’s not an insufficient amount.

Patient: Yeah, I know.

Doctor: Have you been feeling tired all day?

Patient: Yeah, a little.

Doctor: How about your appetite?

Patient: I’m not really hungry, but I’m not losing weight.

Doctor: Have you been drinking enough water?

Patient: Yeah, I try to drink a couple of glasses every day.

Doctor: That’s a good idea.

Doctor: Let’s take a look at your head.

Doctor: Hmmm. It seems like your forehead is a little swollen.

Patient: Yeah, it’s a bit tender.

Doctor: Do you have any problems with your vision?

Patient: No, my eyesight is fine.

Doctor: Do you have any pain in your joints?

Doctor: Have you been feeling any other symptoms?

Doctor: I’m going to give you a prescription for some pain medication.

Doctor: I’d like to see you again next week.

Patient: Okay. Thank you, Doctor.

Doctor: Good morning, Mr Jones. How can I help you?

Patient: I’m not feeling well, Doctor. I’ve been having headaches for the past few days.

Patient: Oh, my head hurts so much.

Doctor: I see.

Patient: It feels like someone is stabbing me in the head.

Doctor: Have you had any nausea or vomiting recently?

Doctor: How about dizziness or blurry vision?

Doctor: Any other symptoms?

Patient: Nothing really.

Doctor: Do you feel tired?

Patient: Kind of.

Doctor: Are you experiencing any pain in your joints?

Doctor: I see. What medications are you currently taking?

Patient: I’m not taking any medication.

Doctor: Have you been drinking a lot of caffeine recently?

Doctor: Have you been working a lot?

Doctor:   Are you experiencing any stress at home or work?

Doctor: How about family history?

Patient: My dad had a stroke when he was in his 50s.

Doctor: Is that the only reason you think you might be having a migraine?

Patient: Well, I’ve never had a headache before.

Doctor: I understand. But it’s possible that you have a migraine. Have you ever had a headache like this before?

Doctor: I see. I’m going to order a CT scan to check your brain for any abnormalities.

Patient: Okay, thank you, Doctor.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Heart Attack

Doctor: Good morning, Mr Jones.

Patient: Good morning, Doctor.

Patient: I’m feeling fine.

Doctor: Any chest pains?

Patient: No, I’m not having any chest pains.

Doctor: Have you been experiencing any shortness of breath?

Patient: No, I’m not having any shortness of breath.

Doctor: Have you noticed any changes in your heart rate or blood pressure?

Doctor: Okay. It sounds like you had a mild heart attack last week. I’m going to write you a prescription for nitroglycerin. This should help relieve your symptoms.

Doctor: Good morning, Ms Smith. How are you feeling today?

Patient: I’m feeling pretty good. But I’ve been having a lot of chest pain recently.

Doctor: Chest pain is one of the most common heart attack symptoms. Tell me exactly what happened.

Patient: I was walking home from work yesterday when I felt like something was stuck in my throat. Then I started getting a sharp pain in my chest. It was really bad.

Doctor: Okay, what did you do next?

Patient: I called my husband to come home right away. He took me to the emergency room. They gave me some tests and told me I had a heart attack.

Doctor: What did they say the tests showed?

Patient: They said that I had a 90% blockage in my left coronary artery.

Doctor: Did they do anything to treat the blockage?

Patient: Yes, they put a stent in my artery.

Doctor: That sounds like a very serious situation. How long ago was this?

Patient: About two weeks ago.

Doctor: You were lucky that you didn’t have a heart attack sooner. If you had waited longer, it could have been much worse.

Patient: I know, but I’m still feeling pretty bad. I’m not sure I’ll ever be able to get back to my normal self again.

Doctor: I’m sorry to hear that. But you’re going to be fine. You’re young, and you have a strong heart. Your chances of surviving this are very high.

Patient: Thank you, Doctor. I appreciate your optimism.

Doctor: You’re welcome. Now, let’s talk about your diet. Do you smoke or drink alcohol?

Patient: No, I don’t. I’m not sure I can do either of those things anymore.

Doctor: That’s a good start. I recommend that you try to cut down on your salt intake. And I also recommend that you eat more fruits and vegetables.

Patient: I’ll try to do that. Thanks.

Doctor: You’re welcome. Good luck!

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Heart Attack Symptoms

Patient: : Hello, Doctor.

Doctor: Hello. How can I help you?

Patient: I’ve been feeling a little dizzy lately, and I’m concerned that it could be a sign of a heart attack.

Doctor: Okay. What symptoms are you experiencing?

Patient: I feel like my heart is racing, and I’m getting lightheaded.

Doctor: Are you also experiencing chest pain?

Patient: Yes, I am.

Doctor: Do you know where it is specifically?

Patient: It’s right here in my chest.

Doctor: Okay, is it located in your left or right side?

Patient: My left.

Doctor: Okay. Do you have any other symptoms?

Patient: I feel like my throat is closing up, and I’m having trouble breathing.

Doctor: Have you had any chest pain before?

Patient: No, this is the first time.

Doctor: Okay. It seems like you’re having a heart attack. I’ll call an ambulance and get you to the hospital right away.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Back Pain

Doctor: Good morning. How can I help you?

Patient: Good morning. I’ve been experiencing some back pain lately.

Doctor: Is it getting worse?

Patient: Yes, it’s been getting progressively worse.

Doctor: Have you tried taking pain medication?

Patient: I’ve taken ibuprofen and acetaminophen, but it doesn’t seem to be helping.

Doctor: Have you been taking any other medications?

Patient: I’m on an antidepressant.

Doctor: Well, I’m not sure what the best course of action would be in this situation. Perhaps you should try some alternative treatments first.

Patient: Alternative treatments? What do you mean?

Doctor: Well, there are many different therapies that can be used to treat back pain. Some of them are physical, while others are more psychological.

Patient: Oh, okay. What do you recommend?

Doctor:   Well, I recommend trying to get a good night’s sleep. It’s important to get enough rest to promote healing.

Patient: That sounds reasonable. I’ll try to do that. Thanks for your advice.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Insomnia

Doctor: Good morning, Mrs Smith.

Patient : I’m having a bit of trouble sleeping lately.

Doctor: Has something disrupted your sleep?

Patient: Well, I had a bit of a rough night last night.

Doctor: What happened?

Patient: I was having some trouble falling asleep. And I kept waking up during the night.

Doctor: Did you have any dreams or nightmares?

Doctor: How about the times you woke up? Were you able to go back to sleep?

Patient: No, I couldn’t get back to sleep. I’d lay there for a few minutes, and then I’d get up and walk around.

Doctor: Was it during the night or early morning hours?

Patient: No, it was later. I guess I just didn’t get enough sleep.

Doctor: I see. Well, it sounds like you may have been having a mild case of insomnia. I’ll give you a prescription for a sleeping pill to help you get some rest.

  Conversation 2:

Doctor: Good morning, Mr Smith.

Patient: Good morning.

Doctor: How can I help you today?

Patient: I have a sore throat and am feeling really tired.

Doctor: Hmm. Well, it sounds like you may have a viral infection. Let me write you a prescription for some Tylenol.

Patient: That sounds great, Doctor.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient on Eye Donation

Patient: I’d like to talk to you about eye donation.

Doctor: Okay. What can I do for you?

Patient: I’m a registered donor, and I’d like to contribute to my local eye bank .

Doctor: Great. Would you like to discuss your options with me?

Patient: Sure. What are your thoughts on eye donation?

Doctor: Eye donation is a very noble cause. But it’s also a tough decision. The procedure is invasive, and it requires the removal of the cornea.

Patient: I understand that. But I’m willing to take that risk if it means helping others.

Doctor: That’s great! I’m glad to hear that.

Patient: I just need to make sure that I’m making the right decision for myself.

Doctor: I think you’re doing the right thing. But it’s your choice. If you’re still interested in donating, I’ll be happy to set you up with an appointment.

Patient: That’s great. Thank you.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient on Blood Donation

Doctor: Hello, I’m Dr Jones. How can I help you today?

Patient: I’m here for my blood donation.

Doctor: Great! Let’s take a seat.

Doctor: I need to ask you a few questions first.

Doctor: How long have you lived in the area?

Patient: For about three years now.

Doctor: Have you donated blood before?

Patient: Yes, I have.

Doctor: Okay, how often do you donate?

Patient: Every time I get a chance.

Doctor: Good! Are you currently taking any medications or have any health conditions?

Patient: No, not at the moment.

Doctor: Great! We should be able to get you a blood donation appointment in a couple of weeks. I’ll call you again to schedule your appointment.

Conversation Between Doctor and Patient About Junk Food

Doctor: Hi, how are you today?

Patient: I’m fine. How are you?

Doctor: I’m fine. I’m just looking over your medical history.

Patient: Great. So, I guess you’re telling me that I’m not overweight, right?

Doctor: No, I’m not telling you that. Your weight is just fine. But I do want to talk to you about your eating habits.

Patient: Oh, okay. Well, I try to eat healthy as much as I can, but sometimes I eat a lot of junk food.

Doctor: I understand. It’s important to watch what you eat, especially if you’re overweight.

Patient: Yes, that’s right.

Doctor: Have you ever considered joining a gym?

Patient: No, I’ve never done that before.

Doctor: You don’t have to join a gym to eat healthier. All you have to do is exercise regularly. And it doesn’t have to be a gym. You can exercise at home, or even outside if you prefer.

Patient: That sounds good. I’ll think about it.

Doctor: I’m glad to hear that. Good luck!

In conclusion, when you are asked questions by a doctor or other health care professional, the best thing you can do is to be open and honest about what you are experiencing. You should answer the question as directly as possible, and don’t hesitate to ask any follow-up questions you may have. The more information you provide, the more likely you will be able to get the proper treatment for your condition and feel better sooner.

dialogue writing about doctor and patient

Shobhit is the founder of Ishiksha, content writer and educator who has been creating educational content since 2021. His writing covers topics like science, technology, and the humanities. When he isn't writing, Shobhit enjoys reading nonfiction, watching documentaries, and going on nature walks.

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  • v.10(1); Spring 2010

Doctor-Patient Communication: A Review

Jennifer fong ha.

* Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia

† Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia

‡ University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia

Nancy Longnecker

Effective doctor-patient communication is a central clinical function in building a therapeutic doctor-patient relationship, which is the heart and art of medicine. This is important in the delivery of high-quality health care. Much patient dissatisfaction and many complaints are due to breakdown in the doctor-patient relationship. However, many doctors tend to overestimate their ability in communication. Over the years, much has been published in the literature on this important topic. We review the literature on doctor-patient communication.

INTRODUCTION

“Medicine is an art whose magic and creative ability have long been recognized as residing in the interpersonal aspects of patient-physician relationship.” 1

A doctor's communication and interpersonal skills encompass the ability to gather information in order to facilitate accurate diagnosis, counsel appropriately, give therapeutic instructions, and establish caring relationships with patients. 2 – 4 These are the core clinical skills in the practice of medicine, with the ultimate goal of achieving the best outcome and patient satisfaction, which are essential for the effective delivery of health care. 5 , 6

Basic communication skills in isolation are insufficient to create and sustain a successful therapeutic doctor-patient relationship, which consists of shared perceptions and feelings regarding the nature of the problem, goals of treatment, and psychosocial support. 2 , 7 Interpersonal skills build on this basic communication skill. 2 Appropriate communication integrates both patient- and doctor-centered approaches. 4

The ultimate objective of any doctor-patient communication is to improve the patient's health and medical care. 2 Studies on doctor-patient communication have demonstrated patient discontent even when many doctors considered the communication adequate or even excellent. 8 Doctors tend to overestimate their abilities in communication. Tongue et al 9 reported that 75% of the orthopedic surgeons surveyed believed that they communicated satisfactorily with their patients, but only 21% of the patients reported satisfactory communication with their doctors. Patient surveys have consistently shown that they want better communication with their doctors. 2

The principles of patient-centered medicine date back to the ancient Greek school of Cos. 10 However, patient-centered medicine has not always been common practice. For example, in the 1950s to 1970s, most doctors considered it inhumane and detrimental to patients to disclose bad news because of the bleak treatment prospect for cancers. 11 , 12 The medical model has more recently evolved from paternalism to individualism. Information exchange is the dominant communication model, and the health consumer movement has led to the current model of shared decision making and patient-centered communication. 6 , 7 , 13 – 15

BENEFITS OF EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

Effective doctor-patient communication is a central clinical function, and the resultant communication is the heart and art of medicine and a central component in the delivery of health care. 7 , 8 , 16 The 3 main goals of current doctor-patient communication are creating a good interpersonal relationship, facilitating exchange of information, and including patients in decision making. 4 , 7 , 11 , 17 Effective doctor-patient communication is determined by the doctors' “bedside manner,” which patients judge as a major indicator of their doctors' general competence. 1

Good doctor-patient communication has the potential to help regulate patients' emotions, facilitate comprehension of medical information, and allow for better identification of patients' needs, perceptions, and expectations. 4 , 7 , 17 Patients reporting good communication with their doctor are more likely to be satisfied with their care, and especially to share pertinent information for accurate diagnosis of their problems, follow advice, and adhere to the prescribed treatment. 1 , 6 , 7 , 9 , 14 , 16 , 18 – 23 Patients' agreement with the doctor about the nature of the treatment and need for follow-up is strongly associated with their recovery. 10

Studies have shown correlations between a sense of control and the ability to tolerate pain, recovery from illness, decreased tumor growth, and daily functioning. 16 , 20 , 24 Enhanced psychological adjustments and better mental health have also been reported. 6 , 10 , 16 , 25 , 26 Some studies have observed a decrease in length of hospital stay and therefore the cost of individual medical visits and fewer referrals. 1 , 27

A more patient-centered encounter results in better patient as well as doctor satisfaction. 1 , 5 – 7 , 9 , 13 , 15 , 18 , 19 , 22 , 25 , 26 , 28 – 30 Satisfied patients are less likely to lodge formal complaints or initiate malpractice complaints. 1 , 5 , 9 , 19 , 22 , 28 Satisfied patients are advantageous for doctors in terms of greater job satisfaction, less work-related stress, and reduced burnout. 4 , 26

THE PROBLEMS

There are many barriers to good communication in the doctor-patient relationship, including patients' anxiety and fear, doctors' burden of work, fear of litigation, fear of physical or verbal abuse, and unrealistic patient expectations. 31

Deterioration of Doctors' Communication Skills

It has been observed that communication skills tend to decline as medical students progress through their medical education, and over time doctors in training tend to lose their focus on holistic patient care. 32 Furthermore, the emotional and physical brutality of medical training, particularly during internship and residency, suppresses empathy, substitutes techniques and procedures for talk, and may even result in derision of patients. 32

Nondisclosure of Information

The doctor-patient interaction is a complex process, and serious miscommunication is a potential pitfall, especially in terms of patients' understanding of their prognosis, purpose of care, expectations, and involvement in treatment. 12 These important factors may affect the choices patients make regarding their treatment and end-of-life care, which can have a significant influence on the disease. 33 Good communication skills practiced by doctors allowed patients to perceive themselves as a full participant during discussions relating to their health. 10 This subjective experience that influences patient biology is the “biology of self-confidence” described by Sobel, which emphasized the critical role of patients' perception in their healing process. 34

Doctors' Avoidance Behavior

There are reported observations of doctors avoiding discussion of the emotional and social impact of patients' problems because it distressed them when they could not handle these issues or they did not have the time to do so adequately. This situation negatively affected doctors emotionally and tended to increase patients' distress. 26 This avoidance behavior may result in patients being unwilling to disclose problems, which could delay and adversely impact their recovery. 26

Discouragement of Collaboration

Physicians have been found to discourage patients from voicing their concerns and expectations as well as requests for more information. 32 This negative influence of the doctors' behavior and the resultant nature of the doctor-patient communication deterred patients from asserting their need for information and explanations. 32 Patients can feel disempowered and may be unable to achieve their health goals. 32 Lack of sufficient explanation results in poor patient understanding, and a lack of consensus between doctor and patient may lead to therapeutic failure. 32

Resistance by Patients

Today, patients have recognized that they are not passive recipients and are able to resist the power and expert authority that society grants doctors. 35 They can implicitly and explicitly resist the monologue of information transfer from doctors by actively reconstructing expert information to assert their own perspectives, integrate with their knowledge of their own bodies and experiences, as well as the social realities of their lives. 35 Being attentive to social relationships and contexts will ensure that this information is received, and most importantly, acted on. 35 Lee and Garvin 35 asserted that inequality, social relations, and structural constraints may be the most influential factors in health care. This was illustrated in their study when female patients from a lower socioeconomic demographic in the Appalachian region of the United States modified advice to avoid sun exposure and, by taking into account societal pressures that equated tanned skin with beauty, continued tanning despite knowledge of the risks associated with sun exposure and skin cancer ( Figure ). The study by Lee and Garvin 35 demonstrates the need to take into account social factors in the production, dissemination, and use of knowledge.

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STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT

Communication skills.

Communication skills involve both style and content. 36 Attentive listening skills, empathy, and use of open-ended questions are some examples of skillful communication. Improved doctor-patient communication tends to increase patient involvement and adherence to recommended therapy; influence patient satisfaction, adherence, and health care utilization; and improve quality of care and health outcomes. 7 , 37

Breaking bad news to patients is a complex and challenging communication task in the practice of medicine. 12 Relationship building is especially important in breaking bad news. 17 Important factors include understanding patients' perspectives, sharing information, and patients' knowledge and expectations. 12 , 38 Miscommunication has serious implications, as it may hinder patients' understanding, expectations of treatment, or involvement in treatment planning. 12 In addition, miscommunication decreases patient satisfaction with medical care, level of hopefulness, and subsequent psychological adjustment. 12

Baile et al 12 reported that patients often regard their doctors as one of their most important sources of psychological support. Empathy is one of the most powerful ways of providing this support to reduce patients' feelings of isolation and validating their feelings or thoughts as normal and to be expected.

Communication Training

Doctors are not born with excellent communication skills, as they have different innate talents. Instead they can understand the theory of good doctor-patient communication, learn and practice these skills, and be capable of modifying their communication style if there is sufficient motivation and incentive for self-awareness, self-monitoring, and training. 11 , 25 Communication skills training has been found to improve doctor-patient communication. 39 , 40 However, the improved behaviors may lapse over time. 28 It is therefore important to practice new skills, with regular feedback on the acquired behavior. 28 Some have said that medical education should go beyond skills training to encourage physicians' responsiveness to the patients' unique experience. 10

Collaborative Communication

Collaborative communication is a reciprocal and dynamic relationship, involving the 2-way exchange of information. 41 In an ideal world, doctors should collaborate with their patients to provide the best care because doctors tend to make decisions based on quick assessments, which may be biased. 41 This requires the doctors to take time or set up opportunities to offer and discuss treatment choices to patients and share the responsibility and control with them. 7 , 11 Successful information exchange ensures that concerns are elicited and explored and that explanations of treatment options are balanced and understood to allow for shared decision making. 7 , 11 , 14 , 42 In this approach, the doctor facilitates discussion and negotiation with patients and the treatment options are evaluated and tailored to the context of the patients' situation and needs, rather than a standardized protocol. 7 , 11 , 42 Care options need to be collaborative between doctor and patient, taking into account patient expectations, outcome preferences, level of risk acceptance, and any associated cost to maximize adherence and to assure the best outcome. 32

Conflict Management

Feudtner 41 described situations in pediatric palliative care in which the cause of conflicts was often not expressed. The root source was often unspoken and thus unclear or unknown to one or even both parties, which generated feelings of discord. Conflict is often a challenging situation as it can evoke feelings of helplessness, frustration, confusion, anger, uncertainty, failure, or sadness. 11 The doctor should recognize these feelings and develop skills to identify problematic responses in the patient or themselves to de-escalate the situation and enable the relationship problems to be turned into a clinical success. 11

In addition to minimizing avoidance behavior, which prevents patients from expressing opinions, effective doctor-patient communication should involve productive conversation, which involves understanding of both parties' perspectives, by shifting from a perspective that is rigidly certain of one's belief to a more exploratory approach that strives to understand the situation from another perspective. 41 Recognizing the impact of patient reciprocation of communication and affect in a medical visit is important as it may help create positive exchanges to defuse negative patterns. 25

Health Beliefs

Beliefs and values affect the doctor-patient relationship and interaction. 9 Divergent beliefs can affect health care through competing therapies, fear of the health care system, or distrust of prescribed therapies. 37 This perception gap may negatively affect treatment decisions and therefore may influence patient outcomes despite appropriate therapy. 17 Although doctors use a biomedical model to understand illness, patient beliefs and values are influenced by social and behavioral factors as well as biology or anatomy. 17

It is important to identify and address perceived barriers and benefits of treatment to improve patient adherence to medical plans by ensuring that the benefits and importance of treatment are understood. 17 Doctors should understand patients' functional meaning of disease, as well as the relationship meaning and symbolic meaning, followed by a summary of this information and telling the patient the problem from the doctor's perspective and, finally, asking the patient to summarize what was said. 17 Agreement between doctor and patient is a key variable that influences outcome. 17

Patients construct their own version of adherence according to their personal world views and social contexts, which can result in a divergent expectation of adherence practice. 9 , 13 , 15 Good doctor-patient communication is a mechanism used to gain an understanding of patients' social context, expectations, and experience. 9 , 13 , 42 With collaborative communication, a particular condition, perspective, or fact can be identified, allowing for a view from a different perspective, drawing attention for a better assessment and the subsequent treatment. 41 In this model, effective doctors acknowledge and respect patients' rights to make decisions and choices. 13

LIMITATIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

Clinical research will guide improvements in determining best practice. Randomized controlled trials are able to effectively control bias and chance in evaluating efficacy. However, this is easier said than done in terms of investigations of communication. A majority of the studies reported in this review were cross-sectional. 7 However, doctor-patient relationships are frequently long term, involving multiple visits, and this may limit the generalizability of the studies.

The approaches used in assessing doctor-patient communication and health outcomes in the literature are shown in the Table . 7 , 30 Behavioral and observational components involve recordings to evaluate the actual medical encounter and analyze it in order to code behavior based on one of the observational instruments with respect to task and socioemotional behaviors. 7 , 14 , 30 The patients' perception measures are assessed via surveys to rate frequency, occurrence, or other elements of physician behavior. 7 , 14 , 43 Patients' perceptions may have a greater impact on their own outcomes than physician behavior, but their perceptions are subjective and subject to bias, and patients may be influenced by other factors such as their health status and state of mind and may not accurately reflect the reality of the consultation. 7

Approaches in Assessment of Doctor-Patient Communication

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Comparisons between studies are difficult as numerous tools are available but no single tool is completely satisfactory. Different studies use combinations of different tools for this reason. In addition, items are generated for measurement of patient perceptions without predefined categories of doctors' behaviors. 7

Qualitative measures, although difficult to gauge, can provide a deeper understanding of patients' subjective perceptions. Clinically the most easily quantified outcomes are physiological measures, but these may not be possible in many surgical or chronic illnesses. 19 They are also highly specific and may contribute minimally to an understanding of the patient's overall health. 19 Satisfaction is a complex notion with many determinants and is used as the ultimate outcome of the delivery of health care services as it is a proxy for health, and its rating provides useful information about the structure, process, and outcomes of care. 21 , 44 Morss et al, as quoted by Alazri and Neal, 21 reviewed 21 relevant qualitative studies and found that the domains used to assess patient satisfaction with care included availability of the physician, coordination in a multidisciplinary team, competence, communication and relationships, ability to provide information and educate patients, responsiveness to emotional needs of patients, ability to provide holistic care, and ability to support patients' decision making. Satisfaction contributes to better medical outcomes through fulfillment of patients' values and expectations. 21 Patients who experience good processes and outcomes of care are more satisfied and therefore more likely to continue maintaining the existing doctor-patient relationship. 21

The main independent predictors of satisfaction have been patients' perceptions of communication and partnership, and a positive doctor approach. 27 Satisfaction strongly predicts compliance with treatment and medical outcomes in acute illness. 27 However, its use in medical interviews to relate to patient-centeredness may be inaccurate as its scales include subscales on communication. 27

A majority of the literature frequently uses patient satisfaction and adherence to determine the efficacy of the doctor-patient relationship. 7 , 39 The ability to generalize is limited, depending on, among other things, the size and representative nature of the specific population studied. 7 , 36 Satisfaction needs to be investigated with a tightly defined and homogenous case mix to explore cause and effect of various factors on doctor-patient communication. 27 In addition, the Hawthorne effect (awareness that one is being observed and evaluated) is difficult to avoid in observational studies and may affect behavior. 5 , 45

“The patient will never care how much you know, until they know how much you care.” (Terry Canale in his American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Vice Presidential Address 9 )

Doctor-patient communication is a major component of the process of health care. 46 Doctors are in a unique position of respect and power. Hippocrates suggested that doctors may influence patients' health. 19 Effective doctor-patient communication can be a source of motivation, incentive, reassurance, and support. 19 , 47 A good doctor-patient relationship can increase job satisfaction and reinforce patients' self-confidence, motivation, and positive view of their health status, which may influence their health outcomes. 19 , 47

Most complaints about doctors are related to issues of communication, not clinical competency. 9 , 29 , 42 Patients want doctors who can skillfully diagnose and treat their sicknesses as well as communicate with them effectively. 32

Doctors with better communication and interpersonal skills are able to detect problems earlier, can prevent medical crises and expensive intervention, and provide better support to their patients. This may lead to higher-quality outcomes and better satisfaction, lower costs of care, greater patient understanding of health issues, and better adherence to the treatment process. 29 , 32 There is currently a greater expectation of collaborative decision making, with physicians and patients participating as partners to achieve the agreed upon goals and the attainment of quality of life. 32

Bla Bla Français

Bla Bla Français

Spoken French for The Real Life

Conversation beween doctor and patient in French

Conversation between doctor and patient in French

Often times, when living or travelling in a country where people speak a foreign language, we don't think about health problems until one actually hits us.

Only then do we realize we've never had to deal with a doctor who doesn't speak our language ! Being able to have a small conversation in French with a doctor - with you as the patient - is an important skill to have.

Obviously, there are hundreds of possible health problems for which you may end up seeing a doctor.  However, for most common petty troubles, a visit to a general practitioner might follow a typical pattern.

In this article, we'll look at (and listen to) an example conversation dialogue in French between doctor and patient.  We'll then go through the most interesting phrases and expressions in the dialogue, with comments and explanations about how to (re)use them.

In the following dialogue, a female patient in her forties is seen by Docteur Durand, a "médecin généraliste" (general practitioner).

Note that the right way to refer to a doctor is "un médecin".  Although people often say "voir un docteur", the word "Docteur" in French is just a title (like "Doctor" in English), the correct phrase is "voir un médecin".

Conversation between doctor and patient in French : the dialogue

Bonjour madame.  Alors, qu'est-ce-qui vous amène ? Bonjour Docteur.  Eh bien, ça fait plusieurs jours que j'ai mal partout. Où avez-vous mal exactement ? Dans la nuque, les bras, les épaules, les mains, les jambes, les pieds ... partout ! Aha...  Avez-vous pris votre température ? Oui, je n'ai pas de fièvre. Bon, veuillez vous asseoir là.  Ouvrez la bouche et dites "aaaaaah". "Aaaaaah" Hum, je ne vois rien d'anormal, il ne semble pas y avoir d'inflammation. Avez-vous également mal au ventre ? Euh non docteur. Des migraines ? Des nausées ? Des soucis de digestion ? Non, aucune. Ressentez-vous une fatigue anormale ? Non, en fait je suis plutôt en forme, mis à part ces douleurs. Avez-vous fait de nouvelles activités ces temps-ci ? Non pas vraiment...   Ah si, depuis une semaine, je participe à un marathon de danse tous les soirs.  Mais à part ça ... Ah d'accord, je vois...  Bon, je vais vous donner de l'aspirine...  Et allez-y doucement sur la danse... Si vous voulez bien m'excuser, j'ai encore beaucoup de patients à voir.  Bonne journée madame.

Listen to the audio for the complete dialogue :

Here's the English version :

Good afternoon ma'am.  So, what brings you here ? Hi Doctor.  Well, I've been feeling pain all over my body for several days. Where exactly is the pain located ? In my neck, my arms, my shoulders, my hands, my legs, my feet ... everywhere ! Aha...  did you take your temperature ? Yes, I don't have any fever. OK, please sit here.  Open your mouth and say "aaaaaah". "Aaaaaah" Hum, I'm not seeing anything wrong, there doesn't seem to be an inflammation. Does your belly hurt ? No, Doctor. Headaches ? Nausea ? Digestion problems ? No, none. Are you feeling unusually tired  ? No, I'm actually feeling pretty good, aside from these pains. Have you been doing any special activities lately ? No, not really ... Well yeah, for the past week I've been participating in a danse marathon every night.  But other than that ... Oh OK, I see ... Well I'll just give you some aspirin...  And take it easy on the dansing .. Now if you'll excuse me, I have many more patients to see.  Have a nice day ma'am.

Conversation between doctor and patient in French : what seems to be the trouble ?

At the start of the visit, the doctor greets the lady saying "bonjour madame".  He could also just say "Bonjour ...",  but appending "madame" is often considered more polite and respectful.

Having no time to waste, he then asks : "alors, qu'est-ce-qui vous amène ?" (so, what brings you here ?)

The word "alors" serves as a transition from his quick greeting to the question of why she's here.  He could have skipped the word altogether, but using it indicates he's ready to start working.  It sort of means, "OK let's get straight to the point".

This is a common way to start a consultation with a service provider.  For example, you go to a technican to get your PC fixed.  At the store, you wait for your turn, then someone comes to attend you.  He might say :

  • "Alors, qu'est-ce-que je peux faire pour vous ?" https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/3-alors-keske-j-p-faire-pr-vs.mp3
  • "Alors, que puis-je faire pour vous ?" https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/4-alors-ke-puis-faire-pr-vs.mp3

For more examples of a conversation in a store, check out this article and audio dialogue .

In the case of a doctor, dentist, psychologist, and generally speaking medical related service providers, they will often say :

"qu'est-ce-qui vous amène ?" (what brings you here)

rather than "que puis-je faire pour vous ?" which sounds a bit too mercantile.   It sort of reflects the nuance between a "patient" and a "client"...

French conversation between doctor and patient : exposing the health problem

The patient replies with "bonjour Docteur", which is the way you typically address a docteur.  In the same manner, you would say "bonjour Professeur " when talking to a professor.

She then starts exposing her problem, beginning with "eh bien" :

"eh bien, ça fait plusieurs jours que j'ai mal partout."

Just like "alors" earlier, "eh bien" serves as a transition and a lead into the description of her problem,  similar to an English "well".

Notice the phrase "ça fait plusieurs jours que", which precedes "j'ai mal partout".  This is a common way to express duration, and something that's ongoing, in spoken French :

  • Ça fait des mois que je travaille sur ce projet  (I've been working on this project for months) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/5-ca-fait-des-mois-que-je-travaille.mp3
  • Ça fait des années que je m'entraine  (I've been practicing for years) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/6-c-fait-des-annees.mp3
  • Ça fait des heures que je t'attends !  (I've been waiting for you for hours !) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/7-ca-fait-des-h-ke-je-tatta.mp3

It's a bit like saying "it's been hours that I've been waiting for you !"  It's a colloquial way of saying things with an emphasis on duration - which comes first in the sentence.

An alternative, more neutral phrasing would be :

  • J'ai mal partout depuis plusieurs jours https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/8-g-mal-partt-depuis-pls-jours.mp3
  • Je m'entraine depuis des années
  • Je t'attends depuis des heures !

The patient uses the phrase "j'ai mal partout" (I'm hurting everywhere).  "Avoir mal" (to hurt) is used very often in spoken French :

  • "J'ai mal à la tête" (my head hurts  / I have a headache)
  • "Tu as mal au ventre" (your belly hurts)
  • "Il a mal au coeur" (he's feeling nauseous - litterally "his heart is hurting")
  • "Nous avons mal aux pieds" (our feet hurt)
  • "Vous avez mal au dos" (your back hurts)

An alternative way of expressing pain is using the word "douleur" (pain) :

  • J'ai une douleur au bras (I have pain in my arm)
  • J'ai une douleur à l'estomac (I have pain in my stomach)

The doctor then asks the patient :

"Où avez-vous mal exactement ?" (where exactly are you feeling pain ?)

This is a common way of asking for precisions about something.  For example :

  • "Ou allez-vous exactement ?" (where exactly are you going ?) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/11-ou-allez-vous-exact.mp3
  • "Qu'essayez-vous de faire exactement ?"  (what exactly are you trying to do ?) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/12-quessayez-vs-de-faire-exact.mp3
  • "Pourquoi pleures-tu exactement ?"  (why exactly are you crying ?) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/13-pq-pleures-tu-exact.mp3

The patient then lists all the troublesome parts of her body.  Notice she uses "les" when listing body parts (les bras, les jambes...) instead of "mes" (mes bras, mes jambes).  When expressing pain, you typically say :

"J'ai mal dans les bras" or "j'ai une douleur dans les bras"

instead of  "j'ai mal dans mes bras" or "j'ai une douleur dans mes bras", sometimes considered redundant and poor language.

In a similar way, we say "je me lave les dents" rather than "je lave mes dents".  Go figure ...

Conversation between doctor and patient in French : ruling out some causes

The doctor asks his patient : "Avez-vous pris votre température ?" (did you take your temperature).  He implictly means "avec un thermomètre" (with a thermometer).

In French, "avoir de la température" is synonymous with "avoir de la fièvre" (to have fever) :

"Elle est malade ?"

"Oui, elle a de la température."

"oui elle a de la fièvre".

In our conversation in French, the patient answers to the doctor "non je n'ai pas de fièvre".

He then says "bon, veuillez vous asseoir là".  The phrase "veuillez + verb" is a polite and formal way to ask someone to do something, more formal than just a regular "please".  It's a bit like saying "if you would please ..." or "if you'd be kind enough to ...".

Some other examples :

  • "Veuillez m'apporter un café" (if you would please bring me some coffee) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/17-veuillez-mapporter-cafe.mp3
  • "Veuillez baisser le son"  (if you would please turn the volume down) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/18-veuillez-baisser-le-son.mp3
  • "Veuiller fermer la porte"   (if you would be kind enough to close the door) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/19-veuillez-fermer-la-porte.mp3

Again, the phrase "veuillez vous asseoir" is quite formal.  If he were to speak to his son, for example, he would probably say instead :

"Assieds-toi là s'il te plait."

Next, he asks his patient to open her mouth and say "aaaaah" - a classic request a doctor makes so he can get a good view of the patient's throat - same as in English.

After examining the patient's throat, the doctor concludes he's not seeing anything wrong or abnormal :

"Je ne vois rien d'anormal".

Note the use of " d' " after "rien" and before the adjective "anormal".  Other examples are :

  • "Je ne vois rien de grave" (I don't see anything serious) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/22-je-ne-vois-rien-de-grave.mp3
  • "Je ne mange rien de sucré"  (I don't eat anything sweet) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/23-je-ne-mange-rien-de-sucre.mp3
  • "Il ne fait rien de mal"  (he's not doing anything wrong) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/24-il-ne-fait-rien-de-mal.mp3

Note that in our dialogue, " d' " replaces "de" because "anormal" starts with a vowel.

The doctor adds :  "il ne semble pas y avoir d'inflammation"

The phrase "il ne semble pas y avoir de ..."  (there doesn't seem to be) is used quite frequently in French.  It is used when drawing conclusions from the observation of something :

  • "Il ne semble pas y avoir de monde" (there don't seem to be a lot of people) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/25-il-ne-semble-pas-y-avoir-de-monde.mp3
  • "il ne semble pas y avoir de bruit" (there doesn't seem to any noise) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/26-il-ne-semble-pas-bruit.mp3

Here's another way the doctor could have said it :

"il ne semble pas qu'il y ait d'inflammation"  (note the use of subjunctive after "semble que")

This looks a bit more grammatically complex, yet this structure is used quite a bit in everyday French-speaking life.

Conversation between doctor and patient in French : investigating

The doctor pursues his investigation and asks :

"Avez-vous également mal au ventre ?"

Note the use of "également" (as well).  He might have said "avez-vous mal au ventre également ?" or "avez-vous aussi mal au ventre ?"

He then goes through a brief list of ailments (headaches, nausea, digestion troubles) that his patient might be experiencing, this time omitting "avez-vous" - it's implicit as he's continuing from his previous question.

The lady responds negatively for all of them :

"non, aucun" : she's not experiencing any of the ailments the doctor listed.  She could have also replied :

"non, je n'ai aucune migraine, aucune nausée, aucun souci de digestion".

The doctor then asks :

"ressentez-vous une fatigue inhabituelle ?"

Note that he expresses himself in a rather formal way, using the kind of phrasing one may read in a book - a common way for doctors to address their patients.   In a more informal setting, he might have said instead :

"Vous vous sentez plus fatiguée que d'habitude ?"  (you feel more tired than usual ?)

Instead, he uses the verb "ressentir" instead of the more colloquial "sentir",  and a classic interrogative form (verb + subject) : "ressentez-vous ?"

The patient replies "non en fait je suis plutôt en forme".  "En forme" litterally means "in shape" and can be used to mean just that.  In our context, though, the woman is referring to her general well-being (feeling well).

  • "elle est en forme physiquement"  (she's physically in shape, she's fit) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/29-elle-est-en-forme-phy.mp3
  • "Il est en forme ce soir"   (he seems to be feeling well tonight) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/30-il-est-en-forme-ce-soir.mp3
  • "Je ne suis pas en forme aujourd'hui"  (I'm not feeling so great today) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/31-je-suis-pas-en-forme-ajd.mp3
  • "Je n'ai pas la forme aujourd'hui (same as above) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/32-je-nai-pas-la-forme-ajd.mp3

She says "plutôt en forme", with "plutôt" meaning "quite", "rather".  She's actually feeling quite good these days.

  • "Il est plutôt beau"  (he's quite handsome) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/33-il-est-plutot-bo.mp3
  • "Tu es plutôt grand" (you're quite tall)
  • "Ces gens sont plutôt chiants ..."  (these people are quite painful ...) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/34-ces-gens-sont-plt-chiants.mp3

She adds "mis à part ces douleurs",  indicating that the pains she feels are an exception to her well-being.

"Mis à part" is used for "aside from", "apart from", "except" :

  • "Mis à part l'argent, il a tout pour réussir"  (aside from money, he has everything to succeed) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/35-mis-a-part-largent.mp3
  • "Mis à part le français, tu parles toutes les langues !"  (except for French, you speak all languages !) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/36-mis-a-part-le-frs.mp3
  • "Mis à part le goûter, je ne rate aucun repas"  (apart from afternoon snacks, I don't miss any meal) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/37-mis-a-part-le-gouter.mp3

Conversation between doctor and patient in French : the outcome

Next in our French conversation, the doctor asks his patient if she's done any special new activities lately :

"Avez-vous fait de nouvelles activités ces temps-ci ?"

Notice the expression "faire des activités" (do some activities), or equivalently "avoir des activités"  :

  • "Tu as beaucoup d'activités !"  (you have a lot of activities) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/38-tu-as-bcp-dactivites.mp3
  • "Elle a des activités sociales"  (she has social activities) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/39-elle-a-des-activ-sociales.mp3
  • "Tu fais souvent ce genre d'activité ?"  (do you do this kind of activities often ?) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/40-tu-fais-souvent-ce-genre.mp3

He uses the phrase "Ces temps-ci" which means "lately", "recently", "these days" :

  • "Tu as vu Jean ces temps-ci ?"  (have you seen Jean lately ?) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/41-tu-as-vu-jean-ces-temps-ci.mp3
  • "Elle a l'air fatiguée ces temps-ci"  (she's been looking tired lately)
  • "Ces temps-ci j'ai beaucoup de travail"  (I have a lot of work these days) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/42-ces-tps-ci-g-bcp-de-travail.mp3

An alternative, equivalent expression is "ces derniers temps" :

"Je fais beaucoup de rencontres ces derniers temps" (I've been meeting a lot of people these days)

Our patient replies "non, pas vraiment" (not really).  Just like in English, it indicates she's thinking about the question, probably reviewing in her mind the activities she's done over the past days.

Then she remembers she's been participating in a danse marathon.  Note how she says :

"depuis une semaine, je participe à un marathon"

Remember how the patient earlier said "ça fait plusieurs jours que j'ai mal partout" ?  Well, using "depuis [duration]" is another way to express an ongoing action.  She might have said earlier :

"Depuis plusieurs jours, j'ai mal partout."

And here, she could have said equivalently :

"Ça fait une semaine que je participe à un marathon".

Some other examples of using "depuis" :

  • "Je prends des cours de français depuis six mois" https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/44-j-prends-cours-de-frs-depuis-6-mois.mp3
  • "Je ne travaille plus depuis la semaine dernière" https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/45-je-ne-travaille-plus-depuis-la-sem.mp3

Note that in the last example, "la semaine dernière" is a point in time rather than a duration – you can use "depuis" in both cases.

The patient then adds "mais à part ça…"  (aside from that)

Earlier, she used "mis à part" saying "je suis plutôt en forme mis à part ces douleurs" (aside from these pains).  Here, "à part ça" means the same as "mis à part ça", it's just an abbreviated way of saying it.

The expression "mais à part ça…" is often used as-is to express that what precedes is an exception.  Here, it's like saying "I've been dansing every night, but aside from that, nothing else, that's the only new activity I've been doing".

The doctor suddenly understand what's going on and says :

"ah d'accord … je vois …"

He's basically saying, "OK I see… not need to look any further".  He may be thinking she wasted his time having him look for causes for her pains while the reason is quite obvious (intense dansing every night).

The doctor then says he'll give her some aspirin, and suggests she should take it easy on the dansing :

"Allez-y doucement sur la danse"

The phrase "allez-y doucement" translates roughly to "take it easy", "go easy".  Another similar phrase is "allez-y mollo" (much more colloquial) :

  • "vas-y doucement sur l'alcool"  (go easy on the alcohol)
  • "vas-y mollo avec le télephone (easy with the phone) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/48-vas-y-mollo-ac-tel.mp3
  • "Tu es fatigué, vas-y mollo"  (you're tired, take it easy) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/49-t-fatigue-vas-y-mollo.mp3

Conversation between doctor and patient in French : ending the consultation

The doctor ends the conversation saying "Si vous voulez bien m'excuser".  This is a formal way to excuse oneself and leave a conversation or place, for example when at a dinner party :

"Si vous voulez bien m'excuser, je dois partir"  (if you'll excuse me, I have to leave)

Another formal way to say the same is "veuillez m'excuser" - remember, we talked about "veuillez" earlier in this story.

He politely states the reason why he needs to leave (or in this case, she does) :

"j'ai encore beaucoup de patients à voir".

Notice the structure "j'ai encore beaucoup de [object] à [verbe]"  (I still have many/much … to  …).  Examples :

  • "Il a encore beaucoup d'années à vivre"  (he still has many years to live) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/51-il-a-encore-bcp-dannees.mp3
  • "Vous avez encore beaucoup de travail à finir" (you still have much work to finish) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/52-vs-avez-encore-bcp-travail.mp3
  • "Nous avons encore beaucoup de choses à faire"   (we still have a lot of things to do) https://www.blablafrancais.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/53-ns-avons-encore-bcp-de-choses.mp3

Saying this, the doctor is implicitely saying to the patient he has some real problems to deal with, unlike the minor issues with obvious causes she's suffering from.

Likewise, his ending "bonne journée madame" is quite formal and in somewhat of a dry tone, probably indicating he's slighty annoyed for wasting his time – though he remains polite and professional all the way.

Epilogue : test yourself !

Let's find out if you've learned anything from this dialogue and associated explanations and examples.

Look at the following quiz and write your answers in the comments section below.

The correct answers will be posted later - if you want to get them faster, just add your email address to your answers - I'll delete it right after emailing the answers to you.

1) You're at the doctor's and want to let her know you have pain in your right knee.  What do you say ?

A. J'ai mal au genou droit

B. J'ai le genou droit douleur

C. J'ai le genou droit mal foutu

2) The doctor examines you and concludes you have nothing serious, just small minor things resulting from stress.  How does he say that to you :

A. Ce n'est pas sérieux

B. Vous n'avez rien de grave

C. Allez-y mollo

3) The doctor gives you a prescription for a drug and explains you need to take it 3 times a day.  How does he say it ?

A.  Veuillez le prendre trois fois par jour

B. Si vous voulez bien m'excuser, prenez-le 3 fois par jour

C. Ça fait trois fois par jour que vous devez le prendre

D. Prenez le depuis trois fois dans la journée

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3 Comments on “Conversation beween doctor and patient in French”

wow twas a great learnin experience

1-A : correct ! 2-C: “allez-y mollo” is really colloquial, close to slang. A doctor would typically say “Vous n’avez rien de grave” (answer B). Note that “ce n’est pas sérieux” has a very different meaning, depending on context it can mean “this is a joke!” or “this is bad work!” 3-A: correct! Answer D (“prenez-le depuis 3 fois dans la journée”) would have been right without the word “depuis”.

1. A 2. C 3. A

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Doctor-Patient Communication: Why and How Communication Contributes to the Quality of Medical Care

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A dialogue between doctor and patient about fever

A dialogue between doctor and patient about fever

Question: Suppose, you are Kabir. You have been suffering from fever for a week. Right now, you are at the chamber of a doctor.  Now write a dialogue between doctor and patient about fever.

Answer: A dialogue between doctor and patient about fever:

What should I do if I have a fever?

  • When you first notice your fever. Then take some rest.
  • Don’t forget to drink water.
  • Always try to eat healthy foods.
  • Don’t be so worried.
  • Dres’s light: lighter clothing can have a cooling effect.
  • If your temperature’s over between 100 º and 102 º F, let your doctor know.

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A Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient | All Class [2023]

Are you searching for a a dialogue between doctor and patient, a dialogue between doctor and patient for ssc or class 8-10.

Then you are coming to the right blog post. Here we share with you six different type of dialogue between doctor and patient conversation, that you can use in your exam preparation.

A Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient for ssc

A dialogue between doctor and patient for class 6, dialouge between doctor and patient for class 8, a dialogue between doctor and patient about illness, a dialogue between doctor and patient about fever, a dialogue between doctor and patient about health problem.

Doctor: Hello Arif, how can I help you today?

Arif: Hello doctor, I have been feeling tired and weak lately. I also have a persistent cough and my throat is sore.

Doctor : I see. Have you been experiencing any other symptoms such as fever, body aches, or shortness of breath?

Arif: Yes, I have a low-grade fever and my body aches a lot. I also feel short of breath sometimes.

Doctor: Okay, I think it’s best if we run some tests to get a clear diagnosis. I will order a blood test and a chest x-ray for you. In the meantime, try to get plenty of rest and stay hydrated.

Arif: Okay, thank you doctor. I will do that.

Arif: Thank you, doctor. I appreciate your help.

Doctor: You’re welcome. Feel better soon.

Doctor: Hello Suzon, how are you today?

Suzon: Hello doctor, I’m not feeling very well. I have a headache and my stomach hurts.

Doctor: I see. Can you tell me a little bit more about your symptoms? When did they start and how severe are they?

Suzon: My headache started this morning and it’s pretty bad. My stomach hurts a lot too and I feel like I might throw up.

Doctor: Alright, let’s take your temperature first to see if you have a fever. (takes Suzon’s temperature) Yes, your temperature is a little elevated. Have you eaten anything unusual or have you been exposed to anyone who is sick lately?

Suzon: No, I haven’t eaten anything unusual. But one of my friends was sick last week.

Doctor: Alright, I think it’s best if we run some tests to determine the cause of your symptoms. I will order a blood test and a stool sample to check for any infections. In the meantime, drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated and try to get some rest.

Suzon: Okay, thank you doctor.

Doctor: You’re welcome. If the results come back with anything concerning, we can discuss further treatment options. But for now, just focus on getting better.

Suzon: Alright, thank you doctor.

Doctor: No problem, Suzon. If you have any other questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to ask. Get better soon.

Doctor: Hello Rakibul, how are you feeling today?

Rakibul: Hi doctor, I haven’t been feeling very well. I have been experiencing a lot of fatigue and muscle weakness.

Doctor: I see. Have you been experiencing any other symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, or trouble sleeping?

Rakibul: Yes, I have been having trouble sleeping and I have a headache almost every day.

Doctor: Alright, let’s take a look at your medical history. Have you had any health problems in the past or are you taking any medications currently?

Rakibul: No, I don’t have any medical problems. I only take a daily vitamin supplement.

Doctor: Okay, I think it’s best if we run some tests to get a clear diagnosis. I will order a blood test, a urine test, and a sleep study to see if there is an underlying cause for your symptoms.

Rakibul: Okay, thank you doctor.

Doctor: In the meantime, it’s important that you try to get plenty of rest and eat a healthy diet. If your symptoms persist or worsen, don’t hesitate to come back and see me.

Rakibul: Okay, I will do that. Thank you, doctor.

Doctor: You’re welcome, Rakibul. If you have any other questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to ask. Get better soon.

Doctor: Hello, how are you feeling today?

Patient: Not good, doctor. I’ve been feeling quite sick for the past few days.

Doctor: I see. Can you describe your symptoms for me?

Patient: Yes, I have a fever, a headache, a sore throat, and my body aches all over.

Doctor: Okay, those are classic symptoms of a viral illness. Have you been exposed to anyone who is sick recently?

Patient: Yes, my coworker has been out sick for the past few days.

Doctor: That could be the cause of your illness. To be sure, I will order some tests, including a blood test and a throat swab.

Patient: Alright, thank you.

Doctor: In the meantime, it’s important that you get plenty of rest, drink fluids, and avoid close contact with others to prevent the spread of the illness.

Patient: Okay, I understand. Is there anything else I should be doing to help with my symptoms?

Doctor: I can prescribe you some over-the-counter pain medication to help with the aches and fever, and a throat lozenge to soothe your sore throat.

Patient: Thank you, doctor. I appreciate your help.

Doctor : You’re welcome. If your symptoms worsen or if you develop any new symptoms, don’t hesitate to come back and see me. Get better soon.

Patient: Not great, doctor. I’ve been running a fever for the past two days.

Doctor: I see. Can you tell me more about your symptoms? Are you experiencing any other symptoms like a headache, body aches, or a cough?

Patient: Yes, I have a headache and my body aches, but no cough.

Doctor: Alright, those are common symptoms of a viral illness. To be sure, I will take your temperature and order some blood tests.

Patient: Okay, thank you.

Doctor: In the meantime, it’s important that you rest, drink plenty of fluids, and avoid close contact with others to prevent the spread of the illness.

Patient: Okay, I understand. Is there anything else I should be doing to help bring down my fever?

Doctor : You can take over-the-counter fever-reducing medication, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, as directed. You can also use a cool compress on your forehead to help bring down your fever.

Patient: Thank you, doctor.

Doctor: You’re welcome. If your symptoms worsen or if you develop any new symptoms, don’t hesitate to come back and see me. Get well soon

Patient: Not good, doctor. I’ve been feeling quite ill for the past few weeks.

Doctor : I see. Can you tell me more about your symptoms?

Patient : Yes, I have been experiencing fatigue, loss of appetite, and abdominal pain.

Doctor: Alright, those symptoms could be related to several different health problems. I will need to ask you a few more questions to get a better understanding of your situation.

Patient: Okay, I understand.

Doctor: Have you noticed any changes in your weight or bowel movements?

Patient: Yes, I have lost weight and my bowel movements have been irregular.

Doctor: I see. Have you had any previous health problems or surgeries that I should know about?

Patient: No, I haven’t had any major health problems or surgeries.

Doctor: Alright, based on what you’ve told me, I would like to order some tests, including a blood test and a stool sample, to get a clearer picture of what might be causing your symptoms.

Patient: Okay, that sounds good.

Doctor: In the meantime, it’s important that you get plenty of rest, eat a healthy diet, and avoid any foods that seem to worsen your symptoms.

Patient: Okay, I will do that. Thank you, doctor.

Doctor: You’re welcome. If your symptoms persist or worsen, don’t hesitate to come back and see me. Get better soon

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Displeasure with Biden's handling of Hamas-Israel war was on display at closed-door White House meeting

WASHINGTON — Just five minutes into a meeting with President Joe Biden, a Palestinian American doctor who has treated gravely injured patients in Gaza couldn’t bear to stay, so he left. 

Dr. Thaer Ahmad, who specializes in emergency medicine, recalled getting emotional when talking about the many Palestinians he cared for, describing the scale of death in the six months since the war began. 

“The decision to leave was a personal one,” he told NBC News in a phone interview, explaining he wanted to show the White House that “it was important to recognize the pain and the mourning that my community was in.” 

Ahmad stressed that he wanted “to let the administration feel the way that we felt this past six months and kind of get up and walk away from them.” 

He was one of only six Muslim American community leaders who attended a small meeting on Tuesday with Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and senior administration officials at the White House. 

Many others who had been invited to attend declined, according to multiple sources familiar with the outreach, underscoring the deepening tensions between the administration and the Muslim and Arab American communities over the president’s support of Israel in its bombardment of Gaza. More than 30,000 people have died, according to health officials, since Hamas’ terrorist attacks in Israel on Oct. 7 and the group is still holding more than 100 hostages captive.

Another doctor who attended was taken aback when she showed Biden prints of photos of malnourished children and women in Gaza — to which Biden responded that he had seen those images before. The problem, the doctor said, was that she had printed the photos from her own iPhone.

"This speaks volumes to the dismissive nature of the administration when it comes to strong-willed action towards a permanent cease-fire or, at a bare minimum, a red line on the invasion of Rafah," Dr. Nahreen H. Ahmed told NBC News.

Before leaving the meeting early, Ahmad handed a letter to the president from an 8-year-old orphan in Rafah, the southernmost city in Gaza. 

“There is an incredible amount of urgency around this,” Ahmad said, expressing deep skepticism that Israel’s military campaign can be done “in a sophisticated or tactical way” that doesn’t put innocent civilians at risk.  

During the 90-minute meeting, which took place behind closed doors, Biden told attendees that he will not call for a permanent cease-fire between Israel and Hamas until all the remaining hostages are released, according to two people familiar with his comments. 

The president “listened respectfully,” a third source briefed on the meeting said, and pledged to continue working to “significantly increase” humanitarian aid into Gaza.  

Throughout the discussion, other doctors who have spent time in Gaza spoke about their harrowing experiences, including the danger they experienced in trying to help others, a Muslim rights activist who attended the meeting said. They also showed Biden and Harris photos of injured patients, including children, the activist said. 

Biden thanked the Muslim American community leaders for attending the meeting and acknowledged that many people had expressed concern about attending an event at the White House while so many Palestinians are suffering, these people said.  

Salima Suswell, founder and chief executive of the Black Muslim Leadership Council, who attended the meeting at the White House, said she felt like Biden and Harris both listened closely to the attendees and understood their perspectives.

“I thought that it was important to accept the invitation to meet with the president, the vice president and their senior administration officials today, because I have been consistent regarding the importance of engagement,” Suswell said. “It was important for me to let the president know that Black Americans and Black Muslim Americans are deeply hurting about what is happening in Gaza.”

Harris also delivered remarks that reiterated Biden’s stance and seemed designed to soften criticism of Biden’s position on the war, namely that he values the U.S. relationship with Israel more than Palestinians. She said Biden was “sincere” in his concerns, according to an attendee. She told the group she sees how much the war and the civilian death toll are “weighing on” the president and insisted he is “doing absolutely everything that he can to put an end to this war.”

Biden said, according to one of the attendees, that if Israel tries to obstruct the ability to bring aid into Gaza, the U.S. will push back and advocate for more resources to be brought into the region. 

Last Thursday, the United Nations’ highest court ordered Israel to open more land crossings to allow food, water, fuel and other supplies into Gaza after reports that the Israeli government was blocking lifesaving supplies from reaching the devastated enclave. Israeli officials have repeatedly denied obstructing aid from entering Gaza, and instead blame the U.N. for acute shortages of lifesaving supplies in the strip — particularly the north. 

The president did not specify what the U.S. would do to ensure aid can be safely delivered, the attendee said.

Just this week, seven aid workers with disaster relief charity World Central Kitchen were killed by an Israeli airstrike, adding to the 200 who have already died since the war started in October. The aid group said its convoy was hit as it was leaving a warehouse in the Deir al-Balah area of central Gaza, where the team had unloaded more than 100 tons of humanitarian food aid that the charity had brought to Gaza by sea earlier in the day.

In the meeting, one attendee said it appeared Biden and Harris were careful not to discuss what is taking place behind the scenes to negotiate a possible six-week cease-fire between Israel and Hamas, the attendee said. 

After it concluded, the Muslim American community leaders departed and a small group of Muslim staffers participated in a scaled-back iftar dinner with Biden, Harris and other senior administration officials. 

In years past, the White House hosted larger receptions related to Ramadan, including several Eid celebrations that attracted hundreds of guests and included public remarks from the president. 

Several Arab American and Muslim American leaders rejected invitations in recent weeks, specifically citing their discomfort with participating in a celebration when so many in Gaza are facing starvation, two people who received invitations told NBC News. 

“President Biden and Vice President Harris know this a deeply painful moment for many in the Muslim and Arab communities,” a White House official said. “President Biden made clear that he mourns the loss of every innocent life in this conflict.” 

Senior White House officials and Biden campaign aides have attempted to meet with key members of Muslim and Arab American communities in recent months but have often received icy receptions. 

“The president and vice president will continue to engage with Muslim and Arab American communities and listen to the voices of all impacted by this conflict,” the White House official said. 

Ahmad, the doctor who left the meeting, said he plans to go back to Gaza soon and is “legitimately concerned that I may be killed in the process.” 

If that happened, he said, “it’s hard to think” it could happen from a “2,000-pound bomb that the U.S. gave to Israel.” 

“That my government would have had a hand in that, I just hate that,” he said. “That’s kind of the thoughts that are crossing my mind.” 

dialogue writing about doctor and patient

Monica Alba is a White House correspondent for NBC News.

Yamiche Alcindor is an NBC News Washington correspondent.

dialogue writing about doctor and patient

Elyse Perlmutter-Gumbiner is the coordinating producer for the NBC News White House unit.

IMAGES

  1. Write a Conversation Between Doctor and Patient [5 Examples]

    dialogue writing about doctor and patient

  2. English Conversation Between Doctor and Patient in Four Simple Scenarios

    dialogue writing about doctor and patient

  3. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient

    dialogue writing about doctor and patient

  4. How To Write Dialogue Between Doctor And Patient [13 Templates]

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  5. Dialogue between Doctor and Patient in English//Conversation between

    dialogue writing about doctor and patient

  6. Write a Dialogue between Doctor and Patient

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VIDEO

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  2. Dialogue between Doctor and patient in English/Simple conversation between Doctor and patient/

  3. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Headache

  4. Simple English conversation between Doctor and Patient

  5. Dialogue between doctor and patient

  6. Steven Moffat writing Doctor Who with one hand for ANOTHER 9 minutes

COMMENTS

  1. How To Write Dialogue Between Doctor And Patient [13 Templates]

    Use body language and non-verbal cues: Incorporate body language and non-verbal cues into your dialogue to add depth and emotion to the conversation. Describe how the characters behave during the interaction to give readers a better understanding of their feelings and reactions. Keep the dialogue natural and realistic: Ensure the conversation ...

  2. Conversation Between Doctor and Patient [Five Scenarios]

    This post contains conversation between a doctor and a patient/ attendant on five different medical issues: Fever and sore throat, Headache, Stomach ache, Cancer, and. Glaucoma (an ailment of eye) Whereas the first three conversations take place in a clinic, the last two take place in a hospital. The three main characters - doctor, patient ...

  3. A Dialogue between a Doctor and a Patient

    Doctor: Yeah, stay in bed for the next two days. Don't bath or go to under the sun, that could increase your fever. Try to eat properly. Sania: Thanks, Doctor. Doctor: You're welcome. Here are two examples of dialogue between a doctor and a patient, I hope you will enjoy these.

  4. Write a Conversation Between Doctor and Patient [5 Examples]

    Doctor: That's the reason. Don't worry I am prescribing you some medicines, take them regularly and avoid eating outside food. Patient: Thank you so much Doctor. Doctor: Take care. 3. Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient about Headache. Patient: Good evening Doctor! Doctor: Good Evening.

  5. Conversation between Doctor and Patient

    Doctor - (to the nurse) Please send in the next patient. Patient - Hello doctor, good morning. Doctor - Good morning, have a seat. Please tell me what happened. Patient - (showing the knee) For the past few months, I have been experiencing a severe pain in my left knee whenever I stand up or walk long distances.

  6. Dialogue Examples 2

    Dialogue Examples: Dialogue 1 - At the Bank. Dialogue 2 - Doctor & Patient. Dialogue 3 - At the Airport Check in. Dialogue 4 - At the Hotel Check in. Dialogue 5 - Introducing Yourself. Dialogue 6 - Ordering Food at Steakhouse. Dialogue 7 - At the Pharmacy. Dialogue 8 - Giving Directions.

  7. Conversations between Doctor and Patient

    Sample Dialogue 3 - Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient About Back Pain. Doctor - Please send in the next patient. Patient - Hello doctor, good morning. Doctor - Good morning. Please have a seat and tell me what seems to be the problem. Patient - I have been experiencing severe back pain, especially after sitting for long periods ...

  8. Dialogue or Conversation Writing Between Doctor and Patient about

    Advertisement Today, I'm going to share a couple of sample conversations between a Doctor, and Patient about stomach pain. So let's get started. Sample Conversation 1 Doctor: Hello, Good morning. What can I do for you today? Patient: Hello Doctor. I am not very well today. Advertisement Doctor: Come, sit and please tell me. Patient:… Read More »

  9. Doctor-Patient Dialogue: English Conversation

    Join us as we step into a typical hospital setting to explore a simple yet insightful conversation between a doctor and a patient. This video is designed spe...

  10. Conversation Between Doctor and Patient

    In this we will see how to write dialogue between doctor and patient in english.DOWNLOAD & READ MORE:COURSE: https://coursera.pxf.io/coursesLAPTOP DEALS: htt...

  11. English Conversation Between Doctor and Patient in Four Simple

    Doctor: Yes, this is introduced newly by medical supplies companies. It's much more comfortable and doesn't need cleaning after every use. Patient: That's really great. Doctor: Yes it is. (Now he removed the thermometer) Doctor: Temperature is not too high, around 99.8. Let me check your blood pressure as well.

  12. Simple English Conversation Between Doctor ‍⚕ and Patient

    In this video, we learn and write about dialogue writing in English. Simple conversation with a Doctor👨‍⚕| Doctor & Patient Conversation | Hospital conver...

  13. How to talk to your doctor in English

    In the following dialogue, I will demonstrate a conversation between a doctor and a patient. It also includes the dialogue you would have with the appointment setter on the phone. Please be aware that I am not qualified to provide medical advice. This is just an example. Dialogue between a doctor and patient

  14. Making a Doctor's Appointment

    English for Medical Purposes - Making a Doctor's Appointment. Read the following dialogue with a partner to learn important vocabulary used for making doctor's appointments. Practice this dialogue with a friend to help you feel confident when you next make an appointment in English. Check your understanding with the quiz and review vocabulary.

  15. Conversation Between Doctor and Patient

    Doctor: Okay. I'm going to write you a prescription for a couple of days worth of medicine. It's just to make sure that you get well. Patient: I understand. Doctor: I'm going to have you come back in one week to make sure you're feeling better. If you're still sick, then I'll give you a different prescription.

  16. Doctor-Patient Communication: A Review

    Abstract. Effective doctor-patient communication is a central clinical function in building a therapeutic doctor-patient relationship, which is the heart and art of medicine. This is important in the delivery of high-quality health care. Much patient dissatisfaction and many complaints are due to breakdown in the doctor-patient relationship.

  17. conversation between doctor and patient in french

    French conversation between doctor and patient : exposing the health problem. The patient replies with "bonjour Docteur", which is the way you typically address a docteur. In the same manner, you would say "bonjour Professeur " when talking to a professor.

  18. Doctor-Patient Communication: Why and How Communication ...

    The patient-physician relationship and its expression through the medical dialogue have been described or alluded to in the history of medicine since the time of the Greeks. Nevertheless, historians of modern medicine have tracked an undeniable decline in the centrality of communication to the care process. ... Doctor-Patient Communication ...

  19. Doctor

    Doctor - Patient Conversation - At the Doctor's Office. Willin81. 87. 1. 0. 0. Let's do English ESL general vocabulary practice. Listen to the conversation between doctor and patient and fill in the blanks regarding common symptoms.

  20. A dialogue between doctor and patient about fever

    When you first notice your fever. Then take some rest. Don't forget to drink water. Always try to eat healthy foods. Don't be so worried. Dres's light: lighter clothing can have a cooling effect. If your temperature's over between 100º and 102º F, let your doctor know.

  21. Conversation between doctor and patient in english ll Dialogue between

    This video is about conversation between doctor and patient in english or dialogue between doctor and patient.This english conversation is very easy to lear...

  22. A Dialogue Between Doctor and Patient

    Doctor: That could be the cause of your illness. To be sure, I will order some tests, including a blood test and a throat swab. Patient: Alright, thank you. Doctor: In the meantime, it's important that you get plenty of rest, drink fluids, and avoid close contact with others to prevent the spread of the illness.

  23. Displeasure with Biden's handling of Hamas-Israel war was on display at

    WASHINGTON — Just five minutes into a meeting with President Joe Biden, a Palestinian American doctor who has treated gravely injured patients in Gaza couldn't bear to stay, so he left. Dr ...

  24. Dialogue writing between Doctor and Patient about fever, English

    English conversation or dialogue writing for class 10#dialoguewriting #dialoguewritingbetweendoctorandpatient#doctorandpatient#doctorandpatientconversation#e...