• Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar
  • Skip to footer

Get the goods. Subscribe to my newsletter! >>

Jen Kimbrell

Educator & Teacher Seller

in Teaching · December 10, 2023

Introduction to Teaching Expository Writing

If you’re anything like me, you’re always looking for fresh and effective ways to teach expository writing to our students. Today’s your lucky day because I’ve got something special in store for you. In this blog post, we’re diving deep into the world of Expository Writing Lesson Plans.

I want to share with you the difference between expository and informational writing. Plus, how to write lesson plans that aren’t your run-of-the-mill, snooze-worthy activities but the secret sauce to helping your students become confident writers. So, grab a cup of your favorite brew, and stay with me as I unlock the secrets to crafting engaging and effective expository writing lessons!

Pin for Later

expository writing 1st grade

Difference Between Expository and Informational Writing

A few weeks ago, I shared informational writing lesson plans to help make teaching writing to your students easier. One of the first things I must do is clarify the difference between expository and informational writing. Informational writing provides the reader with facts but never provides the author’s personal opinion.

Expository writing imparts information, shares ideas, and provides explanations and evidence. Expository writing is about sharing information, explaining ideas, presenting facts clearly, and organizing. It’s the writing you see in textbooks, travel guides, news articles, and informative reports.

Mastering expository writing is crucial because it:

  • It helps students express their ideas and thoughts clearly.
  • Equips students with the ability to inform and educate others.
  • Fosters critical thinking skills as students conduct research.
  • Prepares students for academic writing, which they’ll encounter from grade school to high school and beyond.
  • Encourages personal interest and learning about various topics.

With elementary students, we want to teach our students how to organize their writing effectively.

Expository Writing Structure

These are the steps of writing an expository text:

  • Brainstorm – Coming up with the idea
  • Research – Looking for information about the idea
  • Introductory Paragraph – Telling the reader about what the writing is about (the main idea)
  • Body of the Essay – Organizing the facts and details for the topic
  • Conclusion – Wrap up the writing and restate what the essay is about
  • Publishing – Sharing the writing with a broader audience

Expository Writing Lesson Plans

Let’s dive into crafting a lesson plan for expository writing. This plan is designed for young writers in various grade levels. Let’s start with a lesson plan about brainstorming ideas.

Lesson Plan 1: Brainstorming Ideas

Objective: To teach young writers how to brainstorm ideas for expository essays. Sidenote: Ensure students understand expository writing and why it’s essential. Show writing examples to help students understand what they will write about.

I Do: Generate a list with your students or create a list of topics—model for students how you would choose a topic of interest. Then, write down everything you know about the topic on a sticky note or graphic organizer.

We Do: Ask students to choose a topic of their own. Give each student a sticky note and have them write down their chosen topic and share it with a partner their topic.

You Do: Have students write down everything they think they know about their topic.

Share Time: Have a class discussion where students share their chosen topics and ideas. Encourage them to ask questions and provide feedback to their peers.

Lesson Plan 2: Research

Objective: TLW learn how to research their topic.

I Do: Explain the importance of conducting research for informative writing. Discuss different sources, including books, articles, websites, and interviews. With younger students, you will want to have most of the resources ready for them. However, with older students, you want to model for them how to find reliable sources.

We Do: Have students research their topic and write their findings on sticky notes.

You Do: Then, have students return to lesson one to determine if what they thought they knew about the topic was correct.

Share Time: Have a class discussion about what they learned and any new questions about the topic. This strategy is called the RAN Strategy.

Lesson Plan 3: Introductory Sentence or Paragraph

Objective: To guide students in creating strong topic sentences (or paragraphs) for their expository writing.

I Do: Start with a mentor text to review the purpose of an expository essay’s topic sentence (thesis statement). Explain that it’s the main idea or focus of the essay. Show students how you would write a topic sentence based on the topic you chose from lesson one. K-2 students would write a sentence, but 3-5 would begin to create a topic paragraph. 

We Do: Work with students to create an anchor chart of strong and weak topic sentences. Be sure to add cue words like explains, describes, or presents to use in their sentences. Students add their topic to the four-square graphic organizer.

You Do: Have students practice writing their topic sentences for their chosen topics. These sentences should clearly state the main point they want to make in their writing.

Share Time: Have the students share their sentences or paragraphs and provide feedback. Ensure each sentence or paragraph is clear, specific, and related to the topic.

Lesson Plan 4: Body of the Essay

Objective: To guide students in organizing their research to write the body of their essay.

I Do: Teach students how to organize their research into categories. You should give younger students the categories upfront as a scaffold. Using the research you found in your model to show students how to put things in categories with key details underneath.

We Do: Have students work in pairs to organize their sticky notes from their research into categories.

You Do: Students will complete their four-square graphic organizer.

Share Time: Have the students share their four-square graphic organizer.

Lesson Plan 5: Concluding Sentence or Paragraph

Objective: To teach young writers how to craft a concluding paragraph for their expository essays.

I Do: Explain the purpose of the concluding paragraph. Emphasize the importance of summarizing the main points and leaving a lasting impression. Use a mentor text to showcase quality work and model how you would write your concluding sentence or paragraph.

We Do: Work with students to create an anchor chart of strong and weak concluding sentences or paragraphs. Be sure to add cue words like as you can see, in summary, or in conclusion to use in their sentences. Students add their conclusions and ideas to the four-square graphic organizer.

You Do: Students will write their concluding sentence or paragraph.

Share Time: Have the students share their sentences or paragraphs.

Lesson Plan 6: Publishing

Incorporating technology in your expository writing lesson plans can make learning more engaging. Have students type and edit their essays on word processing software for a more polished final product.

Here are some ways to utilize technology when publishing the writing:

  • Book Creator  – Great app to help students organize their writing. Students can add images, drawings, videos, and recordings. Plus, there are a lot of great resources on the premium plan that are perfect for writing. I love the graphic organizers and the digital stickers. There are also a ton of templates students could use for their books. This would be great for nonfiction text features.
  • Google Slides or Docs – Students can type their writing in Docs or create a book in Google Slides. 
  • Canva  – Students can create eBooks and presentations in Canva. Another great thing about Canva is that it can integrate with Book Creator. I enjoy making books for my students and then adding the template to Book Creator, as seen in the book below.

An important piece of publishing is the act of allowing students writing to be seen by a broader audience. They need to understand that the act of writing is for a purpose and it is not that it is because the teacher told them to write. Therefore, be sure to allow opportunities to share their writing with the world around them.

Other Ways to Use Technology In Writing

Interactive Whiteboards – Use interactive whiteboards to visually illustrate the writing process, from brainstorming to the final essay.

Presentations – Create engaging presentations to explain key concepts, steps, and examples of expository writing. I like Canva.

Digital Research Tools – Introduce students to online research databases and tools to find credible sources. Use QR codes and LMS platforms to link younger students to appropriate sites.

Digital Graphic Organizers – Encourage students to use digital graphic organizers to plan their essays. You can add the four-square to Google Slides or the Book Creator app.

Additional Details and Tips

Teaching Grammar – Always work with students about the importance of writing a good sentence and the parts that make up a good sentence.

Personal Interest – Encourage students to choose topics that genuinely interest them. This will make the writing process more enjoyable and the final essays more engaging.

Class Discussion – Foster class discussions throughout the process. Students can share their ideas, ask questions, and learn from each other’s perspectives. I usually do this during the lessons’ We Do portion or Share Time.

The Writing Process – Emphasize the importance of the writing process, from prewriting and drafting to revising and editing.

Expository Writing Prompts – Use expository writing prompts to stimulate students’ thinking. These prompts can be related to personal narratives, historical events, or topics of personal interest.

I hope you found these expository writing lesson plans helpful and inspiring. Expository writing is a valuable skill that prepares students for academic writing and encourages them to explore and share their interests and ideas.

Whether you’re a teacher designing lesson plans for your students or a mom looking to help your child master the art of expository writing, these lesson plans are the perfect starting point.

So, get ready to unlock the secrets of expository writing and embark on an informative essay journey to enhance your writing skills and broaden your knowledge.

Reader Interactions

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

You’ve Got Mail!!

Let's keep in touch.

expository writing 1st grade

Don't leave yet!

Did you know that I offer teaching freebies every month?  Sign up for my newsletter to get access to these resources!

Home

Reading & Math for K-5

  • Kindergarten
  • Learning numbers
  • Comparing numbers
  • Place Value
  • Roman numerals
  • Subtraction
  • Multiplication
  • Order of operations
  • Drills & practice
  • Measurement
  • Factoring & prime factors
  • Proportions
  • Shape & geometry
  • Data & graphing
  • Word problems
  • Children's stories
  • Leveled Stories
  • Context clues
  • Cause & effect
  • Compare & contrast
  • Fact vs. fiction
  • Fact vs. opinion
  • Main idea & details
  • Story elements
  • Conclusions & inferences
  • Sounds & phonics
  • Words & vocabulary
  • Reading comprehension
  • Early writing
  • Numbers & counting
  • Simple math
  • Social skills
  • Other activities
  • Dolch sight words
  • Fry sight words
  • Multiple meaning words
  • Prefixes & suffixes
  • Vocabulary cards
  • Other parts of speech
  • Punctuation
  • Capitalization
  • Narrative writing
  • Opinion writing
  • Informative writing
  • Cursive alphabet
  • Cursive letters
  • Cursive letter joins
  • Cursive words
  • Cursive sentences
  • Cursive passages
  • Grammar & Writing

Breadcrumbs

Paragraph Writing for Grade 1 Students

expository writing 1st grade

We have an entirely new section for grade 1 students to focus on learning to write paragraphs .

Cut and paste sentences into a paragraph

Students learn about the structure of paragraphs by sorting sentences in the right order in these worksheets.

Expository paragraphs worksheets

In informative writing, students explain something. These worksheets provide writing prompts for expository writing practice.

Opinion paragraphs practice

In these worksheets students are provided a topic sentence, two facts and a conclusion to write an opinion paragraph .

Narrative paragraphs practice

With first, next and last sentences starters, students write narrative paragraphs .

Practice editing paragraphs

Students practice editing paragraphs for incorrect capitalization, punctuation and missing words in these worksheets.

Pinterest Logo

This content is available to members only.

Join K5 to save time, skip ads and access more content. Learn More

  • Forgot Password?

First Grade Writing Prompts: Engaging Ideas for Youg Writers

By: Author Paul Jenkins

Posted on Published: March 27, 2023  - Last updated: July 31, 2023

Categories Writing

Teaching first graders to write and express their thoughts is crucial to their educational journey. Developing a love for writing at an early stage can have lifelong benefits, improving communication skills and nurturing creativity. One of the best ways to engage young students in writing activities is by introducing them to exciting writing prompts that can spark their imaginations.

First grade writing prompts are designed to be simple yet thought-provoking, offering topics that first graders can understand and relate to. These prompts come in various forms, such as story starters, journal ideas, and opinion-based questions, allowing students to explore different writing styles and subjects. By encouraging first graders to write about their experiences, emotions, and opinions, teachers can effectively develop young learners’ writing abilities and make the process enjoyable.

Numerous resources are available online, offering diverse and age-appropriate first grade writing prompts. These prompts can be easily integrated into daily lessons, both in-person and in virtual classrooms, and are designed to hone essential writing and critical thinking skills among young students.

The Importance of Writing Prompts

Writing prompts are crucial in fostering early literacy skills in first grade students. They provide a starting point for children to begin expressing and organizing their thoughts, subsequently improving their writing abilities. The use of writing prompts can also help children build confidence in their writing and develop a habit of self-expression through words.

One of the main goals of using writing prompts with first graders is to minimize writer’s block. Writing prompts remove the anxiety of creating ideas from scratch by offering a specific topic or situation to write about. This allows students to focus on formulating sentences, using proper grammar, and developing creativity.

First grade writing prompts can be a fun and engaging way to help children improve their reading skills. As they write, they gain exposure to essential vocabulary and learn the fundamental principles of sentence structure. Moreover, when students actively participate in the writing process, they are more likely to retain information and new concepts.

Teachers can tailor writing prompts to align with educational objectives and curriculum guidelines. Examples of writing prompts include sentence starters, open-ended questions, story scenarios, and prompts that encourage using specific vocabulary or grammatical structures. Variety is key in providing both enjoyment and learning opportunities for students.

First Grade Writing Skills

In first grade, students develop foundational writing skills to help them throughout their academic careers. This section focuses on three crucial areas for first grade writing skills: understanding basic sentence structure, building vocabulary, and developing storytelling abilities.

Understanding Basic Sentence Structure

Children are expected to recognize and adequately use basic sentence structure at this stage. They should be able to write complete sentences with a subject and a predicate. Furthermore, they should practice using capitalization, punctuation, and spacing between words.

Teachers and parents can support this learning through various writing prompts. For instance, they can practice writing sentences by answering these prompts, such as “What is your favorite animal?” or “Describe someone you love.”

Building Vocabulary

Expanding vocabulary is an essential aspect of writing development in first grade. Students must learn new words and meanings to express their thoughts and ideas more effectively. Introducing new words through reading and writing activities helps foster a rich vocabulary.

One way to encourage vocabulary development is by using age-appropriate writing prompts. These prompts may include words that are unfamiliar to the students, which can spark curiosity and lead to learning new words.

Developing Storytelling Abilities

First graders are learning to create simple stories using their imagination and experiences. Developing their storytelling abilities is important for building their writing skills and allowing them to communicate thoughts and ideas coherently.

Teachers and parents can use creative writing prompts to inspire young learners to write stories.

These prompts can range from imaginative scenarios like “What would you do if you could fly?” to prompts based on personal experiences like “What is your favorite memory from kindergarten?” Encouraging first graders to write about these topics helps them practice organizing their thoughts and expressing them through stories and sentences.

Types of First Grade Writing Prompts

Narrative prompts.

Narrative writing prompts help first graders practice storytelling, which helps enhance their creative thinking and language skills. These prompts usually ask students to develop fictional stories or share real-life experiences.

  • What did you do on your favorite day ever?
  • Tell a story about a day when it rained ice cream.
  • Write about your favorite superhero and their adventures.

Expository Prompts

Expository writing prompts encourage first graders to gain knowledge, analyze, and convey information. These prompts typically focus on science, social studies, or other educational subjects.

  • How do plants grow? Explain the process.
  • Why is recycling important for our environment?
  • What is your favorite season, and why?

Descriptive Prompts

Descriptive writing prompts aim to improve first graders’ ability to observe and describe things in detail. These prompts use vivid language and sensory details to give the reader a clear picture of the subject.

  • Describe your favorite place to visit and what makes it unique.
  • Write about your favorite animal and its features.
  • How does your favorite food taste, smell, and look?

Seasonal Writing Prompts for 1st Graders

Winter writing prompts: ideas and examples.

Winter-themed writing prompts can inspire young students to express their thoughts and opinions about the season. These prompts encourage creativity and allow first graders to explore their imagination. Here are some winter writing prompt ideas for first grade:

  • Describe your favorite winter activity, and explain why you enjoy it.
  • Would you instead build a snowman or a snow fort? Explain your choice.
  • Imagine you are an ice skater in a winter show. Describe your performance.
  • Write a story about a snow day adventure with friends or family.

Summer Writing Prompts: Ideas and Examples

In contrast to the cold and snowy winter months, summer offers children a warm and sunny environment to write about. First graders can draw from their experiences during summer vacations or other activities to develop imaginative writing prompts. Here are some examples of summer writing prompts for first grade:

  • Describe your favorite summer activity, and explain why it is unique.
  • Imagine you are exploring a secret island during summer vacation. Tell a story about your adventure.
  • Would you rather spend a day at the beach or an amusement park? Explain your choice.
  • Write about an unforgettable summer experience with your friends or family members.

Seasonal writing prompts help first graders connect their writing and the world around them. By incorporating themes and experiences relevant to each season, young writers can develop their writing skills while sharing their unique perspectives.

Fun Writing Prompts for Young Writers

Story starters – definition and purpose.

Story starters are engaging and thought-provoking sentences or questions that provide a jumping-off point for young writers to express their thoughts and ideas on paper. Story starters encourage creativity, spark imagination, and help first graders develop their writing skills while having fun.

Examples for 1st-grade students

Here are some examples of story starters specifically designed for first grade students. These prompts are crafted to inspire and motivate young writers to explore their thoughts, feelings, and experiences creatively.

  • One sunny day, a little caterpillar named Charlie decided to adventure to…
  • In a magical forest filled with talking trees, a brave squirrel named Squeaky set out to…
  • Every night, when the moon brightened, Luna the owl loved to…
  • In a tiny village of friendly dinosaurs, a young Triceratops named Trixie discovered…
  • Far away on a planet made of candy, a group of friends decided to…
  • Deep in the ocean, a curious dolphin named Dolly found a secret underwater cave and…
  • On a quiet, peaceful morning in the jungle, a young elephant named Ella stumbled upon…
  • When the first snow of winter arrived, a group of animal friends decided to build…
  • In a colorful garden filled with magical flowers, a friendly bumblebee named Buzz discovered…
  • Once upon a time, in a land where animals could speak, a clever fox named Felix decided to…
  • High up in the mountains, a playful goat named Greta found a hidden treasure chest and…
  • One rainy day, a cheerful frog named Frankie discovered a magical umbrella that could…
  • In a mystical land filled with fairies and unicorns, a brave princess named Penelope set out on a quest to…
  • On a warm summer day, friends discovered a magical treehouse in their backyard and…

By incorporating these story starters and similar prompts into your lesson plans, you can foster a love of writing in your first grade students, helping them develop essential literacy skills and instilling creative confidence.

Favorite Things

Exploring “favorite things” allows young writers to think about personal preferences and share their thoughts with others. This section offers simple, engaging writing prompts to help first grade students explore their favorite colors, places, and things.

Favorite Color

First grade students can use colors as inspiration for their writing. Ask your students to describe their favorite color and explain why they like it. Encourage them to include specific details and emotions associated with that color. For example:

  • Why is it their favorite color?
  • What objects or things do they associate with this color?
  • How does that color make them feel?

Favorite Place

Writing about favorite places helps students practice using descriptive language and develop spatial awareness. Have your students describe their favorite place and mention what makes it unique. Some prompts could include:

  • What is the setting of the place (indoor or outdoor)?
  • What are the specific features of this place that they enjoy?
  • What memories and experiences are associated with their favorite place?

Favorite Thing

First graders can write about their favorite things to express personal interests and learn about their peers’ preferences. Encourage them to describe their favorite thing, explaining why it is essential to them. Possible questions could be:

  • Why is it their favorite thing?
  • What emotions do they experience when interacting with their favorite thing?
  • How has this particular object or activity impacted their life?

These writing prompts will encourage first grade students to explore their thoughts and preferences while developing essential writing skills. Use these sub-sections as a starting point for creating fun and engaging writing activities for your first grade students.

Engaging First Grade Students

Keeping first grade students engaged and motivated is essential for improving their writing skills. Generating creative writing prompts is a helpful way to ignite their interest and inspire them to express their thoughts.

Creating Interesting Prompts

One way to create exciting prompts is to use relatable topics. Young children are more likely to engage with a subject if they identify with it. Consider using fun writing prompts that revolve around their favorite activities, places, and people.

Additionally, incorporating seasonal themes into writing prompts benefits in maintaining their engagement level. For instance, consider incorporating prompts based on winter, spring, summer, or fall activities to allow students to express their experiences or excitement toward an upcoming event.

Encouraging Creativity

First graders’ creativity can be encouraged by introducing open-ended questions in the writing prompts. Avoid questions with a simple yes or no answer and encourage them to delve deeper into their thoughts and feelings. Examples include:

  • What would you do if you could be invisible for a day?
  • Describe a day in the life of your favorite animal.
  • If you could have any superpower, what would it be and why?

Another approach for nurturing their creative thinking is incorporating visual aids as part of the writing prompt. Providing them with images or illustrations can help spark their imagination, allowing them to create a more vivid and descriptive story.

To promote a collaborative and enjoyable environment, consider integrating group activities and sharing sessions where their writing prompts are discussed. This way, children will refine their writing skills and learn to appreciate others’ perspectives.

Sample First Grade Writing Prompts

First grade writing prompts are essential to help young students develop their writing skills. These prompts encourage creativity, expression, and storytelling.

Opinion writing is also essential for first graders to develop, and prompts encouraging them to share their thoughts and perspectives are particularly useful.

The following examples are just a few of the many engaging prompts available:

  • If you could have any animal as a pet, what would it be and why? Describe what it would be like to have your chosen pet.
  • Imagine that you found a secret door in your room. Where does it lead, and what adventures do you have when you go through it?
  • What would it be called if you could create a new holiday, and how would people celebrate it? Describe the decorations, food, and activities for your special day.
  • Pretend you are a superhero with a unique power. What is your superhero name, and what can you do? Describe a day in the life of your superhero self.
  • What if you woke up one morning and could talk to animals? Which animal would you talk to first, and what would you ask them?
  • Write a story about a day when everything you touched became your favorite snack. What would happen, and how would you feel?
  • Imagine you are an astronaut exploring a new planet. What does the planet look like, and what kind of creatures live there? Describe your adventure on this new planet.
  • What would it be if you could invent a new toy, and how would it work? Describe the toy’s appearance, how to play with it, and why other kids would enjoy it.

Using imaginative prompts like these, first grade students can practice forming coherent sentences and paragraphs while developing their unique voice in writing. Providing a variety of prompts that cover different styles and topics allows young writers to explore a range of genres and discover their preferred style of expression.

Resources and Tips for Teachers

When planning writing activities for your first graders, consider the following tips:

  • Create a supportive and comfortable environment that encourages students to share their ideas and creativity.
  • Provide clear instructions and expectations for each writing assignment.
  • Introduce activities that allow students to practice different types of writing, such as stories, letters, and lists.
  • Offer consistent and constructive feedback on your students’ writing, emphasizing their strengths and providing guidance on areas for improvement.
  • Incorporate peer review activities to help students learn from one another and develop their editing skills.

Remember to adapt activities to the needs and interests of your specific group of students. This will ensure they remain engaged and motivated to develop their writing skills throughout the school year.

Blue Skies with Jennifer White

Common Core Expository Writing Pack & Freebie

You may also like.

expository writing 1st grade

85 Comments

This looks great! I bought your opinion pack and love it. Even though I teach 2nd grade, the standards are pretty much the same so I can use this one too. We are just starting expository writing so I could really use this one.

Swimming into Second

[email protected]

Would love to use this! Thanks for all your work! 🙂

This looks awesome and would love to use it in my classroom!

[email protected]

Thanks for the freebie! The packet looks fantastic 🙂

Catherine [email protected] The Brown-Bag Teacher

This looks great! Would love to win a copy to use!

Ashley [email protected]

This would be great for my students. Just right for the common core. [email protected]

Oops! Forgot to leave my email! [email protected]

This looks fantastic! I could totally use this in my classroom right now.

[email protected]

Thank you for the writing pack and making common core expository look easy.

[email protected]

This looks fantastic!! Thanks for sharing your freebie!

Jennifer jenniferlalsip(at)yahoo(dot)com The First Grade Dream

I would really appreciate being able to use this packet with my students! Thank you!!!

[email protected]

We are working really hard in our school to come up with writing prompts for first grade that align to common core. This would be a great asset for us… 🙂

This looks awesome! Expository writing can be so challenging for the little ones!!

Katie [email protected] Smiles from 2nd Grade

Love your packets! Thanks for creating this for us "firsties" so we can transition easily into CC! [email protected]

It looks like an awesome pack. Thanks for working so hard to help all of us.

Amanda Norman [email protected]

What a great addition to your other pack! I'm positive my kids would benefit from this as much as your other I used!! Great job!

Kiah [email protected]

These resources look great. I would love to have a copy for myself. Thank you for the freebie!

[email protected] :o) V. Special Teacher for Special Kids

I teach a combined 1st and 2nd grade class, so teaching writing can be quite challenging! This would be so helpful! Thanks for the freebie! ) Deb [email protected]

What a wonderful packet! Full of awesome activities! Thanks for the opportunity to win one!

Christina 🙂 Apples, Books, and Crayons [email protected]

This looks great! Thanks for sharing!

Susie [email protected]

I could really use this! I am not very good at teaching writing and have been looking for something like this! Thanks! [email protected] Abi

I love this! I bought your opinion pack and have been using it since November! [email protected]

Looks like a great unit! Thanks for the opportunity to win it! 🙂

~ Amy [email protected]

Im going on maternity leave soon and this packet would be perfect to leave for my sub 🙂

[email protected]

LOVE all of your stuff and would love this too! Thanks for the freebie 🙂 Kristen [email protected]

I would love this writing packet…no matter how much time we spend on writing, it seems it is never enough!

tokyoshoes (at) hotmail (dot) com

This pack looks great! I already own your other one! [email protected]

My firsts would love this! Looks great!!

-Andrew Mr. First Grade

This looks great! I love the mini units for each month!

Katy [email protected]

This looks awesome!!! Thanks for the freebie 🙂

Cait [email protected] Sliding into First!

I would love to use this! We are really diving into different writing with Common Core–but I love it!

Jeanne booky4first.blogspot [email protected]

I teach Multi-age 1-2 and my students and I would be THRILLED to use these materials to assist our writing skills! [email protected]

This looks great! Anything to help meet those CC standards! [email protected]

Love this! Would be wonderful to use in my classroom.

Lori [email protected]

What a wonderful pack! You always put such effort into making great products and it shows! Thanks for the freebie!

[email protected] ThePolishedTeacher

I have been feeling that my writing instruction has become stale. My kids aren't writing as well as I would like, and I know it is my lack of inspiration. I miss the days when we had good inservice speakers and there were conferences and opportunities to refresh our teaching. Since my district is in the same financial situation as most across the country, we no longer have district sponsored instruction. I have been searching over the last few weeks for new ideas, and your pack would be a perfect thing for me.

My email is [email protected]

Looks great! Fingers crossed 🙂

[email protected]

Very nice!! I love you opinion pack too!!

The weather was absolutely gorgeous here today! I still can't believe it was 70 in Western NY in the middle of January!! So crazy!!

Ali alischepis(at)gmail.com

This is very nice! I would love to win this.

[email protected]

I love it! A much needed unit to help with the common core. [email protected]

The packet looks awesome! I would love to use it in my classroom. 🙂

Pam pamjunewu at gmail dot com

This looks wonderful! [email protected]

This writing pack looks FANTASTIC! ~Heather [email protected]

This writing unit looks amazing!! Thanks for all your hard work! So many children will benefit from this writing packet!!

Thanks again, Heather

[email protected]

I love your materials. I have several on my waiting list. This looks like something I would definitely use! Thanks for all your hard work! Lori [email protected]

This looks fabulous! It is obvious how much time you spend on your products, they are all so great! I would love to use this with my firsties! Fingers crossed! 🙂 Dana Fun in 1st Grade [email protected]

I always love your stuff~ it is always of the highest quality! I hope I win this one!! 🙂

~Jen Jen's Kinder Kids [email protected]

This looks great! We have started to phase in the CCSS this year, so this will be perfect for next year when we are in full swing! [email protected]

I am doing I formational writing right now! This would be perfect:)

[email protected]

Really love this!! Hope I win!!!

[email protected]

I have your opinion writing pack & my students love it!! This would be a great addition to my classroom. It looks WONDERFUL!! Lisa [email protected]

Wow! That is a lot of hard work!! [email protected]

Looks great! [email protected]

This looks like an amazing resource to have. Thank you for the opportunity to win it.

Dawn [email protected] Adventures in First with Mrs. Key

This looks great! [email protected]

Wow! That pack looks like it will be so effective! I love writing with my firsties! [email protected]

My first grader could totally use this!

[email protected]

Looks amazing!! Fingers crossed!! 🙂 Julene Hoffman [email protected]

I am raising my hand over here!!! tania My Second Sense

This looks great, as usual! I TOTALLY need this, so I'm hoping….! Thank you! [email protected]

Wow, this packet looks awesome! We are coming up on our nonfiction writing unit, so I would love to win it!

Becky Compassionate Teacher [email protected]

I need all the writing help I can get!! 😉 [email protected]

This is an amazing pack. Would love to win it 🙂

[email protected]

This would be so fun to use. Would love the chance to win it.

[email protected]

I'd love to win. I have your other writing packet and it's wonderful. [email protected]

Very impressive and creative work! This first grade teacher from rural Ohio would LOVE to win!!! Thanks.

Hi there! Thanks for doing this! I love your opinion set. This will be a great addition! [email protected] Sam chizauskie

This would be perfect! We are working on expository writing this grading period, and I'm having a hard time getting started! I'd love to win this!

Looks like a must have for every teacher! My fingers are crossed! Ѽ Lori Teaching With Love and Laughter [email protected]

I have your opinion pack! This would be a great addition to my instruction. Teachin' First [email protected]

Looks wonderful! I have your opinion pack and would love to have this one as well!!! Maybe tonight will finally be my night!!

Thank you for all of your hard work. This looks awesome and would be great in any classroom.

I have your opinion pack and I love it! Now I must have this!

Tamara [email protected]

This looks great and would be so helpful!

I hope I am not too late! This looks wonderful! I am always looking for different ways to teach writing.

Krystyn Ms. Richards's Musings [email protected]

I would love to win your expository writing pack. I love using nonfiction with my little people! Thanks for the opportunity!! Kyp [email protected] or [email protected]

WOW!! What a GREAT pack! I'm a writing only teacher, so this would be PERFECT for my firsties! It's definitely going on my wish list, but fingers crossed I'm your lucky gal!

Maria [email protected]

This looks SO helpful and easy to Xerox and use! I hope I win:). Kelly Kindergarten Kel kellyfindsen (at) gmail (dot) com

This is fantastic Jennifer! So perfect for all the components of writing! ~Christy Fluttering Through First Grade [email protected]

Looks great! Thanks for the opportunity. [email protected]

I bought your opinion pack and love it so I can't wait for this one!

Sandy Wooten [email protected]

http://sandyslearningreef.blogspot.com/

This looks like a GREAT product. Just wanted you to know that EVERY time I come to your blog… it makes me SO happy. Your design is so happy and CUTE! Hope you have a GREAT Monday. Stacy Funky Fresh Firsties

Jennifer, I love it!! Thank you so much! I can't wait to use all of the wonderful ideas packed into this packet! Kyp

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

expository writing 1st grade

Writing Prompts for First Graders: Topics & Tips for Success

  • August 24, 2023

If you’re looking for writing prompts for first graders AND you want to learn how to help kids be successful with their writing, you’re in the right place! In this post, I’m going to share 5 steps to follow when having your 1st graders respond to writing prompts. I’ll also include examples of narrative, informational, and opinion writing prompts that you can use. Plus, I’ll share how you can use differentiation to make sure that all your young writers are successful!

Five Steps for Success When Using Writing Prompts

Step #1: choose a writing prompt that’s engaging and inspires more than a one-word or one-sentence response..

Writing can feel difficult for kids in this age group. Their writing abilities may still be limited, and some kids may feel reluctant to write. To help motivate them, choose prompts that will capture their attention!

expository writing 1st grade

You’ll also want to make sure that students have enough to say when they respond to the prompt. Questions that require only a one-word or one-sentence answer will result in students finishing quickly. 

You’ll also want to make sure that students actually have something to say about the writing topic – perhaps from something they’ve experienced at school or in their daily lives, or from something related to a science/social studies topic you’ve taught them about. If you choose something outside of these areas, students won’t be successful. For example, if you ask students to write about their favorite vacation, it’s possible that they’ve never been on vacation and won’t have anything to say. Or if you ask students to write about their favorite sport but they don’t know much about sports (and you haven’t taught about them in class), they won’t be successful with this prompt, either.

Below are a few prompt ideas from m y differentiated writing prompts for first graders that are both engaging and will elicit a good response from most kids. They are organized by type of writing:

Narrative writing prompts:

  • Write about a time when you felt angry.
  • Write about a first grader who gets lost in the mall/a store. Write a story about what the first grader does.
  • Imagine that you walk into your classroom one morning and find a skunk sitting at your desk. Write a story about what happens.

Informational writing prompts:

  • Explain how to make toast.
  • Explain how day and night are the same and different.
  • Give some tips for staying healthy.
  • Choose an animal that lives in the ocean. Write interesting facts about that animal.

Opinion writing prompts:

  • What is your favorite thing to do after school? Why?
  • What is the best part about being a kid? Why?
  • What is your favorite part of the school day? Why?
  • Should kids be allowed to choose their own bedtimes? Why or why not?

expository writing 1st grade

Step #2: Model how to make a plan for your writing.

When you want students to respond to a writing prompt , the first thing you’ll need to do is  model. ​ And I mean fully model – not just get them started or talk about what you want them to do! You’ll need to show them and talk them through each step in the process. (Of course, as time goes on and students become more comfortable with the writing process, you’ll be able to model less. But when they’re getting started or having difficulty, there’s no such thing as “too much” modeling!)

Using a graphic organizer is a great way to guide students in making a plan for their writing. Even if their written response is not going to be very lengthy, drawing or writing in an organizer will help them create a more complete, coherent piece of writing.

On chart paper, on the board, or under a document camera, take a blank copy of the same graphic organizer that you want students to use. Think aloud as you fill out the graphic organizer. 

Let’s say that you want to model how to respond to the prompt, “Write about a time when you tried something new.” You might say to your students (while modeling how to complete your graphic organizer):

“First graders, I want to write about a time when I tried something new – something I’ve never done before. Hmmm…well, an idea that popped into my mind was the time I first went kayaking. That happened years ago, but at the time, it was new to me. I’d never done it before.”

“Let me think about what I did first, next, and last. I’ll close my eyes for a second and picture what happened. Well, first, my husband and I listened to our kayak tour leader who was going to lead us in the water. She explained kayak safety rules and how to paddle. In my graphic organizer, I’m going to write ‘Listened to kayak tour leader explain safety rules and how to paddle.’ This is not a complete sentence but that’s okay – it’s just an idea, and I’ll add more later when I create my draft.”

(And so on.)

For narrative writing, you might give students a “timeline” graphic organizer so they can map out real events or imagined events for their story:

expository writing 1st grade

Or, a simple “beginning-middle-end” graphic organizer works, too!

expository writing 1st grade

For informational writing, you might try a web (each bubble includes a nonfiction fact):

expository writing 1st grade

You might also try an organizer like this that encourages students to plan an introduction, facts and details, and a conclusion:

expository writing 1st grade

For opinion writing, you might try a “flow chart style” graphic organizer that starts with an opinion, gives reasons, and wraps up with a conclusion:

expository writing 1st grade

After you’ve modeled how to create a plan for writing, allow students to create their own plans. Another tip to help your kids be successful – allow your first graders to talk through their writing idea with a partner before they sit down to fill out their graphic organizers. This conversation can give them a starting point so it’s easier for them to begin working. It can also be motivating for reluctant writers!

Step #3: Model how to take your plan and turn it into a first draft.

Once you’ve modeled how to create a plan and students have made their own plans, it’s time to actually write! Place your graphic organizer next to your blank writing paper (drafting paper) and start modeling how to draft. Explain how you are adding more details and writing in complete sentences. 

You can also focus on a particular skill that you want students to master, like one of these writing skills:

  • Segment words and use your phonics knowledge to spell them
  • Begin each sentence with a capital letter
  • End each sentence with a punctuation mark
  • Write in complete sentences
  • Use spaces between words
  • Write with lots of details
  • Use transition words
  • Tell events in chronological order
  • Avoid run-on sentences

Once you’ve modeled how to turn your graphic organizer into a draft, it’s time for students to write! At this point, some of your young learners will be ready to write, write, write! However, some young students may still need some more support. They might be learning English as a second language, have a learning disability, struggle with language skills, have writer’s block, or simply need extra help to be successful.

This is where differentiated writing supports can really come in handy. Three great tools are sentence starters, word banks, and self-assessment checklists.

Sentence starters  can help show students how to:

  • Structure and organize their writing

expository writing 1st grade

Word banks  can help students:

  • Use more specific vocabulary
  • Get a boost when spelling is a struggle for them
  • Get ideas for their writing (the word bank in the photo below lists adjectives a student might use to describe their desired school mascot)

expository writing 1st grade

Self-assessment checklists  can help students:

  • Learn to revise and edit their writing (more on that in Step #4!)
  • Slow down and check their work rather than immediately declaring that they are finished

expository writing 1st grade

You can even give students a combination of these tools on their writing paper, like these examples:

expository writing 1st grade

In my sets of differentiated writing prompts for first grade , you get options for ALL of these supports (and combinations of them) for every single prompt! This means that you can easily choose the built-in supports you want to use. You can also differentiate by giving different students different writing paper!

Of course, as the school year goes on, you’ll want to remove these supports. The goal is for students to learn to write complete responses on their own. But with first graders, this can take time!

Step #4: Model how to revise and edit your writing.

After students are finished drafting, they might think that they are all done! But we know that an important part of the writing process is revising and editing. You’ll want to show your students how you:

  • Correct spelling, punctuation, and capitalization mistakes
  • Fix grammar errors like incomplete or run-on sentences
  • Look for places that could be confusing to the reader, and add more detail
  • Add an introduction and/or conclusion, if they are missing
  • Fix up messy handwriting

This is a lot for kids to think about. The self-assessment checklists you’ve seen in previous photos can definitely help. It can also help to have kids focus on just ONE area each time they review their work (for example, do a read-through and only look for punctuation errors; do another read-through and only look for capitalization mistakes).

Revising and editing can be tricky for ALL writers – and especially for young children. They will likely need your help to fix certain mistakes. However, one of the best ways to get them to revise and edit without your help is to set up peer editing!

In peer editing, kids read each other their writing and make suggestions for improvement. Of course, they will need to see you model this so they understand how it’s done.

Step #5: Provide an opportunity for students to share their writing.

Having an audience to whom they can share their writing can be very motivating for first graders – and all students! Sharing could be as simple as sitting with a partner and reading them their finished work.

Or, you might have your students re-copy their work onto fancier final draft paper. They can read their work to their peers and you might display it on a bulletin board. You could even invite another class of students into your class, have students pair up, and allow them to share their writing.

Ready to Get Started Using Writing Prompts for First Graders?

To get access to a set of 60 fun 1st grade writing prompts for narrative, informational, and opinion writing, c lick here ! They are great for daily practice and can even be used in literacy centers, once students understand how to respond to them.

expository writing 1st grade

To read how I use prompt writing with other types of writing assignments throughout the school year with my 1st graders,  click here!

If you want to save this post to return to it later, pin the image below to your favorite Pinterest board.

If you're looking for writing prompts for first graders AND you want to learn how to help kids be successful with their writing, this blog post is for you! In it, I share 5 steps to follow when having your 1st graders respond to writing prompts. I also include examples of narrative, informational, and opinion writing prompts that you can use. Plus, I share how you can use differentiation to make sure that all your young writers are successful! Click here for all these tips and ideas about using writing prompts with 1st graders!

Happy teaching!

Related Posts:

LATPP_Blog_10.3.21_Helping-Students-Respond-To-Writing-Prompts_Pin#1

I’m Alison, a literacy specialist. I love getting kids excited about reading and writing – and sharing teaching ideas with other teachers!

Find It fast

Bestsellers.

‎Phonological Awareness Centers.‎001

  • Classroom Organization and Classroom Decor
  • General Instructional Strategies
  • Homework and Home-School Communication
  • Mentor Texts and Other Books
  • Science and Social Studies
  • Teaching in Spanish
  • Tips for Teachers
  • Word Work / Phonics

expository writing 1st grade

Copyright © 2024 Learning at the Primary Pond | Privacy Policy Site Design by Laine Sutherland Designs

expository writing 1st grade

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • How to write an expository essay

How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples

Published on July 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

“Expository” means “intended to explain or describe something.” An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn’t set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject. They tend to involve less research and original arguments than argumentative essays .

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Upload your document to correct all your mistakes in minutes

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

When should you write an expository essay, how to approach an expository essay, introducing your essay, writing the body paragraphs, concluding your essay, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

Sometimes it won’t be directly stated that the assignment is an expository essay, but there are certain keywords that imply expository writing is required. Consider the prompts below.

The word “explain” here is the clue: An essay responding to this prompt should provide an explanation of this historical process—not necessarily an original argument about it.

Sometimes you’ll be asked to define a particular term or concept. This means more than just copying down the dictionary definition; you’ll be expected to explore different ideas surrounding the term, as this prompt emphasizes.

Receive feedback on language, structure, and formatting

Professional editors proofread and edit your paper by focusing on:

  • Academic style
  • Vague sentences
  • Style consistency

See an example

expository writing 1st grade

An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn’t about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person (“I” or “you”).

The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It’s worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline .

A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Like all essays, an expository essay begins with an introduction . This serves to hook the reader’s interest, briefly introduce your topic, and provide a thesis statement summarizing what you’re going to say about it.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

The body of your essay is where you cover your topic in depth. It often consists of three paragraphs, but may be more for a longer essay. This is where you present the details of the process, idea or topic you’re explaining.

It’s important to make sure each paragraph covers its own clearly defined topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Different topics (all related to the overall subject matter of the essay) should be presented in a logical order, with clear transitions between paragraphs.

Hover over different parts of the example paragraph below to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

The conclusion of an expository essay serves to summarize the topic under discussion. It should not present any new information or evidence, but should instead focus on reinforcing the points made so far. Essentially, your conclusion is there to round off the essay in an engaging way.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a conclusion works.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

  • Choosing Essay Topic
  • Write a College Essay
  • Write a Diversity Essay
  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

An expository essay is a broad form that varies in length according to the scope of the assignment.

Expository essays are often assigned as a writing exercise or as part of an exam, in which case a five-paragraph essay of around 800 words may be appropriate.

You’ll usually be given guidelines regarding length; if you’re not sure, ask.

An expository essay is a common assignment in high-school and university composition classes. It might be assigned as coursework, in class, or as part of an exam.

Sometimes you might not be told explicitly to write an expository essay. Look out for prompts containing keywords like “explain” and “define.” An expository essay is usually the right response to these prompts.

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2023, July 23). How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved April 8, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/expository-essay/

Is this article helpful?

Jack Caulfield

Jack Caulfield

Other students also liked, academic paragraph structure | step-by-step guide & examples, how to write topic sentences | 4 steps, examples & purpose, how to write an argumentative essay | examples & tips, "i thought ai proofreading was useless but..".

I've been using Scribbr for years now and I know it's a service that won't disappoint. It does a good job spotting mistakes”

All Formats

Resource types, all resource types.

  • Rating Count
  • Price (Ascending)
  • Price (Descending)
  • Most Recent

1st grade writing-expository resources

Preview of Reading Comprehension Strategies MEGA Bundle | TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE 2024 SALE

Reading Comprehension Strategies MEGA Bundle | TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE 2024 SALE

expository writing 1st grade

Poetry Writing Bundle with Interactive Notebook & Lapbook

expository writing 1st grade

2nd Grade Reading + Phonics Bingo Game! 90 Unique Boards - Level 2 Words!

expository writing 1st grade

Spring Coloring Pages & Easter Color By Number Parts of Speech Worksheets

expository writing 1st grade

Spring Writing and Word Work Print and Go for Distance Learning

expository writing 1st grade

April Writing Center Spring Prompts, Activities and Bulletin Board Posters

expository writing 1st grade

Earth Day Math & Literacy Activities Worksheets Kindergarten First Grade

expository writing 1st grade

Daily Writing Journal for 1st Grade with Handwriting and Directed Drawings

expository writing 1st grade

Kindergarten Writing Units Bundle | Writers Workshop

expository writing 1st grade

Writing Units Bundle: Opinion, Informational & Narrative, Graphic Organizers

expository writing 1st grade

The Writing Process Giant Pencil Poster-Bulletin Board Decor EDITABLE

expository writing 1st grade

Animal Reports 1st Grade Kindergarten Reading Writing Informational Zoo Crafts

expository writing 1st grade

Informative writing for First Grade: All About Book

expository writing 1st grade

How to Writing Unit for Writer's Workshop

Preview of First Grade Writing Bundle Kindergarten Writer's Workshop Curriculum Spanish

First Grade Writing Bundle Kindergarten Writer's Workshop Curriculum Spanish

Preview of Animal Habitats

Animal Habitats

expository writing 1st grade

Opinion Writing Unit: Graphic Organizers, Prompts, Posters, Transition Words

Preview of Paragraph Writing How to Write a Paragraph of the Week for 1st and 2nd grade

Paragraph Writing How to Write a Paragraph of the Week for 1st and 2nd grade

expository writing 1st grade

  • Google Apps™
  • Easel Activity

Preview of St. Patrick's Day Writing - A Rainbow About Me Craft

St. Patrick's Day Writing - A Rainbow About Me Craft

expository writing 1st grade

FIRST GRADE EXPLICIT INFORMATIVE WRITING CURRICULUM

expository writing 1st grade

Informational Writing Graphic Organizers, Prompts, Sentence Starters, Rubrics

Preview of Animal Research Project & Wax Museum

Animal Research Project & Wax Museum

expository writing 1st grade

First Grade Writer's Workshop units

Preview of Expository Writing How-To Explanatory Prompts Writer's Workshop First Grade

Expository Writing How-To Explanatory Prompts Writer's Workshop First Grade

Preview of Differentiated Animal Research Report Writing for Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd Grade

Differentiated Animal Research Report Writing for Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd Grade

expository writing 1st grade

Non-Fiction Texts for Comprehension | Language Strategies, Main Idea | Speech

expository writing 1st grade

Ocean Animals Research Reports Sharks Crab Sting Ray Starfish Sea Turtle Writing

Preview of Elementary Writing Workshop Resources Bundle - Teaching Without Frills

Elementary Writing Workshop Resources Bundle - Teaching Without Frills

Preview of Differentiated First Grade Informational Writing Prompts

Differentiated First Grade Informational Writing Prompts

expository writing 1st grade

How to Writing Pages: Hands-on Sequencing

expository writing 1st grade

Zoo Animals - Animal Research Reports Tiger Panda Bear Peacock Kangaroo Gorilla

Preview of Graphic Organizers for Podcasts

Graphic Organizers for Podcasts

expository writing 1st grade

  • We're hiring
  • Help & FAQ
  • Privacy policy
  • Student privacy
  • Terms of service
  • Tell us what you think

IMAGES

  1. Expository Writing Graphic Organizer Worksheet by Teach Simple

    expository writing 1st grade

  2. Expository Anchor Chart

    expository writing 1st grade

  3. Expository "How-To" Writing FREEBIE

    expository writing 1st grade

  4. Expository Writing First Grade

    expository writing 1st grade

  5. 1st Grade Expository Writing Lesson Plan

    expository writing 1st grade

  6. First Grade Wow: Little Authors!!

    expository writing 1st grade

VIDEO

  1. Expository Writing 2 Writing Using Examples

  2. Expository Writing Style

  3. EXPOSITORY WRITING

  4. Lesson 13

  5. Grade 10 Expository Essay Writing

  6. Expository writing. explain in Tamil

COMMENTS

  1. Expository Writing First Grade : Blue Skies with Jennifer White

    Expository Writing First Grade. Expository Writing First Grade: Expository writing is used to explain, describe, give information, or inform. There is an enormous amount of emphasis on this type of writing across all grades. I created a pack for Expository Writing specifically for first grade, but it works in my kindergarten classroom and ...

  2. Expository paragraph writing worksheets

    In informative or expository paragraph writing, the writer seeks to explain something or "expose the facts". These worksheets provide writing prompts for expository paragraphs structured with a topic sentence, 2 facts and a conclusion. Tell us about who you are. Tell us about where you live. Tell us all about first grade.

  3. 1st Grade Expository Writing Lesson Plan

    This lesson plan introduces expository writing and idea development. Students will focus on writing the first draft of a text. The text that will be used for this lesson is titled "Into the Sea" from the Fountas & Pinnell leveled series. This is a level K book intended for the first and second grades. Expository writing lesson plan for 1st grade.

  4. Free Expository Writing Activities Prompts First Grade Writer's Workshop

    Description. These expository "how to" writing activities are perfect for kindergarten and first grade students. Sentence starters, picture word banks, graphic organizers, rubrics and vocabulary words provide scaffolding so all students can be successful with their explanatory writing prompts. We learn about sequencing words and how to explain ...

  5. First Grade Expository Writing Teaching Resources

    CC 1st Grade Informative and Expository Writing Unit. by . Danielle LaSota. 15. $10.00. PDF; This is a part of my large first grade writing unit. You will find: - 3 different rubrics to grade writing -a parent letter introducing the writing -a 9 week example teaching week at a glance -a blank persuasive writing template -a blank opinion writing ...

  6. Expository Writing How-To Explanatory Prompts Writer's Workshop First Grade

    This standard based expository writing unit teaches kindergarten, first grade and second grade students how-to writing - explaining or teaching how to do something. Everything you need to teach your writer's workshop comes with this unit including posters, writing prompts, picture cards, graphic organizers, sentence starters, student rubric, writing crafts, mini books and more!

  7. Expository Writing First Grade

    This video shows you how to teach expository writing to first graders. You can find writing lesson plans at www.alphakidsinc.com.

  8. First Grade Expository Writing Poster (Teacher-Made)

    This anchor chart supports first-grade students as they study expository writing. It can be printed as a handout (ideal in a Writer's Workshop reference folder) or used in your classroom as an instructional poster. Includes child-friendly illustrations and an easy to read design - perfect for helping students learn and grow as readers and writers. Take a look at our poster for persuasive ...

  9. Expository "How-To" Writing FREEBIE

    In Unit 4of my K-1 writing series, we are tackling "How-To" writing pieces, and my kiddos love it when I tell them they get to be the teacher. I say, "You get to teach me! You have to write and tell me how to do something!". This unit is perfect for both kindergarten and first grade students. In this unit, students must explain "how-to ...

  10. How to Teach Expository Text Structure to Facilitate Reading

    Tompkins (1998) suggested the following three steps to teach expository text structures:. Introduce an organizational pattern: The teacher introduces the signal words and phrases that identify each text structure and gives students a graphic organizer for each pattern. Give students opportunities to work on the text: The teacher provides the students with chances to analyze the text structures ...

  11. Introduction to Teaching Expository Writing

    Expository Writing Structure. These are the steps of writing an expository text: Brainstorm - Coming up with the idea. Research - Looking for information about the idea. Introductory Paragraph - Telling the reader about what the writing is about (the main idea) Body of the Essay - Organizing the facts and details for the topic.

  12. Tell us all about first grade

    Informative writing worksheets. This expository writing worksheet asks the student to Tell us all about first grade. Students draw a picture and write a topic sentence, 2 facts and a conclusion. Worksheet #1. Similar: Tell us all about your family Tell us all about a game you enjoy playing.

  13. Paragraph Writing for Grade 1 Students

    These worksheets provide writing prompts for expository writing practice. Opinion paragraphs practice. In these worksheets students are provided a topic sentence, two facts and a conclusion to write an opinion paragraph. Narrative paragraphs practice. With first, next and last sentences starters, students write narrative paragraphs.

  14. First Grade Writing Prompts: Engaging Ideas for Youg Writers

    First grade writing prompts are designed to be simple yet thought-provoking, offering topics that first graders can understand and relate to. ... Expository writing prompts encourage first graders to gain knowledge, analyze, and convey information. These prompts typically focus on science, social studies, or other educational subjects.

  15. Results for 1st grade expository writing prompts

    These expository "how to" writing activities are perfect for kindergarten and first grade students. Sentence starters, picture word banks, graphic organizers, rubrics and vocabulary words provide scaffolding so all students can be successful with their explanatory writing prompts.We learn about sequencing words and how to explain how to do something.These free lessons are a preview from my K-1 ...

  16. 33 Excellent Expository Writing Prompts » JournalBuddies.com

    This form of writing is a method of writing in which the author describes, informs, or explains a topic to the reader. Learning how to write an expository paper (or essay) is one of the most important skills that students can develop from an early age. Of course, it is also a skill one may develop or refine at any age or stage in school or life.

  17. Expository Writing Teaching Resources for 1st Grade

    Whether you call it expository writing, informational writing or writing informative texts in your classroom, ... and writing procedural texts with an interactive 'How to Decorate a Christmas Tree' slide deck and differentiated writing prompts for 1st grade. PDF

  18. PDF First Grade Expository Writing Prompts

    First Grade Expository Writing Prompts Describe a kind person you know. How do you play checkers? Write about what happens in your favorite movie. How do you take care of a dog? Tell someone how to wash their hands. Describe your mom or dad. What does your school look like? What are three things you did today?

  19. Results for expository writing prompts for first grade

    These informative writing prompts are no prep and perfect for 1st grade information writing lessons or writing centers.This is a year's worth of worksheets that includes student friendly and seasonal topics (e.g. Earth Day, Spring, Winter, St. Patrick's Day)!*NOTE - This activity has the Easel digital overlay tool option.

  20. Common Core Expository Writing Pack & Freebie

    Here is a (general) freebie from the pack, just visit the TPT link here and click the option to "download preview" under the" add to cart" button. I tried to follow (sort of) the same format of my other pack, but addressing the different components and types of Informational Writing: How to, Descriptions, Cause & Effect, Problem ...

  21. Writing Prompts for First Graders: Topics & Tips for Success

    Write a story about what happens. Informational writing prompts: Explain how to make toast. Explain how day and night are the same and different. Give some tips for staying healthy. Choose an animal that lives in the ocean. Write interesting facts about that animal.

  22. How to Write an Expository Essay

    An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn't about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person ("I" or "you"). The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your ...

  23. 1st Grade Writing-expository Worksheets

    This informative writing workshop unit was created to help your students create an All About Book about their favorite animal. They will go through the research and writing proces