Examples

Travel Essay

travel essay rubric

Being given the chance to write essays travel to places around the world is a privilege that shouldn’t be taken for granted. For some people, it’s a dream that isn’t quite easy to reach. After all, not everyone is fortunate enough to afford such luxury.

When one travels, it’s an experience that they want to share with others. They want to tell a story of the things they’ve seen, the people they met, and the culture they’ve experienced. Most people tell this story through photographs, video diaries, or even travel essays. Through this, they are able to express the thrill and joy from their travel experience. It’s not about bragging but it’s about sharing the beauty of our surroundings.

Travel Writing Essay

Travel Writing Essay

Size: 37 kB

Travel Photo Essay

Travel Photo Essay

How to Write a Travel Essay?

Writing a travel essay is simple. The only thing essential is how you deliver the message. When you travel, it’s important to pay close attention to details.

This would be anything from the structure, the ambiance, and the locals. Allow yourself to wander and focus on the uniqueness of the given place. Tour guides, natives, and travel brochures often provide a short history of a place that you could include in your essay. It’s also best to learn the backstory of a place through your own research. This will allow you and the reader to feel the historic value of a place. It’s best to create an essay outline of your experience for you to properly organize your thoughts.

Purpose of Travel Essay

You have probably read a travel essay in the past. This could be from blogs, newspapers, or magazines. Some essays are so well-written that it makes you feel like you’re a part of the experience. This would inspire you to visit the place at one point in your life. However, it’s not all about what to see or where to go. It’s about the experience. It’s about sharing the beauty of a place that most people aren’t aware of. Travelling isn’t only about having fun but it’s also about appreciating the world we live in.

It’s a descriptive essay explaining the endless wonders of mankind. A travel essay also provides a glimpse of the culture of a given place. Writers inform us of the living conditions of the people there, their character traits, and their outlook in life. These essays are meant to be informative for people to remember that there’s a whole different world out there to explore.

Travel Experience

Travel Experience

Short Essay Sample

Short Essay Sample1

Size: 150 kB

Sample Space Essay

Sample Space Essay

Why Is It Important to Write a Travel Essay?

Travel essays may be written for different reasons. This could be to promote a given location to encourage tourists for a given travel agency or even as a good subject for a high school essay . Writing a travel essay is important in such a way that we can promote local tourism.

Not only can this support a country’s economy but it can also contribute to a local citizen’s means of living. A travel essay is often more accurate and descriptive than a mere photograph. It simply brings the image to life.

Travel Essay Generator

Text prompt

  • Instructive
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Write a Travel Essay on a transformative travel experience.

Create a Travel Essay exploring the culture of a country you visited.

Rubric Best Practices, Examples, and Templates

A rubric is a scoring tool that identifies the different criteria relevant to an assignment, assessment, or learning outcome and states the possible levels of achievement in a specific, clear, and objective way. Use rubrics to assess project-based student work including essays, group projects, creative endeavors, and oral presentations.

Rubrics can help instructors communicate expectations to students and assess student work fairly, consistently and efficiently. Rubrics can provide students with informative feedback on their strengths and weaknesses so that they can reflect on their performance and work on areas that need improvement.

How to Get Started

Best practices, moodle how-to guides.

  • Workshop Recording (Fall 2022)
  • Workshop Registration

Step 1: Analyze the assignment

The first step in the rubric creation process is to analyze the assignment or assessment for which you are creating a rubric. To do this, consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of the assignment and your feedback? What do you want students to demonstrate through the completion of this assignment (i.e. what are the learning objectives measured by it)? Is it a summative assessment, or will students use the feedback to create an improved product?
  • Does the assignment break down into different or smaller tasks? Are these tasks equally important as the main assignment?
  • What would an “excellent” assignment look like? An “acceptable” assignment? One that still needs major work?
  • How detailed do you want the feedback you give students to be? Do you want/need to give them a grade?

Step 2: Decide what kind of rubric you will use

Types of rubrics: holistic, analytic/descriptive, single-point

Holistic Rubric. A holistic rubric includes all the criteria (such as clarity, organization, mechanics, etc.) to be considered together and included in a single evaluation. With a holistic rubric, the rater or grader assigns a single score based on an overall judgment of the student’s work, using descriptions of each performance level to assign the score.

Advantages of holistic rubrics:

  • Can p lace an emphasis on what learners can demonstrate rather than what they cannot
  • Save grader time by minimizing the number of evaluations to be made for each student
  • Can be used consistently across raters, provided they have all been trained

Disadvantages of holistic rubrics:

  • Provide less specific feedback than analytic/descriptive rubrics
  • Can be difficult to choose a score when a student’s work is at varying levels across the criteria
  • Any weighting of c riteria cannot be indicated in the rubric

Analytic/Descriptive Rubric . An analytic or descriptive rubric often takes the form of a table with the criteria listed in the left column and with levels of performance listed across the top row. Each cell contains a description of what the specified criterion looks like at a given level of performance. Each of the criteria is scored individually.

Advantages of analytic rubrics:

  • Provide detailed feedback on areas of strength or weakness
  • Each criterion can be weighted to reflect its relative importance

Disadvantages of analytic rubrics:

  • More time-consuming to create and use than a holistic rubric
  • May not be used consistently across raters unless the cells are well defined
  • May result in giving less personalized feedback

Single-Point Rubric . A single-point rubric is breaks down the components of an assignment into different criteria, but instead of describing different levels of performance, only the “proficient” level is described. Feedback space is provided for instructors to give individualized comments to help students improve and/or show where they excelled beyond the proficiency descriptors.

Advantages of single-point rubrics:

  • Easier to create than an analytic/descriptive rubric
  • Perhaps more likely that students will read the descriptors
  • Areas of concern and excellence are open-ended
  • May removes a focus on the grade/points
  • May increase student creativity in project-based assignments

Disadvantage of analytic rubrics: Requires more work for instructors writing feedback

Step 3 (Optional): Look for templates and examples.

You might Google, “Rubric for persuasive essay at the college level” and see if there are any publicly available examples to start from. Ask your colleagues if they have used a rubric for a similar assignment. Some examples are also available at the end of this article. These rubrics can be a great starting point for you, but consider steps 3, 4, and 5 below to ensure that the rubric matches your assignment description, learning objectives and expectations.

Step 4: Define the assignment criteria

Make a list of the knowledge and skills are you measuring with the assignment/assessment Refer to your stated learning objectives, the assignment instructions, past examples of student work, etc. for help.

  Helpful strategies for defining grading criteria:

  • Collaborate with co-instructors, teaching assistants, and other colleagues
  • Brainstorm and discuss with students
  • Can they be observed and measured?
  • Are they important and essential?
  • Are they distinct from other criteria?
  • Are they phrased in precise, unambiguous language?
  • Revise the criteria as needed
  • Consider whether some are more important than others, and how you will weight them.

Step 5: Design the rating scale

Most ratings scales include between 3 and 5 levels. Consider the following questions when designing your rating scale:

  • Given what students are able to demonstrate in this assignment/assessment, what are the possible levels of achievement?
  • How many levels would you like to include (more levels means more detailed descriptions)
  • Will you use numbers and/or descriptive labels for each level of performance? (for example 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 and/or Exceeds expectations, Accomplished, Proficient, Developing, Beginning, etc.)
  • Don’t use too many columns, and recognize that some criteria can have more columns that others . The rubric needs to be comprehensible and organized. Pick the right amount of columns so that the criteria flow logically and naturally across levels.

Step 6: Write descriptions for each level of the rating scale

Artificial Intelligence tools like Chat GPT have proven to be useful tools for creating a rubric. You will want to engineer your prompt that you provide the AI assistant to ensure you get what you want. For example, you might provide the assignment description, the criteria you feel are important, and the number of levels of performance you want in your prompt. Use the results as a starting point, and adjust the descriptions as needed.

Building a rubric from scratch

For a single-point rubric , describe what would be considered “proficient,” i.e. B-level work, and provide that description. You might also include suggestions for students outside of the actual rubric about how they might surpass proficient-level work.

For analytic and holistic rubrics , c reate statements of expected performance at each level of the rubric.

  • Consider what descriptor is appropriate for each criteria, e.g., presence vs absence, complete vs incomplete, many vs none, major vs minor, consistent vs inconsistent, always vs never. If you have an indicator described in one level, it will need to be described in each level.
  • You might start with the top/exemplary level. What does it look like when a student has achieved excellence for each/every criterion? Then, look at the “bottom” level. What does it look like when a student has not achieved the learning goals in any way? Then, complete the in-between levels.
  • For an analytic rubric , do this for each particular criterion of the rubric so that every cell in the table is filled. These descriptions help students understand your expectations and their performance in regard to those expectations.

Well-written descriptions:

  • Describe observable and measurable behavior
  • Use parallel language across the scale
  • Indicate the degree to which the standards are met

Step 7: Create your rubric

Create your rubric in a table or spreadsheet in Word, Google Docs, Sheets, etc., and then transfer it by typing it into Moodle. You can also use online tools to create the rubric, but you will still have to type the criteria, indicators, levels, etc., into Moodle. Rubric creators: Rubistar , iRubric

Step 8: Pilot-test your rubric

Prior to implementing your rubric on a live course, obtain feedback from:

  • Teacher assistants

Try out your new rubric on a sample of student work. After you pilot-test your rubric, analyze the results to consider its effectiveness and revise accordingly.

  • Limit the rubric to a single page for reading and grading ease
  • Use parallel language . Use similar language and syntax/wording from column to column. Make sure that the rubric can be easily read from left to right or vice versa.
  • Use student-friendly language . Make sure the language is learning-level appropriate. If you use academic language or concepts, you will need to teach those concepts.
  • Share and discuss the rubric with your students . Students should understand that the rubric is there to help them learn, reflect, and self-assess. If students use a rubric, they will understand the expectations and their relevance to learning.
  • Consider scalability and reusability of rubrics. Create rubric templates that you can alter as needed for multiple assignments.
  • Maximize the descriptiveness of your language. Avoid words like “good” and “excellent.” For example, instead of saying, “uses excellent sources,” you might describe what makes a resource excellent so that students will know. You might also consider reducing the reliance on quantity, such as a number of allowable misspelled words. Focus instead, for example, on how distracting any spelling errors are.

Example of an analytic rubric for a final paper

Example of a holistic rubric for a final paper, single-point rubric, more examples:.

  • Single Point Rubric Template ( variation )
  • Analytic Rubric Template make a copy to edit
  • A Rubric for Rubrics
  • Bank of Online Discussion Rubrics in different formats
  • Mathematical Presentations Descriptive Rubric
  • Math Proof Assessment Rubric
  • Kansas State Sample Rubrics
  • Design Single Point Rubric

Technology Tools: Rubrics in Moodle

  • Moodle Docs: Rubrics
  • Moodle Docs: Grading Guide (use for single-point rubrics)

Tools with rubrics (other than Moodle)

  • Google Assignments
  • Turnitin Assignments: Rubric or Grading Form

Other resources

  • DePaul University (n.d.). Rubrics .
  • Gonzalez, J. (2014). Know your terms: Holistic, Analytic, and Single-Point Rubrics . Cult of Pedagogy.
  • Goodrich, H. (1996). Understanding rubrics . Teaching for Authentic Student Performance, 54 (4), 14-17. Retrieved from   
  • Miller, A. (2012). Tame the beast: tips for designing and using rubrics.
  • Ragupathi, K., Lee, A. (2020). Beyond Fairness and Consistency in Grading: The Role of Rubrics in Higher Education. In: Sanger, C., Gleason, N. (eds) Diversity and Inclusion in Global Higher Education. Palgrave Macmillan, Singapore.

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Humanities LibreTexts

7.2: Rubrics

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WHAT IS A RUBRIC?

A rubric communicates expectations and creates consistent criteria and standards by which to evaluate a performance or project. In writing, a rubric allows teachers and students to evaluate an activity which can be complex and subjective. A rubric is aimed at accurate and fair assessment, fostering understanding, and indicating a way to proceed with subsequent learning and teaching. A rubric can also provide a basis for self-evaluation, reflection, and peer review.

WHY ARE RUBRICS IMPORTANT?

Rubrics help to…

  • bring objectivity to subjective scoring.
  • take away the “guessing game” by providing students with consistent standards the teacher will be using to evaluate their writing.
  • teach students to set learning goals and take the responsibility for their learning into their own hands by knowing what skills make up a desired performance so they can strive to achieve it.
  • assist students in developing their personal ability to judge excellence, or the lack thereof, in their work and the work of others.
  • assure students that there is equality in grading and standardized expectations.
  • praise students’ strengths and identify their weaknesses because rubrics provide visual representations of areas of excellence and under-performance allowing easy identification of what areas to work on at a glance.
  • provide a clear means for students to monitor their progress on specific criteria over a given period of instruction or time.
  • ensure for teachers that they are evaluating student work fairly, clearly and thoroughly.

HOW DO I DO IT?

The English professors at Skyline College have worked together to create a shared rubric so that regardless of English class or instructor, students will be evaluated according to a consistent set of criteria based on a shared understanding of writing fundamentals. All of the materials designed to instruct, evaluate and comment on student writing in this Rhetoric are based on that departmental rubric. Contained here are three different approaches using Skyline College’s English Departmental rubric to evaluate and comment on writing. These rubrics can be used by students to evaluate one another, and they can be used by instructors to evaluate students. This provides further consistency and shared expectations as the students and the instructor use the same evaluating tool.

Composition Essay Rubric with Explanations

How to : Check the appropriate rubric boxes and provide explanations afterwards of the ratings. Using the information : For areas where a writer receives “needs work” or “adequate,” review that area in the Rhetoric associated with that topic and use the advice when revising.

Comments: further explanations behind the scoring choices along with revision advice (for more commenting space, insert electronically or attach additional page)

Literature Essay Rubric with Explanations

Composition essay rubric.

How to : Check the appropriate rubric boxes and provide explanations afterwards of the ratings. Using the information : For areas where a writer receives “needs work” or “adequate,” review that area in the Rhetoric associated with that topic (link below) and use the advice when revising.

Literature Essay Rubric

Composition essay rubric with integrated comments.

How to : Check the appropriate rubric box and provide an explanation of the ratings by answering the questions below. Fill out each section thoroughly to provide thoughtful and comprehensive feedback. Using the information : For areas where a writer receives “needs work” or “adequate,” review that area in the Rhetoric associated with that topic (link below) and use the advice when revising.

Literature Essay Rubric with Integrated Comments

Ultimate Guide to Writing Your College Essay

Tips for writing an effective college essay.

College admissions essays are an important part of your college application and gives you the chance to show colleges and universities your character and experiences. This guide will give you tips to write an effective college essay.

Want free help with your college essay?

UPchieve connects you with knowledgeable and friendly college advisors—online, 24/7, and completely free. Get 1:1 help brainstorming topics, outlining your essay, revising a draft, or editing grammar.

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Writing a strong college admissions essay

Learn about the elements of a solid admissions essay.

Avoiding common admissions essay mistakes

Learn some of the most common mistakes made on college essays

Brainstorming tips for your college essay

Stuck on what to write your college essay about? Here are some exercises to help you get started.

How formal should the tone of your college essay be?

Learn how formal your college essay should be and get tips on how to bring out your natural voice.

Taking your college essay to the next level

Hear an admissions expert discuss the appropriate level of depth necessary in your college essay.

Student Stories

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Student Story: Admissions essay about a formative experience

Get the perspective of a current college student on how he approached the admissions essay.

Student Story: Admissions essay about personal identity

Get the perspective of a current college student on how she approached the admissions essay.

Student Story: Admissions essay about community impact

Student story: admissions essay about a past mistake, how to write a college application essay, tips for writing an effective application essay, sample college essay 1 with feedback, sample college essay 2 with feedback.

This content is licensed by Khan Academy and is available for free at www.khanacademy.org.

Essay On Travel

500 words essay on travel.

Travelling is an amazing way to learn a lot of things in life. A lot of people around the world travel every year to many places. Moreover, it is important to travel to humans. Some travel to learn more while some travel to take a break from their life. No matter the reason, travelling opens a big door for us to explore the world beyond our imagination and indulge in many things. Therefore, through this Essay on Travel, we will go through everything that makes travelling great.

essay on travel

Why Do We Travel?

There are a lot of reasons to travel. Some people travel for fun while some do it for education purposes. Similarly, others have business reasons to travel. In order to travel, one must first get an idea of their financial situation and then proceed.

Understanding your own reality helps people make good travel decisions. If people gave enough opportunities to travel, they set out on the journey. People going on educational tours get a first-hand experience of everything they’ve read in the text.

Similarly, people who travel for fun get to experience and indulge in refreshing things which may serve as a stress reducer in their lives. The culture, architecture, cuisine and more of the place can open our mind to new things.

The Benefits of Travelling

There are numerous benefits to travelling if we think about it. The first one being, we get to meet new people. When you meet new people, you get the opportunity to make new friends. It may be a fellow traveller or the local you asked for directions.

Moreover, new age technology has made it easier to keep in touch with them. Thus, it offers not only a great way to understand human nature but also explore new places with those friends to make your trip easy.

Similar to this benefit, travelling makes it easier to understand people. You will learn how other people eat, speak, live and more. When you get out of your comfort zone, you will become more sensitive towards other cultures and the people.

Another important factor which we learn when we travel is learning new skills. When you go to hilly areas, you will most likely trek and thus, trekking will be a new skill added to your list.

Similarly, scuba diving or more can also be learned while travelling. A very important thing which travelling teaches us is to enjoy nature. It helps us appreciate the true beauty of the earth .

Get the huge list of more than 500 Essay Topics and Ideas

Conclusion of the Essay on Travel

All in all, it is no less than a blessing to be able to travel. Many people are not privileged enough to do that. Those who do get the chance, it brings excitement in their lives and teaches them new things. No matter how a travelling experience may go, whether good or bad, it will definitely help you learn.

FAQ on Essay on Travel

Question 1: Why is it advantageous to travel?

Answer 1: Real experiences always have better value. When we travel to a city, in a different country, it allows us to learn about a new culture, new language, new lifestyle, and new peoples. Sometimes, it is the best teacher to understand the world.

Question 2: Why is travelling essential?

Answer 2: Travelling is an incredibly vital part of life. It is the best way to break your monotonous routine and experience life in different ways. Moreover, it is also a good remedy for stress, anxiety and depression.

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Understanding the TOK essay rubric

TOK Home > Free TOK notes > TOK essay guidance > Understanding the TOK essay rubric

travel essay rubric

After understanding the of the basics of the essay, your next step is to grasp how it is evaluated and marked, which is outlined in the ‘assessment instrument’. Your TOK teacher will give you a copy of this, or you can find it online in the 2022 TOK Guide.

The overall assessment objective of the TOK essay is to answer the prescribed essay title in a clear, coherent, and critical way. In order to do this, the assessment ‘instrument’ looks for five different skills.

STEP 1: Understand the TOK essay rubric

1. making links to tok.

The discussion within your TOK essay should be linked very effectively to the  areas of knowledge . Most, TOK essays expect you to discuss two AOKs, which will provide you with the context to explore and answer the prescribed title you’ve chosen.

2. Understanding perspectives

Your TOK essay should show a clear awareness of different points of view, and should offer an evaluation of them. This means considering how different perspective might approach the question in different ways.

3. Offering an effective argument

The arguments within your TOK essay are clear and coherent, and are supported by strong examples.

This means expressing your opinions clearly, and supporting them with original and meaningful real-life situations.

4. Keeping discussions relevant

Your essay’s discussions should offer a ‘sustained focus’ on the title. This means that you should be able to pick out any section of your essay, and be able to identify what question it is answering.

5. Considering implications

Your essay needs to not just present and evaluate arguments, it also needs to say why these arguments are significant, and what their implications are.

After you have grasped the rubric strands, you are ready to move on to choosing your prescribed title from the choice of six that are published in March or November – which we provide guidance on here .

Creating a TOK essay: our four-step guide

Click on the buttons below to take you to the four steps of creating a great TOK essay. Don’t forget that we have plenty of videos on this and other aspects of the course, and members of the site have access to a huge amount of other resources to help you master the course and assessment tasks.

travel essay rubric

How to write a TOK essay: webinar

This 80-minute webinar video and presentation gives you a clear, engaging, step-by-step guide to the task, helping you to understand the assessment rubric, choose the right PT, and produce an essay that hits all the assessment targets.

The video is supported by a presentation, and a Q&A debrief answering some of the most common questions asked about writing a TOK essay. Purchase your ticket here .

More support for the TOK essay

Make sure that your TOK teacher has given you access to all the documents and online material that support the essay. These include the TOK Subject Guide, the TOK essay rubric, and exemplar TOK essays (found in ‘MyIB’, which is accessible to teachers).   Make sure you go through our other pages on writing the TOK essay. You’ll find help on understanding what the is looking for, that works for you, what each of the should focus on, how to an effective TOK essay, and how to fill in your .   If your school is a  member  of theoryofknowledge.net, we have designed a series of lessons on the essay, with two formative assessment tasks. These will familiarize you with the essay rubric, knowledge questions, real-life situations, how to deal with perspectives and implications, and structuring an essay. If you are signed into the site, you can access these lessons  here .   You can also find out our thoughts on the TOK essay (and the TOK exhibition) in several webinars that we have delivered. The main one is the TOK Assessment 2022 webinar, but we also consider this form of assessment in our free webinars on the 2022 course. You can see these webinars on  this page  of the site.

travel essay rubric

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Tutorials - How to grade essays with rubric

⇐ Go Back to Tutorials

How to Grade Essays with Rubric :

  • After you log in you will now see a menu link at the very top left that says "Submitted Essays" click this link to enter the Submitted Essays page:

travel essay rubric

  • Now that you are in the Submitted Essays page find the latest submission or look for a particular student by using the "Search Submitted Essays" field. In this case we are going to choose the top submission just click the blue link or click the "Edit" selection when you hover over an essay.  This will bring you to the edit window for this particular essay.

travel essay rubric

  • Within the Edit window if you place your cursor above the student's essay text and then select the new little yellow note icon called "Post Snippets" this will give you the option to place the TTC Rubric within this essay (See next screenshot)

travel essay rubric

  • Just select the Post Snippet called "TTCRubric" and then click "Insert"  (Note there is only one post snippet listed in the future there might be multiple selections)

travel essay rubric

  • The Rubric can be edited within this Edit window, as you can see you can edit the points within each section.
  • NOTE:  On the right hand side is the actual prompts given to the student at the time they submitted there essay.

travel essay rubric

  • You can also change text color if you need to highlight graded rubric areas.

travel essay rubric

  • At the bottom of the rubric you will see an area to place the total points .
  • You can place comments within their essay as well to red line if needed.
  • Place actual points on the right hand side where it says " Points Awarded "
  • Make sure before clicking " Update " that you change the grade status at the top right hand side to "Graded"

travel essay rubric

  • You can also place direct comments to the student (Found below the Edit window) by checking the box on "Allow Comments" At this time we are not going to use the "Allow comments" so do not check that box  just go to next step until further notice.
  • Then click the "Add Comment" button to add a comment.
  • This will tag your name and time stamp to the essay that you have graded plus it will send an email to the student with a direct link to the commented essay.  
  • After you have checked over your edits, grades, and MADE SURE YOU CHANGED STATUS AT TOP TO "GRADED" then go ahead an click "Update".

travel essay rubric

  • You are finished, now just click the "Submitted Essays" menu on the left hand side of your dashboard to go back to the essay list.
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15 Helpful Scoring Rubric Examples for All Grades and Subjects

In the end, they actually make grading easier.

Collage of scoring rubric examples including written response rubric and interactive notebook rubric

When it comes to student assessment and evaluation, there are a lot of methods to consider. In some cases, testing is the best way to assess a student’s knowledge, and the answers are either right or wrong. But often, assessing a student’s performance is much less clear-cut. In these situations, a scoring rubric is often the way to go, especially if you’re using standards-based grading . Here’s what you need to know about this useful tool, along with lots of rubric examples to get you started.

What is a scoring rubric?

In the United States, a rubric is a guide that lays out the performance expectations for an assignment. It helps students understand what’s required of them, and guides teachers through the evaluation process. (Note that in other countries, the term “rubric” may instead refer to the set of instructions at the beginning of an exam. To avoid confusion, some people use the term “scoring rubric” instead.)

A rubric generally has three parts:

  • Performance criteria: These are the various aspects on which the assignment will be evaluated. They should align with the desired learning outcomes for the assignment.
  • Rating scale: This could be a number system (often 1 to 4) or words like “exceeds expectations, meets expectations, below expectations,” etc.
  • Indicators: These describe the qualities needed to earn a specific rating for each of the performance criteria. The level of detail may vary depending on the assignment and the purpose of the rubric itself.

Rubrics take more time to develop up front, but they help ensure more consistent assessment, especially when the skills being assessed are more subjective. A well-developed rubric can actually save teachers a lot of time when it comes to grading. What’s more, sharing your scoring rubric with students in advance often helps improve performance . This way, students have a clear picture of what’s expected of them and what they need to do to achieve a specific grade or performance rating.

Learn more about why and how to use a rubric here.

Types of Rubric

There are three basic rubric categories, each with its own purpose.

Holistic Rubric

A holistic scoring rubric laying out the criteria for a rating of 1 to 4 when creating an infographic

Source: Cambrian College

This type of rubric combines all the scoring criteria in a single scale. They’re quick to create and use, but they have drawbacks. If a student’s work spans different levels, it can be difficult to decide which score to assign. They also make it harder to provide feedback on specific aspects.

Traditional letter grades are a type of holistic rubric. So are the popular “hamburger rubric” and “ cupcake rubric ” examples. Learn more about holistic rubrics here.

Analytic Rubric

Layout of an analytic scoring rubric, describing the different sections like criteria, rating, and indicators

Source: University of Nebraska

Analytic rubrics are much more complex and generally take a great deal more time up front to design. They include specific details of the expected learning outcomes, and descriptions of what criteria are required to meet various performance ratings in each. Each rating is assigned a point value, and the total number of points earned determines the overall grade for the assignment.

Though they’re more time-intensive to create, analytic rubrics actually save time while grading. Teachers can simply circle or highlight any relevant phrases in each rating, and add a comment or two if needed. They also help ensure consistency in grading, and make it much easier for students to understand what’s expected of them.

Learn more about analytic rubrics here.

Developmental Rubric

A developmental rubric for kindergarten skills, with illustrations to describe the indicators of criteria

Source: Deb’s Data Digest

A developmental rubric is a type of analytic rubric, but it’s used to assess progress along the way rather than determining a final score on an assignment. The details in these rubrics help students understand their achievements, as well as highlight the specific skills they still need to improve.

Developmental rubrics are essentially a subset of analytic rubrics. They leave off the point values, though, and focus instead on giving feedback using the criteria and indicators of performance.

Learn how to use developmental rubrics here.

Ready to create your own rubrics? Find general tips on designing rubrics here. Then, check out these examples across all grades and subjects to inspire you.

Elementary School Rubric Examples

These elementary school rubric examples come from real teachers who use them with their students. Adapt them to fit your needs and grade level.

Reading Fluency Rubric

A developmental rubric example for reading fluency

You can use this one as an analytic rubric by counting up points to earn a final score, or just to provide developmental feedback. There’s a second rubric page available specifically to assess prosody (reading with expression).

Learn more: Teacher Thrive

Reading Comprehension Rubric

Reading comprehension rubric, with criteria and indicators for different comprehension skills

The nice thing about this rubric is that you can use it at any grade level, for any text. If you like this style, you can get a reading fluency rubric here too.

Learn more: Pawprints Resource Center

Written Response Rubric

Two anchor charts, one showing

Rubrics aren’t just for huge projects. They can also help kids work on very specific skills, like this one for improving written responses on assessments.

Learn more: Dianna Radcliffe: Teaching Upper Elementary and More

Interactive Notebook Rubric

Interactive Notebook rubric example, with criteria and indicators for assessment

If you use interactive notebooks as a learning tool , this rubric can help kids stay on track and meet your expectations.

Learn more: Classroom Nook

Project Rubric

Rubric that can be used for assessing any elementary school project

Use this simple rubric as it is, or tweak it to include more specific indicators for the project you have in mind.

Learn more: Tales of a Title One Teacher

Behavior Rubric

Rubric for assessing student behavior in school and classroom

Developmental rubrics are perfect for assessing behavior and helping students identify opportunities for improvement. Send these home regularly to keep parents in the loop.

Learn more: Teachers.net Gazette

Middle School Rubric Examples

In middle school, use rubrics to offer detailed feedback on projects, presentations, and more. Be sure to share them with students in advance, and encourage them to use them as they work so they’ll know if they’re meeting expectations.

Argumentative Writing Rubric

An argumentative rubric example to use with middle school students

Argumentative writing is a part of language arts, social studies, science, and more. That makes this rubric especially useful.

Learn more: Dr. Caitlyn Tucker

Role-Play Rubric

A rubric example for assessing student role play in the classroom

Role-plays can be really useful when teaching social and critical thinking skills, but it’s hard to assess them. Try a rubric like this one to evaluate and provide useful feedback.

Learn more: A Question of Influence

Art Project Rubric

A rubric used to grade middle school art projects

Art is one of those subjects where grading can feel very subjective. Bring some objectivity to the process with a rubric like this.

Source: Art Ed Guru

Diorama Project Rubric

A rubric for grading middle school diorama projects

You can use diorama projects in almost any subject, and they’re a great chance to encourage creativity. Simplify the grading process and help kids know how to make their projects shine with this scoring rubric.

Learn more: Historyourstory.com

Oral Presentation Rubric

Rubric example for grading oral presentations given by middle school students

Rubrics are terrific for grading presentations, since you can include a variety of skills and other criteria. Consider letting students use a rubric like this to offer peer feedback too.

Learn more: Bright Hub Education

High School Rubric Examples

In high school, it’s important to include your grading rubrics when you give assignments like presentations, research projects, or essays. Kids who go on to college will definitely encounter rubrics, so helping them become familiar with them now will help in the future.

Presentation Rubric

Example of a rubric used to grade a high school project presentation

Analyze a student’s presentation both for content and communication skills with a rubric like this one. If needed, create a separate one for content knowledge with even more criteria and indicators.

Learn more: Michael A. Pena Jr.

Debate Rubric

A rubric for assessing a student's performance in a high school debate

Debate is a valuable learning tool that encourages critical thinking and oral communication skills. This rubric can help you assess those skills objectively.

Learn more: Education World

Project-Based Learning Rubric

A rubric for assessing high school project based learning assignments

Implementing project-based learning can be time-intensive, but the payoffs are worth it. Try this rubric to make student expectations clear and end-of-project assessment easier.

Learn more: Free Technology for Teachers

100-Point Essay Rubric

Rubric for scoring an essay with a final score out of 100 points

Need an easy way to convert a scoring rubric to a letter grade? This example for essay writing earns students a final score out of 100 points.

Learn more: Learn for Your Life

Drama Performance Rubric

A rubric teachers can use to evaluate a student's participation and performance in a theater production

If you’re unsure how to grade a student’s participation and performance in drama class, consider this example. It offers lots of objective criteria and indicators to evaluate.

Learn more: Chase March

How do you use rubrics in your classroom? Come share your thoughts and exchange ideas in the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, 25 of the best alternative assessment ideas ..

Scoring rubrics help establish expectations and ensure assessment consistency. Use these rubric examples to help you design your own.

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Standards-Based Grading Example

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Guest Essay

Our Mom Is 75. We’re Moving Heaven and Earth for This Eclipse.

A drawing of women in solar-eclipse sunglasses, staring at the sky.

By Kathleen Lenihan and Maureen Lenihan Rust

Ms. Lenihan is a former high school history teacher and an elected member of the School Committee in Lexington, Mass. Ms. Rust is a senior manager for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

If all goes according to plan, on Monday, our 75-year-old mother, Nancy, will be settled into a lawn chair in Waco, Texas — some 1,300 miles from her recliner in Las Vegas — and joining a great many other Americans as they put on solar eclipse glasses, tilt their heads up and try to make sense of what’s happening in the heavens.

None of this was a given. Fiercely independent and more than a little skeptical of hype, fads and feverish mass events, our mother is not what you’d call a joiner. Like many of her generation, she has seen a lot in life; she knows what it’s like to have high expectations and be let down. But she also knows the coming eclipse is neither trend nor fad. Planning to see it has united our family in a desire to participate in a mass event that is a wonder of the world.

Part of the drive to take our mother to Waco is the hard truth of time. Partial eclipses come and go, but the next awe-inspiring and captivating total eclipse will not be seen again in the contiguous United States until 2044. Our mother is in variable health and disabled. Absent good luck and medical advancements, odds are heavily stacked against her living to see another one.

Retirement for our mom came with familiar features — more time for her hobbies, rooting for her favorite teams and vacations that cater to disabled individuals. But this planned excursion is different. A cruise can bill itself as a “once-in-a-lifetime adventure” and then offer many dates on the calendar for the same adventure. No matter how many exhilarating experiences a person has collected in 75 years, this one will stand apart.

Her body may be broken, but our mother is still the experience-seeker she has always been. She left home at 18 for a college a thousand miles away, traveled alone to the Middle East and never met a boat, big or small, she didn’t love.

These days, our mom can barely walk. She moves around via a scooter. Her back is so damaged from osteoporosis and an unsuccessful surgery that she cannot sleep, stand or sit without pain. Still, she remains the same stubborn and determined person she has always been. Years ago, this meant going to law school at the age of 40, traveling the world as a divorced single woman and starting her own business just shy of her 50th birthday. Now it means bristling when we mentioned that we are coming from our homes in Massachusetts and California to “take” her to see the eclipse.

“I decided I was going, so I am going,” she told us. “Compliant” and “rule-following” are words not generally used to describe our mom. It wasn’t true when she was a girl at Catholic school, and it certainly isn’t true now with her adult children.

As for us, we don’t always feel like dutiful children. Sure, we send flowers for Mother’s Day and her birthday. We try to speak at least weekly with our mother, but we also frequently end up in yelling matches over politics. In those moments, we tell her she has lost her mind, and she wonders aloud where she went wrong in raising us. Although we visit every Thanksgiving and Christmas, we have never vacationed together as adults. The daily demands of work and our own children long ago got in the way, and those yelling matches are wearying. It’s easy to end a phone call. It’s much harder to stop an uncomfortable conversation at the dinner table.

Despite all that, we have spent more than a year making the arrangements to escort her to this phenomenon of nature. Flights, rental cars and a wheelchair-friendly rental house have been booked since last spring. Most important, we identified an eclipse event at Baylor University in Waco that could handle my mom’s needs while giving us the best chance to view the eclipse under clear skies. We asked the organizers so many questions about walkways, bathrooms, seating and parking that a representative replied via email, “I can see you are putting a lot of thought into making this happen for your mom.” It is a lot of planning, but then my mom (and dad) did the same for four children. Our childhood was filled with trips to see the birthplaces of presidents, Thomas Edison’s workshop, Civil War battlefields, the U.S. Mint and more. Now, like many people in their 40s and 50s, we’ve reversed our roles.

Our mother stayed home when two of her children viewed the solar eclipse in 2017 in Jackson Hole, Wyo. They came back with tales of an event so transformational, she knew she wanted to witness the next one for herself.

People who have never seen a total eclipse are often befuddled by all the hoopla. They most likely recall a partial solar eclipse from childhood — a vague memory of seeing a strange, shadowy impression of the sun through cheap paper sunglasses. But a total solar eclipse is a singularly spectacular phenomenon. The sky darkens, the temperatures drop, and birds fall silent. Viewers can stare directly in the direction of the sun without any eye protection for the minutes of “totality,” when the moon completely covers the sun. Indeed, the only time a human being can see the entire daytime sky is during a total solar eclipse. As Dr. David Grinspoon, now senior scientist for Astrobiology Strategy at NASA, explained to a reporter in 2017, “It’s like the veil comes off the heavens for a minute.” A total eclipse is so outside the realm of normal human experience that in the minutes of totality in 2017, we shouted out in delight and spontaneously hugged each other. Many of us that day had not fully understood that the universe could put on such a wondrous display.

Knowing all that, our mother is saving her strength. She booked a business class flight to Texas to ease her pain, and she is sitting out most of Waco’s pre-eclipse weekend festivities. She will skip the planned science talks. Instead, she will rest for most of the morning and plan to arrive on Baylor’s campus just in time to see the start of the eclipse.

We inherited the desire to explore our world from our mother. The need to care for her now is just as deeply woven into our psyche. Over the past year of planning, the eclipse became less about science for us and more about ensuring that our mother finally has this experience of a lifetime.

Kathleen Lenihan, the eldest of Nancy’s four children, is an elected member of the Lexington, Mass., School Committee. Maureen Lenihan Rust, the second of Nancy’s four children, is a senior manager for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips . And here’s our email: [email protected] .

Follow the New York Times Opinion section on Facebook , Instagram , TikTok , WhatsApp , X and Threads .

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iRubric: Time Travel Argument Essay rubric

travel essay rubric

IMAGES

  1. What is a Travel Essay: Meaning, Features and Examples

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  2. Travel Brochure Rubric

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  3. 020 Rubrics For Essay Example Writing High School English ~ Thatsnotus

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  4. 007 Ap Essay Rubric Example ~ Thatsnotus

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  5. Travelogue Rubric

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  6. RUBRIC-Travel Brochure

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  1. Unforgettable Trip

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  3. Plus One English Improvement Exam Travel Essay

  4. travel essay format |format travel essay|plus one English exam important question

  5. Travelling , As a part of education/ essay on Education tour

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COMMENTS

  1. iRubric: Travel Writing rubric

    iRubric R98588: Rubric title Travel Writing. Built by csavari using iRubric.com. Free rubric builder and assessment tools.

  2. iRubric: Travel Essay Rubric

    Travel Essay Rubric General 5 paragraph essay rubric Writing Rubric Rubric Code: F4W266. By alswells Ready to use Public Rubric Subject: English Type: Writing Grade Levels: 9-12 Desktop Mobile. Content Excellent 4 pts Good ...

  3. PDF Essay Grading Rubric

    Below are the elements of writing, taken from the Essay Checklist, I use to determine your grade. ESSAY GRADING RUBRIC . Creative title on the essay 5 pts First sentence interesting, surprising, or captivating enough to pull the reader into the narrative 10 pts Sentences written in active voice 10 pts Unnecessary helping verbs (is, are,

  4. PDF Essay Rubric

    Essay Rubric Directions: Your essay will be graded based on this rubric. Consequently, use this rubric as a guide when writing your essay and check it again before you submit your essay. Traits 4 3 2 1 Focus & Details There is one clear, well-focused topic. Main ideas are clear and are well supported by detailed and accurate information.

  5. iRubric: Travelogue Writing rubric

    iRubric SXB395C: For this assignment, you will create a travelogue. In this travelogue, you will paint a "word picture" for readers, as you describe a time when you traveled somewhere new. Your goal is to immerse the reader's senses with your description.. Free rubric builder and assessment tools.

  6. PDF Travel Grant Essay Grading Rubric

    Travel provides a crucial, well-defined benefit to applicant (e.g., student needs resources that are not available locally; student has opportunity to present own research at "make-or-break" meeting, etc.) Overall quality of essay Essay reflects lack of thought, effort, or coherence. Conveys purpose and benefits of travel adequately.

  7. PDF Persuasive Writing Scoring Guide

    Persuasive Writing Scoring Guide. Takes a clear position and supports it consistently with well-chosen reasons and/or examples; may use persuasive strategy to convey an argument. Takes a clear position and supports it with relevant reasons and/or examples through much of the essay. Takes a clear position and supports it with some relevant ...

  8. Travel Essay

    Writing a travel essay is simple. The only thing essential is how you deliver the message. When you travel, it's important to pay close attention to details. This would be anything from the structure, the ambiance, and the locals. Allow yourself to wander and focus on the uniqueness of the given place. Tour guides, natives, and travel ...

  9. PDF Writing Assessment and Evaluation Rubrics

    Holistic scoring is a quick method of evaluating a composition based on the reader's general impres-sion of the overall quality of the writing—you can generally read a student's composition and assign a score to it in two or three minutes. Holistic scoring is usually based on a scale of 0-4, 0-5, or 0-6.

  10. PDF YALE COLLEGE ENGL 114: Grading Rubric

    Written by the Brandeis University Writing Program and revised by Ryan Wepler YALE COLLEGE ENGL 114: Grading Rubric The A Essay makes an interesting, complex—even surprising—argument and is thoroughly well-executed.While an A essay is the result of serious effort, the grade is based on the essay's content and presentation.

  11. Rubric Best Practices, Examples, and Templates

    Rubric Best Practices, Examples, and Templates. A rubric is a scoring tool that identifies the different criteria relevant to an assignment, assessment, or learning outcome and states the possible levels of achievement in a specific, clear, and objective way. Use rubrics to assess project-based student work including essays, group projects ...

  12. 7.2: Rubrics

    Literature Essay Rubric. How to: Check the appropriate rubric boxes and provide explanations afterwards of the ratings. Using the information: For areas where a writer receives "needs work" or "adequate," review that area in the Rhetoric associated with that topic (link below) and use the advice when revising. Criteria

  13. PDF Writing Assessment and Evaluation Rubrics

    Holistic scoring is a quick method of evaluating a composition based on the reader's general impression of the overall quality of the writing—you can generally read a student's composition and assign a score to it in two or three minutes. Holistic scoring is usually based on a scale of 0-4, 0-5, or 0-6.

  14. Ultimate Guide to Writing Your College Essay

    Sample College Essay 2 with Feedback. This content is licensed by Khan Academy and is available for free at www.khanacademy.org. College essays are an important part of your college application and give you the chance to show colleges and universities your personality. This guide will give you tips on how to write an effective college essay.

  15. PDF Writing Assessment and Evaluation Rubrics

    Analytic scoring is usually based on a scale of 0-100 with each aspect receiving a portion of the total points. The General Rubric for Analytic Evaluationon page 14 can be used to score a piece of writing in this way as can the rubrics for specific writing types on pages 17, 26, 31, 36-38, and 43.

  16. iRubric: Travel Journal Assessment rubric

    Travel Journal Assessment. After studying a region, students will create a travel journal of a simulated trip they take to that country. Students will map out their trip and then explain in their journals what they do day to day. Students will need to include aspects of geography, culture, and the economy. Rubric Code: A242595.

  17. Essay on Travel

    Answer 1: Real experiences always have better value. When we travel to a city, in a different country, it allows us to learn about a new culture, new language, new lifestyle, and new peoples. Sometimes, it is the best teacher to understand the world. Question 2: Why is travelling essential? Answer 2: Travelling is an incredibly vital part of life.

  18. PDF Travel Brochure Rubric

    Travel Brochure Rubric 4 3 2 1 Organization The brochure has excellent formatting and very well organized information. The brochure has appropriate formatting and well-organized information. The brochure has some organized information with random formatting. The brochure's format and organization of material are confusing to the reader.

  19. Understanding the TOK essay rubric

    2. Understanding perspectives. Your TOK essay should show a clear awareness of different points of view, and should offer an evaluation of them. This means considering how different perspective might approach the question in different ways. 3. Offering an effective argument. The arguments within your TOK essay are clear and coherent, and are ...

  20. iRubric: Travelogue Writing Assignment rubric

    Travelogue Writing AssignmentTravelogue Writing Assignment. For this assignment, you will create a travelogue. In this travelogue, you will paint a "word picture" for readers, as you describe a time when you traveled somewhere new. Rubric Code: RXX6859.

  21. Tutorials

    At the bottom of the rubric you will see an area to place the total points. You can place comments within their essay as well to red line if needed. Place actual points on the right hand side where it says "Points Awarded". Make sure before clicking "Update" that you change the grade status at the top right hand side to "Graded".

  22. 15 Helpful Scoring Rubric Examples for All Grades and Subjects

    This rubric can help you assess those skills objectively. Learn more: Education World. Project-Based Learning Rubric. Implementing project-based learning can be time-intensive, but the payoffs are worth it. Try this rubric to make student expectations clear and end-of-project assessment easier. Learn more: Free Technology for Teachers. 100 ...

  23. I'm a Doctor. Dengue Fever Took Even Me by Surprise on Vacation

    As Dr. Gabriela Paz-Bailey, the chief of the C.D.C.'s dengue branch, told me by email, "Increased travel to places with dengue risk could lead to more local transmission, but the risk of ...

  24. Our Mom Is 75. We're Moving Heaven and Earth for This Eclipse

    Ms. Lenihan is a former high school history teacher and an elected member of the School Committee in Lexington, Mass. Ms. Rust is a senior manager for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. If ...

  25. iRubric: Time Travel Argument Essay rubric

    iRubric KX5948A: This rubric is for evaluating argument essays written by students assessing their ability to formulate argumentative writings that time travel is or is not possible, and that any risk posed would be worth the benefit. Free rubric builder and assessment tools.