How to Write a Persuasive Essay (This Convinced My Professor!)

How to Write a Persuasive Essay (This Convinced My Professor!)

Table of contents

write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

Meredith Sell

You can make your essay more persuasive by getting straight to the point.

In fact, that's exactly what we did here, and that's just the first tip of this guide. Throughout this guide, we share the steps needed to prove an argument and create a persuasive essay.

This AI tool helps you improve your essay > This AI tool helps you improve your essay >

persuasive essay

Key takeaways: - Proven process to make any argument persuasive - 5-step process to structure arguments - How to use AI to formulate and optimize your essay

Why is being persuasive so difficult?

"Write an essay that persuades the reader of your opinion on a topic of your choice."

You might be staring at an assignment description just like this 👆from your professor. Your computer is open to a blank document, the cursor blinking impatiently. Do I even have opinions?

The persuasive essay can be one of the most intimidating academic papers to write: not only do you need to identify a narrow topic and research it, but you also have to come up with a position on that topic that you can back up with research while simultaneously addressing different viewpoints.

That’s a big ask. And let’s be real: most opinion pieces in major news publications don’t fulfill these requirements.

The upside? By researching and writing your own opinion, you can learn how to better formulate not only an argument but the actual positions you decide to hold. 

Here, we break down exactly how to write a persuasive essay. We’ll start by taking a step that’s key for every piece of writing—defining the terms.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

A persuasive essay is exactly what it sounds like: an essay that persuades . Over the course of several paragraphs or pages, you’ll use researched facts and logic to convince the reader of your opinion on a particular topic and discredit opposing opinions.

While you’ll spend some time explaining the topic or issue in question, most of your essay will flesh out your viewpoint and the evidence that supports it.

The 5 Must-Have Steps of a Persuasive Essay

If you’re intimidated by the idea of writing an argument, use this list to break your process into manageable chunks. Tackle researching and writing one element at a time, and then revise your essay so that it flows smoothly and coherently with every component in the optimal place.

1. A topic or issue to argue

This is probably the hardest step. You need to identify a topic or issue that is narrow enough to cover in the length of your piece—and is also arguable from more than one position. Your topic must call for an opinion , and not be a simple fact .

It might be helpful to walk through this process:

  • Identify a random topic
  • Ask a question about the topic that involves a value claim or analysis to answer
  • Answer the question

That answer is your opinion.

Let’s consider some examples, from silly to serious:

Topic: Dolphins and mermaids

Question: In a mythical match, who would win: a dolphin or a mermaid?

Answer/Opinion: The mermaid would win in a match against a dolphin.

Topic: Autumn

Question: Which has a better fall: New England or Colorado?

Answer/Opinion: Fall is better in New England than Colorado.

Topic: Electric transportation options

Question: Would it be better for an urban dweller to buy an electric bike or an electric car?

Answer/Opinion: An electric bike is a better investment than an electric car.

Your turn: Walk through the three-step process described above to identify your topic and your tentative opinion. You may want to start by brainstorming a list of topics you find interesting and then going use the three-step process to find the opinion that would make the best essay topic.

2. An unequivocal thesis statement

If you walked through our three-step process above, you already have some semblance of a thesis—but don’t get attached too soon! 

A solid essay thesis is best developed through the research process. You shouldn’t land on an opinion before you know the facts. So press pause. Take a step back. And dive into your research.

You’ll want to learn:

  • The basic facts of your topic. How long does fall last in New England vs. Colorado? What trees do they have? What colors do those trees turn?
  • The facts specifically relevant to your question. Is there any science on how the varying colors of fall influence human brains and moods?
  • What experts or other noteworthy and valid sources say about the question you’re considering. Has a well-known arborist waxed eloquent on the beauty of New England falls?

As you learn the different viewpoints people have on your topic, pay attention to the strengths and weaknesses of existing arguments. Is anyone arguing the perspective you’re leaning toward? Do you find their arguments convincing? What do you find unsatisfying about the various arguments? 

Allow the research process to change your mind and/or refine your thinking on the topic. Your opinion may change entirely or become more specific based on what you learn.

Once you’ve done enough research to feel confident in your understanding of the topic and your opinion on it, craft your thesis. 

Your thesis statement should be clear and concise. It should directly state your viewpoint on the topic, as well as the basic case for your thesis.

Thesis 1: In a mythical match, the mermaid would overcome the dolphin due to one distinct advantage: her ability to breathe underwater.

Thesis 2: The full spectrum of color displayed on New England hillsides is just one reason why fall in the northeast is better than in Colorado.

Thesis 3: In addition to not adding to vehicle traffic, electric bikes are a better investment than electric cars because they’re cheaper and require less energy to accomplish the same function of getting the rider from point A to point B.

Your turn: Dive into the research process with a radar up for the arguments your sources are making about your topic. What are the most convincing cases? Should you stick with your initial opinion or change it up? Write your fleshed-out thesis statement.

3. Evidence to back up your thesis

This is a typical place for everyone from undergrads to politicians to get stuck, but the good news is, if you developed your thesis from research, you already have a good bit of evidence to make your case.

Go back through your research notes and compile a list of every …

… or other piece of information that supports your thesis. 

This info can come from research studies you found in scholarly journals, government publications, news sources, encyclopedias, or other credible sources (as long as they fit your professor’s standards).

As you put this list together, watch for any gaps or weak points. Are you missing information on how electric cars versus electric bicycles charge or how long their batteries last? Did you verify that dolphins are, in fact, mammals and can’t breathe underwater like totally-real-and-not-at-all-fake 😉mermaids can? Track down that information.

Next, organize your list. Group the entries so that similar or closely related information is together, and as you do that, start thinking through how to articulate the individual arguments to support your case. 

Depending on the length of your essay, each argument may get only a paragraph or two of space. As you think through those specific arguments, consider what order to put them in. You’ll probably want to start with the simplest argument and work up to more complicated ones so that the arguments can build on each other. 

Your turn: Organize your evidence and write a rough draft of your arguments. Play around with the order to find the most compelling way to argue your case.

4. Rebuttals to disprove opposing theses

You can’t just present the evidence to support your case and totally ignore other viewpoints. To persuade your readers, you’ll need to address any opposing ideas they may hold about your topic. 

You probably found some holes in the opposing views during your research process. Now’s your chance to expose those holes. 

Take some time (and space) to: describe the opposing views and show why those views don’t hold up. You can accomplish this using both logic and facts.

Is a perspective based on a faulty assumption or misconception of the truth? Shoot it down by providing the facts that disprove the opinion.

Is another opinion drawn from bad or unsound reasoning? Show how that argument falls apart.

Some cases may truly be only a matter of opinion, but you still need to articulate why you don’t find the opposing perspective convincing.

Yes, a dolphin might be stronger than a mermaid, but as a mammal, the dolphin must continually return to the surface for air. A mermaid can breathe both underwater and above water, which gives her a distinct advantage in this mythical battle.

While the Rocky Mountain views are stunning, their limited colors—yellow from aspen trees and green from various evergreens—leaves the autumn-lover less than thrilled. The rich reds and oranges and yellows of the New England fall are more satisfying and awe-inspiring.

But what about longer trips that go beyond the city center into the suburbs and beyond? An electric bike wouldn’t be great for those excursions. Wouldn’t an electric car be the better choice then? 

Certainly, an electric car would be better in these cases than a gas-powered car, but if most of a person’s trips are in their hyper-local area, the electric bicycle is a more environmentally friendly option for those day-to-day outings. That person could then participate in a carshare or use public transit, a ride-sharing app, or even a gas-powered car for longer trips—and still use less energy overall than if they drove an electric car for hyper-local and longer area trips.

Your turn: Organize your rebuttal research and write a draft of each one.

5. A convincing conclusion

You have your arguments and rebuttals. You’ve proven your thesis is rock-solid. Now all you have to do is sum up your overall case and give your final word on the subject. 

Don’t repeat everything you’ve already said. Instead, your conclusion should logically draw from the arguments you’ve made to show how they coherently prove your thesis. You’re pulling everything together and zooming back out with a better understanding of the what and why of your thesis. 

A dolphin may never encounter a mermaid in the wild, but if it were to happen, we know how we’d place our bets. Long hair and fish tail, for the win.

For those of us who relish 50-degree days, sharp air, and the vibrant colors of fall, New England offers a season that’s cozier, longer-lasting, and more aesthetically pleasing than “colorful” Colorado. A leaf-peeper’s paradise.

When most of your trips from day to day are within five miles, the more energy-efficient—and yes, cost-efficient—choice is undoubtedly the electric bike. So strap on your helmet, fire up your pedals, and two-wheel away to your next destination with full confidence that you made the right decision for your wallet and the environment.

3 Quick Tips for Writing a Strong Argument

Once you have a draft to work with, use these tips to refine your argument and make sure you’re not losing readers for avoidable reasons.

1. Choose your words thoughtfully.

If you want to win people over to your side, don’t write in a way that shuts your opponents down. Avoid making abrasive or offensive statements. Instead, use a measured, reasonable tone. Appeal to shared values, and let your facts and logic do the hard work of changing people’s minds.

Choose words with AI

write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

You can use AI to turn your general point into a readable argument. Then, you can paraphrase each sentence and choose between competing arguments generated by the AI, until your argument is well-articulated and concise.

2. Prioritize accuracy (and avoid fallacies).

Make sure the facts you use are actually factual. You don’t want to build your argument on false or disproven information. Use the most recent, respected research. Make sure you don’t misconstrue study findings. And when you’re building your case, avoid logical fallacies that undercut your argument.

A few common fallacies to watch out for:

  • Strawman: Misrepresenting or oversimplifying an opposing argument to make it easier to refute.
  • Appeal to ignorance: Arguing that a certain claim must be true because it hasn’t been proven false.
  • Bandwagon: Assumes that if a group of people, experts, etc., agree with a claim, it must be true.
  • Hasty generalization: Using a few examples, rather than substantial evidence, to make a sweeping claim.
  • Appeal to authority: Overly relying on opinions of people who have authority of some kind.

The strongest arguments rely on trustworthy information and sound logic.

Research and add citations with AI

write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

We recently wrote a three part piece on researching using AI, so be sure to check it out . Going through an organized process of researching and noting your sources correctly will make sure your written text is more accurate.

3. Persuasive essay structure

Persuasive essay structure

If you’re building a house, you start with the foundation and go from there. It’s the same with an argument. You want to build from the ground up: provide necessary background information, then your thesis. Then, start with the simplest part of your argument and build up in terms of complexity and the aspect of your thesis that the argument is tackling.

A consistent, internal logic will make it easier for the reader to follow your argument. Plus, you’ll avoid confusing your reader and you won’t be unnecessarily redundant.

The essay structure usually includes the following parts:

  • Intro - Hook, Background information, Thesis statement
  • Topic sentence #1 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Concluding sentence
  • Topic sentence #2 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Concluding sentence Topic sentence #3 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Conclusion - Thesis and main points restated, call to action, thought provoking ending

Are You Ready to Write?

Persuasive essays are a great way to hone your research, writing, and critical thinking skills. Approach this assignment well, and you’ll learn how to form opinions based on information (not just ideas) and make arguments that—if they don’t change minds—at least win readers’ respect. ‍

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

Allison Bressmer

Allison Bressmer

How to write a persuasive essay

Most composition classes you’ll take will teach the art of persuasive writing. That’s a good thing.

Knowing where you stand on issues and knowing how to argue for or against something is a skill that will serve you well both inside and outside of the classroom.

Persuasion is the art of using logic to prompt audiences to change their mind or take action , and is generally seen as accomplishing that goal by appealing to emotions and feelings.

A persuasive essay is one that attempts to get a reader to agree with your perspective.

What is a persuasive essay?

Ready for some tips on how to produce a well-written, well-rounded, well-structured persuasive essay? Just say yes. I don’t want to have to write another essay to convince you!

How Do I Write a Persuasive Essay?

What are some good topics for a persuasive essay, how do i identify an audience for my persuasive essay, how do you create an effective persuasive essay, how should i edit my persuasive essay.

Your persuasive essay needs to have the three components required of any essay: the introduction , body , and conclusion .

That is essay structure. However, there is flexibility in that structure.

There is no rule (unless the assignment has specific rules) for how many paragraphs any of those sections need.

Although the components should be proportional; the body paragraphs will comprise most of your persuasive essay.

What should every essay include?

How Do I Start a Persuasive Essay?

As with any essay introduction, this paragraph is where you grab your audience’s attention, provide context for the topic of discussion, and present your thesis statement.

TIP 1: Some writers find it easier to write their introductions last. As long as you have your working thesis, this is a perfectly acceptable approach. From that thesis, you can plan your body paragraphs and then go back and write your introduction.

TIP 2: Avoid “announcing” your thesis. Don’t include statements like this:

  • “In my essay I will show why extinct animals should (not) be regenerated.”
  • “The purpose of my essay is to argue that extinct animals should (not) be regenerated.”

Announcements take away from the originality, authority, and sophistication of your writing.

Instead, write a convincing thesis statement that answers the question "so what?" Why is the topic important, what do you think about it, and why do you think that? Be specific.

How Many Paragraphs Should a Persuasive Essay Have?

This body of your persuasive essay is the section in which you develop the arguments that support your thesis. Consider these questions as you plan this section of your essay:

  • What arguments support your thesis?
  • What is the best order for your arguments?
  • What evidence do you have?
  • Will you address the opposing argument to your own?
  • How can you conclude convincingly?

The body of a persuasive essay

TIP: Brainstorm and do your research before you decide which arguments you’ll focus on in your discussion. Make a list of possibilities and go with the ones that are strongest, that you can discuss with the most confidence, and that help you balance your rhetorical triangle .

What Should I Put in the Conclusion of a Persuasive Essay?

The conclusion is your “mic-drop” moment. Think about how you can leave your audience with a strong final comment.

And while a conclusion often re-emphasizes the main points of a discussion, it shouldn’t simply repeat them.

TIP 1: Be careful not to introduce a new argument in the conclusion—there’s no time to develop it now that you’ve reached the end of your discussion!

TIP 2 : As with your thesis, avoid announcing your conclusion. Don’t start your conclusion with “in conclusion” or “to conclude” or “to end my essay” type statements. Your audience should be able to see that you are bringing the discussion to a close without those overused, less sophisticated signals.

The conclusion of a persuasive essay

If your instructor has assigned you a topic, then you’ve already got your issue; you’ll just have to determine where you stand on the issue. Where you stand on your topic is your position on that topic.

Your position will ultimately become the thesis of your persuasive essay: the statement the rest of the essay argues for and supports, intending to convince your audience to consider your point of view.

If you have to choose your own topic, use these guidelines to help you make your selection:

  • Choose an issue you truly care about
  • Choose an issue that is actually debatable

Simple “tastes” (likes and dislikes) can’t really be argued. No matter how many ways someone tries to convince me that milk chocolate rules, I just won’t agree.

It’s dark chocolate or nothing as far as my tastes are concerned.

Similarly, you can’t convince a person to “like” one film more than another in an essay.

You could argue that one movie has superior qualities than another: cinematography, acting, directing, etc. but you can’t convince a person that the film really appeals to them.

Debatable and non-debatable concepts

Once you’ve selected your issue, determine your position just as you would for an assigned topic. That position will ultimately become your thesis.

Until you’ve finalized your work, consider your thesis a “working thesis.”

This means that your statement represents your position, but you might change its phrasing or structure for that final version.

When you’re writing an essay for a class, it can seem strange to identify an audience—isn’t the audience the instructor?

Your instructor will read and evaluate your essay, and may be part of your greater audience, but you shouldn’t just write for your teacher.

Think about who your intended audience is.

For an argument essay, think of your audience as the people who disagree with you—the people who need convincing.

That population could be quite broad, for example, if you’re arguing a political issue, or narrow, if you’re trying to convince your parents to extend your curfew.

Once you’ve got a sense of your audience, it’s time to consult with Aristotle. Aristotle’s teaching on persuasion has shaped communication since about 330 BC. Apparently, it works.

Ethos, pathos and logos

Aristotle taught that in order to convince an audience of something, the communicator needs to balance the three elements of the rhetorical triangle to achieve the best results.

Those three elements are ethos , logos , and pathos .

Ethos relates to credibility and trustworthiness. How can you, as the writer, demonstrate your credibility as a source of information to your audience?

How will you show them you are worthy of their trust?

How to make your essay credible

  • You show you’ve done your research: you understand the issue, both sides
  • You show respect for the opposing side: if you disrespect your audience, they won’t respect you or your ideas

Logos relates to logic. How will you convince your audience that your arguments and ideas are reasonable?

How to use logic in essays

You provide facts or other supporting evidence to support your claims.

That evidence may take the form of studies or expert input or reasonable examples or a combination of all of those things, depending on the specific requirements of your assignment.

Remember: if you use someone else’s ideas or words in your essay, you need to give them credit.

ProWritingAid's Plagiarism Checker checks your work against over a billion web-pages, published works, and academic papers so you can be sure of its originality.

Find out more about ProWritingAid’s Plagiarism checks.

Pathos relates to emotion. Audiences are people and people are emotional beings. We respond to emotional prompts. How will you engage your audience with your arguments on an emotional level?

How to use emotion in essays

  • You make strategic word choices : words have denotations (dictionary meanings) and also connotations, or emotional values. Use words whose connotations will help prompt the feelings you want your audience to experience.
  • You use emotionally engaging examples to support your claims or make a point, prompting your audience to be moved by your discussion.

Be mindful as you lean into elements of the triangle. Too much pathos and your audience might end up feeling manipulated, roll their eyes and move on.

An “all logos” approach will leave your essay dry and without a sense of voice; it will probably bore your audience rather than make them care.

Once you’ve got your essay planned, start writing! Don’t worry about perfection, just get your ideas out of your head and off your list and into a rough essay format.

After you’ve written your draft, evaluate your work. What works and what doesn’t? For help with evaluating and revising your work, check out this ProWritingAid post on manuscript revision .

After you’ve evaluated your draft, revise it. Repeat that process as many times as you need to make your work the best it can be.

When you’re satisfied with the content and structure of the essay, take it through the editing process .

Grammatical or sentence-level errors can distract your audience or even detract from the ethos—the authority—of your work.

You don’t have to edit alone! ProWritingAid’s Realtime Report will find errors and make suggestions for improvements.

You can even use it on emails to your professors:

ProWritingAid's Realtime Report

Try ProWritingAid with a free account.

How Can I Improve My Persuasion Skills?

You can develop your powers of persuasion every day just by observing what’s around you.

  • How is that advertisement working to convince you to buy a product?
  • How is a political candidate arguing for you to vote for them?
  • How do you “argue” with friends about what to do over the weekend, or convince your boss to give you a raise?
  • How are your parents working to convince you to follow a certain academic or career path?

As you observe these arguments in action, evaluate them. Why are they effective or why do they fail?

How could an argument be strengthened with more (or less) emphasis on ethos, logos, and pathos?

Every argument is an opportunity to learn! Observe them, evaluate them, and use them to perfect your own powers of persuasion.

write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

Be confident about grammar

Check every email, essay, or story for grammar mistakes. Fix them before you press send.

Allison Bressmer is a professor of freshman composition and critical reading at a community college and a freelance writer. If she isn’t writing or teaching, you’ll likely find her reading a book or listening to a podcast while happily sipping a semi-sweet iced tea or happy-houring with friends. She lives in New York with her family. Connect at linkedin.com/in/allisonbressmer.

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  • How to Write a Persuasive Essay to Draw Readers’ Attention
  • How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Organize Your ‘A+’ Work

What Makes a Persuasive Essay Stand Out

Topics that are always burning, correct way to organize your written work, use a quotation or ask a question.

Ask yourself what the main point of any persuasive essay is. Regardless of a topic, it is to convince a reader to take your side, accept your position, and follow only your recommendations. A really successful paper will provide evidence, consider others’ views, and finally present a conclusion which is strong.

  • Take a stance but show you are aware of all possible prejudices and have more than one suggestion.
  • Do a proper research to be able to provide evidence that is compelling and detailed.
  • Study the audience to know whether it will or will not agree with all the theories and ideas of your persuasive essay.
  • Write according to a structure; mind a logical order of evidence presentation.
  • Use hard facts which will support the argument. Provide meaningful examples both to enhance the argument & clearly illustrate it.

Also, use linking words to allow a reader to follow the argument’s flow (similarly, nevertheless, furthermore, however). Do not concentrate only on the word count. Credit quotes & sources in footnotes or a written work itself. End every paragraph with a summary or make it link to the next one.

Whether you are writing your work for the first time or not, feel absolutely free to address our company and get professional assistance . We do know how hard it is to concentrate, find the right words, reliable sources, cite them properly, and back up every word with data. We are here to make your college work, which will distinguish you from hundreds of other students.

A persuasive essay is an essay used to convince a reader about a particular idea or focus, usually one that you believe in. Your persuasive essay could be based on anything about which you have an opinion or that you can make a clear argument about. Whether you're arguing against junk food at school or petitioning for a raise from your boss, knowing how to write a persuasive essay is a skill that everyone should have.

If you are looking for a single-word answer, here it is — reasoning. This work is not just a dozen ideas collected into one text but is a group of arguments on a single topic, each of them is supported by evidence. To succeed in creating this school work, you need to do three things.

  • Gather all the existing information on the topic.
  • Make sure the flow of thoughts, ideas, and arguments is logical.
  • Create a valid perspective of a discussed problem.

Completing a written assignment is easier if you have dealt with an argumentative one. They are similar. The only difference is that this time your main weapons are sound logic, expertise,  factual evidence.

It has become fashionable to say that time is fleeting and what was urgent yesterday is of no interest today. When it comes to persuasive essay topics, there are few which may be referred to as up-to-date at any time.

  • Moral/ethical sides of abortions
  • Social media
  • Smoking & drinking age
  • Immigrants in the USA & Europe
  • Anorexia & model body
  • Homestay vs. hospice care

If you can choose your own essay topic, start with any of these: they are popular, so there will be no problem to find useful data. In case of any writing or copy editing issues related, you can contact us.

Arguments are nothing if your persuasive essay is poorly organized. When it comes to the structure of a paper, there are three poor structure elements poisoning the outcome: lack of flow between paragraphs, a missing introduction/conclusion, sentences which start with coordinating conjunctions like ‘because’ or ‘and’, the wrong use of quotation marks .

  • Introduction. Its aim is to grab the attention of a reader and give background data on a subject. A sound ending for an introduction is a clear statement of a thesis.
  • Body. This is where you put all the facts and arguments to support an essay . A new paragraph is focused on a new point. There should be a paragraph that includes a counter-argument, too.
  • Conclusion. It restates the core argument & converts a reader to your point of view.

What content is typically characterized as ‘bad’ by most school teachers or college professors? It is the one that doesn’t fully reflect the topic, includes punctual or spelling errors (or both), has ideas that are hard to prove with examples, is nothing but plagiarism. Stylistic mistakes in a written work influence your final grade. The most common ones are too short or too long sentences, an overly informal tone, repeated phrases.

These are the two effective catching techniques for a good persuasive essay. You may use one or combine them to develop your essay writing . Using a quote is a wise step as no matter what you want or need to say, there was someone, who has already said the same thing better. An appropriate quote is a classy beginning or a vivid connection to a topic. The problem you may face is the lack of time to find a proper one. Luckily, our team is here to help you with your writing.

As for asking a question, you are to use only a rhetorical one . Why? It makes people think & keep looking for answers in your essay. Every time a rhetorical question is asked, people are likely to agree with your ideas, so persuading becomes not a complicated task to accomplish.

Remember, when you write a persuasive essay, your own fears and restrictive limitations are the bounds preventing you from creating a really worthy paper . Our company encourages you to stretch the bindings, use every opportunity, take any chance to hand in a work full of important content, strong paragraphs, serious ideas.

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay

Last Updated: December 17, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Christopher Taylor, PhD . Christopher Taylor is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Austin Community College in Texas. He received his PhD in English Literature and Medieval Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 4,275,222 times.

A persuasive essay is an essay used to convince a reader about a particular idea or focus, usually one that you believe in. Your persuasive essay could be based on anything about which you have an opinion or that you can make a clear argument about. Whether you're arguing against junk food at school or petitioning for a raise from your boss, knowing how to write a persuasive essay is an important skill that everyone should have.

Sample Persuasive Essays

write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

How to Lay the Groundwork

Step 1 Read the prompt carefully.

  • Look for language that gives you a clue as to whether you are writing a purely persuasive or an argumentative essay. For example, if the prompt uses words like “personal experience” or “personal observations,” you know that these things can be used to support your argument.
  • On the other hand, words like “defend” or “argue” suggest that you should be writing an argumentative essay, which may require more formal, less personal evidence.
  • If you aren’t sure about what you’re supposed to write, ask your instructor.

Step 2 Give yourself time.

  • Whenever possible, start early. This way, even if you have emergencies like a computer meltdown, you’ve given yourself enough time to complete your essay.

Step 3 Examine the rhetorical situation.

  • Try using stasis theory to help you examine the rhetorical situation. This is when you look at the facts, definition (meaning of the issue or the nature of it), quality (the level of seriousness of the issue), and policy (plan of action for the issue).
  • To look at the facts, try asking: What happened? What are the known facts? How did this issue begin? What can people do to change the situation?
  • To look at the definition, ask: What is the nature of this issue or problem? What type of problem is this? What category or class would this problem fit into best?
  • To examine the quality, ask: Who is affected by this problem? How serious is it? What might happen if it is not resolved?
  • To examine the policy, ask: Should someone take action? Who should do something and what should they do?

Step 4 Consider your audience.

  • For example, if you are arguing against unhealthy school lunches, you might take very different approaches depending on whom you want to convince. You might target the school administrators, in which case you could make a case about student productivity and healthy food. If you targeted students’ parents, you might make a case about their children’s health and the potential costs of healthcare to treat conditions caused by unhealthy food. And if you were to consider a “grassroots” movement among your fellow students, you’d probably make appeals based on personal preferences.

Step 5 Pick a topic that appeals to you.

  • It also should present the organization of your essay. Don’t list your points in one order and then discuss them in a different order.
  • For example, a thesis statement could look like this: “Although pre-prepared and highly processed foods are cheap, they aren’t good for students. It is important for schools to provide fresh, healthy meals to students, even when they cost more. Healthy school lunches can make a huge difference in students’ lives, and not offering healthy lunches fails students.”
  • Note that this thesis statement isn’t a three-prong thesis. You don’t have to state every sub-point you will make in your thesis (unless your prompt or assignment says to). You do need to convey exactly what you will argue.

Step 11 Brainstorm your evidence.

  • A mind map could be helpful. Start with your central topic and draw a box around it. Then, arrange other ideas you think of in smaller bubbles around it. Connect the bubbles to reveal patterns and identify how ideas relate. [5] X Research source
  • Don’t worry about having fully fleshed-out ideas at this stage. Generating ideas is the most important step here.

Step 12 Research, if necessary.

  • For example, if you’re arguing for healthier school lunches, you could make a point that fresh, natural food tastes better. This is a personal opinion and doesn’t need research to support it. However, if you wanted to argue that fresh food has more vitamins and nutrients than processed food, you’d need a reliable source to support that claim.
  • If you have a librarian available, consult with him or her! Librarians are an excellent resource to help guide you to credible research.

How to Draft Your Essay

Step 1 Outline your essay.

  • An introduction. You should present a “hook” here that grabs your audience’s attention. You should also provide your thesis statement, which is a clear statement of what you will argue or attempt to convince the reader of.
  • Body paragraphs. In 5-paragraph essays, you’ll have 3 body paragraphs. In other essays, you can have as many paragraphs as you need to make your argument. Regardless of their number, each body paragraph needs to focus on one main idea and provide evidence to support it. These paragraphs are also where you refute any counterpoints that you’ve discovered.
  • Conclusion. Your conclusion is where you tie it all together. It can include an appeal to emotions, reiterate the most compelling evidence, or expand the relevance of your initial idea to a broader context. Because your purpose is to persuade your readers to do/think something, end with a call to action. Connect your focused topic to the broader world.

Step 2 Come up with your hook.

  • For example, you could start an essay on the necessity of pursuing alternative energy sources like this: “Imagine a world without polar bears.” This is a vivid statement that draws on something that many readers are familiar with and enjoy (polar bears). It also encourages the reader to continue reading to learn why they should imagine this world.
  • You may find that you don’t immediately have a hook. Don’t get stuck on this step! You can always press on and come back to it after you’ve drafted your essay.

Step 3 Write an introduction....

  • Put your hook first. Then, proceed to move from general ideas to specific ideas until you have built up to your thesis statement.
  • Don't slack on your thesis statement . Your thesis statement is a short summary of what you're arguing for. It's usually one sentence, and it's near the end of your introductory paragraph. Make your thesis a combination of your most persuasive arguments, or a single powerful argument, for the best effect.

Step 4 Structure your body paragraphs.

  • Start with a clear topic sentence that introduces the main point of your paragraph.
  • Make your evidence clear and precise. For example, don't just say: "Dolphins are very smart animals. They are widely recognized as being incredibly smart." Instead, say: "Dolphins are very smart animals. Multiple studies found that dolphins worked in tandem with humans to catch prey. Very few, if any, species have developed mutually symbiotic relationships with humans."
  • "The South, which accounts for 80% of all executions in the United States, still has the country's highest murder rate. This makes a case against the death penalty working as a deterrent."
  • "Additionally, states without the death penalty have fewer murders. If the death penalty were indeed a deterrent, why wouldn't we see an increase in murders in states without the death penalty?"
  • Consider how your body paragraphs flow together. You want to make sure that your argument feels like it's building, one point upon another, rather than feeling scattered.

Step 5 Use the last sentence of each body paragraph to transition to the next paragraph.

  • End of the first paragraph: "If the death penalty consistently fails to deter crime, and crime is at an all-time high, what happens when someone is wrongfully convicted?"
  • Beginning of the second paragraph: "Over 100 wrongfully convicted death row inmates have been acquitted of their crimes, some just minutes before their would-be death."

Step 6 Add a rebuttal or counterargument.

  • Example: "Critics of a policy allowing students to bring snacks into the classroom say that it would create too much distraction, reducing students’ ability to learn. However, consider the fact that middle schoolers are growing at an incredible rate. Their bodies need energy, and their minds may become fatigued if they go for long periods without eating. Allowing snacks in the classroom will actually increase students’ ability to focus by taking away the distraction of hunger.”
  • You may even find it effective to begin your paragraph with the counterargument, then follow by refuting it and offering your own argument.

Step 7 Write your conclusion at the very end of your essay.

  • How could this argument be applied to a broader context?
  • Why does this argument or opinion mean something to me?
  • What further questions has my argument raised?
  • What action could readers take after reading my essay?

How to Write Persuasively

Step 1 Understand the conventions of a persuasive essay.

  • Persuasive essays, like argumentative essays, use rhetorical devices to persuade their readers. In persuasive essays, you generally have more freedom to make appeals to emotion (pathos), in addition to logic and data (logos) and credibility (ethos). [13] X Trustworthy Source Read Write Think Online collection of reading and writing resources for teachers and students. Go to source
  • You should use multiple types of evidence carefully when writing a persuasive essay. Logical appeals such as presenting data, facts, and other types of “hard” evidence are often very convincing to readers.
  • Persuasive essays generally have very clear thesis statements that make your opinion or chosen “side” known upfront. This helps your reader know exactly what you are arguing. [14] X Research source
  • Bad: The United States was not an educated nation, since education was considered the right of the wealthy, and so in the early 1800s Horace Mann decided to try and rectify the situation.

Step 2 Use a variety of persuasion techniques to hook your readers.

  • For example, you could tell an anecdote about a family torn apart by the current situation in Syria to incorporate pathos, make use of logic to argue for allowing Syrian refugees as your logos, and then provide reputable sources to back up your quotes for ethos.
  • Example: Time and time again, the statistics don't lie -- we need to open our doors to help refugees.
  • Example: "Let us not forget the words etched on our grandest national monument, the Statue of Liberty, which asks that we "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” There is no reason why Syrians are not included in this.
  • Example: "Over 100 million refugees have been displaced. President Assad has not only stolen power, he's gassed and bombed his own citizens. He has defied the Geneva Conventions, long held as a standard of decency and basic human rights, and his people have no choice but to flee."

Step 3 Be authoritative and firm.

  • Good: "Time and time again, science has shown that arctic drilling is dangerous. It is not worth the risks environmentally or economically."
  • Good: "Without pushing ourselves to energy independence, in the arctic and elsewhere, we open ourselves up to the dangerous dependency that spiked gas prices in the 80's."
  • Bad: "Arctic drilling may not be perfect, but it will probably help us stop using foreign oil at some point. This, I imagine, will be a good thing."

Step 4 Challenge your readers.

  • Good: Does anyone think that ruining someone’s semester, or, at least, the chance to go abroad, should be the result of a victimless crime? Is it fair that we actively promote drinking as a legitimate alternative through Campus Socials and a lack of consequences? How long can we use the excuse that “just because it’s safer than alcohol doesn’t mean we should make it legal,” disregarding the fact that the worst effects of the drug are not physical or chemical, but institutional?
  • Good: We all want less crime, stronger families, and fewer dangerous confrontations over drugs. We need to ask ourselves, however, if we're willing to challenge the status quo to get those results.
  • Bad: This policy makes us look stupid. It is not based in fact, and the people that believe it are delusional at best, and villains at worst.

Step 5 Acknowledge, and refute, arguments against you.

  • Good: While people do have accidents with guns in their homes, it is not the government’s responsibility to police people from themselves. If they're going to hurt themselves, that is their right.
  • Bad: The only obvious solution is to ban guns. There is no other argument that matters.

How to Polish Your Essay

Step 1 Give yourself a day or two without looking at the essay.

  • Does the essay state its position clearly?
  • Is this position supported throughout with evidence and examples?
  • Are paragraphs bogged down by extraneous information? Do paragraphs focus on one main idea?
  • Are any counterarguments presented fairly, without misrepresentation? Are they convincingly dismissed?
  • Are the paragraphs in an order that flows logically and builds an argument step-by-step?
  • Does the conclusion convey the importance of the position and urge the reader to do/think something?

Step 3 Revise where necessary.

  • You may find it helpful to ask a trusted friend or classmate to look at your essay. If s/he has trouble understanding your argument or finds things unclear, focus your revision on those spots.

Step 4 Proofread carefully.

  • You may find it helpful to print out your draft and mark it up with a pen or pencil. When you write on the computer, your eyes may become so used to reading what you think you’ve written that they skip over errors. Working with a physical copy forces you to pay attention in a new way.
  • Make sure to also format your essay correctly. For example, many instructors stipulate the margin width and font type you should use.

Expert Q&A

Christopher Taylor, PhD

You Might Also Like

Write an Essay

  • ↑ https://www.grammarly.com/blog/how-to-write-a-persuasive-essay/
  • ↑ https://www.hamilton.edu/academics/centers/writing/writing-resources/persuasive-essays
  • ↑ https://www.hamilton.edu/writing/writing-resources/persuasive-essays
  • ↑ https://www.adelaide.edu.au/writingcentre/sites/default/files/docs/learningguide-mindmapping.pdf
  • ↑ https://examples.yourdictionary.com/20-compelling-hook-examples-for-essays.html
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/transitions/
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/rebuttal_sections.html
  • ↑ http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson_images/lesson56/strategy-definition.pdf
  • ↑ https://stlcc.edu/student-support/academic-success-and-tutoring/writing-center/writing-resources/pathos-logos-and-ethos.aspx
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/editing-and-proofreading/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/revising-drafts/
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/the_writing_process/proofreading/proofreading_suggestions.html

About This Article

Christopher Taylor, PhD

To write a persuasive essay, start with an attention-grabbing introduction that introduces your thesis statement or main argument. Then, break the body of your essay up into multiple paragraphs and focus on one main idea in each paragraph. Make sure you present evidence in each paragraph that supports the main idea so your essay is more persuasive. Finally, conclude your essay by restating the most compelling, important evidence so you can make your case one last time. To learn how to make your writing more persuasive, keep reading! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

Writing a Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays convince readers to accept a certain perspective. Writing a persuasive essay therefore entails making an argument that will appeal to readers, so they believe what you say has merit. This act of appealing to readers is the art of persuasion, also known as rhetoric. In classical rhetoric, persuasion involves appealing to readers using ethos, pathos, and logos.

In this tutorial, we refer to the sample persuasive draft and final paper written by fictional student Maggie Durham.

THE ART OF PERSUASION

Ethos refers to establishing yourself as a credible source of information. To convince an audience of anything, they must first trust you are being earnest and ethical. One strategy to do this is to write a balanced discussion with relevant and reliable research that supports your claims. Reliable research would include quoting or paraphrasing experts, first-hand witnesses, or authorities. Properly citing your sources, so your readers can also retrieve them, is another factor in establishing a reliable ethos. When writing for academic purposes, expressing your argument using unbiased language and a neutral tone will also indicate you are arguing fairly and with consideration of others having differing views.

When you appeal to your readers’ emotions, you are using pathos. This appeal is common in advertising that convinces consumers they lack something and buying a certain product or service will fulfill that lack. Emotional appeals are subtler in academic writing; they serve to engage a reader in the argument and inspire a change of heart or motivate readers toward a course of action. The examples you use, how you define terms, any comparisons you draw, as well as the language choices you use can draw readers in and impact their willingness to go along with your ideas.

Consider that one purpose of persuasion is to appeal to those who do not already agree with you, so it will be important to show that you understand other points of view. You will also want to avoid derogatory or insulting descriptions or remarks about the opposition. You wouldn’t want to offend the very readers you want to persuade.

Establishing an appeal of logos is to write a sound argument, one that readers can follow and understand. To do this, the facts and evidence you use should be relevant, representative, and reliable, and the writing as a whole should be well organized, developed, and edited.

STEPS FOR WRITING PERSUASIVELY

Step one: determine the topic.

The first step in writing a persuasive essay is to establish the topic. The best topic is one that interests you. You can generate ideas for a topic by prewriting, such as by brainstorming whatever comes to mind, recording in grocery-list fashion your thoughts, or freewriting in complete sentences what you know or think about topics of interest.

Whatever topic you choose, it needs to be:

  • Interesting : The topic should appeal both to you and to your intended readers.
  • Researchable : A body of knowledge should already exist on the topic.
  • Nonfiction : The information about the topic should be factual, not based on personal opinions or conspiracy theories.
  • Important : Your reader should think the topic is relevant to them or worthy of being explored and discussed.

Our sample student Maggie Durham has selected the topic of educational technology. We will use Maggie’s sample persuasive draft and final paper as we discuss the steps for writing a persuasive essay.

Step Two: Pose a Research Question

Once you have a topic, the next step is to develop a research question along with related questions that delve further into the first question. If you do not know what to ask, start with one of the question words: What? Who? Where? When? Why? and How? The research question helps you focus or narrow the scope of your topic by identifying a problem, controversy, or aspect of the topic that is worth exploration and discussion. Some general questions about a topic would be the following:

  • Who is affected by this problem and how?
  • Have previous efforts or polices been made to address this problem? – What are they?
  • Why hasn’t this problem been solved already?

For Maggie’s topic of educational technology, potential issues or controversies range from data privacy to digital literacy to the impact of technology on learning, which is what Maggie is interested in. Maggie’s local school district has low literacy rates, so Maggie wants to know the following:

  • Are there advantages and/or disadvantages of technology within primary and secondary education?
  • Which types of technology are considered the best in terms of quality and endurance?
  • What types of technology and/or programs do students like using and why?
  • Do teachers know how to use certain technologies with curriculum design, instruction, and/or assessment?

Step Three: Draft a Thesis

A thesis is a claim that asserts your main argument about the topic. As you conduct your research and draft your paper, you may discover information that changes your mind about your thesis, so at this point in writing, the thesis is tentative. Still, it is an important step in narrowing your focus for research and writing.

The thesis should

1. be a complete sentence,

2. identify the topic, and

3. make a specific claim about that topic.

In a persuasive paper, the thesis is a claim that someone should believe or do something. For example, a persuasive thesis might assert that something is effective or ineffective. It might state that a policy should be changed or a plan should be implemented. Or a persuasive thesis might be a plea for people to change their minds about a particular issue.

Once you have figured out your research question, your thesis is simply the answer. Maggie’s thesis is “Schools should supply technology aids to all students to increase student learning and literacy rates.” Her next step is to find evidence to support her claim.

Step Four: Research

Once you have a topic, research question, and thesis, you are ready to conduct research. To find sources that would be appropriate for an academic persuasive essay, begin your search in the library. The Purdue Global Library has a number of tutorials on conducting research, choosing search teams, types of sources, and how to evaluate information to determine its reliability and usefulness. Remember that the research you use will not only provide content to prove your claim and develop your essay, but it will also help to establish your credibility as a reliable source (ethos), create a logical framework for your argument (logos), and appeal to your readers emotionally (pathos).

Step Five: Plan Your Argument; Make an Outline

Once you have located quality source information—facts, examples, definitions, knowledge, and other information that answers your research question(s), you’ll want to create an outline to organize it. The example outline below illustrates a logical organizational plan for writing a persuasive essay. The example outline begins with an introduction that presents the topic, explains the issue, and asserts the position (the thesis). The body then provides the reasoning for the position and addresses the opposing viewpoints that some readers may hold. In your paper, you could modify this organization and address the opposing viewpoints first and then give the reasoning for your viewpoints, or you can alternate and give one opposing viewpoint then counter that with your viewpoint and then give another opposing viewpoint and counter that with your viewpoint.

The outline below also considers the alternatives to the position—certainly, there are other ways to think about or address the issue or situation. Considering the alternatives can be done in conjunction with looking at the opposing viewpoints. You do not always have to disagree with other opinions, either. You can acknowledge that another solution could work or another belief is valid. However, at the end of the body section, you will want to stand by your original position and prove that in light of all the opposing viewpoints and other perspectives, your position has the most merit.

Sample Outline of a Persuasive Argument

  • 1. Introduction: Tell them what you will tell them.
  • a. Present an interesting fact or description to make the topic clear and capture the reader’s attention.
  • b. Define and narrow the topic using facts or descriptions to illustrate what the situation or issue is (and that is it important).
  • c. Assert the claim (thesis) that something should be believed or done about the issue. (Some writers also briefly state the reasons behind this claim in the thesis as Maggie does in her paper when she claims that schools should supply tablets to students to increase learning , engagement, and literacy rates ).
  • 2. Body: Tell them.
  • a. Defend the claim with logical reasons and practical examples based on research.
  • b. Anticipate objections to the claim and refute or accommodate them with research.
  • c. Consider alternate positions or solutions using examples from research.
  • d. Present a final point based on research that supports your claim in light of the objections and alternatives considered.
  • 3. Conclusion: Tell them what you told them.
  • a. Recap the main points to reinforce the importance of the issue.
  • b. Restate the thesis in new wording to reinforce your position.
  • c. Make a final remark to leave a lasting impression, so the reader will want to continue this conversation and ideally adopt the belief or take the action you are advocating.

In Maggie’s draft, she introduced the topic with facts about school ratings in Texas and then narrowed the topic using the example of her local school district’s literacy rates. She then claimed the district should provide each student a tablet in order to increase learning (and thus, literacy rates).

Maggie defends her claim with a series of examples from research that proved how access to tablets, technology-integrated curriculums, and “flipped classrooms” have improved literacy rates in other districts. She anticipates objections to her proposal due to the high cost of technology and counter argues this with expert opinions and examples that show partnerships with businesses, personalized curriculums that technology makes possible, and teacher training can balance the costs. Maggie included an alternative solution of having students check out tablets from the library, but her research showed that this still left students needing Wi-Fi at home while her proposal would include a plan for students to access Wi-Fi.

Maggie concluded her argument by pointing out the cost of not helping the students in this way and restated her thesis reaffirming the benefits, and then left the reader with a memorable quote.

Click here to see Maggie’s draft with feedback from her instructor and a peer. Sample Persuasive Draft

Feedback, Revision, and Editing

After you write a draft of your persuasive essay, the next step is to have a peer, instructor, or tutor read it and provide feedback. Without reader feedback, you cannot fully know how your readers will react to your argument. Reader feedback is meant to be constructive. Use it to better understand your readers and craft your argument to more appropriately appeal to them.

Maggie received valuable feedback on her draft from her instructor and classmate. They pointed to where her thesis needed to be even more specific, to paragraphs where a different organization would make her argument more convincing, to parts of the paper that lacked examples, sentences that needed revision and editing for greater clarity, and APA formatting that needed to be edited.

Maggie also took a critical look at her paper and looked back at her writing process. One technique she found helpful was to read her paper aloud because it let her know where her wording and organization were not clear. She did this several times as she revised and again as she edited and refined her paper for sentence level clarity and concision.

In the end, Maggie produced a convincing persuasive essay and effective argument that would appeal to readers who are also interested in the way technology can impact and improve student learning, an important topic in 2014 when this paper was written and still relevant today.

Click here to see Maggie’s final draft after revising and editing. Sample Persuasive Revised

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Persuasive Essay Writing Basics: How to Convince Your Readers?

The main goal for the author is to sway the audience to adopt a particular point of view about the persuasive essay's subject. In this paper, you need to introduce the subject clearly, give a list of evidence and create a conclusion for readers. Remember that all your thoughts and ideas need to be supported with facts.

How to Start This Paper?

There are five different ways how to begin your persuasive essay: Start with a quote from a famous person or a book. Put a short anecdote or a funny story at the beginning to catch the attention of people. You can start your work with a thesis statement and use this part as a hook. Bring some interesting facts or statistical data at the beginning to make readers involved. Start your work with a question, and answer it inside your paper.

Effective Hints

Here are some useful hints you may need for making a good essay: Make a good attention catcher because you won't get a second chance to make people interested. We recommend writing this part at the end when you've finished all other parts. Check out that all sentences are well-connected to the paper's thesis statement. Try to write with short and understandable sentences. Readers would understand your work better if you describe things clearly. You can use various online software to check grammar, but only reading aloud could prevent logical errors and misprints. Ask your friend to read a finished work and give their honest opinion to you. Read successful examples to figure out how to make a great attention catcher. Plan your work beforehand, and don't leave everything for the last night before the deadline. The essay written in rush wouldn't surprise anyone in a good sense.

Step-By-Step Guide

Follow these simple but very effective steps that will help you to come up with a successful persuasive essay: Define your future audience. Brainstorm all possible topics and ideas you can write about. Choose a good topic. Write a body part and conclusion of your future paper. Concentrate on your writing and think what kind of hook would be suitable here. Create a couple of bright sentences that will introduce the main idea of your document to readers and motivate them to read the entire work. Review your finished paper to avoid mistakes.

Practice a Lot

We hope that after reading our article, you have understood what is a good hook for a persuasive essay, and how to create it properly. Use our ideas and make an exciting paper to attract a lot of people! We tried to light up the most important moments and hope this article was useful for you and that you will use mentioned techniques in your writing. Improve your experience and take your abilities to new heights. Learn different techniques and surprise readers with new persuasive essays. If you are able to write well, it is your life skill that definitely will be helpful in different situations on your way.

Literacy Ideas

How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps

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WHAT IS A PERSUASIVE ESSAY?

What is a persuasive essay?

A persuasive text presents a point of view around a topic or theme that is backed by evidence to support it.

The purpose of a persuasive text can be varied.  Maybe you intend to influence someone’s opinion on a specific topic, or you might aim to sell a product or service through an advertisement.

The challenge in writing a good persuasive text is to use a mix of emotive language and, in some cases, images that are supported by hard evidence or other people’s opinions.

In a persuasive essay or argument essay, the student strives to convince the reader of the merits of their opinion or stance on a particular issue. The student must utilise several persuasive techniques to form a coherent and logical argument to convince the reader of a point of view or to take a specific action.

Persuasive essay | persuasive essays | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

PERSUADING PEOPLE REQUIRES A CONSISTENT APPROACH…

Persuasive texts are simple in structure.  You must clearly state your opinion around a specific topic and then repeatedly reinforce your opinions with external facts or evidence.  A robust concluding summary should leave little doubt in the reader’s mind.  ( Please view our planning tool below for a detailed explanation. )

TYPES OF PERSUASIVE TEXT

We cover the broad topic of writing a general persuasive essay in this guide, there are several sub-genres of persuasive texts students will encounter as they progress through school. We have complete guides on these text types, so be sure to click the links and read these in detail if required.

  • Argumentative Essays – These are your structured “Dogs are better pets than Cats” opinion-type essays where your role is to upsell the positive elements of your opinions to your audience whilst also highlighting the negative aspects of any opposing views using a range of persuasive language and techniques.
  • Advertising – Uses persuasive techniques to sell a good or service to potential customers with a call to action.
  • Debating Speeches – A debate is a structured discussion between two teams on a specific topic that a moderator judges and scores. Your role is to state your case, sell your opinions to the audience, and counteract your opposition’s opinions.
  • Opinion Articles, Newspaper Editorials. – Editorials often use more subtle persuasive techniques that blur the lines of factual news reporting and opinions that tell a story with bias. Sometimes they may even have a call to action at the end.
  • Reviews – Reviews exist to inform others about almost any service or product, such as a film, restaurant, or product. Depending on your experiences, you may have firm opinions or not even care that much about recommending it to others. Either way, you will employ various persuasive techniques to communicate your recommendations to your audience.
  • Please note a DISCUSSION essay is not a traditional persuasive text, as even though you are comparing and contrasting elements, the role of the author is to present an unbiased account of both sides so that the reader can make a decision that works best for them. Discussions are often confused as a form of persuasive writing.

A COMPLETE TEACHING UNIT ON PERSUASIVE WRITING SKILLS

Persuasive essay | opinion writing unit 1 | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

Teach your students to produce writing that  PERSUADES  and  INFLUENCES  thinking with this  HUGE  writing guide bundle covering: ⭐ Persuasive Texts / Essays ⭐ Expository Essays⭐ Argumentative Essays⭐ Discussions.

A complete 140 PAGE unit of work on persuasive texts for teachers and students. No preparation is required.

THE STRUCTURE OF A PERSUASIVE ESSAY

Persuasive essay | persuasive essay template | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

1. Introduction

In the introduction, the student will naturally introduce the topic. Controversial issues make for great topics in this writing genre. It’s a cliche in polite society to discourage discussions involving politics, sex, or religion because they can often be very divisive. While these subjects may not be the best topics of conversation for the dinner table at Thanksgiving, they can be perfect when deciding on a topic for persuasive writing. Obviously, the student’s age and abilities should be considered, as well as cultural taboos, when selecting a topic for the essay. But the point holds, the more controversial, the better.

Let’s take a look at some of the critical elements of the introduction when writing a persuasive essay:

Title: Tell your audience what they are reading.

This will often be posed as a question; for example, if the essay is on the merits of a vegetarian lifestyle, it may be called something like: To Eat Meat or Not?

Hook : Provide your audience with a reason to continue reading.

As with any genre of writing, capturing the reader’s interest from the outset is crucial. There are several methods of doing this, known as hooks. Students may open their essays with anecdotes, jokes, quotations, or relevant statistics related to the topic under discussion.

Background: Provide some context to your audience.

In this introductory section, students will provide the reader with some background on the topic. This will place the issue in context and briefly weigh some opinions on the subject.

Thesis statement: Let the audience know your stance.

After surveying the topic in the first part of the introduction, it is now time for the student writer to express their opinion and briefly preview the points they will make later in the essay.

2. Body Paragraphs

The number of paragraphs forming this essay section will depend on the number of points the writer chooses to make to support their opinion. Usually three main points will be sufficient for beginning writers to coordinate. More advanced students can increase the number of paragraphs based on the complexity of their arguments, but the overall structure will largely remain intact.

Be sure to check out our complete guide to writing perfect paragraphs here .

The TEEL acronym is valuable for students to remember how to structure their paragraphs.  Read below for a deeper understanding.

Topic Sentence:

The topic sentence states the central point of the paragraph. This will be one of the reasons supporting the thesis statement made in the introduction.

These sentences will build on the topic sentence by illustrating the point further, often by making it more specific.

These sentences’ purpose is to support the paragraph’s central point by providing supporting evidence and examples. This evidence may be statistics, quotations, or anecdotal evidence.

The final part of the paragraph links back to the initial statement of the topic sentence while also forming a bridge to the next point to be made. This part of the paragraph provides some personal analysis and interpretation of how the student arrived at their conclusions and connects the essay as a cohesive whole.

3. Conclusion

The conclusion weaves together the main points of the persuasive essay. It does not usually introduce new arguments or evidence but instead reviews the arguments made already and restates them by summing them up uniquely. It is important at this stage to tie everything back to the initial thesis statement. This is the writer’s last opportunity to drive home their point, to achieve the essay’s goal, to begin with – persuade the reader of their point of view.

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Ending an essay well can be challenging, but it is essential to end strongly, especially for persuasive essays. As with the hooks of the essay’s opening, there are many tried and tested methods of leaving the reader with a strong impression. Encourage students to experiment with different endings, for example, concluding the essay with a quotation that amplifies the thesis statement.

Another method is to have the student rework their ending in simple monosyllabic words, as simple language often has the effect of being more decisive in impact. The effect they are striving for in the final sentence is the closing of the circle.

Several persuasive writing techniques can be used in the conclusion and throughout the essay to amp up the persuasive power of the writing. Let’s take a look at a few.

ETHOS, PATHOS & LOGOS TUTORIAL VIDEO (2:20)

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TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT PERSUASIVE ESSAY

Persuasive writing template and graphic organizer

PERSUASIVE TECHNIQUES

In this article, we have outlined a basic structure that will be helpful to students in approaching the organization of their persuasive writing. It will also be helpful for the students to be introduced to a few literary techniques that will help your students to present their ideas convincingly. Here are a few of the more common ones:

Repetition: There is a reason why advertisements and commercials are so repetitive – repetition works! Students can use this knowledge to their advantage in their persuasive writing. It is challenging to get the reader to fully agree with the writer’s opinion if they don’t fully understand it. Saying the same thing in various ways ensures the reader gets many bites at the ‘understanding’ cherry.

Repetition Example: “The use of plastic bags is not only bad for the environment, but it is also bad for our economy. Plastic bags are not biodegradable, meaning they will not decompose and will continue to take up space in landfills. Plastic bags are also not recyclable, meaning they will not be reused and will instead end up in landfills. Plastic bags are not only bad for the environment, but they are also bad for our economy as they are costly to dispose of and take up valuable space in landfills.”

In this example, the phrase “not only bad for the environment but also bad for our economy” is repeated multiple times to reinforce the idea that plastic bags are not just a problem for the environment but also the economy. The repetition of the phrase emphasizes the point and makes it more persuasive.

It is also important to note that repetition could be used differently, such as repeating a word or phrase to create rhythm or emphasis.

Storytelling: Humans tend to understand things better through stories. Think of how we teach kids important values through time-tested fables like Peter and the Wolf . Whether through personal anecdotes or references to third-person experiences, stories help climb down the ladder of abstraction and reach the reader on a human level.

Storytelling Example: “Imagine you are walking down the street, and you come across a stray dog clearly in need of food and water. The dog looks up at you with big, sad eyes, and you cannot help but feel a twinge of compassion. Now, imagine that same scenario, but instead of a stray dog, it’s a homeless person sitting on the sidewalk. The person is clearly in need of food and shelter, and their eyes also look up at her with a sense of hopelessness.

The point of this story is to show that just as we feel compelled to help a stray animal in need, we should also feel compelled to help a homeless person. We should not turn a blind eye to the suffering of our fellow human beings, and we should take action to address homelessness in our community. It is important to remember that everyone deserves a roof over their head and a warm meal to eat. The story is designed to elicit an emotional response in the reader and make the argument more relatable and impactful.

By using storytelling, this passage creates an image in the reader’s mind and creates an emotional connection that can be more persuasive than just stating facts and figures.

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Dissent: We live in a cynical age, so leaving out the opposing opinion will smack of avoidance to the reader. Encourage your students to turn to that opposing viewpoint and deal with those arguments in their essays .

Dissent Example: “Many people argue that students should not have to wear uniforms in school. They argue that uniforms stifle creativity and individuality and that students should be able to express themselves through their clothing choices. While these are valid concerns, I strongly disagree.

In fact, uniforms can actually promote individuality by levelling the playing field and removing the pressure to dress in a certain way. Furthermore, uniforms can promote a sense of community and belonging within a school. They can also provide a sense of discipline and structure, which can help to create a more focused and productive learning environment. Additionally, uniforms can save families money and eliminate the stress of deciding what to wear daily .

While some may argue that uniforms stifle creativity and individuality, the benefits of uniforms far outweigh the potential drawbacks. It is important to consider the impact of uniforms on the school as a whole, rather than focusing solely on individual expression.”

In this example, the writer presents the opposing viewpoint (uniforms stifle creativity and individuality) and then provides counterarguments to refute it. By doing so, the writer can strengthen their own argument and present a more convincing case for why uniforms should be worn in school.

A Call to Action: A staple of advertising, a call to action can also be used in persuasive writing. When employed, it usually forms part of the conclusion section of the essay and asks the reader to do something, such as recycle, donate to charity, sign a petition etc.

A quick look around reveals to us the power of persuasion, whether in product advertisements, newspaper editorials, or political electioneering; persuasion is an ever-present element in our daily lives. Logic and reason are essential in persuasion, but they are not the only techniques. The dark arts of persuasion can prey on emotion, greed, and bias. Learning to write persuasively can help our students recognize well-made arguments and help to inoculate them against the more sinister manifestations of persuasion.

Call to Action Example: “Climate change is a pressing issue that affects us all, and it’s important that we take action now to reduce our carbon footprint and protect the planet for future generations. As a society, we have the power to make a difference and it starts with small changes that we can make in our own lives.

I urge you to take the following steps to reduce your carbon footprint:

  • Reduce your use of single-use plastics
  • Use public transportation, carpool, bike or walk instead of driving alone.
  • Support clean energy sources such as solar and wind power
  • Plant trees and support conservation efforts

It’s easy to feel like one person can’t make a difference, but the truth is that every little bit helps. Together, we can create a more sustainable future for ourselves and for the planet.

So, let’s take action today and make a difference for a better future, it starts with minor changes, but it all adds up and can make a significant impact. We need to take responsibility for our actions and do our part to protect the planet.”

In this example, the writer gives a clear and specific call to action and encourages the reader to take action to reduce their carbon footprint and protect the planet. By doing this, the writer empowers the reader to take action and enables them to change.

Now, go persuade your students of the importance of perfecting the art of persuasive writing!

A COMPLETE UNIT ON TEACHING FACT AND OPINION

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This  HUGE 120 PAGE  resource combines four different fact and opinion activities you can undertake as a  WHOLE GROUP  or as  INDEPENDENT READING GROUP TASKS  in either  DIGITAL  or  PRINTABLE TASKS.

20 POPULAR PERSUASIVE ESSAY TOPICS FOR STUDENTS

Writing an effective persuasive essay demonstrates a range of skills that will be of great use in nearly all aspects of life after school.

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In essence, if you can influence a person to change their ideas or thoughts on a given topic through how you structure your words and thoughts, you possess a very powerful skill.

Be careful not to rant wildly.  Use facts and other people’s ideas who think similarly to you in your essay to strengthen your concepts.

Your biggest challenge in getting started may be choosing a suitable persuasive essay topic.  These 20 topics for a persuasive essay should make this process a little easier.

  • WHY ARE WE FASCINATED WITH CELEBRITIES AND WEALTHY PEOPLE ON TELEVISION AND SOCIAL MEDIA?
  • IS IT RIGHT FOR SCHOOLS TO RAISE MONEY BY SELLING CANDY AND UNHEALTHY FOODS TO STUDENTS?
  • SHOULD GIRLS BE ALLOWED TO PLAY ON BOYS SPORTING TEAMS?
  • IS TEACHING HANDWRITING A WASTE OF TIME IN THIS DAY AND AGE?
  • SHOULD THERE BE FAR GREATER RESTRICTIONS AROUND WHAT CAN BE POSTED ON THE INTERNET?
  • SHOULD PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES HAVE TO TAKE DRUG TESTS?
  • ARE TEENAGE PREGNANCY SHOWS A NEGATIVE OR POSITIVE INFLUENCE ON VIEWERS?
  • SHOULD GAMBLING BE PROMOTED IN ANY WAY IN SPORTS EVEN THOUGH IT BRINGS IN LARGE AMOUNTS OF REVENUE?
  • SHOULD SPORTING TEAMS THAT LOSE BE REWARDED BY RECEIVING INCENTIVES SUCH AS HIGH DRAFT PICKS AND / OR FINANCIAL BENEFITS?
  • SHOULD SHARKS THAT ATTACK PEOPLE BE DESTROYED? SHOULD WE GET INVOLVED IN FOREIGN CONFLICTS AND ISSUES THAT DON’T DIRECTLY AFFECT OUR COUNTRY?
  • SHOULD WE GET INVOLVED IN FOREIGN CONFLICTS AND ISSUES THAT DON’T DIRECTLY AFFECT OUR COUNTRY?
  • COULD VIDEO GAMES BE CONSIDERED AS A PROFESSIONAL SPORT?
  • IF YOU WERE THE LEADER OF YOUR COUNTRY AND HAD A LARGE SURPLUS TO SPEND, WHAT WOULD YOU DO WITH IT?
  • WHEN SHOULD A PERSON BE CONSIDERED AND TREATED AS AN ADULT?
  • SHOULD SMOKING BECOME AN ILLEGAL ACTIVITY?
  • SHOULD THE VOTING AGE BE LOWERED?
  • DOES PROTECTIVE PADDING IN SPORTS MAKE IT MORE DANGEROUS?
  • SHOULD CELL PHONES BE ALLOWED IN THE CLASSROOM?
  • IS TEACHING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE A WASTE OF TIME?
  • SHOULD WE TEACH ETIQUETTE IN SCHOOLS?

PERSUASIVE PROMPTS FOR RELUCTANT WRITERS

If your students need a little more direction and guidance, here are some journal prompts that include aspects to consider.

  • Convince us that students would be better off having a three-day weekend .  There are many angles you could take with this, such as letting children maximize their childhood or trying to convince your audience that a four-day school week might actually be more productive.
  • Which is the best season?  And why?   You will really need to draw on the benefits of your preferred season and sell them to your audience.  Where possible, highlight the negatives of the competing seasons.  Use lots of figurative language and sensory and emotional connections for this topic.
  • Aliens do / or don’t exist?  We can see millions of stars surrounding us just by gazing into the night sky, suggesting alien life should exist, right? Many would argue that if there were aliens we would have seen tangible evidence of them by now.  The only fact is that we just don’t know the answer to this question.  It is your task to try and convince your audience through some research and logic what your point of view is and why.
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory? Do your research on this popular and divisive topic and make your position clear on where you stand and why.  Use plenty of real-world examples to support your thoughts and points of view.  
  • Should Smartphones be banned in schools?   Whilst this would be a complete nightmare for most students’ social lives, maybe it might make schools more productive places for students to focus and learn.  Pick a position, have at least three solid arguments to support your point of view, and sell them to your audience.

VISUAL JOURNAL PROMPTS FOR PERSUASIVE WRITING

Try these engaging, persuasive prompts with your students to ignite the writing process . Scroll through them.

Persuasive writing prompts

Persuasive Essay Examples (Student Writing Samples)

Below are a collection of persuasive essay samples.  Click on the image to enlarge and explore them in greater detail.  Please take a moment to read the persuasive texts in detail and the teacher and student guides highlight some of the critical elements of writing a persuasion.

Please understand these student writing samples are not intended to be perfect examples for each age or grade level but a piece of writing for students and teachers to explore together to critically analyze to improve student writing skills and deepen their understanding of persuasive text writing.

We recommend reading the example either a year above or below, as well as the grade you are currently working with, to gain a broader appreciation of this text type.

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VIDEO TUTORIALS FOR PERSUASIVE WRITING

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OTHER GREAT ARTICLES RELATED TO PERSUASIVE ESSAY WRITING

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Teaching Resources

Use our resources and tools to improve your student’s writing skills through proven teaching strategies.

WHERE CAN I FIND A COMPLETE UNIT OF WORK ON HOW TO WRITE PERSUASIVE ESSAYS?

persuasive writing unit

We pride ourselves on being the web’s best resource for teaching students and teachers how to write a persuasive text. We value the fact you have taken the time to read our comprehensive guides to understand the fundamentals of writing skills.

We also understand some of you just don’t have the luxury of time or the resources to create engaging resources exactly when you need them.

If you are time-poor and looking for an in-depth solution that encompasses all of the concepts outlined in this article, I strongly recommend looking at the “ Writing to Persuade and Influence Unit. ”

Working in partnership with Innovative Teaching Ideas , we confidently recommend this resource as an all-in-one solution to teach how to write persuasively.

This unit will find over 140 pages of engaging and innovative teaching ideas.

PERSUASIVE ESSAY WRITING CHECKLIST AND RUBRIC BUNDLE

writing checklists

The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers

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Top 5 Persuasive Writing Techniques for Students

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5 Top Persuasive Writing Lesson Plans for Students and Teachers

Persuasive essay | persuasive writing prompts | 23 Persuasive writing Topics for High School students | literacyideas.com

23 Persuasive writing Topics for High School students

Persuasive essay | 1 reading and writing persuasive advertisements | How to Write an Advertisement: A Complete Guide for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

How to Write an Advertisement: A Complete Guide for Students and Teachers

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How to Start an Essay with Strong Hooks and Leads

Apr 14, 2023

Powerful Persuasive Essay Examples That Will Spark Your Creativity

Are you looking to make a difference with your writing? Discover the power of persuasion with these inspiring essay examples and expert tips. Learn how to craft compelling arguments that will capture your reader's attention and inspire them to take action. Unlock your potential and start making a difference today!

Are you looking to improve your persuasive essay writing skills? Whether you're a student writing for an assignment, a professional looking to make a compelling argument, or simply someone who wants to make a difference, this blog post is for you.

Persuasive essays require you to take a position on a particular issue and use evidence and persuasive language to convince your readers to see things from your perspective. While they can be challenging, writing persuasive essays is an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills and improve your writing abilities.

In this blog post, we'll provide you with expert tips on how to create persuasive essays that captivate and convince your audience. We'll also share some inspiring examples that demonstrate effective persuasive writing techniques. From the importance of vaccination to the need for gun control, our examples cover a range of topics and show how to structure your essay and use persuasive language to sway your readers.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced writer, this blog post will equip you with the tools and knowledge to create compelling and persuasive essays that will leave a lasting impact.

What is a Persuasive Essay?

Persuasive writing, often referred to as argumentative essay writing, employs reasoning and logical arguments to demonstrate that one concept holds more validity than another. Its goal is to convince the reader to embrace a specific perspective or engage in a certain action. This style of writing is common in both academic and personal contexts. Typically, such essays start with a query which the author then addresses throughout the piece, arguing for or against it. The argument is built on robust evidence and sound logic, incorporating factual statements, rational explanations, illustrative examples, and expert quotations.

How to Create Persuasive Essays

Crafting a persuasive essay requires a combination of solid research, careful planning, and effective writing techniques. Here are some tips to help you create a persuasive essay that will make a lasting impact:

1. Understand Your Audience

Before you begin writing, it's important to know your target audience. Who are you writing for? What are their interests, beliefs, and values? Understanding your audience will help you tailor your arguments to resonate with them and increase your chances of persuading them.

2. Conduct Thorough Research

To write a persuasive essay, you need to have a deep understanding of your topic. Conducting thorough research will help you gather the necessary evidence to support your arguments. Make use of reputable sources such as academic journals, government reports, and expert opinions to ensure that your essay is grounded in facts.

3. Develop a Clear Thesis Statement

Your thesis statement is the backbone of your essay. It should be a clear and concise statement that sums up your argument and sets the tone for the rest of your essay. Make sure to include it in your introduction and refer to it throughout the essay.

4. Use Persuasive Language

In a persuasive essay, it's important to use language that is compelling and convincing. Use rhetorical devices such as repetition, metaphors, and analogies to drive your point home. Avoid using overly emotional language, as it can detract from your credibility.

5. Address Counterarguments

Acknowledge and address potential counterarguments in your essay. This shows that you have considered all sides of the issue and strengthens your argument. Be sure to refute counterarguments with solid evidence and reasoning.

6. Conclude with a Call to Action

End your essay with a strong call to action. Encourage your reader to take action based on your arguments. This can include signing a petition, contacting a representative, or making a donation to a relevant cause.

By following these tips, you can create a persuasive essay that effectively communicates your message and inspires action.

Here are our Top Persuasive Essay Examples to Inspire You

The Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet: A Persuasive Essay Sample

As people become more health conscious and environmentally aware, plant-based diets have gained popularity in recent years. A plant-based diet consists mainly of plant foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and seeds, with little or no animal products. There are many reasons why people choose a plant-based diet, ranging from ethical concerns to health benefits.

In this persuasive essay sample, we'll examine the many benefits of a plant-based diet and why it's a smart choice for your health and the environment. We'll explore the evidence behind plant-based diets, including studies that show how they can help prevent chronic diseases like heart disease and type 2 diabetes, as well as the environmental impact of animal agriculture.

Plant-Based Diets and Chronic Diseases: How They're Linked

Eating a plant-based diet has been linked to a reduced risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer. There are many reasons why a plant-based diet may be beneficial for preventing and managing chronic diseases.

One reason is that plant-based diets are typically high in fibre, which can help regulate blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Additionally, many plant-based foods are rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, which can help reduce inflammation in the body and protect against chronic diseases.

Another reason is that plant-based diets are often lower in saturated fat and cholesterol than those that include meat and dairy products. High intake of saturated fat and cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease, and consuming a plant-based diet can help lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease.

The Environmental Impact of Animal Agriculture: Why Plant-Based Diets Are More Sustainable

Animal agriculture significantly impacts the environment, contributing to issues such as deforestation, greenhouse gas emissions, and water pollution. Individuals can reduce their environmental footprint and promote sustainability by choosing a plant-based diet.

One reason is that animal agriculture significantly contributes to greenhouse gas emissions, with livestock production accounting for around 14.5% of all human-induced greenhouse gas emissions. In contrast, plant-based diets have been shown to have a lower carbon footprint, with some studies suggesting that a vegan diet can reduce carbon emissions by up to 73%.

Animal agriculture also requires significant land, water, and other resources. For example, producing one kilogram of beef requires approximately 15,000 litres of water, while producing one kilogram of wheat requires only 1,250 litres. By choosing plant-based options, individuals can reduce their water footprint and promote sustainable use of resources.

Debunking the Myths: Addressing Common Misconceptions About Plant-Based Diets

Sure, here's an explanation of the subheading "Debunking the Myths: Addressing Common Misconceptions About Plant-Based Diets," along with some potential points and subheadings you could use:

Many misconceptions surround plant-based diets, including concerns about protein intake, nutritional deficiencies, and tasteless meals. By debunking these myths and providing accurate information, individuals can make informed decisions about adopting a plant-based lifestyle and enjoy its numerous health benefits.

One common misconception is that plant-based diets need more protein. However, many plant-based foods are protein-rich, including beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. You can quickly meet your daily protein needs by including various foods.

Plant-Based Protein Sources: What to Eat to Meet Your Nutritional Needs

Sure, here's an explanation of the subheading "Plant-Based Protein Sources: What to Eat to Meet Your Nutritional Needs," along with some potential points and subheadings you could use:

Plant-based diets are often criticized for lacking protein, but plenty of plant-based sources of protein can help individuals meet their nutritional needs. By incorporating various protein sources into their diet, individuals can ensure they get all the nutrients they need to support their health and well-being.

One of the best plant-based protein sources is legumes, which include beans, lentils, and chickpeas. Legumes are not only high in protein but also rich in fiber and other essential nutrients. Other plant-based protein sources include nuts and seeds, whole grains, and certain vegetables like broccoli and spinach.

Plant-Based Diets and Weight Loss: Can They Help You Shed Pounds?

One of the potential benefits of a plant-based diet is weight loss. Many studies have shown that individuals who follow a plant-based diet tend to have lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), and body fat percentage than those who consume a meat-based diet. There are several reasons why a plant-based diet may be effective for weight loss.

Making the Transition to a Plant-Based Diet: Tips and Resources for Getting Started

Sure, here's an explanation of the subheading "Making the Transition to a Plant-Based Diet: Tips and Resources for Getting Started," along with some potential points and subheadings you could use:

Transitioning to a plant-based diet can seem daunting, especially if you're used to consuming many meat and dairy products. However, switching to a plant-based diet can be a manageable and enjoyable process with the right resources and strategies.

In conclusion, a plant-based diet has numerous benefits for our health, the environment, and animal welfare. The examples and evidence presented in this article show that a diet focused on whole, plant-based foods can help prevent chronic diseases, reduce our carbon footprint, and improve animal welfare. 

Body Image: A Persuasive Essay Exploring the Dangers of Unrealistic Beauty Standards

Body image is a complex and multifaceted issue affecting many people, particularly women, worldwide. In today's society, unrealistic beauty standards set by the media, advertising, and popular culture are becoming increasingly prevalent, leading to negative consequences for individuals' physical and mental health. In this persuasive essay, I will explore the dangers of these unrealistic beauty standards and argue that they must be challenged and changed.

Introduction: Understanding the Issue of Body Image

Body image refers to an individual's perception and feelings about their physical appearance. It is a complex issue that affects people of all ages, genders, and backgrounds. In today's society, there is increasing pressure to conform to narrow and unrealistic beauty standards in the media, advertising, and popular culture.

The issue of body image mainly concerns women, who are often subjected to unrealistic beauty standards that prioritize thinness and youthfulness. However, men and individuals of all genders can also experience negative body image and feel pressure to conform to societal expectations.

The Impact of Unrealistic Beauty Standards on Individuals

Unrealistic beauty standards can have a range of negative impacts on individuals' physical and mental health. The pressure to conform to narrow beauty ideals can lead to feelings of inadequacy, low self-worth, and even depression and anxiety.

One of the most concerning effects of unrealistic beauty standards is the link to disordered eating behaviors. Studies have shown that individuals who feel pressure to conform to societal beauty ideals are at a higher risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge-eating disorder. These conditions can have severe physical and psychological consequences and require specialized treatment.

In addition to eating disorders, unrealistic beauty standards can lead to harmful practices such as excessive exercise and cosmetic surgeries. These behaviors can negatively impact individuals' physical health, including injury, scarring, and chronic pain.

It is crucial to recognize the impact of unrealistic beauty standards on individuals' well-being and work towards promoting a more inclusive and diverse representation of beauty. By challenging harmful beauty norms and promoting body positivity, we can empower individuals to feel confident and comfortable in their skin and prioritize their mental and physical health.

The Link Between Unrealistic Beauty Standards and Eating Disorders

Unrealistic beauty standards can significantly impact an individual's risk of developing eating disorders. The pressure to conform to narrow beauty ideals can create a sense of inadequacy and low self-worth, leading to a distorted perception of one's body and unhealthy eating behaviors.

Studies have shown that individuals who feel pressure to conform to societal beauty standards are at a higher risk of developing eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge-eating disorder. These conditions are characterized by extreme behaviors surrounding food and eating and can have severe physical and psychological consequences.

The Need for Body Positivity and Acceptance in Society

The need for body positivity and acceptance in society is more critical now than ever. With the prevalence of unrealistic beauty standards and the negative impacts on individuals' mental and physical health, creating a more inclusive and accepting environment that celebrates diversity in all forms is crucial.

Body positivity is a movement that encourages individuals to embrace their unique qualities and characteristics, including their physical appearance. This movement challenges harmful beauty norms and promotes a more accepting and inclusive society.

Strategies for Challenging and Changing Unrealistic Beauty Standards

Challenging and changing unrealistic beauty standards is crucial for promoting a more inclusive and accepting society. Here are some strategies for challenging and changing these harmful norms:

Promote diverse representations of beauty: Encourage media outlets, advertisers, and fashion brands to include various expressions of beauty, including individuals of different sizes, shapes, ages, and backgrounds.

Support body positivity movements: Support and participate in body positivity movements that promote self-love, self-acceptance, and diversity.

Educate others about the negative impacts of unrealistic beauty standards on individuals' mental and physical health and the importance of promoting body positivity and acceptance.

Challenge harmful language: Challenge harmful language and stereotypes surrounding beauty, including derogatory comments about individuals' weight, size, or appearance.

Encourage self-care: Encourage individuals to prioritize their mental and physical health, including engaging in self-care activities that promote self-love and self-acceptance.

In conclusion, the impact of unrealistic beauty standards on individuals' mental and physical health is significant, and it is crucial to promote body positivity and acceptance in society. By challenging and changing these harmful norms and promoting diversity and inclusivity, we can create a more accepting and supportive environment for all individuals.

The Importance of Mental Health Care: A Persuasive Essay Example

Mental health is critical to overall well-being, yet it is often overlooked and stigmatized. The importance of mental health care cannot be overstated, as it impacts individuals' ability to function and thrive in their daily lives. This essay will explore the significance of mental health care and why individuals need to prioritize their mental health.

Mental health refers to an individual's psychological and emotional well-being. It encompasses many factors, including thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Mental health impacts every aspect of our lives, from our ability to form and maintain relationships to our productivity and overall quality of life.

However, despite its critical role in our lives, mental health is often stigmatized and dismissed as a personal weakness or something to be ashamed of. This stigma can prevent individuals from seeking the care and support they need, leading to adverse mental and physical health consequences. Therefore, it is essential to understand the importance of mental health care and work to reduce the stigma surrounding it.

The prevalence of mental health disorders:

The prevalence of mental health disorders is a significant issue affecting millions worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), one in four people will experience a mental health disorder at some point. Mental health disorders can range from anxiety and depression to more severe conditions like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Mental health disorders do not discriminate and can affect individuals of any age, gender, or cultural background. They can also significantly impact an individual's daily life, relationships, and overall well-being. Left untreated, mental health disorders can become debilitating and have long-term consequences.

While mental health disorders are prevalent, they are often underdiagnosed and undertreated. This may be due to mental health stigma, a lack of understanding or awareness of the symptoms, or a lack of access to mental health resources.

It is essential to raise awareness about the prevalence of mental health disorders and reduce the stigma surrounding them. By doing so, individuals can be encouraged to seek help and receive the support they need to manage their mental health. Mental health care should be a priority for everyone, and individuals should be encouraged to seek help early on to prevent the progression of their symptoms.

The consequences of untreated mental health issues: 

Untreated mental health issues can severely affect an individual's daily life and well-being. If left untreated, mental health disorders can lead to declining quality of life, relationship problems, and decreased productivity.

One of the most significant consequences of untreated mental health issues is a decline in quality of life. Mental health disorders can make it challenging to perform everyday tasks, maintain relationships, and participate in activities that bring joy and fulfillment. Over time, this can lead to hopelessness, isolation, and a decreased sense of purpose.

Untreated mental health issues can also significantly impact an individual's relationships. Mental health disorders can cause mood swings, irritability, and a lack of interest in social activities, which can strain relationships with family, friends, and coworkers.

The benefits of seeking mental health care:

Seeking mental health care is essential to improving one's overall well-being. Mental health care can provide individuals with the tools and support to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

One of the most significant benefits of seeking mental health care is improved coping skills. Mental health care professionals can teach individuals coping strategies that help them manage their symptoms, reduce stress, and improve their overall mental health.

Mental health care can also help individuals enhance their communication skills. Poor communication can cause misunderstandings and conflict, worsening mental health symptoms. Mental health professionals can help individuals improve their communication skills, leading to better relationships with family, friends, and coworkers.

Barriers to accessing mental health care:

Despite the many benefits of seeking mental health care, many barriers can prevent individuals from accessing the care they need. These internal and external barriers prevent individuals from receiving the support and treatment they need to manage their mental health.

One of the most significant barriers to accessing mental health care is the stigma surrounding mental health. Many individuals are reluctant to seek help for mental health issues due to the fear of being judged or misunderstood. This stigma can also prevent individuals from receiving support from family, friends, and coworkers, making it even harder to access care.

Another significant barrier is the cost of mental health care. Many mental health care services can be expensive, making it difficult for individuals without insurance or limited financial resources to access the care they need. This can lead to delayed or inadequate treatment, further exacerbating mental health issues.

Solutions for improving access to mental health care:

Improving access to mental health care is crucial to ensure that individuals receive the support and treatment they need to manage their mental health. While there are many barriers to accessing mental health care, several solutions can also help improve access and reduce these barriers.

One solution is to increase awareness and education about mental health issues. By reducing stigma and raising awareness, individuals may be more likely to seek help for mental health issues. This can also help improve support from family, friends, and coworkers, making it easier for individuals to access care.

Another solution is to improve the affordability of mental health care. This can be achieved by increasing insurance coverage for mental health care services or providing financial assistance to individuals who cannot afford mental health care services. Telehealth services can also offer remote mental health care, reducing costs and increasing accessibility for individuals in rural or underserved areas.

It is also essential to increase the availability of mental health care services. This can be achieved by increasing the number of mental health care providers, particularly in underserved areas. Providing mental health care services in schools, workplaces, and community centers can also improve accessibility for individuals.

In conclusion, mental health care is essential to ensuring individuals can manage their mental health and well-being. The prevalence of mental health disorders and the consequences of untreated mental health issues demonstrate the need for individuals to seek the support and treatment they need. However, stigma, cost, availability, and logistics can prevent individuals from accessing the necessary care.

Final Thoughts:

In conclusion, persuasive essays are a powerful tool for inspiring change and encouraging action. Effective writing techniques and compelling arguments can inspire others to adopt your perspective and act toward a better future.

If you're looking for support in writing your persuasive essays, Jenni AI is here to help. As an AI language model, Jenni AI can provide personalized suggestions and citations to help you improve your writing and make your essays more persuasive.

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Persuasive Essays – Tips & Examples of How to Write Them

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Persuasive-Essays-Definition

A persuasive essay, which is a significant aspect of the academic essay , is a concise piece of writing, typically ranging from 500 to 2000 words, that advocates for a particular viewpoint. Rather than deconstructing, attacking, or refuting another argument, persuasive essays passionately argue to inform and convince readers that their expressed opinion is the most valid. Within the realm of academic writing , persuasive essays serve as a powerful tool to influence and shape the opinions of the readers.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

  • 1 Persuasive Essays – In a Nutshell
  • 2 Definition: Persuasive essays
  • 3 Persuasive essays: The introduction
  • 4 Persuasive Essays: The body
  • 5 Persuasive essays: The conclusion
  • 6 The three elements of persuasive essays
  • 7 Writing persuasive essays: Step-by-step guide

Persuasive Essays – In a Nutshell

The following article on persuasive essays covers:

  • What persuasive essays are
  • What makes a persuasive essay great
  • How persuasive essays are structured
  • Persuasive essay examples
  • The three Aristotelian themes of persuasive essays
  • How to write a persuasive essay step by step

Definition: Persuasive essays

  • Persuasive essays always cover subjective themes . With any topic under intense debate, an effective persuasive essay can succinctly argue a particular viewpoint by presenting the facts (as the author sees them).
  • Decent persuasive essays are more than just a bland ledger of factual statements. A great persuasive essay relies on three core rhetorical tools – Ethos (authoritarian appeal), pathos (emotional appeal), and logos (logical appeal). These themed elements flow together in prose to appeal to all biases.
  • The open-ended applications of persuasive essays are immense. A quality persuasive essay can argue the merits of brand-new, fresh perspectives just as easily as defending a centuries-old status quo. It’s your choice.
  • Nevertheless, persuasive essays aren’t always the best way to frame written debates. More in-depth topical explorations and scientific (objective) studies might benefit more from segmented projects or long-form articles.

Ireland

Persuasive essays: The introduction

A good introduction establishes your controversy, the broad limits of said debate, and which side of the divide you (personally) fall on. It should also briefly explain why your chosen material is relevant (today) and use “hooks” to convince your reader to care.

You can structure your introduction with these rhetorical questions :

Here’s a short (fictional) example for reference.

Cosmic Voyage: The Second One (1987-2002) is often considered the best weekly sci-fi show ever made for American television. The Byronic Captain Jimmy Blorbo charmed viewers with his debonaire yet diplomatic engagement style, bare-knuckle astronaut action, and trademark love of teatime.

Jimmy’s classically-trained actor, Sir Charles Casserole, is now (somehow) in the running to be the next secretary general of the UN. His nomination has been publically controversial, derided as “unserious” by world leaders. Can actors really embody the traits of those they pretend to be?

I think so. Heroic actors have exemplary people skills and commanding charisma – vital strengths for a public speaker. And playing a great leader on screen can easily translate into real-life political success. Here’s why.

Persuasive Essays: The body

The body of your persuasive essay is where you make your main argument in themed paragraphs. It’s the core of your persuasive essay.

The body consists of a series of points that provide evidence for your central assertion (e.g. heroic actors make excellent politicians). When used skillfully, the body can also house themed threads and subtle appeals to positive emotions (e.g. nostalgia, enthusiasm, happiness).

You can use the simple TEEL method to structure each paragraph in your persuasive essays:

  • Topic – A single sentence summarizing a good supporting point.
  • Explanation – Elaborate on why it’s a good point.
  • Evidence – Provide solid proof as to why the point’s true.
  • Link – Reference your core argument or the next paragraph (or both).

If we applied TEEL to the argument above, parts of a paragraph might look like this:

  • Topic Sentance – Despite his seemingly frivolous background, Casserole commands a positive online fandom who draw on his life lessons and nuanced geopolitical opinions.
  • Explanation – Charles has become a committed advocate for global peace, justice, and fairness. Followers consistently praise his well-measured yet empathetic responses to traumatic current events.
  • Evidence – One recent solidarity post he made contained only his characters’ iconic catchphrase, “Injustice: No Thanks!”. It broke all records for social media with over twenty million “likes”.
  • Link – Charles clearly has a deep well of public respect, recognition, and acclaim for his informal, populist, and often unconventional diplomacy.

The body can also refute counterarguments. However, try to keep your defensive writing brief. Solid persuasive essays avoid spending too much time anticipating criticism or better ideas – you’re making a positive, firm statement about your opinion.

Don’t deviate much, either. You don’t need to state the context of every point you mention. Stick to the present tense wherever you can.

Persuasive essays: The conclusion

Your conclusion briefly restates your core themes, context, and the most relevant points before summarizing why the argument you’ve just made is correct.

It should contain a recap threading all your evidence together and a final statement as to why the reader should adopt your opinion. It’s also an excellent place to make your “golden” point. Finish on a positive note by promoting the very best piece of evidence for your views.

Your final lines should be climatic, strong, simple, clear, and decisive. No one enjoys reading a passionate argument that finishes by hedging or “fence-sitting”.

Here’s another (fictional) example:

Casserole has leveraged decades of well-deserved fame, taking lessons from his most famous role to promote a stuffed, informed platform for ethical, positive change. As a result? Charles already boasts an extraordinary +60 worldwide approval rating (RESGOV, Dec. 2022).

With an appreciative audience of billions, an uncanny knack for predicting the “right side of history”, and a lot of ready-made, crowd-pleasing press, the idealistic Voyage ethos he still embodies is more than ready to go global. Justice? Yes, please.

The three elements of persuasive essays

The Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle identified three rhetorical elements at the heart of every great persuasive argument. The ability to appeal well to people’s sense of authority (ethos), emotions (pathos), and reality (logos) can make or break a persuasive essay.

Ethos is general proof that you know your topic. Your life experience, reading, qualifications, sheer interest, essays, work, and reputation count – when cited appropriately and effectively.

Beware! An authoritative ethos alone isn’t enough to fully justify your opinion. Excellent credentials count for nothing if your fundamental topical understanding is poor or based on fiction.

Pathos is an appeal to the readers’ sense of empathy and emotion. It’s central to making an ethical case as to why it’s good that readers should do, say, or believe in something.

Pathos can also invoke positive connections as a form of persuasion. Readers value evidence that what you’re advocating is linked to emotional memories they like and value.

Logos covers the practical, logical, and objective evidence that backs up your argument. Reasoned theories, factual proof, measured data, and anecdotal evidence fall into this category.

Without provable, coherent logos? Your persuasive essays will collapse under close academic scrutiny. Facts put validity and strength behind your words.

Writing persuasive essays: Step-by-step guide

  • Identify your audience – Who is your work to convince?
  • Research your subject – Examine arguments and pick a side.
  • Draft your points – Select the best available evidence.
  • Build your case – Link useful facts, data, and anecdotes.
  • Anticipate counterarguments – Are there any objections?
  • Write and refine – Fine-tune your finished argument.
  • Call to action – Tell your reader what they should do.

What are persuasive essays?

Persuasive Essays are short-form written pieces that make a positive, evidenced case for one side of a particular argument. A persuasive essay can also introduce brand-new perspectives.

Why are persuasive essays written?

Convincing others to think like you is the foundation of all power. Well-written persuasive essays can sell controversial products, public figures, policies, and projects.

Are persuasive essays always accurate?

No – watch out! A talented author can fake logos by using circular reasoning, “common sense”, emotional blackmail, and repeating the opinions of others.

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Persuasive Essay Guide

Persuasive Essay Examples

Caleb S.

30+ Free Persuasive Essay Examples To Get You Started

persuasive essay examples

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Are you looking to improve your persuasive writing skills?

One of the best ways to do that is by reading persuasive essay examples. These examples can show you how to structure your arguments effectively.

But finding good examples can be a challenge. Don't worry, though – we've gathered some helpful persuasive essays for you right here!

So, if you're in search of persuasive essay examples to help you write your own, you're in the right place. 

Keep reading this blog to explore various examples

Arrow Down

  • 1. Persuasive Essay Examples For Students
  • 2. Persuasive Essay Examples for Different Formats
  • 3. Persuasive Essay Outline Examples
  • 4. Persuasive Essay Format Example
  • 5. How to Write A Persuasive Essay With Examples
  • 6. How to End a Persuasive Essay Examples
  • 7. Catchy Persuasive Essay Topics

Persuasive Essay Examples For Students

A persuasive essay aims to convince the reader of the author’s point of view. 

To find the right path for your essay, it's helpful to go through some examples. Similarly, good essay examples also help to avoid any potential pitfalls and offer clear information to the readers to adopt. 

Here are some persuasive essay examples pdf:

3rd-grade Persuasive Essay Example

4th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Example 5th-grade pdf

Persuasive Essay Examples for 6th Grade pdf

7th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

8th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Examples Grade 10

11th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Writing Example For Kids

Persuasive Essay Examples High School

The following are good persuasive essay examples for high school. Having a look at them will help you understand better.

High-school Persuasive Essay Example

Examples of Persuasive Essay in Everyday Life

Persuasive Essay Examples for Middle School

Check out these persuasive essay examples for middle school to get a comprehensive idea of the format structure. 

Persuasive Essay Examples Middle School

Short Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Examples for College Students

Essay writing at the college level becomes more difficult and complicated. We have provided you with top-notch college persuasive and argumentative essay examples here.

Read them to understand the essay writing process easily. 

Persuasive Essay Examples College

Higher English Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay About Smoking

Argumentative and Persuasive Examples

Persuasive Essay Examples For University

It becomes even more challenging to draft a perfect essay at the university level. Have a look at the below examples of a persuasive essay to get an idea of writing one.

University Persuasive Essay Example

5 Paragraph Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Examples for Different Formats

A persuasive essay can be written in several formats. For instance, you can write the usual 5-paragraph essay, or even something longer or shorter.

Below are a few sample essays in various common formats.

Persuasive Essay Examples 5 Paragraph

Persuasive Essay Examples 3 Paragraph

Short Persuasive Essay Examples

These examples tell you how to remain convincing and persuasive regardless of the essay format you use.

Persuasive Essay Outline Examples

Creating an impressive outline is the most important step for writing a persuasive essay. It helps to organize thoughts and make the writing process easier.

 A standard outline consists of the following sections.

  • Introduction
  • Body Paragraphs

Have a look at the following persuasive essay outline template examples.

Persuasive Essay Outline

Persuasive Essay Template

Persuasive Essay Format Example

A persuasive essay outline is bound to follow a specific format and structure. The main elements of a persuasive essay format are as follows.

  • Font: Times New Roman, Georgia, or Arial
  • Font Size: 16pt for the headlines and 12pt for the rest of the text
  • Alignment: Justified
  • Spacing: Double spacing
  • Word Count: It usually contains 500 to 2000 words

How to Write A Persuasive Essay With Examples

Planning an essay before starting writing is essential to produce an organized and structured writing piece. So, it is better to understand the concept beforehand to impress your instructor.  

The below example will show a good starting to an essay.

A Good Start for a Persuasive Essay - Short Example

How to Start a Persuasive Essay Examples

The introduction is the first part of an essay and your first chance to grab the reader's attention. It should clearly state the essay's purpose and give the reader a clear idea of what to expect.

A compelling persuasive essay introduction must have the following elements.

  • Hook statement + topic
  • A strong thesis statement
  • Your arguments

Here are some examples of persuasive essay introductions to help you make a compelling start:

Introduction Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Thesis Statement Examples

Persuasive Essay Hook Examples

How to End a Persuasive Essay Examples

Just like the introduction, the conclusion of the persuasive essay is equally important. It is considered as the last impression of your writing piece to the audience.

A good conclusion paragraph must include the following aspects.

  • Restate the thesis statement or hypothesis
  • Summarize the key arguments
  • Avoid being obvious
  • Include a call to action

Have a look at the document to explore the sample conclusions of a persuasive essay.

Conclusion Persuasive Essay Examples

Catchy Persuasive Essay Topics

Now that you have read some good examples, it's time to write your own persuasive essay.

But what should you write about? You can write persuasive essays about any topic, from business and online education to controversial topics like abortion , gun control , and more.

Here is a list of ten persuasive essay topics that you can use to grab your reader's attention and make them think:

  • Should the government increase taxes to fund public health initiatives?
  • Is the current education system effective in preparing students for college and the workplace?
  • Should there be tighter gun control laws?
  • Should schools have uniforms or a dress code?
  • Are standardized tests an accurate measure of student performance?
  • Should students be required to take physical education courses?
  • Is undocumented immigration a legitimate cause for concern in the United States?
  • Is affirmative action still necessary in today’s society?
  • How much, if any, regulation should there be on technology companies?
  • Is the death penalty an appropriate form of punishment for serious crimes?

Check out two examples on similar topics:

Political Persuasive Essay Examples

Persuasive Essay Examples About Life

Need more topic ideas? Check out our extensive list of unique persuasive essay topics and get started!

But if you're still feeling stuck, don't worry. Our persuasive essay writing service is here to the rescue!

Our experienced writers specialize in creating top-notch essays on a wide range of topics. Whether it's a challenging persuasive essay or any other type, we've got you covered.

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Persuasive Essay

Chapter 10 Rhetorical Modes

10.9 persuasion, learning objectives.

  • Determine the purpose and structure of persuasion in writing.
  • Identify bias in writing.
  • Assess various rhetorical devices.
  • Distinguish between fact and opinion.
  • Understand the importance of visuals to strengthen arguments.
  • Write a persuasive essay.

The Purpose of Persuasive Writing

The purpose of persuasion in writing is to convince, motivate, or move readers toward a certain point of view, or opinion. The act of trying to persuade automatically implies more than one opinion on the subject can be argued.

The idea of an argument often conjures up images of two people yelling and screaming in anger. In writing, however, an argument is very different. An argument is a reasoned opinion supported and explained by evidence. To argue in writing is to advance knowledge and ideas in a positive way. Written arguments often fail when they employ ranting rather than reasoning.

Most of us feel inclined to try to win the arguments we engage in. On some level, we all want to be right, and we want others to see the error of their ways. More times than not, however, arguments in which both sides try to win end up producing losers all around. The more productive approach is to persuade your audience to consider your opinion as a valid one, not simply the right one.

The Structure of a Persuasive Essay

The following five features make up the structure of a persuasive essay:

  • Introduction and thesis
  • Opposing and qualifying ideas
  • Strong evidence in support of claim
  • Style and tone of language
  • A compelling conclusion

Creating an Introduction and Thesis

The persuasive essay begins with an engaging introduction that presents the general topic. The thesis typically appears somewhere in the introduction and states the writer’s point of view.

Avoid forming a thesis based on a negative claim. For example, “The hourly minimum wage is not high enough for the average worker to live on.” This is probably a true statement, but persuasive arguments should make a positive case. That is, the thesis statement should focus on how the hourly minimum wage is low or insufficient.

Acknowledging Opposing Ideas and Limits to Your Argument

Because an argument implies differing points of view on the subject, you must be sure to acknowledge those opposing ideas. Avoiding ideas that conflict with your own gives the reader the impression that you may be uncertain, fearful, or unaware of opposing ideas. Thus it is essential that you not only address counterarguments but also do so respectfully.

Try to address opposing arguments earlier rather than later in your essay. Rhetorically speaking, ordering your positive arguments last allows you to better address ideas that conflict with your own, so you can spend the rest of the essay countering those arguments. This way, you leave your reader thinking about your argument rather than someone else’s. You have the last word.

Acknowledging points of view different from your own also has the effect of fostering more credibility between you and the audience. They know from the outset that you are aware of opposing ideas and that you are not afraid to give them space.

It is also helpful to establish the limits of your argument and what you are trying to accomplish. In effect, you are conceding early on that your argument is not the ultimate authority on a given topic. Such humility can go a long way toward earning credibility and trust with an audience. Audience members will know from the beginning that you are a reasonable writer, and audience members will trust your argument as a result. For example, in the following concessionary statement, the writer advocates for stricter gun control laws, but she admits it will not solve all of our problems with crime:

Although tougher gun control laws are a powerful first step in decreasing violence in our streets, such legislation alone cannot end these problems since guns are not the only problem we face.

Such a concession will be welcome by those who might disagree with this writer’s argument in the first place. To effectively persuade their readers, writers need to be modest in their goals and humble in their approach to get readers to listen to the ideas. See Table 10.5 “Phrases of Concession” for some useful phrases of concession.

Table 10.5 Phrases of Concession

  • Foreign policy
  • Television and advertising
  • Stereotypes and prejudice
  • Gender roles and the workplace
  • Driving and cell phones

Collaboration

Please share with a classmate and compare your answers. Choose the thesis statement that most interests you and discuss why.

Bias in Writing

Everyone has various biases on any number of topics. For example, you might have a bias toward wearing black instead of brightly colored clothes or wearing jeans rather than formal wear. You might have a bias toward working at night rather than in the morning, or working by deadlines rather than getting tasks done in advance. These examples identify minor biases, of course, but they still indicate preferences and opinions.

Handling bias in writing and in daily life can be a useful skill. It will allow you to articulate your own points of view while also defending yourself against unreasonable points of view. The ideal in persuasive writing is to let your reader know your bias, but do not let that bias blind you to the primary components of good argumentation: sound, thoughtful evidence and a respectful and reasonable address of opposing sides.

The strength of a personal bias is that it can motivate you to construct a strong argument. If you are invested in the topic, you are more likely to care about the piece of writing. Similarly, the more you care, the more time and effort you are apt to put forth and the better the final product will be.

The weakness of bias is when the bias begins to take over the essay—when, for example, you neglect opposing ideas, exaggerate your points, or repeatedly insert yourself ahead of the subject by using I too often. Being aware of all three of these pitfalls will help you avoid them.

The Use of I in Writing

The use of I in writing is often a topic of debate, and the acceptance of its usage varies from instructor to instructor. It is difficult to predict the preferences for all your present and future instructors, but consider the effects it can potentially have on your writing.

Be mindful of the use of I in your writing because it can make your argument sound overly biased. There are two primary reasons:

  • Excessive repetition of any word will eventually catch the reader’s attention—and usually not in a good way. The use of I is no different.
  • The insertion of I into a sentence alters not only the way a sentence might sound but also the composition of the sentence itself. I is often the subject of a sentence. If the subject of the essay is supposed to be, say, smoking, then by inserting yourself into the sentence, you are effectively displacing the subject of the essay into a secondary position. In the following example, the subject of the sentence is underlined:

Smoking is bad.

I think smoking is bad.

In the first sentence, the rightful subject, smoking , is in the subject position in the sentence. In the second sentence, the insertion of I and think replaces smoking as the subject, which draws attention to I and away from the topic that is supposed to be discussed. Remember to keep the message (the subject) and the messenger (the writer) separate.

Developing Sound Arguments

Does my essay contain the following elements?

  • An engaging introduction
  • A reasonable, specific thesis that is able to be supported by evidence
  • A varied range of evidence from credible sources
  • Respectful acknowledgement and explanation of opposing ideas
  • A style and tone of language that is appropriate for the subject and audience
  • Acknowledgement of the argument’s limits
  • A conclusion that will adequately summarize the essay and reinforce the thesis

Fact and Opinion

Facts are statements that can be definitely proven using objective data. The statement that is a fact is absolutely valid. In other words, the statement can be pronounced as true or false. For example, 2 + 2 = 4. This expression identifies a true statement, or a fact, because it can be proved with objective data.

Opinions are personal views, or judgments. An opinion is what an individual believes about a particular subject. However, an opinion in argumentation must have legitimate backing; adequate evidence and credibility should support the opinion. Consider the credibility of expert opinions. Experts in a given field have the knowledge and credentials to make their opinion meaningful to a larger audience.

For example, you seek the opinion of your dentist when it comes to the health of your gums, and you seek the opinion of your mechanic when it comes to the maintenance of your car. Both have knowledge and credentials in those respective fields, which is why their opinions matter to you. But the authority of your dentist may be greatly diminished should he or she offer an opinion about your car, and vice versa.

In writing, you want to strike a balance between credible facts and authoritative opinions. Relying on one or the other will likely lose more of your audience than it gains.

The word prove is frequently used in the discussion of persuasive writing. Writers may claim that one piece of evidence or another proves the argument, but proving an argument is often not possible. No evidence proves a debatable topic one way or the other; that is why the topic is debatable. Facts can be proved, but opinions can only be supported, explained, and persuaded.

On a separate sheet of paper, take three of the theses you formed in Note 10.94 “Exercise 1”, and list the types of evidence you might use in support of that thesis.

Using the evidence you provided in support of the three theses in Note 10.100 “Exercise 2”, come up with at least one counterargument to each. Then write a concession statement, expressing the limits to each of your three arguments.

Using Visual Elements to Strengthen Arguments

Adding visual elements to a persuasive argument can often strengthen its persuasive effect. There are two main types of visual elements: quantitative visuals and qualitative visuals.

Quantitative visuals present data graphically. They allow the audience to see statistics spatially. The purpose of using quantitative visuals is to make logical appeals to the audience. For example, sometimes it is easier to understand the disparity in certain statistics if you can see how the disparity looks graphically. Bar graphs, pie charts, Venn diagrams, histograms, and line graphs are all ways of presenting quantitative data in spatial dimensions.

Qualitative visuals present images that appeal to the audience’s emotions. Photographs and pictorial images are examples of qualitative visuals. Such images often try to convey a story, and seeing an actual example can carry more power than hearing or reading about the example. For example, one image of a child suffering from malnutrition will likely have more of an emotional impact than pages dedicated to describing that same condition in writing.

Writing at Work

Writing a persuasive essay.

Choose a topic that you feel passionate about. If your instructor requires you to write about a specific topic, approach the subject from an angle that interests you. Begin your essay with an engaging introduction. Your thesis should typically appear somewhere in your introduction.

Start by acknowledging and explaining points of view that may conflict with your own to build credibility and trust with your audience. Also state the limits of your argument. This too helps you sound more reasonable and honest to those who may naturally be inclined to disagree with your view. By respectfully acknowledging opposing arguments and conceding limitations to your own view, you set a measured and responsible tone for the essay.

Make your appeals in support of your thesis by using sound, credible evidence. Use a balance of facts and opinions from a wide range of sources, such as scientific studies, expert testimony, statistics, and personal anecdotes. Each piece of evidence should be fully explained and clearly stated.

Make sure that your style and tone are appropriate for your subject and audience. Tailor your language and word choice to these two factors, while still being true to your own voice.

Finally, write a conclusion that effectively summarizes the main argument and reinforces your thesis. See Chapter 15 “Readings: Examples of Essays” to read a sample persuasive essay.

Choose one of the topics you have been working on throughout this section. Use the thesis, evidence, opposing argument, and concessionary statement as the basis for writing a full persuasive essay. Be sure to include an engaging introduction, clear explanations of all the evidence you present, and a strong conclusion.

Key Takeaways

  • The purpose of persuasion in writing is to convince or move readers toward a certain point of view, or opinion.
  • An argument is a reasoned opinion supported and explained by evidence. To argue, in writing, is to advance knowledge and ideas in a positive way.
  • A thesis that expresses the opinion of the writer in more specific terms is better than one that is vague.
  • It is essential that you not only address counterarguments but also do so respectfully.
  • It is also helpful to establish the limits of your argument and what you are trying to accomplish through a concession statement.
  • To persuade a skeptical audience, you will need to use a wide range of evidence. Scientific studies, opinions from experts, historical precedent, statistics, personal anecdotes, and current events are all types of evidence that you might use in explaining your point.
  • Make sure that your word choice and writing style is appropriate for both your subject and your audience.
  • You should let your reader know your bias, but do not let that bias blind you to the primary components of good argumentation: sound, thoughtful evidence and respectfully and reasonably addressing opposing ideas.
  • You should be mindful of the use of I in your writing because it can make your argument sound more biased than it needs to.
  • Facts are statements that can be proven using objective data.
  • Opinions are personal views, or judgments, that cannot be proven.
  • In writing, you want to strike a balance between credible facts and authoritative opinions.
  • Quantitative visuals present data graphically. The purpose of using quantitative visuals is to make logical appeals to the audience.
  • Qualitative visuals present images that appeal to the audience’s emotions.
  • Successful Writing. Authored by : Anonymous. Provided by : Anonymous. Located at : http://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/successful-writing/ . License : CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

Examples

Short Persuasive Essay

write a short persuasive essay convincing your readers

When we were still in school, we were often taught that writing is a part of being a student. Applicants for a scholarship or applicants for those who wish to attend a new school were often told to  write an essay  about themselves. There are of course a lot of different types of essays, but this article is going to show you how to write a persuasive essay. If you are a student hoping to find ways to write one, or simply anyone willing to find tips on writing an essay to persuade this article is for you. From definitions, examples and tips. Anyone can benefit from this, student, professional, anyone. What are you waiting for? Check this out now. 6+ Short Persuasive Essay Examples in PDF.

6+ Short Persuasive Essay Examples in PDF

1. short persuasive essay template.

Short Persuasive Essay Template

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2. Basic Short Persuasive Essay

Basic Short Persuasive Essay

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Essential Short Persuasive Essay

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Job Short Persuasive Essay

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School Short Persuasive Essay

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Community Short Persuasive Essay

7. Short Persuasive Essay Formal

Short Persuasive Essay Formal

Defining Essay

A short nonfiction piece of literary writing. A written piece of writing where you show your argument on a single topic. The definition is often too vague and overlaps with the ideas. 

Defining Persuasive Essay

This type of essay is a kind of academic writing. When you write a persuasive essay , you mainly use your logic and arguments to persuade your audience of your point of view. To do this, you must use solid proof like facts, doing your own research, statistics, examples and quotations from professionals. 

Tips for Writing Persuasive Essays

As we all know, writing any kind of essay is tough. But it doesn’t have to be a problem that we could not solve. Rather, here are some tips to make a good persuasive essay to help you with your writing. 

  • Do your research: One thing you must remember when writing a good persuasive essay is to do some extensive research. The reason for this is because you are going to convince your readers about your topic.
  • Make a draft: Before you write your essay, and after you do some research, make a draft. Check every small detail if they are correct. This way, when you are about to write the full essay, it would spare you lots of time to edit anything you need. Also, this helps you formulate your thoughts.
  • Choose a side: Choose a side when you want to persuade your readers. Explain everything clearly as well.
  • Tone of writing: Your writing tone should match your audience. Do not be too rude nor discriminate when you write. You are not there to pick a fight with your readers, rather, you are there to convince them to believe in your point of view.
  • Understand your audience: To draw your audience in, first you must understand them. Who are your targeted audiences? What do they need to know from you? What can you tell them so they would be convinced at what you are saying? How will you approach the topic you intend to write and persuade them of your point of view.
  • Short: Remember essays are not meant to be very long. Rather, essays are considered short since they are only written as a way for the author to express their opinions and their beliefs.

How do I make a good persuasive essay?

To make a good persuasive essay is to do follow the tips listed above. The tips are there to help you write a good persuasive essay. But to make a very good one takes practice.

What topic is okay when writing this type of essay?

You can talk about general topics. Avoid topics that may be too discriminating to your readers.

How much is the minimum word count for this type of essay?

Around 2500 words. Anything less than that will make the argument less convincing.

How do I make an impressive persuasive essay without practicing?

Unfortunately, there is no instant way of making a very good essay without practice. With practice and following the tips, you sure will be making the best essay.

Making a good persuasive essay can be tough. It can be a challenge to write when you have no idea what to write. But all that could change. Following the tips and downloading the examples can help you practice on writing this essay. The few things to always remember are, research, tone of writing, knowing your audience and persuade your reader why he or she must believe in your views. Give them a good reason, add a valid fact to make your research more convincing.

Short Persuasive Essay Generator

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Short Persuasive Essay on the importance of reading books

Short Persuasive Essay on adopting pets from animal shelters

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  1. How to Write a Persuasive Essay with Examples

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  2. How to Write a Persuasive Essay (with Pictures)

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  3. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

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  4. Persuasive Essay

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  5. 10 Top Tips for Persuasive Writing 1. Assume that that your reader

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  6. Persuasive Writing examples KS2 (English

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VIDEO

  1. How to write a persuasive essay

  2. How to Write a Persuasive Essay? #essaywriting #shorts

  3. How Concrete Examples Make Your Essay Writing More Convincing

  4. How to Write Your Persuasive Essay on The Social Dilemma

  5. Week 9 Instructor Session: What is a Persuasive Essay?

  6. How do I start a persuasive essay?

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Persuasive Essay (This Convinced My Professor!)

    The 5 Must-Have Steps of a Persuasive Essay. If you're intimidated by the idea of writing an argument, use this list to break your process into manageable chunks. Tackle researching and writing one element at a time, and then revise your essay so that it flows smoothly and coherently with every component in the optimal place. 1.

  2. Persuasive Writing Strategies and Tips, with Examples

    1 Choose wording carefully. Word choice—the words and phrases you decide to use—is crucial in persuasive writing as a way to build a personal relationship with the reader. You want to always pick the best possible words and phrases in each instance to convince the reader that your opinion is right. Persuasive writing often uses strong ...

  3. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

    TIP 1: Some writers find it easier to write their introductions last. As long as you have your working thesis, this is a perfectly acceptable approach. From that thesis, you can plan your body paragraphs and then go back and write your introduction. TIP 2: Avoid "announcing" your thesis.

  4. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

    The first step in writing a persuasive essay is choosing a topic and picking a side. If the topic is something you believe in, it will make the entire experience of researching, writing, and arguing your perspective more personal. Choosing a topic that appeals to you on an emotional or sentimental level will make its defense easier.

  5. Persuasive Essay Guide: How to Write a Persuasive Essay

    The last time you wrote a persuasive essay may have been in high school or college, but the skill of writing a strong persuasive argument is always a useful one to have. Persuasive writing begins with a writer forming their own opinion on a topic, which they then attempt to convince their reader of this opinion by walking them through a number of logical and ethical arguments.

  6. How to Write a Persuasive Essay to Draw Readers' Attention

    Use a Quotation or Ask a Question. Ask yourself what the main point of any persuasive essay is. Regardless of a topic, it is to convince a reader to take your side, accept your position, and follow only your recommendations. A really successful paper will provide evidence, consider others' views, and finally present a conclusion which is strong.

  7. How To Write an Effective Persuasive Essay in 6 Steps

    1. Pick your position. Be specific about the position that you are taking and consider whether it is one you believe in. If so, it will be easier to find arguments to support it. The more specific your position is, the easier it will be to tailor your persuasive techniques to support it.

  8. How to Write a Persuasive Essay (with Pictures)

    Pick a topic that appeals to you. Because a persuasive essay often relies heavily on emotional appeals, you should choose to write on something about which you have a real opinion. Pick a subject about which you feel strongly and can argue convincingly. [3] 6. Look for a topic that has a lot of depth or complexity.

  9. Writing a Persuasive Essay

    The thesis should. 1. be a complete sentence, 2. identify the topic, and. 3. make a specific claim about that topic. In a persuasive paper, the thesis is a claim that someone should believe or do something. For example, a persuasive thesis might assert that something is effective or ineffective.

  10. How to Write a Persuasive Essay

    Every essay you write will have 3 parts: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Think of the organization of an essay like this: Intro - Tell your reader what you're going to write about. Body - Write about it. Conclusion - Tell them what you wrote about. Let's go through each of those parts for a persuasive essay.

  11. How to Write a Persuasive Essay That's Convincing

    Introductory paragraph. Three (or two, or four, or eighty-seven) body paragraphs. Conclusion. Nothing wrong with that. You can adapt this into a persuasive essay format very easily, simply by using the three body paragraphs as your 1-2-3: Identify the audience. State the action. State the benefit to the audience.

  12. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Expert Guide

    2 Steps to Write a Persuasive Essay. 2.1 Prepare for Writing Your Persuasive Essay. 2.2 Conduct Advanced Academic Research. 2.3 Outline Your Essay. 2.4 How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Introduction. 2.5 Write the Body of the Essay. 2.6 Make a Solid Conclusion. 2.7 Edit and Proofread Your Essay.

  13. Persuasive Essay Writing Basics: How to Convince Your Readers?

    Choose a good topic. Write a body part and conclusion of your future paper. Concentrate on your writing and think what kind of hook would be suitable here. Create a couple of bright sentences that will introduce the main idea of your document to readers and motivate them to read the entire work. Review your finished paper to avoid mistakes.

  14. How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps

    Thesis statement: Let the audience know your stance. After surveying the topic in the first part of the introduction, it is now time for the student writer to express their opinion and briefly preview the points they will make later in the essay. 2. Body Paragraphs.

  15. Powerful Persuasive Essay Examples That Will Spark Your Creativity

    Persuasive essays require you to take a position on a particular issue and use evidence and persuasive language to convince your readers to see things from your perspective. While they can be challenging, writing persuasive essays is an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills and improve your writing abilities.

  16. A Comprehensive Guide on How to Write a Persuasive Essay

    How to Write a Persuasive Essay: The Main Components. 1. Introduction: Capturing Attention and Stating the Thesis. The introduction serves as the gateway to your persuasive essay. Begin by grabbing the reader's attention with a compelling hook—an anecdote, a surprising fact, or a thought-provoking question.

  17. Persuasive Essays ~ Tips & Examples of How to Write Them

    A persuasive essay, which is a significant aspect of the academic essay, is a concise piece of writing, typically ranging from 500 to 2000 words, that advocates for a particular viewpoint.Rather than deconstructing, attacking, or refuting another argument, persuasive essays passionately argue to inform and convince readers that their expressed opinion is the most valid.

  18. Writing a Persuasive Essay

    WRITING A PERSUASIVE ESSAY . Structure and organization are integral components of an effective persuasive essay. No matter how ... For example: You want to convince your reader that the forces of industry did not shape American foreign policy from the late 19th century through 1914, and you plan to do this by showing that there ...

  19. 30+ Persuasive Essay Examples

    Persuasive Essay Format Example. A persuasive essay outline is bound to follow a specific format and structure. The main elements of a persuasive essay format are as follows. Font: Times New Roman, Georgia, or Arial. Font Size: 16pt for the headlines and 12pt for the rest of the text. Alignment: Justified.

  20. 10.9 Persuasion

    The Purpose of Persuasive Writing. The purpose of persuasion in writing is to convince, motivate, or move readers toward a certain point of view, or opinion. The act of trying to persuade automatically implies more than one opinion on the subject can be argued. The idea of an argument often conjures up images of two people yelling and screaming ...

  21. Short Persuasive Essay

    Short Persuasive Essay. When we were still in school, we were often taught that writing is a part of being a student. ... The reason for this is because you are going to convince your readers about your topic. Make a draft: Before you write your essay, and after you do some research, make a draft. Check every small detail if they are correct ...

  22. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics)

    Persuasive writing examples make use of reasons and logic to make them more persuasive. When you write your own persuasive essay examples, you must convince your readers to adopt your point of view or to take a specific action. To do this, you must present solid arguments using facts, examples, and quotes from experts.

  23. PDF Persuade Me, Please! Reading a Persuasive Essay and Liking It!

    Reading a Persuasive Essay Graphic Organizer to plan their essay. Develop your introduction, supporting paragraphs and conclusion. Consider how you will appeal to the readers' logic and emotions. Pick a place away from distractions and begin the draft of your persuasive essay. Let the act of writing help your ideas evolve.

  24. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Second, follow these steps on how to write an argumentative essay: Brainstorm: research, free-write, and read samples to choose a debatable topic. Prepare: organize thoughts, craft a thesis, decide on arguments and evidence. Draft: outline an essay, start with an engaging introduction, delve into arguments, and conclude like a boss.